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Morgellons Disease HELP
Based on 52 articles published since 2010
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These are the 52 published articles about Morgellons Disease that originated from Worldwide during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3
1 Editorial Delusions may not always be delusions. 2010

Savely, Virginia. · ·Arch Psychiatr Nurs · Pubmed #20650366.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Review Differentiating Psychosomatic, Somatopsychic, Multisystem Illnesses, and Medical Uncertainty. 2019

Bransfield, Robert C / Friedman, Kenneth J. ·Department of Psychiatry, Rutgers-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA. Bransfield@comcast.net. · Retired, Plantation, FL, USA. Retired Associate Professor of Pharmacology and Physiology, NJ Medical School, Newark, NJ 07103, USA. kenneth.j.friedman@gmail.com. ·Healthcare (Basel) · Pubmed #31597359.

ABSTRACT: There is often difficulty differentiating between psychosomatic, somatopsychic, multisystem illness, and different degrees of medical uncertainty. Uncommon, complex, and multisystem diseases are commonly misdiagnosed. Two case histories are described, and relevant terms differentiating psychosomatic, somatopsychic, and multisystem illnesses are identified, reviewed, and discussed. Adequate differentiation requires an understanding of the mind/body connection, which includes knowledge of general medicine, psychiatry, and the systems linking the body and the brain. A psychiatric diagnosis cannot be given solely based upon the absence of physical, laboratory, or pathological findings. Medically unexplained symptoms, somatoform disorder, and compensation neurosis are outdated and/or inaccurate terms. The terms subjective, nonspecific, and vague can be used inaccurately. Conversion disorders, functional disorders, psychogenic illness, factitious disorder imposed upon another (Munchausen's syndrome by proxy), somatic symptom disorder, psychogenic seizures, psychogenic pain, psychogenic fatigue, and delusional parasitosis can be over-diagnosed. Bodily distress disorder and bodily distress syndrome are scientifically unsupported and inaccurate. Many "all in your head" conditions may be related to the microbiome and the immune system. Better education concerning the interface between medicine and psychiatry and the associated diagnostic nomenclature as well as utilizing clinical judgment and thorough assessment, exercising humility, and maintaining our roots in traditional medicine will help to improve diagnostic accuracy and patient trust.

3 Review Current Understanding and Approach to Delusional Infestation. 2019

Moriarty, Natalie / Alam, Mariam / Kalus, Andrea / O'Connor, Kim. ·University of Washington, Seattle. · University of Washington, Seattle. Electronic address: koconnor@uw.edu. ·Am J Med · Pubmed #31295443.

ABSTRACT: Delusional infestation is a psychiatric condition defined by a fixed belief of infestation despite contrary evidence. Diagnosis includes exclusion of organic etiologies. Treatment with antipsychotics is effective and safe in the majority of patients. Patients are characteristically reluctant to pursue psychiatric evaluation and may resist discussing their disease in psychiatric terms. Strategies to strengthen the provider-patient therapeutic alliance facilitate communication around appropriate treatment. Without antipsychotic medications, patients can become heavy utilizers of care and practice self-destructive behaviors in attempts to clear their perceived infestation.

4 Review Morgellons disease: insights into treatment. 2018

Aung-Din, David / Sahni, Dev R / Jorizzo, Joseph L / Feldman, Steven R. ·Center for Research, Department of Dermatology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina Department of Pathology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina Department of Social Sciences & Health Policy, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. sfeldman@wakehealth.edu. ·Dermatol Online J · Pubmed #30695970.

ABSTRACT: Morgellons disease is a disfiguring and distressing condition. Patients commonly present with multiple, non-healing, cutaneous wounds. Patients report protruding fibers or other objects as the source and often provide samples to the clinician. Originally the etiology of this condition was broad and debated ranging from infectious to psychiatric. This article reviews current treatments and details our approach to treatment, aiming to aid clinicians with useful pharmacotherapy and adherence techniques when treating patients with Morgellons disease. Although current opinions have consolidated to the psychiatric spectrum, Morgellons treatment remains difficult and unstandardized with most evidence from retrospective reviews and a handful of case reports. Having considerable overlap with delusions of parasitosis, treatments have consisted of various antipsychotics and antibacterial wound care. Many antipsychotics have been selected owing to additional antipruritic or analgesic benefits. Generally, low-doses are used to minimize the risk of side effects. Risperidone or trifluoperazine can provide relief to patients especially when paired with adjuvant therapies, strong doctor-patient relationships, and a multidisciplinary approach.

5 Review Use of antipsychotic drugs in dermatology. 2018

Gupta, Madhulika A / Vujcic, Branka / Pur, Daiana R / Gupta, Aditya K. ·Department of Psychiatry, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: magupta@uwo.ca. · Department of Psychiatry, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ·Clin Dermatol · Pubmed #30446201.

ABSTRACT: Antipsychotic drugs can be beneficial in dermatology because of their both central nervous system and peripheral effects. All antipsychotic drugs have a central postsynaptic dopamine D2 receptor blocking effect, which underlies their antipsychotic action. The antipsychotic drugs have varying degrees of histamine H1-receptor, cholinergic muscarinic receptor, and α1-adrenergic receptor blocking effects, which can affect cutaneous perception and the autonomic reactivity of the skin and can be potentially beneficial in the management of certain histamine or sympathetically mediated dermatologic manifestations (eg, urticaria, pruritus, hyperhidrosis). In addition to their antipsychotic effect, antipsychotic drugs also have a general anxiolytic effect related in part to their α1-adrenergic receptor blocking action, which can be of benefit in many dermatologic conditions, including pruritus. The antipsychotic drugs are most commonly used in dermatology for the management of a delusional disorder, somatic type, manifesting as delusional infestation, and as monotherapy or as augmentation therapy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants, and for management of trichotillomania and skin-picking or excoriation disorder. There is earlier literature (1) on the possible beneficial effect of the phenothiazine antipsychotics in a wide range of pruritic dermatoses, and (2) the efficacy of pimozide as adjunctive therapy for metastatic melanoma, which both warrant further investigation.

6 Review Reframing delusional infestation: perspectives on unresolved puzzles. 2018

Lai, Jianbo / Xu, Zhe / Xu, Yi / Hu, Shaohua. ·Department of Psychiatry, First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou 310003, China, dorhushaohua@zju.edu.cn. · The Key Laboratory of Mental Disorder's Management in Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou 310003, China, dorhushaohua@zju.edu.cn. · Brain Research Institute of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310003, China, dorhushaohua@zju.edu.cn. · Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou 310003, China. · Department of Psychiatry, Third People's Hospital of Huzhou, Hangzhou 313000, China. ·Psychol Res Behav Manag · Pubmed #30319296.

ABSTRACT: Delusional infestation (DI), a debilitating psychocutaneous condition, featured as a false fixed belief of being infested accompanied by somatosensory abnormality, behavior alteration, and cognitive impairment. Although management of primary causes and pharmacotherapy with antipsychotics and/or antidepressants can help to alleviate symptoms in most patients, the underlying etiology of DI still remains unclear. Morgellons disease (MD), characterized by the presence of cutaneous filaments projected from or embedded in skin, is also a polemic issue because of its relationship with spirochetal infection. This review aims to discuss the following topics that currently confuse our understandings of DI: 1) the relationship of real/sham "infestation" with DI/MD; 2) behavior alterations, such as self-inflicted trauma; 3) neuroimaging abnormality and disturbance in neurotransmitter systems; and 4) impaired insight in patients with this disease. In discussion, we try to propose a multifactorial approach to the final diagnosis of DI/MD. Future studies exploring the neurobiological etiology of DI/MD are warranted.

7 Review History of Morgellons disease: from delusion to definition. 2018

Middelveen, Marianne J / Fesler, Melissa C / Stricker, Raphael B. ·Atkins Veterinary Services, Calgary, AB, Canada. · Union Square Medical Associates, San Francisco, CA, USA. ·Clin Cosmet Investig Dermatol · Pubmed #29467580.

ABSTRACT: Morgellons disease (MD) is a skin condition characterized by the presence of multicolored filaments that lie under, are embedded in, or project from skin. Although the condition may have a longer history, disease matching the above description was first reported in the US in 2002. Since that time, the condition that we know as MD has become a polemic topic. Because individuals afflicted with the disease may have crawling or stinging sensations and sometimes believe they have an insect or parasite infestation, most medical practitioners consider MD a purely delusional disorder. Clinical studies supporting the hypothesis that MD is exclusively delusional in origin have considerable methodological flaws and often neglect the fact that mental disorders can result from underlying somatic illness. In contrast, rigorous experimental investigations show that this skin affliction results from a physiological response to the presence of an infectious agent. Recent studies from that point of view show an association between MD and spirochetal infection in humans, cattle, and dogs. These investigations have determined that the cutaneous filaments are not implanted textile fibers, but are composed of the cellular proteins keratin and collagen and result from overproduction of these filaments in response to spirochetal infection. Further studies of the genetics, pathogenesis, and treatment of MD are warranted.

8 Review Review of epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of common primary psychiatric causes of cutaneous disease. 2018

Krooks, J A / Weatherall, A G / Holland, P J. ·a Florida Atlantic University Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine , Boca Raton , FL , USA. · b ClearlyDerm Center for Dermatology , Boca Raton , FL , USA. · c Psychiatry and Neurology Department , Florida Atlantic University Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine , Boca Raton , FL , USA. ·J Dermatolog Treat · Pubmed #29052453.

ABSTRACT: Approximately half of all patients presenting to dermatologists exhibit signs and symptoms of psychiatric conditions that are either primary or secondary to cutaneous disease. Because patients typically resist psychiatric consult, dermatologists often are on the front line in evaluating and treating these patients. Accordingly, distinguishing the specific underlying or resulting psychiatric condition is essential for effective treatment. The etiology, epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and first-line treatment of specific primary psychiatric causes of dermatologic conditions, including delusional infestation, Morgellons syndrome, olfactory reference syndrome, body dysmorphic disorder, excoriation disorder, trichotillomania, and dermatitis artefacta are discussed here, followed by a discussion of the recommended treatment approach with an overview of the different first-line therapies discussed in this review, specifically cognitive behavioral therapy, atypical antipsychotics, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and tricyclic antidepressants. Included is a guide for dermatologists to use while prescribing these medications.

9 Review Morgellons disease: a filamentous borrelial dermatitis. 2016

Middelveen, Marianne J / Stricker, Raphael B. ·International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society, Bethesda, MD, USA. ·Int J Gen Med · Pubmed #27789971.

ABSTRACT: Morgellons disease (MD) is a dermopathy characterized by multicolored filaments that lie under, are embedded in, or project from skin. Although MD was initially considered to be a delusional disorder, recent studies have demonstrated that the dermopathy is associated with tickborne infection, that the filaments are composed of keratin and collagen, and that they result from proliferation of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in epithelial tissue. Culture, histopathological and molecular evidence of spirochetal infection associated with MD has been presented in several published studies using a variety of techniques. Spirochetes genetically identified as

10 Review Delusional Infestation: State of the Art. 2016

Vulink, Nienke C. ·Department of Psychiatry, Academic Medical Centre (AMC), PO Box 1105 AZ, 1106 AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands. n.c.vulink@amc.nl. ·Acta Derm Venereol · Pubmed #27282746.

ABSTRACT: Patients with a delusional infestation (DI) have an overwhelming conviction that they are being infested with (non) pathogens without any medical proof. The patients need a systematic psychiatric and dermatological evaluation to assess any possible underlying cause that could be treated. Because they avoid psychiatrists, a close collaboration of dermatologists and psychiatrists, who examine the patient together, seems to be a promising solution. It helps to start a trustful doctor-patient relationship and motivates the patient for psychiatric treatment. We here review diagnostic criteria, classification of symptoms, pathophysiology and treatment options of DI. Antipsychotic medication is the treatment of choice when any other underlying cause or disorder is excluded. Further research is needed to assess the pathophysiology, and other treatment options for patients with DI.

11 Review An approach to the evaluation of delusional infestation. 2012

Halvorson, Christian R. · ·Cutis · Pubmed #24005827.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Review Dermatologic infestations. 2012

Shmidt, Eugenia / Levitt, Jacob. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. ·Int J Dermatol · Pubmed #22250620.

ABSTRACT: Head lice are transmitted by head to head contact. Optimal therapy includes malathion lotion 0.5% repeated in one week left on for 30 minutes to 8 hours. Spinosad topical suspension 0.9% repeated in one week left on for 10 minutes is another option. Scabies is transmitted mainly by direct contact but also via heavily infested fomites due to crusted scabies. Permethrin 5% cream to the body repeated in four days is often sufficient; however, scalp treatment with malathion lotion 0.5% is helpful in crusted scabies and in infested children. Oral ivermectin 200 mcg/kg is another option, repeated in four days. For scabies more than lice, fomites should be placed in a drier at 60 °C for 10 minutes to kill the arthropods. Treatment of close contacts in both cases will control outbreaks and repeated infestations. Both have been associated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection. Bed bugs are a common cause for papular urticaria. Identification of the insect in the mattress or bedding confirms the diagnosis. Prevention involves encasing the mattress in a sealed plastic cover and extermination. Delusions of parasitosis is a diagnosis of exclusion that is best treated with an antipsychotic.

13 Article Classification and Staging of Morgellons Disease: Lessons from Syphilis. 2020

Middelveen, Marianne J / Martinez, Roberto M / Fesler, Melissa C / Sapi, Eva / Burke, Jennie / Shah, Jyotsna S / Nicolaus, Carsten / Stricker, Raphael B. ·Atkins Veterinary Services, Calgary, AB, Canada. · Martinez Veterinary Services, Calgary, AB, Canada. · Union Square Medical Associates, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Department of Biology and Environmental Science, University of New Haven, West Haven, CT, USA. · Australian Biologics, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · IGeneX Laboratories, Palo Alto, CA, USA. · BCA-Clinic, Augsburg, Germany. ·Clin Cosmet Investig Dermatol · Pubmed #32104041.

ABSTRACT: Introduction: Morgellons disease (MD) is a contested dermopathy that is associated with Methods: Drawing on historical and pathological parallels with syphilis, we formulated a more detailed staging system based on clinical features as well as severity of skin lesions and corresponding histopathological infection patterns, as determined by anti- Results: Clinical classes I-IV of MD are further categorized as mild, moderate and severe, or stages A, B and C, respectively, based on histopathological findings. Stage A lesions demonstrated little or no immune infiltrates and little or no disorganization of cells; macrophages were not present, and hemorrhage was negligible. Extracellular isolated spirochetes and intracellular staining of keratinocytes in the lower epidermis was occasionally seen. Stage C lesions demonstrated positive staining of keratinocytes in the stratum basale and stratum spinosum and positive intracellular staining of macrophages for Conclusion: The enhanced staging system provides objective criteria to assess the severity of dermopathy in MD. Further studies are needed to determine the optimal treatment for MD based on this staging system related to

14 Article Mixed 2019

Middelveen, Marianne J / Filush, Katherine R / Bandoski, Cheryl / Kasliwala, Rumanah S / Melillo, Anthony / Stricker, Raphael B / Sapi, Eva. ·Atkins Veterinary Services Ltd., Calgary, AB T3B 4C9, Canada. middel@telus.net. · Department of Biology and Environmental Science, University of New Haven, West Haven, CT 06516, USA. katherine.r.filush@gmail.com. · Department of Biology and Environmental Science, University of New Haven, West Haven, CT 06516, USA. Cherylbandoski@gmail.com. · Department of Biology and Environmental Science, University of New Haven, West Haven, CT 06516, USA. rumanahk@yahoo.com. · Department of Biology and Environmental Science, University of New Haven, West Haven, CT 06516, USA. tmelillo8@gmail.com. · Union Square Medical Associates, San Francisco, CA 94108, USA. rstricker@usmamed.com. · Department of Biology and Environmental Science, University of New Haven, West Haven, CT 06516, USA. unh@evasapi.net. ·Healthcare (Basel) · Pubmed #31108976.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Morgellons disease (MD) is a dermopathy that is associated with tick-borne illness. It is characterized by spontaneously developing skin lesions containing embedded or projecting filaments, and patients may also experience symptoms resembling those of Lyme disease (LD) including musculoskeletal, neurological and cardiovascular manifestations. Various species of Borrelia and co-infecting pathogens have been detected in body fluids and tissue specimens from MD patients. We sought to investigate the coexistence of METHODS: Testing for Bb and Hp was performed on dermatological specimens from 14 MD patients using tissue culture, immunohistochemical (IHC) staining, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and confocal microscopy. Markers for amyloid and biofilm formation were investigated using histochemical and IHC staining. RESULTS: Bb and Hp were detected in dermatological tissue taken from MD lesions. Bb and Hp tended to co-localize in foci within the epithelial tissue. Skin sections exhibiting foci of co-infecting Bb and Hp contained amyloid markers including β-amyloid protein, thioflavin and phosphorylated tau. The biofilm marker alginate was also found in the sections. CONCLUSIONS: Mixed Bb and Hp biofilms containing β-amyloid and phosphorylated tau may play a role in the evolution of MD.

15 Article Peripheral neuropathy associated with silver toxicity. 2019

Naddaf, Elie / Dyck, Peter J / Jannetto, Paul J / Murray, David L / Dyck, P James B. ·From the Departments of Neurology (E.N., P.J.D., P.J.B.D.) and Laboratory Medicine and Pathology (P.J.J., D.L.M.), Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. · From the Departments of Neurology (E.N., P.J.D., P.J.B.D.) and Laboratory Medicine and Pathology (P.J.J., D.L.M.), Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. dyck.pjames@mayo.edu. ·Neurology · Pubmed #30709965.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Article Morgellons disease treatment with quetiapine. 2019

Carrillo de Albornoz Calahorro, Carmen Maura / López-Delgado, David / Gutiérrez-Rojas, Luis. ·Unidad de Gestión Clínica de Psiquiatría, Complejo Hospitalario Granada, Servicio Andaluz de Salud, Granada, Spain. Electronic address: carmens_maura@hotmail.com. · Unidad de Gestión Clínica de Dermatología, Complejo Hospitalario Granada, Servicio Andaluz de Salud, Granada, Spain. · Unidad de Gestión Clínica de Psiquiatría, Complejo Hospitalario Granada, Servicio Andaluz de Salud, Granada, Spain. ·Med Clin (Barc) · Pubmed #29706457.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Article Detection of tick-borne infection in Morgellons disease patients by serological and molecular techniques. 2018

Middelveen, Marianne J / Cruz, Iris Du / Fesler, Melissa C / Stricker, Raphael B / Shah, Jyotsna S. ·Atkins Veterinary Services, Calgary, AB, Canada. · IGeneX Laboratories, Palo Alto, CA, USA. · Union Square Medical Associates, San Francisco, CA, USA, rstricker@usmamed.com. ·Clin Cosmet Investig Dermatol · Pubmed #30519067.

ABSTRACT: Background: Morgellons disease (MD) is a skin condition associated with Lyme disease (LD) and tick-borne illness. Patients with this skin disorder experience ulcerative lesions that contain multicolored filamentous collagen and keratin inclusions. Infection with various species of Patients and methods: Sera from 30 patients with MD were tested for antibody reactivity to antigens from the Results: Seroreactivity to Bb, RFB or both was detected in 63% of the cohort, while positive PCR testing for Bb, RFB or both was detected in 53% of the cohort. Overall, 90% of patients tested positive for exposure and/or infection with Conclusion: The study demonstrates an association between MD and positive tests for both Bb and RFB spirochetes. In conjunction with previous studies, our study provides corroborative evidence linking MD to

18 Article Delusional infestation versus Morgellons disease. 2018

Hylwa, Sara A / Ronkainen, Sanna D. ·Departments of Dermatology, Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA; University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. Electronic address: Sara.Hylwa@hcmed.org. · University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. ·Clin Dermatol · Pubmed #30446193.

ABSTRACT: Delusional infestation is the conviction that one is infested with pathogens-either animate or inanimate-despite medical or microbiologic evidence to the contrary. Infestation with inanimate pathogens, specifically fibers or filaments, has been controversially termed Morgellons disease by the patients themselves, who believe that this is not a psychiatric disease but rather a new organic condition or a skin manifestation of an infection, such as Lyme disease. A large-scale study by the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention on patients presenting with Morgellons clinical manifestations did not find evidence of fibers in the skin nor an association with any infection, including Lyme disease. Once the diagnosis of delusional infestation is made, the cornerstone of treatment is antipsychotics, although this is often quite challenging, as patients are reluctant to take these medications.

19 Article Clinical evaluation of Morgellons disease in a cohort of North American patients. 2018

Fesler, Melissa C / Middelveen, Marianne J / Stricker, Raphael B. ·Union Square Medical Associates, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Atkins Veterinary Services, Calgary, AB, Canada. ·Dermatol Reports · Pubmed #29774138.

ABSTRACT: Morgellons disease (MD) is a dermatological condition characterized by aberrant production of keratin and collagen fibers in skin. Although infection with

20 Article Morgellons Disease-Dredged Up From History and Customized. 2018

Chu, Christopher. ·Department of Dermatology, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #29641827.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Article Treatment of Oral Mucosal Lesions Associated With Overlapping Psychodermatologic Disorders. 2018

Alfaris, Sausan / France, Katherine / Sollecito, Thomas P / Stoopler, Eric T. ·Postdoctoral Student, Department of Oral Medicine, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Resident, Department of Oral Medicine, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Professor and Chair of Oral Medicine, Department of Oral Medicine, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Associate Professor of Oral Medicine, Department of Oral Medicine, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ·Compend Contin Educ Dent · Pubmed #29600872.

ABSTRACT: Delusional infestations are psychodermatologic disorders in which those affected have a false belief they are infested by parasites and/or "growing" inanimate objects from cutaneous surfaces. Individuals with delusional parasitosis (DP) believe parasites, bacteria, worms, mites, or other living organisms are the source of cutaneous symptoms, while those with Morgellons disease (MD) attribute their symptoms to growth of small fibers or inorganic material. In both DP and MD, self-inflicted, non-healing cutaneous lesions caused by scratching at the affected areas to alleviate symptoms are commonly observed. This report describes a case of oral mucosal lesions in a patient demonstrating overlapping symptoms of DP and MD. It is important for oral healthcare providers to recognize oral signs and symptoms that may be associated with psychodermatologic disorders.

22 Article Management of Morgellons Disease With Low-Dose Trifluoperazine. 2018

Yan, Bernice Y / Jorizzo, Joseph L. ·Department of Dermatology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #29322188.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

23 Article Morgellons disease: experiences of an integrated multidisciplinary dermatology team to achieve positive outcomes. 2018

Mohandas, Padma / Bewley, Anthony / Taylor, Ruth. ·a Department of Dermatology , The Royal Derby Hospital , Derby , England. · b Department of Dermatology , The Royal London Hospital , London , England. ·J Dermatolog Treat · Pubmed #28665169.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In recent years, there has been a reported increase in affliction of the skin with small fibres or other particles. The condition has been referred to as Morgellons disease. Patients present with stinging, burning or crawling sensations of the skin, with perceived extrusion of inanimate material alongside fatigue and other systemic symptoms. Sufferers often experience significant morbidity and reduction in quality of life. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to explore the various clinical presentations, management strategies and outcomes employed to treat this condition in our patients. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective case notes review of 35 patients referred to our multidisciplinary psycho-dermatology clinic at the Royal London Hospital between January 2004 and January 2017. RESULTS: The majority of patients were women (25) 71.4%, with a mean age of 54.6 years (26-80 years). Most (26) 74.2% were living alone. The average duration of illness prior to presentation was 3.8 years (4 months-20 years). Many patients had perceived precipitating factors (54.2%) and often self-diagnosed (28.5%). Psychiatric co-morbidities included 42.8% with depressive symptoms and 25.7% with anxiety. Substance misuse was elicited in five patients (14%). Management of patients included both the treatment of skin disease and psychosocial co-morbidities. Out of the 35 patients who attended (14) 40% cleared or showed significant improvement. Sixteen (45.7%) patients were stable and under review. One patient declined treatment and three did not attend review. One patient died from disease unrelated to her skin condition. CONCLUSIONS: Morgellons disease is a condition, which is widely discussed on the internet and patients often self-diagnose. The course of the disease can be chronic and debilitating. For a positive outcome, it is important that a strong physican-patient relationship is cultivated. As demonstrated in this case series, managing patients holistically in an integrated multidisciplinary dermatology setting helps achieve positive outcomes.

24 Article Formication, tactile hallucinations, delusional parasitosis, and Morgellons: Enough to make your skin crawl. 2017

Dowben, Jonathan S / Kowalski, Peter C / Keltner, Norman L. ·Child and Family Behavioral Health Service (CAFBHS), Department of Behavioral Medicine, Brooke Army Medical Center (BAMC), Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, Texas, USA. · Behavioral Health Center of Eastern Idaho Regional Medical Center, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA. · School of Nursing, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, USA. ·Perspect Psychiatr Care · Pubmed #28960311.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

25 Article History of Morgellons disease: the same name for different psychodermatologic diseases? 2017

Ferreira, Bárbara Roque / Roccia, Maria Grazia / Cardoso, José Carlos / França, Katlein / Wollina, Uwe / Lotti, Torello / Fioranelli, Massimo. ·Dermatology Department, Coimbra Hospital and University Centre, Coimbra, Portugal. · University B.I.S. Group of Institutions, Punjab Technical University, Punjab, India. · Centro Studi per la Ricerca Multidisciplinare e Rigenerativa, Università Degli Studi "G. Marconi", Rome, Italy. k.franca@med.miami.edu. · Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences; Institute for Bioethics and Health Policy, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 1600 NW 10th Ave, 1140, 33136, Miami, FL, USA. k.franca@med.miami.edu. · Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Academic Teaching Hospital Dresden-Friedrichstadt, Dresden, Germany. · Centro Studi per la Ricerca Multidisciplinare e Rigenerativa, Università Degli Studi "G. Marconi", Rome, Italy. · Department of Nuclear Physics, Subnuclear and Radiation, Università Degli Studi "G. Marconi", Rome, Italy. ·Wien Med Wochenschr · Pubmed #28299553.

ABSTRACT: "Morgellons disease" has been a controversial topic in the history of psychodermatology. The most consensual scientific opinion is that it is a primary psychiatric disorder, particularly, a delusional disorder, although others were also pointed out. Some authors have suggested that it may correspond to a common dermatosis with secondary psychopathology. The Morgellons Research Foundation has advocated that it is "an emerging infectious" entity. This paper intends to critically review the main ideas and controversies, since its first description.

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