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Obesity HELP
Based on 99,958 articles published since 2007
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These are the 99958 published articles about Obesity that originated from Worldwide during 2007-2018.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline The diagnosis and management of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: Practice guidance from the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases. 2018

Chalasani, Naga / Younossi, Zobair / Lavine, Joel E / Charlton, Michael / Cusi, Kenneth / Rinella, Mary / Harrison, Stephen A / Brunt, Elizabeth M / Sanyal, Arun J. ·Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN. · Center for Liver Disease and Department of Medicine, Inova Fairfax Hospital, Falls Church, VA. · Columbia University, New York, NY. · University of Chicago, Chicago, IL. · University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. · Northwestern University, Chicago, IL. · Pinnacle Clinical Research, San Antonio, TX. · Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO. · Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA. ·Hepatology · Pubmed #28714183.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Guideline [Dose adaptation of the drugs used for hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation in patients with comorbidity: Obesity, chronic renal disease or hepatopathy: Guidelines from the Francophone Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy (SFGM-TC)]. 2017

Simon, Nicolas / Coiteux, Valérie / Bruno, Bénédicte / Taque, Sophie / Charbonnier, Amandine / Souchet, Laetitia / Vincent, Laure / Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim / Chalandon, Yves. ·Université de Lille, EA 7365, GRITA, groupe de recherche sur les formes injectables et les technologies associées, 59000 Lille, France; CHU de Lille, institut de pharmacie, 59000 Lille, France. · CHU de Lille, service des maladies du sang, 59000 Lille, France. · CHU de Lille, service d'hématologie pédiatrique, 59000 Lille, France. · CHU Anne de Bretagne, service d'hémato-oncologie pédiatrique, 2, rue Henri-Le- Guilloux, 35033 Rennes cedex 9, France. · CHU, service d'hématologie clinique et de thérapie cellulaire, 80054 Amiens cedex 1, France. · Groupe hospitalier Pitié-Salpêtrière, service d'hématologie clinique, 47-83, boulevard de l'Hôpital, 75013 Paris, France. · CHU, département d'hématologie clinique, 191, avenue du Doyen-Gaston-Giraud, 34295 Montpellier, France. · CHU de Lille, LIRIC Inserm U995, université de Lille 2, 59000 Lille, France. Electronic address: Ibrahim.YAKOUBAGHA@CHRU-LILLE.FR. · Hôpitaux universitaires de Genève et faculté de médecine université de Genève, service d'hématologie, 4, rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil, 1205 Genève, Suisse. ·Bull Cancer · Pubmed #29173979.

ABSTRACT: In September 2016 in Lille, France, the Francophone Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy (SFGM-TC) organized the 7th Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation Clinical Practices Harmonization Workshop Series. Our work group focused on chemotherapy drug dose adaptation for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients presenting a comorbidity. The purpose of this workshop was to provide recommendations on chemotherapy drug dose adaptation for patient populations receiving hematopoietic stem cell transplantation who also had the following comorbidities: obesity, chronic kidney disease and hepatopathy.

3 Guideline Committee Opinion No. 714: Obesity in Adolescents. 2017

Anonymous5220917. · ·Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #28832485.

ABSTRACT: Rates of obesity among adolescents in the United States have increased at a dramatic rate along with the prevalence of weight-related diseases. Between the 1980s and 2014, the prevalence of obesity among adolescent females in the United States increased from approximately 10% to 21%. Although the steep increase in the prevalence of obesity in children (2-11 years) has slowed, the prevalence of obesity in adolescents (12-19 years) continues to increase. Because the obese female adolescent faces medical, psychologic, and reproductive health challenges, early intervention is imperative in preventing short-term and long-term morbidity. The obstetrician-gynecologist who is knowledgeable about the behavioral and environmental factors that influence obesity may be better able to educate parents, guardians, and adolescents and advocate for programs that increase physical activity and improve nutrition. The obstetrician-gynecologist should be able to identify obese adolescents, particularly those at risk of comorbid conditions. They may have the opportunity to initiate behavioral counseling, participate in multidisciplinary teams that care for overweight and obese adolescents, and advocate for community programs to prevent obesity.

4 Guideline Committee Opinion No. 714 Summary: Obesity in Adolescents. 2017

Anonymous5140917. · ·Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #28832476.

ABSTRACT: Rates of obesity among adolescents in the United States have increased at a dramatic rate along with the prevalence of weight-related diseases. Between the 1980s and 2014, the prevalence of obesity among adolescent females in the United States increased from approximately 10% to 21%. Although the steep increase in the prevalence of obesity in children (2-11 years) has slowed, the prevalence of obesity in adolescents (12-19 years) continues to increase. Because the obese female adolescent faces medical, psychologic, and reproductive health challenges, early intervention is imperative in preventing short-term and long-term morbidity. The obstetrician-gynecologist who is knowledgeable about the behavioral and environmental factors that influence obesity may be better able to educate parents, guardians, and adolescents and advocate for programs that increase physical activity and improve nutrition. The obstetrician-gynecologist should be able to identify obese adolescents, particularly those at risk of comorbid conditions. They may have the opportunity to initiate behavioral counseling, participate in multidisciplinary teams that care for overweight and obese adolescents, and advocate for community programs to prevent obesity.

5 Guideline [2016 European guidelines on cardiovascular disease prevention in clinical practice. The Sixth Joint Task Force of the European Society of Cardiology and Other Societies on Cardiovascular Disease Prevention in Clinical Practice (constituted by representatives of 10 societies and by invited experts. Developed with the special contribution of the European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation]. 2017

Piepoli, Massimo F / Hoes, Arno W / Agewall, Stefan / Albus, Christian / Brotons, Carlos / Catapano, Alberico L / Cooney, Marie-Therese / Corrà, Ugo / Cosyns, Bernard / Deaton, Christi / Graham, Ian / Hall, Michael Stephen / Hobbs, F D Richard / Løchen, Maja-Lisa / Löllgen, Herbert / Marques-Vidal, Pedro / Perk, Joep / Prescott, Eva / Redon, Josep / Richter, Dimitrios J / Sattar, Naveed / Smulders, Yvo / Tiberi, Monica / van der Worp, H Bart / van Dis, Ineke / Verschuren, W M Monique. ·European Society of Cardiology (ESC). · International Society of Behavioural Medicine (ISBM). · WONCA Europe. · European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS). · International Diabetes Federation European Region (IDF Europe). · International Federation of Sport Medicine (FIMS). · European Society of Hypertension (ESH). · European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD). · European Stroke Organisation (ESO). · European Heart Network (EHN). ·G Ital Cardiol (Rome) · Pubmed #28714997.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Guideline White Paper AGA: POWER - Practice Guide on Obesity and Weight Management, Education, and Resources. 2017

Acosta, Andres / Streett, Sarah / Kroh, Mathew D / Cheskin, Lawrence J / Saunders, Katherine H / Kurian, Marina / Schofield, Marsha / Barlow, Sarah E / Aronne, Louis. ·Clinical Enteric Neuroscience Translational and Epidemiological Research (C.E.N.T.E.R.), Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. Electronic address: acostacardenas.andres@mayo.edu. · Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California. · Department of Surgical Endoscopy, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio. · Johns Hopkins Weight Management Center, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland. · Comprehensive Weight Control Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York and representative of The Obesity Society. · Department of Minimally Invasive Surgery, New York University, New York, New York. · Nutrition Services Coverage, Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Chicago, Illinois. · Baylor College of Medicine and Center for Childhood Obesity, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas and representative of North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. ·Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol · Pubmed #28242319.

ABSTRACT: The epidemic of obesity continues at alarming rates, with a high burden to our economy and society. The American Gastroenterological Association understands the importance of embracing obesity as a chronic, relapsing disease and supports a multidisciplinary approach to the management of obesity. Because gastrointestinal disorders resulting from obesity are more frequent and often present sooner than type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease, gastroenterologists have an opportunity to address obesity and provide an effective therapy early. Patients who are overweight or obese already fill gastroenterology clinics with gastroesophageal reflux disease and its associated risks of Barrett's esophagus and esophageal cancer, gallstone disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, and colon cancer. Obesity is a major modifiable cause of diseases of the digestive tract that frequently goes unaddressed. As internists, specialists in digestive disorders, and endoscopists, gastroenterologists are in a unique position to play an important role in the multidisciplinary treatment of obesity. This American Gastroenterological Association paper was developed with content contribution from Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons, The Obesity Society, Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, and North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, endorsed with input by American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, and Obesity Medicine Association, and describes POWER: Practice Guide on Obesity and Weight Management, Education and Resources. Its objective is to provide physicians with a comprehensive, multidisciplinary process to guide and personalize innovative obesity care for safe and effective weight management.

7 Guideline Combined hormonal contraception and the risk of venous thromboembolism: a guideline. 2017

Anonymous420953 / Anonymous430953. ·American Society for Reproductive Medicine, Birmingham, Alabama. ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #27793376.

ABSTRACT: While venous thromboembolism (VTE) is rare in young women of reproductive age, combined oral contraceptives increase the risk of VTE. In the patient in whom combined hormonal contraception is appropriate, it is reasonable to use any currently available preparation.

8 Guideline ESPEN guidelines on definitions and terminology of clinical nutrition. 2017

Cederholm, T / Barazzoni, R / Austin, P / Ballmer, P / Biolo, G / Bischoff, S C / Compher, C / Correia, I / Higashiguchi, T / Holst, M / Jensen, G L / Malone, A / Muscaritoli, M / Nyulasi, I / Pirlich, M / Rothenberg, E / Schindler, K / Schneider, S M / de van der Schueren, M A E / Sieber, C / Valentini, L / Yu, J C / Van Gossum, A / Singer, P. ·Departments of Geriatric Medicine, Uppsala University Hospital and Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Electronic address: tommy.cederholm@pubcare.uu.se. · Department of Medical, Surgical and Health Sciences, University of Trieste, Trieste, Italy. Electronic address: barazzon@units.it. · Pharmacy Department, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, United Kingdom; Pharmacy Department, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, United Kingdom. Electronic address: peter.austin@uhs.nhs.uk. · Department of Medicine, Kantonsspital Winterthur, Winterthur, Switzerland. Electronic address: peter.ballmer@ksw.ch. · Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Trieste, Trieste, Italy. Electronic address: biolo@units.it. · Institute of Nutritional Medicine, University of Hohenheim, Stuttgart, Germany. Electronic address: bischoff.stephan@uni-hohenheim.de. · School of Nursing, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA. Electronic address: compherc@nursing.upenn.edu. · Department of Surgery, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Electronic address: isabel_correia@uol.com.br. · Department of Surgery and Palliative Medicine, Fujita Health University, School of Medicine, Toyoake, Japan. Electronic address: t-gucci30219@herb.ocn.ne.jp. · Center for Nutrition and Bowel Disease, Department of Gastroenterology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark. Electronic address: mette.holst@rn.dk. · The Dean's Office and Department of Medicine, The University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT, USA. Electronic address: gordon.jensen@med.uvm.edu. · Pharmacy Department, Mount Carmel West Hospital, Columbus, OH, USA. Electronic address: ainsleym@nutritioncare.org. · Department of Clinical Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy. Electronic address: maurizio.muscaritoli@uniroma1.it. · Nutrition and Dietetics, Alfred Health, Melbourne, Australia. Electronic address: i.nyulasi@alfred.org.au. · Department of Internal Medicine, Elisabeth Protestant Hospital, Berlin, Germany. Electronic address: matthias.pirlich@pgdiakonie.de. · Department of Food and Meal Science, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden. Electronic address: elisabet.rothenberg@vgregion.se. · Department of Internal Medicine III, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Medical University Vienna, Vienna, Austria. Electronic address: karin.schindler@meduniwien.ac.at. · Department of Gastroenterology and Clinical Nutrition, Archet Hospital, University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Nice, France. Electronic address: stephane.schneider@unice.fr. · Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Internal Medicine, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Nutrition, Sports and Health, Faculty of Health and Social Studies, HAN University of Applied Sciences, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: m.devanderschueren@vumc.nl. · Institute for Biomedicine of Ageing, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Hospital St. John of Lord, Regensburg, Germany. Electronic address: cornel.sieber@fau.de. · Department of Agriculture and Food Sciences, Section of Dietetics, University of Applied Sciences, Neubrandenburg, Germany. Electronic address: valentini@hs-nb.de. · Department of General Surgery, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China. Electronic address: yu-jch@163.com. · Department of Gastroenterology, Clinic of Intestinal Diseases and Nutritional Support, Hopital Erasme, Free University of Brussels, Brussels, Belgium. Electronic address: Andre.VanGossum@erasme.ulb.ac.be. · Department of Critical Care, Institute for Nutrition Research, Rabin Medical Center, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Petah Tikva 49100 Israel. Electronic address: pierre.singer@gmail.com. ·Clin Nutr · Pubmed #27642056.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: A lack of agreement on definitions and terminology used for nutrition-related concepts and procedures limits the development of clinical nutrition practice and research. OBJECTIVE: This initiative aimed to reach a consensus for terminology for core nutritional concepts and procedures. METHODS: The European Society of Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN) appointed a consensus group of clinical scientists to perform a modified Delphi process that encompassed e-mail communication, face-to-face meetings, in-group ballots and an electronic ESPEN membership Delphi round. RESULTS: Five key areas related to clinical nutrition were identified: concepts; procedures; organisation; delivery; and products. One core concept of clinical nutrition is malnutrition/undernutrition, which includes disease-related malnutrition (DRM) with (eq. cachexia) and without inflammation, and malnutrition/undernutrition without disease, e.g. hunger-related malnutrition. Over-nutrition (overweight and obesity) is another core concept. Sarcopenia and frailty were agreed to be separate conditions often associated with malnutrition. Examples of nutritional procedures identified include screening for subjects at nutritional risk followed by a complete nutritional assessment. Hospital and care facility catering are the basic organizational forms for providing nutrition. Oral nutritional supplementation is the preferred way of nutrition therapy but if inadequate then other forms of medical nutrition therapy, i.e. enteral tube feeding and parenteral (intravenous) nutrition, becomes the major way of nutrient delivery. CONCLUSION: An agreement of basic nutritional terminology to be used in clinical practice, research, and the ESPEN guideline developments has been established. This terminology consensus may help to support future global consensus efforts and updates of classification systems such as the International Classification of Disease (ICD). The continuous growth of knowledge in all areas addressed in this statement will provide the foundation for future revisions.

9 Guideline The rehabilitation of children and adolescents with severe or medically complicated obesity: an ISPED expert opinion document. 2017

Grugni, Graziano / Licenziati, Maria Rosaria / Valerio, Giuliana / Crinò, Antonino / Maffeis, Claudio / Tanas, Rita / Morino, Giuseppe Stefano / Anonymous3850880. ·Division of Auxology, Italian Auxological Institute, Verbania, Italy. · Department of Pediatrics, AORN Santobono-Pausilipon, Naples, Italy. mrlicenziati@gmail.com. · Department of Movement Sciences and Wellness, Parthenope University, Naples, Italy. · Autoimmune Endocrine Diseases Unit Bambino Gesù Hospital, Research Hospital Palidoro, Rome, Italy. · Pediatric Diabetes and Metabolic Disorders Unit, Department of Life and Reproduction Sciences, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Pediatric Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria, Ferrara, Italy. · Nutrition Education Unit, Bambino Gesù Hospital, San Paolo Hospital, Rome, Italy. ·Eat Weight Disord · Pubmed #27585923.

ABSTRACT: Severe/medically complicated obesity in childhood, and particularly in adolescence, is a real disability that requires an intensive and continuous approach which should follow the procedures and schedule of rehabilitation medicine. Given the lack of a specific document focusing on children and adolescents, the Childhood Obesity Study Group set out to explore the available evidence for the treatment of severe or medically complicated obesity and to set standards tailored to the specific context of the Italian Health Service. Through a series of meetings and electronic communications, the writing committee (selected from members of the Study Group) selected the key issues, explored the literature and produced a draft document which was submitted to the other experts until the final synthesis was approved by the group. In brief, the following issues were involved: (1) definition and epidemiology; (2) identification of common goals designed to regain functional competence and limit the progression of metabolic and psychological complications; (3) a multi-professional team approach; (4) the care setting. This paper is an expert opinion document on the rehabilitation of severe and medically complicated obesity in children and adolescents produced by experts belonging to the Childhood Obesity Study Group of the Italian Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology (ISPED).

10 Guideline Controversial issues in CKD clinical practice: position statement of the CKD-treatment working group of the Italian Society of Nephrology. 2017

Bellizzi, Vincenzo / Conte, Giuseppe / Borrelli, Silvio / Cupisti, Adamasco / De Nicola, Luca / Di Iorio, Biagio R / Cabiddu, Gianfranca / Mandreoli, Marcora / Paoletti, Ernesto / Piccoli, Giorgina B / Quintaliani, Giuseppe / Ravera, Maura / Santoro, Domenico / Torraca, Serena / Minutolo, Roberto / Anonymous6920879. ·Division of Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation, Nephrology Unit, University Hospital "San Giovanni di Dio e Ruggi d'Aragona", Via San Leonardo, 84131, Salerno, Italy. vincenzo.bellizzi@tin.it. · Nephrology Division, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy. · Dept. of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Nephrology Unit, Landolfi Hospital, Solofra, AV, Italy. · Nephrology Division, Brotzu Hospital, Cagliari, Italy. · Nephrology and Dialysis Unit, Ospedale S. Maria della Scaletta, Imola, BO, Italy. · Nephrology Unit, University of Genoa and IRCCS A.O.U. San Martino IST, Genoa, Italy. · Dept. of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Torino, Torino, Italy. · Nephrologie, CH Le Mans, Le Mans, France. · O. U. Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation, Santa Maria della Misericordia Hospital, Perugia, Italy. · Dept. of Internal Medicine, University of Messina, Messina, Italy. · Division of Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation, Nephrology Unit, University Hospital "San Giovanni di Dio e Ruggi d'Aragona", Via San Leonardo, 84131, Salerno, Italy. ·J Nephrol · Pubmed #27568307.

ABSTRACT: This position paper of the study group "Conservative treatment of Chronic Kidney Disease-CKD" of the Italian Society of Nephrology addresses major practical, unresolved, issues related to the conservative treatment of chronic renal disease. Specifically, controversial topics from everyday clinical nephrology practice which cannot find a clear, definitive answer in the current literature or in nephrology guidelines are discussed. The paper reports the point of view of the study group. Concise and practical advice is given on several common issues: renal biopsy in diabetes; dual blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS); management of iron deficiency; low protein diet; dietary salt intake; bicarbonate supplementation; treatment of obesity; the choice of conservative therapy vs. dialysis. For each topic synthetic statements, guideline-style, are reported.

11 Guideline Clinical Practice Guidelines for Sustained Neuromuscular Blockade in the Adult Critically Ill Patient. 2016

Murray, Michael J / DeBlock, Heidi / Erstad, Brian / Gray, Anthony / Jacobi, Judi / Jordan, Che / McGee, William / McManus, Claire / Meade, Maureen / Nix, Sean / Patterson, Andrew / Sands, M Karen / Pino, Richard / Tescher, Ann / Arbour, Richard / Rochwerg, Bram / Murray, Catherine Friederich / Mehta, Sangeeta. ·1Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, PA. 2Albany Medical Center, Albany, NY. 3University of Arizona College of Pharmacy, Tucson, AZ. 4Clinic Medical Center, Burlington, MA. 5Indiana University, Indiana, IN. 6Grand Strand Medical Center, Myrtle Beach, SC. 7Baystate Medical Center, Springfield, MA. 8Saint Elizabeth's Medical Center, Boston, MA. 9University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. 10Riverside Medical Group, Yorktown, VA. 11University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE. 12Novant Health, Clemmons, NC. 13Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA. 14Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. 15Lancaster General Hospital, Lancaster, PA. 16McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. 17Medscape, New York, NY. 18University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. ·Crit Care Med · Pubmed #27755068.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To update the 2002 version of "Clinical practice guidelines for sustained neuromuscular blockade in the adult critically ill patient." DESIGN: A Task Force comprising 17 members of the Society of Critical Medicine with particular expertise in the use of neuromuscular-blocking agents; a Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation expert; and a medical writer met via teleconference and three face-to-face meetings and communicated via e-mail to examine the evidence and develop these practice guidelines. Annually, all members completed conflict of interest statements; no conflicts were identified. This activity was funded by the Society for Critical Care Medicine, and no industry support was provided. METHODS: Using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation system, the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation expert on the Task Force created profiles for the evidence related to six of the 21 questions and assigned quality-of-evidence scores to these and the additional 15 questions for which insufficient evidence was available to create a profile. Task Force members reviewed this material and all available evidence and provided recommendations, suggestions, or good practice statements for these 21 questions. RESULTS: The Task Force developed a single strong recommendation: we recommend scheduled eye care that includes lubricating drops or gel and eyelid closure for patients receiving continuous infusions of neuromuscular-blocking agents. The Task Force developed 10 weak recommendations. 1) We suggest that a neuromuscular-blocking agent be administered by continuous intravenous infusion early in the course of acute respiratory distress syndrome for patients with a PaO2/FIO2 less than 150. 2) We suggest against the routine administration of an neuromuscular-blocking agents to mechanically ventilated patients with status asthmaticus. 3) We suggest a trial of a neuromuscular-blocking agents in life-threatening situations associated with profound hypoxemia, respiratory acidosis, or hemodynamic compromise. 4) We suggest that neuromuscular-blocking agents may be used to manage overt shivering in therapeutic hypothermia. 5) We suggest that peripheral nerve stimulation with train-of-four monitoring may be a useful tool for monitoring the depth of neuromuscular blockade but only if it is incorporated into a more inclusive assessment of the patient that includes clinical assessment. 6) We suggest against the use of peripheral nerve stimulation with train of four alone for monitoring the depth of neuromuscular blockade in patients receiving continuous infusion of neuromuscular-blocking agents. 7) We suggest that patients receiving a continuous infusion of neuromuscular-blocking agent receive a structured physiotherapy regimen. 8) We suggest that clinicians target a blood glucose level of less than 180 mg/dL in patients receiving neuromuscular-blocking agents. 9) We suggest that clinicians not use actual body weight and instead use a consistent weight (ideal body weight or adjusted body weight) when calculating neuromuscular-blocking agents doses for obese patients. 10) We suggest that neuromuscular-blocking agents be discontinued at the end of life or when life support is withdrawn. In situations in which evidence was lacking or insufficient and the study results were equivocal or optimal clinical practice varies, the Task Force made no recommendations for nine of the topics. 1) We make no recommendation as to whether neuromuscular blockade is beneficial or harmful when used in patients with acute brain injury and raised intracranial pressure. 2) We make no recommendation on the routine use of neuromuscular-blocking agents for patients undergoing therapeutic hypothermia following cardiac arrest. 3) We make no recommendation on the use of peripheral nerve stimulation to monitor degree of block in patients undergoing therapeutic hypothermia. 4) We make no recommendation on the use of neuromuscular blockade to improve the accuracy of intravascular-volume assessment in mechanically ventilated patients. 5) We make no recommendation concerning the use of electroencephalogram-derived parameters as a measure of sedation during continuous administration of neuromuscular-blocking agents. 6) We make no recommendation regarding nutritional requirements specific to patients receiving infusions of neuromuscular-blocking agents. 7) We make no recommendation concerning the use of one measure of consistent weight over another when calculating neuromuscular-blocking agent doses in obese patients. 8) We make no recommendation on the use of neuromuscular-blocking agents in pregnant patients. 9) We make no recommendation on which muscle group should be monitored in patients with myasthenia gravis receiving neuromuscular-blocking agents. Finally, in situations in which evidence was lacking or insufficient but expert consensus was unanimous, the Task Force developed six good practice statements. 1) If peripheral nerve stimulation is used, optimal clinical practice suggests that it should be done in conjunction with assessment of other clinical findings (e.g., triggering of the ventilator and degree of shivering) to assess the degree of neuromuscular blockade in patients undergoing therapeutic hypothermia. 2) Optimal clinical practice suggests that a protocol should include guidance on neuromuscular-blocking agent administration in patients undergoing therapeutic hypothermia. 3) Optimal clinical practice suggests that analgesic and sedative drugs should be used prior to and during neuromuscular blockade, with the goal of achieving deep sedation. 4) Optimal clinical practice suggests that clinicians at the bedside implement measure to attenuate the risk of unintended extubation in patients receiving neuromuscular-blocking agents. 5) Optimal clinical practice suggests that a reduced dose of an neuromuscular-blocking agent be used for patients with myasthenia gravis and that the dose should be based on peripheral nerve stimulation with train-of-four monitoring. 6) Optimal clinical practice suggests that neuromuscular-blocking agents be discontinued prior to the clinical determination of brain death.

12 Guideline Preventing Obesity and Eating Disorders in Adolescents. 2016

Golden, Neville H / Schneider, Marcie / Wood, Christine / Anonymous2580879 / Anonymous2590879 / Anonymous2600879. · ·Pediatrics · Pubmed #27550979.

ABSTRACT: Obesity and eating disorders (EDs) are both prevalent in adolescents. There are concerns that obesity prevention efforts may lead to the development of an ED. Most adolescents who develop an ED did not have obesity previously, but some teenagers, in an attempt to lose weight, may develop an ED. This clinical report addresses the interaction between obesity prevention and EDs in teenagers, provides the pediatrician with evidence-informed tools to identify behaviors that predispose to both obesity and EDs, and provides guidance about obesity and ED prevention messages. The focus should be on a healthy lifestyle rather than on weight. Evidence suggests that obesity prevention and treatment, if conducted correctly, do not predispose to EDs.

13 Guideline AAP Updates Recommendations for Routine Preventive Pediatric Health Care. 2016

Lambert, Mara. · ·Am Fam Physician · Pubmed #27548604.

ABSTRACT: Run by Jan 2017.

14 Guideline Practice Policy Statement: Integrating Effective Weight Management Into Practice. 2016

Edshteyn, Ingrid / Uduhiri, Kelechi A / Morgan, Toyosi O / Rhodes, Katrina L / Sherin, Kevin M / Anonymous710975. ·Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center, Derby, Connecticut. Electronic address: iedshteyn@gmail.com. · Providence Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia. · Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · American Association of Public Health Physicians, Green Cove Springs, Florida. · Department of Family Medicine, Florida State University College of Medicine, Tallahassee, Florida; University of Central Florida College of Medicine, Orlando, Florida; Florida Department of Health in Orange County, Orlando, Florida. ·Am J Prev Med · Pubmed #27374207.

ABSTRACT: The American College of Preventive Medicine Prevention Practice Committee contributes to policy guidelines and recommendations on preventive health topics for clinicians and public health decision makers. As an update to a previously published statement on weight management counseling of overweight adults, the College is providing a consensus-based recommendation designed to more effectively integrate weight management strategies into clinical practice and to incorporate referrals to effective evidence-based community and commercial weight management programs. The goal is to empower providers to include lifestyle interventions as part of the foundation of clinical practice.

15 Guideline Surgical Management of Osteoarthritis of the Knee: Evidence-based Guideline. 2016

McGrory, Brian J / Weber, Kristy L / Jevsevar, David S / Sevarino, Kaitlyn. ·From the Division of Joint Replacement, the Department of Orthopedics and Sports Medicine, Maine Medical Partners, Falmouth, ME (Dr. McGrory), the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (Dr. Weber), the Department of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH (Dr. Jevsevar), and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (Ms. Sevarino). ·J Am Acad Orthop Surg · Pubmed #27355286.

ABSTRACT: Surgical Management of Osteoarthritis of the Knee: Evidence-based Guideline is based on a systematic review of the current scientific and clinical research. The guideline contains 38 recommendations pertaining to the preoperative, perioperative, and postoperative care of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee who are considering surgical treatment. The purpose of this clinical practice guideline is to help improve surgical management of patients with OA of the knee based on current best evidence. In addition to guideline recommendations, the work group highlighted the need for better research on the surgical management of OA of the knee.

16 Guideline Use of the direct oral anticoagulants in obese patients: guidance from the SSC of the ISTH. 2016

Martin, K / Beyer-Westendorf, J / Davidson, B L / Huisman, M V / Sandset, P M / Moll, S. ·Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology-Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA. · Thrombosis Research Unit, Center for Vascular Diseases, University Hospital, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany. · Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, USA. · Department of Thrombosis and Hemostasis, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands. · Department of Hematology, Oslo University Hospital and University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. ·J Thromb Haemost · Pubmed #27299806.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Guideline 8 USPSTF recommendations FPs need to know about. 2016

Campos-Outcalt, Doug. ·Medical Director, Mercy Care Plan, Phoenix, AZ, USA. Email: campos-outcaltd@mercycareplan.com. ·J Fam Pract · Pubmed #27275937.

ABSTRACT: Treat high blood pressure only if measurements taken outside of the office confirm an initial high BP reading · Screen blood-glucose levels in overweight/obese individuals 40 to 70 years old · and more.

18 Guideline BAP guidelines on the management of weight gain, metabolic disturbances and cardiovascular risk associated with psychosis and antipsychotic drug treatment. 2016

Cooper, Stephen J / Reynolds, Gavin P / Anonymous370992 / Barnes, Tre / England, E / Haddad, P M / Heald, A / Holt, Rig / Lingford-Hughes, A / Osborn, D / McGowan, O / Patel, M X / Paton, C / Reid, P / Shiers, D / Smith, J. ·Professor of Psychiatry (Emeritus), Queen's University Belfast, UK Clinical Lead for the National Audit of Schizophrenia, Centre for Quality Improvement, Royal College of Psychiatrists, London, UK sjcooperqub@gmail.com. · Professor (Emeritus), Queen's University Belfast, UK Honorary Professor of Neuroscience, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield, UK. · Professor of Psychiatry, The Centre for Mental Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · General Practitioner, Laurie Pike Health Centre, Birmingham, UK. · Honorary Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK Consultant Psychiatrist, Greater Manchester West Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust, Salford, UK. · Consultant Physician, Leighton and Macclesfield Hospitals, Cheshire, UK Research Fellow, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. · Professor in Diabetes and Endocrinology, Human Development and Health Academic Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK. · Professor of Addiction Biology, Imperial College, London, UK Consultant Psychiatrist, CNWL NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Professor of Psychiatric Epidemiology and Honorary Consultant Psychiatrist, Division of Psychiatry UCL, London, UK. · Trainee in Psychiatry, Hairmyres Hospital, Glasgow, UK. · Honorary Senior Lecturer, King's College London, IOPPN, Department of Psychosis Studies PO68, London, UK. · Chief Pharmacist, Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust, Dartford, UK Joint-Head, Prescribing Observatory for Mental Health, CCQI, Royal College of Psychiatrists, London, UK. · Policy Manager, Rethink Mental Illness, London, UK. · Primary Care Lead for the National Audit of Schizophrenia, Centre for Quality Improvement, Royal College of Psychiatrists, London, UK. · Professor of Early Intervention and Psychosis, University of Worcester, Worcester, UK. ·J Psychopharmacol · Pubmed #27147592.

ABSTRACT: Excess deaths from cardiovascular disease are a major contributor to the significant reduction in life expectancy experienced by people with schizophrenia. Important risk factors in this are smoking, alcohol misuse, excessive weight gain and diabetes. Weight gain also reinforces service users' negative views of themselves and is a factor in poor adherence with treatment. Monitoring of relevant physical health risk factors is frequently inadequate, as is provision of interventions to modify these. These guidelines review issues surrounding monitoring of physical health risk factors and make recommendations about an appropriate approach. Overweight and obesity, partly driven by antipsychotic drug treatment, are important factors contributing to the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease in people with schizophrenia. There have been clinical trials of many interventions for people experiencing weight gain when taking antipsychotic medications but there is a lack of clear consensus regarding which may be appropriate in usual clinical practice. These guidelines review these trials and make recommendations regarding appropriate interventions. Interventions for smoking and alcohol misuse are reviewed, but more briefly as these are similar to those recommended for the general population. The management of impaired fasting glycaemia and impaired glucose tolerance ('pre-diabetes'), diabetes and other cardiovascular risks, such as dyslipidaemia, are also reviewed with respect to other currently available guidelines.These guidelines were compiled following a consensus meeting of experts involved in various aspects of these problems. They reviewed key areas of evidence and their clinical implications. Wider issues relating to primary care/secondary care interfaces are discussed but cannot be resolved within guidelines such as these.

19 Guideline SIO management algorithm for patients with overweight or obesity: consensus statement of the Italian Society for Obesity (SIO). 2016

Santini, Ferruccio / Busetto, Luca / Cresci, Barbara / Sbraccia, Paolo. ·Obesity Center, Endocrinology Unit, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Medicine, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Section of Diabetology, Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy. · Department of Systems Medicine, Medical School, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via Montpellier 1, 00133, Rome, Italy. sbraccia@med.uniroma2.it. ·Eat Weight Disord · Pubmed #27100225.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Guideline [Obesity: guidelines for clinical management. Executive summary]. 2016

Anonymous640865. · ·Arch Argent Pediatr · Pubmed #27079397.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Guideline American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery position statement on intragastric balloon therapy endorsed by the Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons. 2016

Ali, Mohamed R / Moustarah, Fady / Kim, Julie J / Anonymous2300864. ·Department of Surgery, University of California-Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California. Electronic address: mrali@ucdavis.edu. · Faculty of Medical Sciences & Neuroscience Research Center, Lebanese University, Beirut, Lebanon; Department of Surgery, Central Michigan University College of Medicine, Mount Pleasant, Michigan. · Department of Surgery, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts. ·Surg Obes Relat Dis · Pubmed #27056407.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Guideline Lipids and bariatric procedures Part 2 of 2: scientific statement from the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS), the National Lipid Association (NLA), and Obesity Medicine Association (OMA). 2016

Bays, Harold / Kothari, Shanu N / Azagury, Dan E / Morton, John M / Nguyen, Ninh T / Jones, Peter H / Jacobson, Terry A / Cohen, David E / Orringer, Carl / Westman, Eric C / Horn, Deborah B / Scinta, Wendy / Primack, Craig. ·Louisville Metabolic and Atherosclerosis Research Center, Louisville, Kentucky. · Department of General Surgery, Gundersen Health System, La Crosse, Wisconsin. Electronic address: snkothar@gundersenhealth.org. · Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California. · Department of Surgery, University of California Irvine Medical Center, Orange, California. · Methodist DeBakey Heart and Vascular Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. · Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. · Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · University of Miami Hospital, Miami, Florida. · Duke University Health System, Durham, North Carolina. · University of Texas Medical School, Houston, Texas. · Medical Weight Loss of New York, Fayetteville, New York. · Scottsdale Weight Loss, Scottsdale, Arizona. ·Surg Obes Relat Dis · Pubmed #27050404.

ABSTRACT: Bariatric procedures generally improve dyslipidemia, sometimes substantially so. Bariatric procedures also improve other major cardiovascular risk factors. This 2-part Scientific Statement examines the lipid effects of bariatric procedures and reflects contributions from authors representing the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS), the National Lipid Association (NLA), and the Obesity Medicine Association (OMA). Part 1 was published in the Journal of Clinical Lipidology, and reviewed the impact of bariatric procedures upon adipose tissue endocrine and immune factors, adipose tissue lipid metabolism, as well as the lipid effects of bariatric procedures relative to bile acids and intestinal microbiota. This Part 2 reviews: (1) the importance of nutrients (fats, carbohydrates, and proteins) and their absorption on lipid levels; (2) the effects of bariatric procedures on gut hormones and lipid levels; (3) the effects of bariatric procedures on nonlipid cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors; (4) the effects of bariatric procedures on lipid levels; (5) effects of bariatric procedures on CVD; and finally, (6) the potential lipid effects of vitamin, mineral, and trace element deficiencies, that may occur after bariatric procedures.

23 Guideline American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery position statement on vagal blocking therapy for obesity. 2016

Papasavas, Pavlos / El Chaar, Maher / Kothari, Shanu N / Anonymous7070860. ·Department of Surgery, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Connecticut. · The Medical School of Temple University/St Luke's University Hospital and Health Network, Allentown, Pennsylvania. · Department of General Surgery, Gundersen Health System, La Crosse, Wisconsin. Electronic address: snkothar@gundersenhealth.org. ·Surg Obes Relat Dis · Pubmed #26948945.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

24 Guideline American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery position statement on long-term survival benefit after metabolic and bariatric surgery. 2016

Kim, Julie / Eisenberg, Dan / Azagury, Dan / Rogers, Ann / Campos, Guilherme M. ·Department of Surgery, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: jkim7@tuftsmedicalcenter.org. · Department of Surgery, Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California. · Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California. · Department of Surgery, Penn State University, Hershey, Pennsylvania. · Division of Bariatric and Gastrointestinal Surgery, Department of Surgery, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia. ·Surg Obes Relat Dis · Pubmed #26944548.

ABSTRACT: The following position statement has been issued by the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery in response to numerous inquiries made to the Society by patients, physicians, society members, hospitals, health insurance payors, the media, and others regarding the benefit of metabolic and bariatric surgery on long-term survival. An overview of the current available published peer-reviewed scientific evidence is presented.

25 Guideline Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Adult Critically Ill Patient: Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) and American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.). 2016

McClave, Stephen A / Taylor, Beth E / Martindale, Robert G / Warren, Malissa M / Johnson, Debbie R / Braunschweig, Carol / McCarthy, Mary S / Davanos, Evangelia / Rice, Todd W / Cresci, Gail A / Gervasio, Jane M / Sacks, Gordon S / Roberts, Pamela R / Compher, Charlene / Anonymous461058 / Anonymous471058. ·Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky. · Nutrition Support Specialist, Barnes Jewish Hospital, St Louis, Missouri. · Chief Division of General Surgery, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon. · Critical Care Dietitian, Portland VA Medical Center, Portland, Oregon. · Clinical Nurse Specialist: Wound, Skin, Ostomy, UW Health University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin. · Professor, Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition and Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. · Senior Nurse Scientist, Center for Nursing Science and Clinical Inquiry, Madigan Healthcare System, Tacoma, Washington. · Pharmacotherapy Specialist, Nutrition Support, The Brooklyn Hospital Center, Brooklyn, New York. · Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Allergy, Pulmonary, and Critical Care Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee. · Project Research Staff, Digestive Disease Institute, Gastroenterology and Pathobiology, Cleveland, Ohio. · Chair and Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Butler University College of Pharmacy and Health Science, Indianapolis, Indiana. · Professor and Head, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Harrison School of Pharmacy, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama. · Professor and Vice Chair, Division Chief of Critical Care Medicine, Director of Research John A. Moffitt Endowed Chair, Department of Anesthesiology, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. · Professor of Nutrition Science, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania compherc@nursing.upenn.edu. ·JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr · Pubmed #26773077.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

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