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Myeloid Leukemia HELP
Based on 29,283 articles published since 2010
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These are the 29283 published articles about Leukemia, Myeloid that originated from Worldwide during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline [Recommendations from the French CML Study Group (Fi-LMC) for BCR-ABL1 kinase domain mutation analysis in chronic myeloid leukemia]. 2020

Cayuela, Jean-Michel / Chomel, Jean-Claude / Coiteux, Valérie / Dulucq, Stéphanie / Escoffre-Barbe, Martine / Etancelin, Pascaline / Etienne, Gabriel / Hayette, Sandrine / Millot, Frédéric / Nibourel, Olivier / Nicolini, Franck-Emmanuel / Réa, Delphine / Anonymous1901098. ·Siège social, institut Bergonié, Groupe d'étude français pour la leucémie myéloïde chronique Fi-LMC, 229, cours de l'Argonne, 33000 Bordeaux, France; Siège social, Groupe des biologistes moléculaires des hémopathies malignes (GBMHM), 7, avenue Marcel-Doret, 31500 Toulouse, France. Electronic address: jean-michel.cayuela@aphp.fr. · Siège social, institut Bergonié, Groupe d'étude français pour la leucémie myéloïde chronique Fi-LMC, 229, cours de l'Argonne, 33000 Bordeaux, France; Siège social, Groupe des biologistes moléculaires des hémopathies malignes (GBMHM), 7, avenue Marcel-Doret, 31500 Toulouse, France. · Siège social, institut Bergonié, Groupe d'étude français pour la leucémie myéloïde chronique Fi-LMC, 229, cours de l'Argonne, 33000 Bordeaux, France. · Siège social, Groupe des biologistes moléculaires des hémopathies malignes (GBMHM), 7, avenue Marcel-Doret, 31500 Toulouse, France. ·Bull Cancer · Pubmed #31353136.

ABSTRACT: In the context of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) resistant to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) mutations still remain the sole biological marker that directly condition therapeutic decision. These recommendations aim at updating the use of BCR-ABL1 mutation testing with respect to new available therapeutic options and at repositioning different testing methods at the era of next generation sequencing (NGS). They have been written by a panel of experts from the French Study Group on CML (Fi-LMC), after a critical review of relevant publications. TKD mutation testing is recommended in case of treatment failure but not in case of optimal response. For patients in warning situation, mutation testing must be discussed depending on the type of TKI used, lasting of the treatment, kinetic evolution of BCR-ABL1 transcripts along time and necessity for switching treatment. The kind and the frequency of TKD mutations occasioning resistance mainly depend on the TKI in use and disease phase. Because of its better sensitivity, NGS methods are recommended for mutation testing rather than Sanger's. Facing a given TKD mutation, therapeutic decision should be taken based on in vitro sensitivity and clinical efficacy data. Identification by sequencing of a TKD mutation known to induce resistance must lead to a therapeutic change. The clinical value of testing methods more sensitive than NGS remains to be assessed.

2 Guideline Recommendations from a Portuguese Expert Group for Discontinuation of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patients in Clinical Practice. 2019

Almeida, Antonio / Pierdomenico, Francesca / Guerrero, Blanca Polo / Saraiva, Filipa / Montalvão, Ana / Coutinho, Jorge / Mariz, Mário / Melo, Teresa / Santos, Maria João / Pereira, Alexandra / Cerveira, Nuno. ·Department of Hematology. Hospital da Luz. Lisboa. Portugal. · Department of Hematology. Instituto Português de Oncologia. Lisboa. Portugal. · Department of Hematology. Hospital de Santa Maria. Centro Hospitalar Universitário Lisboa Norte. Lisboa. Portugal. · Department of Hematology. Hospital de Santo António dos Capuchos. Centro Hospitalar Lisboa Central. Lisboa. Portugal. · Department of Oncology. Hospital José Joaquim Fernandes. Unidade Local de Saúde do Baixo Alentejo. Beja. Portugal. · Department of Clinical Hematology. Centro Hospitalar e Universitário do Porto. Porto. Portugal. · Department of Onco-Hematology. Instituto Português de Oncologia. Porto. Portugal. · Department of Clinical Hematology. Centro Hospitalar de Vila Nova de Gaia/Espinho. Vila Nova de Gaia. Portugal. · Department of Clinical Hematology. Hospital Pedro Hispano. Unidade Local de Saúde de Matosinhos. Matosinhos. Portugal. · Department of Clinical Hematology. Centro Hospitalar e Universitário de Coimbra. Coimbra. Portugal. · Department of Genetics and Research Centre. Portuguese Oncology Institute. Porto. Portugal. ·Acta Med Port · Pubmed #31445538.

ABSTRACT: Until recently, the main goal of chronic myeloid leukemia therapy was disease control with the best overall survival, which required lifelong treatment. However, currently, the treatment-free remission concept is becoming an important goal in clinical practice, and several tyrosine kinase inhibitors discontinuation studies have shown that round 50% of patients with a durable deep molecular response beyond major molecular response successfully interrupt tyrosine kinase inhibitors for at least three years without loss of molecular response. However, and regardless of the existing evidence, the exact conditions for attempting treatment-free remission remain poorly defined. Different authors tried to guide the clinical decision regarding this topic but there are some points that differ, namely with respect to the recommended duration of tyrosine kinase inhibitors therapy and the appropriate molecular response prior to treatment-free remission. The goal of this article is to propose an algorithm to guide clinical practice in Portugal concerning chronic phase-chronic myeloid leukemia patients who wish to attempt treatment-free remission, since there are no national guidelines.

3 Guideline Initial Diagnostic Workup of Acute Leukemia: ASCO Clinical Practice Guideline Endorsement Summary of the CAP and ASH Guideline. 2019

de Haas, Valérie / Ismaila, Nofisat / Zhang, Ling. ·1 Princess Máxima Center for Pediatric Oncology, Utrecht, the Netherlands. · 2 American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA. · 3 Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL. ·J Oncol Pract · Pubmed #30521418.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Guideline Discontinuation of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in chronic myeloid leukemia: Recommendations for clinical practice from the French Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Study Group. 2018

Rea, Delphine / Ame, Shanti / Berger, Marc / Cayuela, Jean-Michel / Charbonnier, Aude / Coiteux, Valérie / Cony-Makhoul, Pascale / Dubruille, Viviane / Dulucq, Stéphanie / Etienne, Gabriel / Legros, Laurence / Nicolini, Franck / Roche-Lestienne, Catherine / Escoffre-Barbe, Martine / Gardembas, Martine / Guerci-Bresler, Agnès / Johnson-Ansah, Hyacinthe / Rigal-Huguet, Françoise / Rousselot, Philippe / Mahon, François-Xavier / Anonymous5100945. ·French Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Study Group, Bergonié Institute, Bordeaux, France. ·Cancer · Pubmed #29723417.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The ultimate goal of chronic myeloid leukemia management in the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) era for patients who obtain deep molecular responses is maintaining a durable off-treatment response after treatment discontinuation; this situation is called treatment-free remission (TFR). Knowledge accumulated during the last 10 years justifies moving TFR strategies from research to clinical practice. METHODS: Twenty experts from the French Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Study Group (France Intergroupe des Leucémies Myéloïdes Chroniques), including 17 hematologists, 2 molecular biologists, and 1 cytogeneticist, critically reviewed published data with the goal of developing evidence-based recommendations for TKI discontinuation in clinical practice. RESULTS: Clinically relevant questions were addressed, including the selection of candidate patients (with known prognostic factors for outcomes taken into account), detailed monitoring procedures during the treatment-free phase, a definition of relapse requiring therapy resumption, and monitoring after treatment reintroduction. CONCLUSIONS: This work presents consensus statements with the aim of guiding physicians and biologists by means of pragmatic recommendations for safe TKI discontinuation in daily practice. Cancer 2018;124:2956-63. © 2018 American Cancer Society.

5 Guideline Diagnosis and management of Aspergillus diseases: executive summary of the 2017 ESCMID-ECMM-ERS guideline. 2018

Ullmann, A J / Aguado, J M / Arikan-Akdagli, S / Denning, D W / Groll, A H / Lagrou, K / Lass-Flörl, C / Lewis, R E / Munoz, P / Verweij, P E / Warris, A / Ader, F / Akova, M / Arendrup, M C / Barnes, R A / Beigelman-Aubry, C / Blot, S / Bouza, E / Brüggemann, R J M / Buchheidt, D / Cadranel, J / Castagnola, E / Chakrabarti, A / Cuenca-Estrella, M / Dimopoulos, G / Fortun, J / Gangneux, J-P / Garbino, J / Heinz, W J / Herbrecht, R / Heussel, C P / Kibbler, C C / Klimko, N / Kullberg, B J / Lange, C / Lehrnbecher, T / Löffler, J / Lortholary, O / Maertens, J / Marchetti, O / Meis, J F / Pagano, L / Ribaud, P / Richardson, M / Roilides, E / Ruhnke, M / Sanguinetti, M / Sheppard, D C / Sinkó, J / Skiada, A / Vehreschild, M J G T / Viscoli, C / Cornely, O A. ·Department of Infectious Diseases, Haematology and Oncology, University Hospital Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Infectious Diseases Unit, University Hospital Madrid, Madrid, Spain; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Department of Medical Microbiology, Hacettepe University Medical School, Ankara, Turkey; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · The National Aspergillosis Centre, Wythenshawe Hospital, Mycology Reference Centre Manchester, Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust, ECMM Excellence Centre of Medical Mycology, Manchester, UK; The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK; Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, UK; European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Department of Paediatric Haematology/Oncology, Centre for Bone Marrow Transplantation, University Children's Hospital Münster, Münster, Germany; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Department of Microbiology and Immunology, ECMM Excellence Centre of Medical Mycology, University Hospital Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Institute of Hygiene, Microbiology and Social Medicine, ECMM Excellence Centre of Medical Mycology, Medical University Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Infectious Diseases Clinic, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG). · Department of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, Spain; CIBER Enfermedades Respiratorias - CIBERES (CB06/06/0058), Madrid, Spain; Medicine Department, School of Medicine, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, Spain; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Department of Medical Microbiology, Radboud University Medical Centre, Centre of Expertise in Mycology Radboudumc/CWZ, ECMM Excellence Centre of Medical Mycology, Nijmegen, Netherlands; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · MRC Centre for Medical Mycology, Institute of Medical Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Department of Infectious Diseases, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon, France; Inserm 1111, French International Centre for Infectious Diseases Research (CIRI), Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Lyon, France; European Respiratory Society (ERS). · Department of Medicine, Section of Infectious Diseases, Hacettepe University Medical School, Ankara, Turkey; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Department Microbiological Surveillance and Research, Statens Serum Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Department of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Institute of Infection and Immunity, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK; European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV), Lausanne, Switzerland; European Respiratory Society (ERS). · Department of Internal Medicine, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; Burns, Trauma and Critical Care Research Centre, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; European Respiratory Society (ERS). · Radboud Centre for Infectious Diseases, Radboud University Medical Centre, Centre of Expertise in Mycology Radboudumc/CWZ, ECMM Excellence Centre of Medical Mycology, Nijmegen, Netherlands; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG). · Medical Clinic III, University Hospital Mannheim, Mannheim, Germany; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Department of Pneumology, University Hospital of Tenon and Sorbonne, University of Paris, Paris, France; European Respiratory Society (ERS). · Infectious Diseases Unit, Istituto Giannina Gaslini Children's Hospital, Genoa, Italy; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG). · Department of Medical Microbiology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education & Research, Chandigarh, India; European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Department of Critical Care Medicine, Attikon University Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Medical School, Athens, Greece; European Respiratory Society (ERS). · Infectious Diseases Service, Ramón y Cajal Hospital, Madrid, Spain; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Univ Rennes, CHU Rennes, Inserm, Irset (Institut de Recherche en santé, environnement et travail) - UMR_S 1085, Rennes, France; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Division of Infectious Diseases, University Hospital of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Department of Haematology and Oncology, University Hospital of Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG). · Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Thoracic Clinic, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Centre for Medical Microbiology, University College London, London, UK; European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Department of Clinical Mycology, Allergy and Immunology, North Western State Medical University, St Petersburg, Russia; European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Radboud Centre for Infectious Diseases, Radboud University Medical Centre, Centre of Expertise in Mycology Radboudumc/CWZ, ECMM Excellence Centre of Medical Mycology, Nijmegen, Netherlands; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · International Health and Infectious Diseases, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany; Clinical Infectious Diseases, Research Centre Borstel, Leibniz Center for Medicine & Biosciences, Borstel, Germany; German Centre for Infection Research (DZIF), Tuberculosis Unit, Hamburg-Lübeck-Borstel-Riems Site, Lübeck, Germany; European Respiratory Society (ERS). · Division of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology, Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University, Frankfurt, Germany; European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, Children's Hospital, University of Paris, Paris, France; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Department of Haematology, ECMM Excellence Centre of Medical Mycology, University Hospital Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Infectious Diseases Service, Department of Medicine, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland; Department of Medicine, Ensemble Hospitalier de la Côte, Morges, Switzerland; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Department of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Canisius-Wilhelmina Hospital, Centre of Expertise in Mycology Radboudumc/CWZ, ECMM Excellence Centre of Medical Mycology, Nijmegen, Netherlands; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Department of Haematology, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Roma, Italy; European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Quality Unit, Pôle Prébloc, Saint-Louis and Lariboisière Hospital Group, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France. · The National Aspergillosis Centre, Wythenshawe Hospital, Mycology Reference Centre Manchester, Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust, ECMM Excellence Centre of Medical Mycology, Manchester, UK; The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK; Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, UK; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Infectious Diseases Unit, 3rd Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Aristotle University School of Health Sciences, Thessaloniki, Greece; Hippokration General Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Department of Haematology and Oncology, Paracelsus Hospital, Osnabrück, Germany; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Institute of Microbiology, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli - Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Microbiology and Immunology, McGill University, Montreal, Canada; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Department of Haematology and Stem Cell Transplantation, Szent István and Szent László Hospital, Budapest, Hungary; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG). · First Department of Medicine, Laiko Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Department I of Internal Medicine, ECMM Excellence Centre of Medical Mycology, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; Centre for Integrated Oncology, Cologne-Bonn, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; German Centre for Infection Research (DZIF) partner site Bonn-Cologne, Cologne, Germany; European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · Ospedale Policlinico San Martino and University of Genova (DISSAL), Genova, Italy; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM). · First Department of Medicine, Laiko Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece; German Centre for Infection Research (DZIF) partner site Bonn-Cologne, Cologne, Germany; CECAD Cluster of Excellence, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; Clinical Trials Center Cologne, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; ESCMID Fungal Infection Study Group (EFISG); European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM); ESCMID European Study Group for Infections in Compromised Hosts (ESGICH). Electronic address: Oliver.cornely@uk-koeln.de. ·Clin Microbiol Infect · Pubmed #29544767.

ABSTRACT: The European Society for Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, the European Confederation of Medical Mycology and the European Respiratory Society Joint Clinical Guidelines focus on diagnosis and management of aspergillosis. Of the numerous recommendations, a few are summarized here. Chest computed tomography as well as bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in patients with suspicion of pulmonary invasive aspergillosis (IA) are strongly recommended. For diagnosis, direct microscopy, preferably using optical brighteners, histopathology and culture are strongly recommended. Serum and BAL galactomannan measures are recommended as markers for the diagnosis of IA. PCR should be considered in conjunction with other diagnostic tests. Pathogen identification to species complex level is strongly recommended for all clinically relevant Aspergillus isolates; antifungal susceptibility testing should be performed in patients with invasive disease in regions with resistance found in contemporary surveillance programmes. Isavuconazole and voriconazole are the preferred agents for first-line treatment of pulmonary IA, whereas liposomal amphotericin B is moderately supported. Combinations of antifungals as primary treatment options are not recommended. Therapeutic drug monitoring is strongly recommended for patients receiving posaconazole suspension or any form of voriconazole for IA treatment, and in refractory disease, where a personalized approach considering reversal of predisposing factors, switching drug class and surgical intervention is also strongly recommended. Primary prophylaxis with posaconazole is strongly recommended in patients with acute myelogenous leukaemia or myelodysplastic syndrome receiving induction chemotherapy. Secondary prophylaxis is strongly recommended in high-risk patients. We strongly recommend treatment duration based on clinical improvement, degree of immunosuppression and response on imaging.

6 Guideline Primary prophylaxis of invasive fungal infections in patients with haematological malignancies: 2017 update of the recommendations of the Infectious Diseases Working Party (AGIHO) of the German Society for Haematology and Medical Oncology (DGHO). 2018

Mellinghoff, Sibylle C / Panse, Jens / Alakel, Nael / Behre, Gerhard / Buchheidt, Dieter / Christopeit, Maximilian / Hasenkamp, Justin / Kiehl, Michael / Koldehoff, Michael / Krause, Stefan W / Lehners, Nicola / von Lilienfeld-Toal, Marie / Löhnert, Annika Y / Maschmeyer, Georg / Teschner, Daniel / Ullmann, Andrew J / Penack, Olaf / Ruhnke, Markus / Mayer, Karin / Ostermann, Helmut / Wolf, Hans-H / Cornely, Oliver A. ·Cologne Excellence Cluster on Cellular Stress Responses in Aging-Associated Diseases (CECAD), University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany. sibylle.mellinghoff@uk-koeln.de. · Department I of Internal Medicine, German Centre for Infection Research (DZIF), University Hospital of Cologne, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany. sibylle.mellinghoff@uk-koeln.de. · Department of Oncology, Haematology, Haemostaseology and Stem Cell Transplantation, University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Aachen, Germany. · Department I of Internal Medicine, Haematology and Oncology, University Hospital Dresden, Dresden, Germany. · Division of Haematology and Oncology, Leipzig University Hospital, Leipzig, Germany. · Department of Internal Medicine-Haematology and Oncology, Mannheim University Hospital, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany. · Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Clinic for Haematology and Medical Oncology with Department for Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medicine Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany. · Department I for Internal Medicine, Klinikum Frankfurt (Oder), Frankfurt (Oder), Germany. · Department of Bone Marrow Transplantation, West German Cancer Centre, University Hospital of Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg, Germany. · Department V for Internal Medicine, University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany. · Department of Internal Medicine V, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Haematology and Oncology, University Hospital of Jena, Jena, Germany. · Department I of Internal Medicine, German Centre for Infection Research (DZIF), University Hospital of Cologne, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany. · Department of Haematology, Oncology and Palliative Care, Klinikum Ernst von Bergmann, Potsdam, Germany. · Department of Haematology, Medical Oncology, and Pneumology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz, Germany. · Department II of Internal Medicine, University Hospital Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg, Germany. · Department for Haematology, Oncology and Tumour immunology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Department of Haematology and Oncology, Paracelsus-Kliniken Osnabrück, Osnabrück, Germany. · Department III of Internal Medicine, University Hospital Bonn, Bonn, Germany. · Department of Haematology and Oncology, University of Munich, Munich, Germany. · Department IV of Internal Medicine, University Hospital Halle, Halle, Germany. · Cologne Excellence Cluster on Cellular Stress Responses in Aging-Associated Diseases (CECAD), University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany. · Clinical Trials Centre Cologne (ZKS Köln), University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany. ·Ann Hematol · Pubmed #29218389.

ABSTRACT: Immunocompromised patients are at high risk of invasive fungal infections (IFI), in particular those with haematological malignancies undergoing remission-induction chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and recipients of allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplants (HSCT). Despite the development of new treatment options in the past decades, IFI remains a concern due to substantial morbidity and mortality in these patient populations. In addition, the increasing use of new immune modulating drugs in cancer therapy has opened an entirely new spectrum of at risk periods. Since the last edition of antifungal prophylaxis recommendations of the German Society for Haematology and Medical Oncology in 2014, seven clinical trials regarding antifungal prophylaxis in patients with haematological malignancies have been published, comprising 1227 patients. This update assesses the impact of this additional evidence and effective revisions. Our key recommendations are the following: prophylaxis should be performed with posaconazole delayed release tablets during remission induction chemotherapy for AML and MDS (AI). Posaconazole iv can be used when the oral route is contraindicated or not feasible. Intravenous liposomal amphotericin B did not significantly decrease IFI rates in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) patients during induction chemotherapy, and there is poor evidence to recommend it for prophylaxis in these patients (CI). Despite substantial risk of IFI, we cannot provide a stronger recommendation for these patients. There is poor evidence regarding voriconazole prophylaxis in patients with neutropenia (CII). Therapeutic drug monitoring TDM should be performed within 2 to 5 days of initiating voriconazole prophylaxis and should be repeated in case of suspicious adverse events or of dose changes of interacting drugs (BIItu). General TDM during posaconazole prophylaxis is not recommended (CIItu), but may be helpful in cases of clinical failure such as breakthrough IFI for verification of compliance or absorption.

7 Guideline [Preventative and therapeutic relapse strategies after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Guidelines from the Francophone society of bone marrow transplantation and cellular therapy (SFGM-TC)]. 2017

Yafour, Nabil / Beckerich, Florence / Bulabois, Claude Eric / Chevallier, Patrice / Daguindau, Étienne / Dumesnil, Cécile / Guillaume, Thierry / Huynh, Anne / Levrat, Stavroula Masouridi / Menard, Anne-Lise / Michallet, Mauricette / Pautas, Cécile / Poiré, Xavier / Ravinet, Aurelie / Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim / Bazarbachi, Ali. ·Établissement hospitalier et universitaire 1(er) Novembre 1954, service d'hématologie et de thérapie cellulaire, BP 4166, 31000 Ibn Rochd, Oran, Algérie; Université d'Oran 1, Ahmed Ben Bella, faculté de médecine, Oran, Algérie. · Hôpital Henri-Mondor, service d'hématologie et de thérapie cellulaire, boulevard Maréchal-de-Lattre-de-Tassigny, 94000 Créteil, France. · Centre hospitalier universitaire, service d'hématologie clinique, 38043 Grenoble cedex 9, France. · CHU de Nantes, service d'hématologie clinique, Hôtel-Dieu, place Alexis-Ricordeau, 44035 Nantes, France. · CHRU de Besançon, service d'hématologie, 3, boulevard Fleming, 25000 Besancon, France. · CHU de Rouen, service d'hémato-oncologie pédiatrique, 1, rue de Germont, 76031 Rouen cedex, France. · IUCT-Oncopole, service d'hématologie et de greffe de cellules souches hématopoïétiques, 1, rue Irène-Joliot-Curie, 31059 Toulouse cedex, France. · Division of hematology, department of medical specialties, Geneva university hospitals, 4, rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil, 1205 Geneva, Suisse. · Centre Henri-Becquerel, service d'hématologie clinique, rue d'Amiens, CS 11516, 76038 Rouen cedex 1, France. · Centre hospitalier Lyon Sud, service d'hématologie clinique, 165, chemin du Grand-Revoyet, 69495 Pierre-Bénite cedex, France. · Universitaires Saint-Luc, section of hematology cliniques, 1200 Brussels, Belgique. · CHU Clermont-Ferrand, service de thérapie cellulaire et d'hématologie clinique adulte, 63100 Clermont-Ferrand, France; Université Clermont-Auvergne, EA7453 et CIC-501, 63003 Clermont-Ferrand, France. · CHRU de Lille, université de Lille 2, département de maladie du sang, LIRIC Inserm U995, 59000 Lille, France. Electronic address: ibrahim.yakoubagha@chru-lille.fr. · American university of Beirut, medical center, P.O. Box 113-6044 Beirut, Liban. ·Bull Cancer · Pubmed #29179894.

ABSTRACT: Disease relapse remains the first cause of mortality of hematological malignancies after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT). The risk of recurrence is elevated in patients with high-risk cytogenetic or molecular abnormalities, as well as when allo-HCT is performed in patients with refractory disease or with persistent molecular or radiological (PET-CT scan) residual disease. Within the frame of the 7th annual workshops of the francophone society for bone marrow transplantation and cellular therapy, the working group reviewed the literature in order to elaborate unified guidelines for the prevention and treatment of relapse after allo-HCT. For high risk AML and MDS, a post transplant maintenance strategy is possible, using hypomethylating agents or TKI anti-FLT3 when the target is present. For Philadelphia positive ALL, there was a consensus for the use of post-transplant TKI maintenance. For lymphomas, there are no strong data on the use of post-transplant maintenance, and hence a preemptive strategy is recommended based on modulation of immunosuppression, close follow-up of donor chimerism, and donor lymphocytes infusion. For multiple myeloma, even though the indication of allo-HCT is controversial, our recommendation is post transplant maintenance using bortezomib, due to its a good toxicity profile without increasing the risk of GVHD.

8 Guideline JSH guideline for tumors of hematopoietic and lymphoid tissues-lukemia: 4. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)/myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). 2017

Usui, Noriko. ·Department of Transfusion Medicine/Clinical Oncology and Hematology, The Jikei University Daisan Hospital, Komae, Tokyo, 201-8601, Japan. usuin@jikei.ac.jp. ·Int J Hematol · Pubmed #28936634.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Guideline Chronic myeloid leukaemia: ESMO Clinical Practice Guidelines for diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. 2017

Hochhaus, A / Saussele, S / Rosti, G / Mahon, F-X / Janssen, J J W M / Hjorth-Hansen, H / Richter, J / Buske, C / Anonymous161129. ·Klinik für Innere Medizin II, Hämatologie/Onkologie, Universitätsklinikum Jena, Jena. · III. Medizinische Klinik, Universitätsmedizin Mannheim, Fakultät für Klinische Medizin Mannheim der Universität Heidelberg, Mannheim, Germany. · Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine, Institute of Haematology and Medical Oncology Lorenzo ed Ariosto Seràgnoli, Bologna University School of Medicine, Bologna, Italy. · CHU de Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France. · Department of Hematology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Hematology, St Olavs Hospital and Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, NTNU, Trondheim, Norway. · Department of Hematology, Oncology and Radiation Physics, Skane University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. · CCC Ulm, Institut für Experimentelle Tumorforschung, Universitätsklinikum Ulm, Ulm, Germany. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #28881915.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Guideline Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Version 3.2017, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology. 2017

O'Donnell, Margaret R / Tallman, Martin S / Abboud, Camille N / Altman, Jessica K / Appelbaum, Frederick R / Arber, Daniel A / Bhatt, Vijaya / Bixby, Dale / Blum, William / Coutre, Steven E / De Lima, Marcos / Fathi, Amir T / Fiorella, Melanie / Foran, James M / Gore, Steven D / Hall, Aric C / Kropf, Patricia / Lancet, Jeffrey / Maness, Lori J / Marcucci, Guido / Martin, Michael G / Moore, Joseph O / Olin, Rebecca / Peker, Deniz / Pollyea, Daniel A / Pratz, Keith / Ravandi, Farhad / Shami, Paul J / Stone, Richard M / Strickland, Stephen A / Wang, Eunice S / Wieduwilt, Matthew / Gregory, Kristina / Ogba, Ndiya. · ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #28687581.

ABSTRACT: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common form of acute leukemia among adults and accounts for the largest number of annual deaths due to leukemias in the United States. This portion of the NCCN Guidelines for AML focuses on management and provides recommendations on the workup, diagnostic evaluation, and treatment options for younger (age <60 years) and older (age ≥60 years) adult patients.

11 Guideline Brazilian guidelines on hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia. 2017

Silla, Lucia / Dulley, Frederico / Saboya, Rosaura / Kerbauy, Fabio / de Moraes Arantes, Adriano / Pezzi, Annelise / Gross, Luisa Grave / Paton, Eduardo / Hamerschlak, Nelson. ·Cellular Therapy Program HCPA, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil. · Bone Marrow Transplantation Unit, Hospital Inglês, São Paulo, Brazil. · Hematology and Bone Marrow Transplantation Unit, Hospital Albert Einstein e UNIFESP, São Paulo, Brazil. · Hematology and Bone Marrow Transplantation Unit, Hospital Araújo Jorge, Goiãnia, Brazil. · Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil. · Bone Marrow Transplantation Unit, Hospital de Cancer de Barretos, Barretos, Brazil. ·Eur J Haematol · Pubmed #27621140.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION/OBJECTIVES: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) accounts for 90% of all cases of acute leukemia in adults. In Brazil, the mortality from myeloid leukemia is 1.74/100 000 men and 1.37/100 000 women. Our aim was to review and update guidelines of the Brazilian Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation on indications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for the treatment AML. CONCLUSIONS: (i) Allo-HSCT is recommended for high-risk AML (IA); (ii) allo-HSCT is recommended for AML of intermediate risk (IA); (iii) allo-HSCT is recommended for AML relapsed/refractory (C4); (iv) auto-HSCT is recommended for AML after 1 consolidation (C4); (v) auto-HSCT is recommended for AML in CR1 (higher than QT in the Brazilian experience) (C4); (vi) auto-HSCT is accepted for AML M3 in second molecular complete remission (2B); (vii) peripheral blood instead of Bone Marrow HSC for advanced disease (2A); (viii) recommended conditioning protocols: Bu-Cy/Bu-Mel, Bu-Flu, TBI-Cy. In umbilical cord HSCT, consider ATG-based protocols (2A); (ix) allogeneic HSCT for the treatment of AML can be used in patients between 60 and 80 yr with good performance status and the absence of significant comorbidities (C4).

12 Guideline Cytogenetics in the management of acute myeloid leukemia: an update by the Groupe francophone de cytogénétique hématologique (GFCH). 2016

Luquet, Isabelle / Bidet, Audrey / Cuccuini, Wendy / Lafage-Pochitaloff, Marina / Mozziconacci, Marie-Joëlle / Terré, Christine. ·Laboratoire d'hématologie, Génétique des hémopathies, IUCT-O, Toulouse, France. · Laboratoire d'hématologie-cytogénétique, Hôpital Haut-Lévêque, CHU de Bordeaux, Pessac, France. · Laboratoire central d'hématologie, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Paris, France. · Département de génétique, Hôpital Timone, APHM, Aix Marseille Université, Marseille, France. · Laboratoire de cytogénétique et biologie moléculaire, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Marseille, France. · Laboratoire de cytogénétique, Centre de transfusion sanguine, Le Chesnay, France. ·Ann Biol Clin (Paris) · Pubmed #27545007.

ABSTRACT: The karyotype is critical for the evaluation of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) at diagnosis. Cytogenetic abnormalities detected in AML are one of the most powerful independent prognostic factors. It impacts on the choice of treatment in clinical trials. All chromosomes can be targeted, common chromosomal abnormalities are recurrent and may be associated with a cytological well-defined type. In 40% of the cases, the karyotype is normal and must be associated with molecular biology studies that can refine the prognosis. The usefulness of the karyotype is more limited during the follow-up of the patient due to its limited sensitivity, but it is still useful in the clinical management of relapse. Since 2001, the WHO (World Health Organization) classification of hematological malignancies integrates cytogenetic data in the classification of AML. Karyotype is therefore mandatory in the diagnosis of AML.

13 Guideline Cytogenetics in the management of Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms: an update by the Groupe francophone de cytogénétique hématologique (GFCH). 2016

Bilhou-Nabéra, Chrystèle / Bidet, Audrey / Eclache, Virginie / Lippert, Eric / Mozziconacci, Marie-Joëlle. ·Laboratoire d'hématologie, Unité de cytogénétique onco-hématologique, Hôpital Saint-Antoine, AP-HP, Paris, France. · Laboratoire d'hématologie-cytogénétique, Hôpital Haut-Lévêque, CHU de Bordeaux, Pessac, France. · Laboratoire d'hématologie et de cytogénétique, Hôpital Avicenne, AP-HP, Bobigny, France. · Laboratoire d'hématologie biologique, CHRU de Brest & Equipe Ecla, Inserm U1078, Université de Bretagne occidentale, Brest, France. · Laboratoire de cytogénétique et biologie moléculaire, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Marseille, France. ·Ann Biol Clin (Paris) · Pubmed #27477946.

ABSTRACT: The recent years have witnessed tremendous progress in the molecular characterization of Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). Beside a better understanding of pathophysiology, these abnormalities often constitute very useful diagnostic markers in diseases where exclusion of reactive states used to be the strongest argument. However, conventional and molecular cytogenetics keep a major interest in MPN, either as a second line exploration, in cases where no molecular marker is available, for differential diagnosis or as a proof of clonality or in first line for cases with hyperleukocytosis, for differential diagnosis (CML), to evidence druggable targets (ABL1, RET, PDGFR…) or as a prognosis marker. In this article, we will review the interest of cytogenetic techniques in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

14 Guideline Cytogenetics in the management of "chronic myeloid leukemia": an update by the Groupe francophone de cytogénétique hématologique (GFCH). 2016

Roche-Lestienne, Catherine / Boudry-Labis, Elise / Mozziconacci, Marie-Joëlle. ·Institut de génétique médicale, CHU Lille, Lille, France. · Laboratoire de cytogénétique hématologique et moléculaire, Institut Paoli Calmettes, Marseille, France. ·Ann Biol Clin (Paris) · Pubmed #27477825.

ABSTRACT: Cytogenetic evaluation is one the most important criteria for diagnosis and response to treatment in chronic myeloid leukemia, and recent baseline prognostic factors including particular additional clonal cytogenetic abnormalities have been established. The French cytogenetic group in hematology GFCH proposes here an updating of recommendations for cytogenetic assessment of CML in the era of tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

15 Guideline [Cardiovascular management of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia from a multidisciplinary perspective, and proposing action protocol by consensus meeting]. 2016

García-Gutiérrez, Valentín / Jiménez-Velasco, Antonio / Gómez-Casares, M Teresa / Sánchez-Guijo, Fermín / López-Sendón, Jose Luis / Steegmann Olmedillas, Juan Luis. ·Servicio de Hematología, Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, España. Electronic address: jvalentingg@gmail.com. · Servicio de Hematología, Hospital Regional Universitario Carlos Haya, Instituto de Investigación Biomédica de Málaga (IBIMA), Málaga, España. · Servicio de Hematología, Hospital Universitario de Gran Canaria Dr. Negrín, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Las Palmas, España. · Servicio de Hematología, Instituto de Investigación Biomédica de Salamanca (IBSAL)-Hospital Universitario de Salamanca, Salamanca, España. · Servicio de Cardiología, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Hematología, Hospital Universitario de La Princesa, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria (IIS-IP), Madrid, España. ·Med Clin (Barc) · Pubmed #27107729.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES: The second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI, dasatinib and nilotinib) used in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) treatment have shown a benefit compared to imatinib in responses achieved and disease progression. However, both have been related to some cardiovascular toxicity, being more frequent in patients with cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs). Nowadays, due to the lack of recommendations for CML patients, CVRF management is carried out heterogeneously. The aim of this work is to develop recommendations on the prevention and monitoring of cardiovascular events (CVD) in patients with CML treated with TKIs. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Experts from the Spanish Group of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia together with experts in cardiovascular risk have elaborated, after a consensus meeting, recommendations for the prevention and follow-up of CVE in patients with CML treated with TKI. RESULTS: Recommendations regarding the necessary information to be collected on clinical history, treatment decisions, as well as treatment and monitoring of CVRFs are shown in this document. CONCLUSIONS: TKI treatment requires comprehensive patient management from a multidisciplinary approach, in which both the prevention and management of CVRFs are essential.

16 Guideline Diagnosis, prevention, and management of bleeding episodes in Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms: recommendations by the Hemostasis Working Party of the German Society of Hematology and Medical Oncology (DGHO) and the Society of Thrombosis and Hemostasis Research (GTH). 2016

Appelmann, Iris / Kreher, Stephan / Parmentier, Stefani / Wolf, Hans-Heinrich / Bisping, Guido / Kirschner, Martin / Bergmann, Frauke / Schilling, Kristina / Brümmendorf, Tim H / Petrides, Petro E / Tiede, Andreas / Matzdorff, Axel / Griesshammer, Martin / Riess, Hanno / Koschmieder, Steffen. ·Department of Hematology, Oncology, Hemostaseology, and Stem Cell Transplantation, Faculty of Medicine, RWTH Aachen University, 52074, Aachen, Germany. · Department of Hematology and Oncology, Charite Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Department of Hematology, Oncology, and Palliative Medicine, Rems-Murr-Klinikum Winnenden, Winnenden, Germany. · Department of Internal Medicine IV, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Saale), Germany. · Department of Medicine I, Mathias Spital Rheine, Rheine, Germany. · Medizinisches Versorgungszentrum Wagnerstibbe, Hannover, Germany. · Department of Hematology and Oncology, University Hospital Jena, Jena, Germany. · Hematology Oncology Centre, Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich Medical School, Munich, Germany. · Department of Haematology, Haemostasis, Oncology and Stem-Cell Transplantation, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany. · Clinic for Internal Medicine II, Dept. of Hematology, Oncology, Asklepios Clinic Uckermark, Schwedt/Oder, Germany. · Johannes Wesling Academic Medical Center, Minden, Germany. · Department of Hematology, Oncology, Hemostaseology, and Stem Cell Transplantation, Faculty of Medicine, RWTH Aachen University, 52074, Aachen, Germany. skoschmieder@ukaachen.de. ·Ann Hematol · Pubmed #26916570.

ABSTRACT: Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (Ph-negative MPN) comprise a heterogeneous group of chronic hematologic malignancies. The quality of life, morbidity, and mortality of patients with MPN are primarily affected by disease-related symptoms, thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications, and progression to myelofibrosis and acute leukemia. Major bleeding represents a common and important complication in MPN, and the incidence of such bleeding events will become even more relevant in the future due to the increasing disease prevalence and survival of MPN patients. This review discusses the causes, differential diagnoses, prevention, and management of bleeding episodes in patients with MPN, aiming at defining updated standards of care in these often challenging situations.

17 Guideline Minimal Residual Disease and Childhood Leukemia: Standard of Care Recommendations From the Pediatric Oncology Group of Ontario MRD Working Group. 2016

Athale, Uma H / Gibson, Paul J / Bradley, Nicole M / Malkin, David M / Hitzler, Johann / Anonymous3910859. ·Division of Hematology/Oncology, Hamilton Health Sciences, McMaster Children's Hospital, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Pediatrics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Pediatrics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. · Pediatric Oncology Group of Ontario (POGO), Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Hematology/Oncology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Pediatrics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ·Pediatr Blood Cancer · Pubmed #26914030.

ABSTRACT: Minimal residual disease (MRD) is an independent predictor of relapse risk in children with leukemia and is widely used for risk-adapted treatment. This article summarizes current evidence supporting the use of MRD, including clinical significance, current international clinical practice, impact statement, and recommended indications. The proposed MRD recommendations have been endorsed by the MRD Working Group of the Pediatric Oncology Group of Ontario and provide the foundation for a strategy that aims at equitable access to MRD evaluation for children with leukemia.

18 Guideline [Management of the cardiovascular disease risk during nilotinib treatment in chronic myeloid leukemia: 2015 recommendations from the France Intergroupe des Leucémies Myéloïdes Chroniques]. 2016

Rea, Delphine / Ame, Shanti / Charbonnier, Aude / Coiteux, Valérie / Cony-Makhoul, Pascale / Escoffre-Barbe, Martine / Etienne, Gabriel / Gardembas, Martine / Guerci-Bresler, Agnès / Legros, Laurence / Nicolini, Franck / Tulliez, Michel / Hermet, Eric / Huguet, Françoise / Johnson-Ansah, Hyacinthe / Lapusan, Simona / Quittet, Philippe / Rousselot, Philippe / Mahon, François-Xavier / Messas, Emmanuel. ·Assistance publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, hôpital Saint-Louis, pôle hématologie-oncologie-radiothérapie, service d'hématologie adulte, 1, avenue Claude-Vellefaux, 75475 Paris cedex 10, France. Electronic address: delphine.rea@aphp.fr. · Hôpital de Hautepierre, département d'hématologie et d'oncologie, CHU de Strasbourg, 1, place de l'Hôpital, BP 426, 67091 Strasbourg cedex, France. · Institut Paoli-Calmettes, département d'onco-hématologie, 232, boulevard Sainte-Marguerite, BP 156, 13273 Marseille cedex 9, France. · CHRU de Lille, service des maladies du sang, rue Michel-Polonovski, 59037 Lille cedex, France. · Centre hospitalier Annecy-Genevois, délégation à la recherche clinique et à l'innovation et service d'hématologie, 1, avenue de l'Hôpital, BP 90074, Metz-Tessy, 74374 Pringy, France. · Hôpital Pontchaillou, service d'hématologie clinique, 2, rue Henri-Le-Guilloux, 35033 Rennes cedex, France. · Institut Bergonié, service d'oncologie médicale, 229, cours de l'Argonne, CS61283, 33076 Bordeaux cedex, France. · CHU d'Angers, service des maladies du sang, 4, rue Larrey, 49933 Angers cedex, France. · CHU de Nancy, service d'hématologie et de médecine interne, rue du Morvan, 54511 Vandœuvre-lès-Nancy, France. · Hôpital de l'Archet, service d'hématologie, 151, route Saint-Antoine-de-Ginestière, 06200 Nice, France. · Centre hospitalier Lyon Sud, service d'hématologie clinique 1G, 165, chemin du Grand-Revoyet, 69495 Pierre-Bénite, France; Inserm U1052, CRCL, 165, chemin du Grand-Revoyet, 69495 Pierre-Bénite, France. · Hôpital Henri-Mondor, laboratoire d'hématologie, 51, avenue du Maréchal-de-Lattre-de-Tassigny, 94010 Créteil cedex, France. · CHU Estaing, service de thérapie cellulaire et d'hématologie clinique adulte, 1, place Lucie-Aubrac, 63000 Clermont-Ferrand, France. · Institut universitaire du cancer Toulouse-Oncopole, service d'hématologie, 1, avenue Irène-Joliot-Curie, 31059 Toulouse cedex 9, France. · CHU de Caen, institut d'hématologie, avenue de la Côte-de-Nacre, CS30001, 14033 Caen cedex, France. · Hôpital Saint-Antoine, service d'hématologie clinique et de thérapie cellulaire, 186, rue du Faubourg-Saint-Antoine, 75012 Paris, France. · CHRU de Montpellier, département d'hématologie clinique, 80, avenue Augustin-Fliche, 34295 Montpellier, France. · Hôpital André-Mignot, service d'hématologie oncologie, 177, rue de Versailles, 78157 Le Chesnay cedex, France. · Hôpital Haut-Lévèque, laboratoire d'hématologie, avenue Magellan, 33604 Pessac, France. · Hôpital européen Georges-Pompidou, service de médecine vasculaire, Inserm U970, 20, rue Leblanc, 75015 Paris, France. ·Bull Cancer · Pubmed #26790711.

ABSTRACT: Tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting the BCR-ABL oncoprotein represent an outstanding progress in chronic myeloid leukemia and long-term progression-free survival has become a reality for a majority of patients. However, tyrosine kinase inhibitors may at best chronicize rather than cure the disease thus current recommendation is to pursue treatment indefinitely. As a consequence, high quality treatment and care must integrate optimal disease control and treatment tolerability. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors have an overall favorable safety profile in clinical practice since most adverse events are mild to moderate in intensity. However, recent evidence has emerged that new generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors may sometimes damage vital organs and if not adequately managed, morbidity and mortality may increase. The 2nd generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor nilotinib is licensed for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia with resistance or intolerance to imatinib and newly diagnosed chronic phase-chronic myeloid leukemia. Nilotinib represents an important therapeutic option but it is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of this article by the France Intergroupe des Leucémies Myéloïdes Chroniques is to provide an overview of nilotinib efficacy and cardiovascular safety profile and to propose practical recommendations with the goal to minimize the risk and severity of cardiovascular events in nilotinib-treated patients.

19 Guideline Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of acute myeloid leukaemia in pregnancy. 2015

Ali, Sahra / Jones, Gail L / Culligan, Dominic J / Marsden, Philippa J / Russell, Nigel / Embleton, Nicholas D / Craddock, Charles / Anonymous4000833. ·Department of Haematology, Hull Royal Infirmary, Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust, Hull, UK. · Department of Haematology, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Department of Haematology, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen, UK. · Department of Women's Services, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Department of Haematology, Nottingham City Hospital, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Nottingham, UK. · Department of Paediatrics, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Department of Haematology, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK. ·Br J Haematol · Pubmed #26081614.

ABSTRACT: Pregnant women should be managed by a multidisciplinary team that includes haematologists, obstetricians, neonatologists and anaesthetists (Grade 1C) As for non-pregnant patients, acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) should be diagnosed using the World Health Organization (WHO) classification (Grade 1A) Women diagnosed with AML in pregnancy should be treated without delay (Grade 1B) When the diagnosis of AML is made in the first trimester, a successful pregnancy outcome is unlikely and spontaneous pregnancy loss in this situation carries considerable risks for the mother. The reasons for and against elective termination should be discussed with the patient (Grade 2C) In the case of presentation beyond 32 weeks gestation, it may be reasonable to deliver the foetus prior to commencement of chemotherapy (Grade 2C) Between 24 and 32 weeks, risks of foetal chemotherapy exposure must be balanced against risks of prematurity following elective delivery at that stage of gestation (Grade 1C) The risk-benefit ratio must be carefully considered before using any drugs in pregnancy (Grade 1C) Where AML induction chemotherapy is delivered, a standard daunorubicin, cytarabine 3 + 10 schedule should be used (Grade 1B) Chemotherapy should be dosed according to actual body weight and adjustments made for weight changes during treatment (Grade 1C) Quinolones, tetracyclines and sulphonamide use should be avoided in pregnancy (Grade 1B) Amphotericin B or lipid derivatives are the antifungal of choice in pregnancy (Grade 2C) Cytomegalovirus (CMV)-negative blood products should be administered during pregnancy regardless of CMV serostatus (Grade 1B) A course of corticosteroids should be considered if delivery is anticipated between 24 and 35 weeks gestation, given over a 48-h period during the week prior to delivery (Grade 1A) Use of magnesium sulphate should be considered in the 24 h prior to delivery if this is before 30 weeks gestation (Grade 1A) Where possible, delivery should be planned for a time when the woman is at least 3 weeks post-chemotherapy to minimize risk of neonatal myelosuppression (Grade 1C) Planned delivery is easier to manage than spontaneous labour; induction of labour is usually advised (Grade 2C) Epidural analgesia should be avoided in a woman who is significantly thrombocytopenic (platelet count <80 × 10(9) /l) and/or neutropenic (white blood cell count <1 × 10(9) /l): (Grade 1C) Elective caesarean section should only be recommended for obstetric indications (Grade 2C) Antibiotics should be administered during and after premature rupture of membranes and delivery (Grade 1C).

20 Guideline Prophylaxis and management of venous thromboembolism in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms: consensus statement of the Haemostasis Working Party of the German Society of Hematology and Oncology (DGHO), the Austrian Society of Hematology and Oncology (ÖGHO) and Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis Research (GTH e.V.). 2014

Kreher, Stephan / Ochsenreither, Sebastian / Trappe, Ralf U / Pabinger, Ingrid / Bergmann, Frauke / Petrides, Petro E / Koschmieder, Steffen / Matzdorff, Axel / Tiede, Andreas / Griesshammer, Martin / Riess, Hanno / Anonymous1160809 / Anonymous1170809 / Anonymous1180809. ·Department of Hematology and Oncology, Charite Berlin, Berlin, Hindenburgdamm 30, 12200, Berlin, Germany, stephan.kreher@charite.de. ·Ann Hematol · Pubmed #25307456.

ABSTRACT: Patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) like polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia are at increased risk of arterial and venous thrombosis. Strategies of prevention may consist of platelet aggregation inhibitors and/or cytoreductive agents depending on the underlying disease and the individual risk. Clinical evidence for management of acute venous thromboembolic events in MPN patients is limited. Modality and duration of therapeutic anticoagulation after venous thrombosis has to be evaluated critically with special regard to the increased risk for spontaneous bleeding events associated with the underlying diseases. Both for therapy of the acute event and for secondary prophylaxis, low-molecular-weight heparins should preferentially be used. A prolongation of the therapeutic anticoagulation beyond the usual 3 to 6 months can only be recommended in high-risk settings and after careful evaluation of potential risks and benefits for the individual patient. New direct oral anticoagulants (NOAC) should not preferentially be used due to lack of clinical experience in patients with MPN and potential drug interactions (e.g. with JAK inhibitors). Consequent treatment of the underlying myeloproliferative disease and periodical evaluation of the response to therapy is crucial for optimal secondary prophylaxis of thromboembolic events in those patients.

21 Guideline Managing children with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML): recommendations for the management of CML in children and young people up to the age of 18 years. 2014

de la Fuente, Josu / Baruchel, André / Biondi, Andrea / de Bont, Eveline / Dresse, Marie-Françoise / Suttorp, Meinolf / Millot, Frédéric / Anonymous6960798. ·Paediatrics Department, Saint Mary Hospital, London, UK. ·Br J Haematol · Pubmed #24976289.

ABSTRACT: Chronic myeloid leukaemia in children and young people is a relatively rare form of leukaemia that shows increased incidence with age and some evidence suggests that the molecular basis differs from that in adults. Significant advances in targeted therapy with the development and use in children of tyrosine kinase inhibitors and the ability to monitor and understand the prognostic significance of minimal residual disease by standardized molecular techniques has shifted the management of this condition from bone marrow transplantation as the main therapeutic modality to individualized treatment for each patient based on achieving specific milestones. The physiological changes occurring during childhood, particularly those affecting growth and development and the long-term use of treatment, pose specific challenges in this age group, which we are only beginning to understand.

22 Guideline [Chinese guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (2014)]. 2014

Jun, Ma / Anonymous1740795. · ·Zhonghua Xue Ye Xue Za Zhi · Pubmed #24857227.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

23 Guideline Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Version 1.2014. 2013

O'Brien, Susan / Radich, Jerald P / Abboud, Camille N / Akhtari, Mojtaba / Altman, Jessica K / Berman, Ellin / DeAngelo, Daniel J / Deininger, Michael / Devine, Steven / Fathi, Amir T / Gotlib, Jason / Jagasia, Madan / Kropf, Patricia / Moore, Joseph O / Pallera, Arnel / Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier / Reddy, Vishnu Vb / Shah, Neil P / Smith, B Douglas / Snyder, David S / Wetzler, Meir / Gregory, Kristina / Sundar, Hema / Anonymous2580775. ·From 1The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; 2Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance; 3Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine; 4Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center at The Nebraska Medical Center; 5Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University; 6Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center; 7Dana-Farber/Brigham & Women's Cancer Center; 8Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah; 9The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute; 10Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center; 11Stanford Cancer Institute; 12Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center; 13Fox Chase Cancer Center; 14Duke Cancer Institute; 15St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/The University of Tennessee Health Science Center; 16Moffitt Cancer Center; 17University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center; 18UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center; 19The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins; 20City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center; 21Roswell Park Cancer Institute; and 22National Comprehensive Cancer Network. ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #24225967.

ABSTRACT: The 2014 NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia recommend quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) standardized to International Scale (IS) as the preferred method for monitoring molecular response to tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy. A BCR-ABL1 transcript level of 10% or less (IS) is now included as the response milestone at 3 and 6 months. Change of therapy to an alternate TKI is recommended for patients with BCR-ABL1 transcript levels greater than 10% (IS) at 3 months after primary treatment with imatinib. Continuing the same dose of TKI or switching to an alternate TKI are options for patients with BCR-ABL1 transcript levels greater than 10% (IS) at 3 months after primary treatment with dasatinib or nilotinib. The guidelines recommend 6-month evaluation with QPCR (IS) for patients with BCR-ABL1 transcript levels greater than 10% at 3 months. Monitoring with QPCR (IS) every 3 months is recommended for all patients, including those who meet response milestones at 3, 6, 12, and 18 months (BCR-ABL1 transcript level ≤10% [IS] at 3 and 6 months, complete cytogenetic response at 12 and 18 months).

24 Guideline Acute myeloid leukemia, version 2.2013. 2013

O'Donnell, Margaret R / Tallman, Martin S / Abboud, Camille N / Altman, Jessica K / Appelbaum, Frederick R / Arber, Daniel A / Attar, Eyal / Borate, Uma / Coutre, Steven E / Damon, Lloyd E / Lancet, Jeffrey / Maness, Lori J / Marcucci, Guido / Martin, Michael G / Millenson, Michael M / Moore, Joseph O / Ravandi, Farhad / Shami, Paul J / Smith, B Douglas / Stone, Richard M / Strickland, Stephen A / Wang, Eunice S / Gregory, Kristina M / Naganuma, Maoko / Anonymous3200769. ·From 1City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center; 2Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center; 3Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine; 4Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University; 5Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance; 6Stanford Cancer Institute; 7Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center; 8University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center; 9UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center; 10Moffitt Cancer Center; 11UNMC Eppley Cancer Center at The Nebraska Medical Center; 12The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute; 13St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/The University of Tennessee Health Science Center; 14Fox Chase Cancer Center; 15Duke Cancer Institute; 16The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; 17Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah; 18The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins; 19Dana-Farber Cancer Institute; 20Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center; 21Roswell Park Cancer Institute; and 22National Comprehensive Cancer Network. ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #24029121.

ABSTRACT: These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize several key updates to the NCCN Guidelines for Acute Myeloid Leukemia and discuss the clinical evidence that support the recommendations. The updates described in this article focus on the acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) section, featuring recommendations for additional induction/consolidation regimens in patients with low- or intermediate-risk APL, and providing guidance on maintenance strategies for APL.

25 Guideline Acute myeloblastic leukaemias in adult patients: ESMO Clinical Practice Guidelines for diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. 2013

Fey, M F / Buske, C / Anonymous2431075. ·Department of Medical Oncology, Inselspital and University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #23970018.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

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