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Obesity HELP
Based on 99,738 articles published since 2007
|||| 33 

These are the 99738 published articles about Obesity that originated from Worldwide during 2007-2017.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Committee Opinion No. 714: Obesity in Adolescents. 2017

Anonymous3031286. · ·Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #28832485.

ABSTRACT: Rates of obesity among adolescents in the United States have increased at a dramatic rate along with the prevalence of weight-related diseases. Between the 1980s and 2014, the prevalence of obesity among adolescent females in the United States increased from approximately 10% to 21%. Although the steep increase in the prevalence of obesity in children (2-11 years) has slowed, the prevalence of obesity in adolescents (12-19 years) continues to increase. Because the obese female adolescent faces medical, psychologic, and reproductive health challenges, early intervention is imperative in preventing short-term and long-term morbidity. The obstetrician-gynecologist who is knowledgeable about the behavioral and environmental factors that influence obesity may be better able to educate parents, guardians, and adolescents and advocate for programs that increase physical activity and improve nutrition. The obstetrician-gynecologist should be able to identify obese adolescents, particularly those at risk of comorbid conditions. They may have the opportunity to initiate behavioral counseling, participate in multidisciplinary teams that care for overweight and obese adolescents, and advocate for community programs to prevent obesity.

2 Guideline Committee Opinion No. 714 Summary: Obesity in Adolescents. 2017

Anonymous2951286. · ·Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #28832476.

ABSTRACT: Rates of obesity among adolescents in the United States have increased at a dramatic rate along with the prevalence of weight-related diseases. Between the 1980s and 2014, the prevalence of obesity among adolescent females in the United States increased from approximately 10% to 21%. Although the steep increase in the prevalence of obesity in children (2-11 years) has slowed, the prevalence of obesity in adolescents (12-19 years) continues to increase. Because the obese female adolescent faces medical, psychologic, and reproductive health challenges, early intervention is imperative in preventing short-term and long-term morbidity. The obstetrician-gynecologist who is knowledgeable about the behavioral and environmental factors that influence obesity may be better able to educate parents, guardians, and adolescents and advocate for programs that increase physical activity and improve nutrition. The obstetrician-gynecologist should be able to identify obese adolescents, particularly those at risk of comorbid conditions. They may have the opportunity to initiate behavioral counseling, participate in multidisciplinary teams that care for overweight and obese adolescents, and advocate for community programs to prevent obesity.

3 Guideline [2016 European guidelines on cardiovascular disease prevention in clinical practice. The Sixth Joint Task Force of the European Society of Cardiology and Other Societies on Cardiovascular Disease Prevention in Clinical Practice (constituted by representatives of 10 societies and by invited experts. Developed with the special contribution of the European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation]. 2017

Piepoli, Massimo F / Hoes, Arno W / Agewall, Stefan / Albus, Christian / Brotons, Carlos / Catapano, Alberico L / Cooney, Marie-Therese / Corrà, Ugo / Cosyns, Bernard / Deaton, Christi / Graham, Ian / Hall, Michael Stephen / Hobbs, F D Richard / Løchen, Maja-Lisa / Löllgen, Herbert / Marques-Vidal, Pedro / Perk, Joep / Prescott, Eva / Redon, Josep / Richter, Dimitrios J / Sattar, Naveed / Smulders, Yvo / Tiberi, Monica / van der Worp, H Bart / van Dis, Ineke / Verschuren, W M Monique. · · European Society of Cardiology (ESC). · International Society of Behavioural Medicine (ISBM). · WONCA Europe. · European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS). · International Diabetes Federation European Region (IDF Europe). · International Federation of Sport Medicine (FIMS). · European Society of Hypertension (ESH). · European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD). · European Stroke Organisation (ESO). · European Heart Network (EHN). ·G Ital Cardiol (Rome) · Pubmed #28714997.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Guideline Combined hormonal contraception and the risk of venous thromboembolism: a guideline. 2017

Anonymous1281202 / Anonymous1291202. ·American Society for Reproductive Medicine, Birmingham, Alabama. · ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #27793376.

ABSTRACT: While venous thromboembolism (VTE) is rare in young women of reproductive age, combined oral contraceptives increase the risk of VTE. In the patient in whom combined hormonal contraception is appropriate, it is reasonable to use any currently available preparation.

5 Guideline The rehabilitation of children and adolescents with severe or medically complicated obesity: an ISPED expert opinion document. 2017

Grugni, Graziano / Licenziati, Maria Rosaria / Valerio, Giuliana / Crinò, Antonino / Maffeis, Claudio / Tanas, Rita / Morino, Giuseppe Stefano / Anonymous4581386. ·Division of Auxology, Italian Auxological Institute, Verbania, Italy. · Department of Pediatrics, AORN Santobono-Pausilipon, Naples, Italy. mrlicenziati@gmail.com. · Department of Movement Sciences and Wellness, Parthenope University, Naples, Italy. · Autoimmune Endocrine Diseases Unit Bambino Gesù Hospital, Research Hospital Palidoro, Rome, Italy. · Pediatric Diabetes and Metabolic Disorders Unit, Department of Life and Reproduction Sciences, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Pediatric Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria, Ferrara, Italy. · Nutrition Education Unit, Bambino Gesù Hospital, San Paolo Hospital, Rome, Italy. · ·Eat Weight Disord · Pubmed #27585923.

ABSTRACT: Severe/medically complicated obesity in childhood, and particularly in adolescence, is a real disability that requires an intensive and continuous approach which should follow the procedures and schedule of rehabilitation medicine. Given the lack of a specific document focusing on children and adolescents, the Childhood Obesity Study Group set out to explore the available evidence for the treatment of severe or medically complicated obesity and to set standards tailored to the specific context of the Italian Health Service. Through a series of meetings and electronic communications, the writing committee (selected from members of the Study Group) selected the key issues, explored the literature and produced a draft document which was submitted to the other experts until the final synthesis was approved by the group. In brief, the following issues were involved: (1) definition and epidemiology; (2) identification of common goals designed to regain functional competence and limit the progression of metabolic and psychological complications; (3) a multi-professional team approach; (4) the care setting. This paper is an expert opinion document on the rehabilitation of severe and medically complicated obesity in children and adolescents produced by experts belonging to the Childhood Obesity Study Group of the Italian Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology (ISPED).

6 Guideline Controversial issues in CKD clinical practice: position statement of the CKD-treatment working group of the Italian Society of Nephrology. 2017

Bellizzi, Vincenzo / Conte, Giuseppe / Borrelli, Silvio / Cupisti, Adamasco / De Nicola, Luca / Di Iorio, Biagio R / Cabiddu, Gianfranca / Mandreoli, Marcora / Paoletti, Ernesto / Piccoli, Giorgina B / Quintaliani, Giuseppe / Ravera, Maura / Santoro, Domenico / Torraca, Serena / Minutolo, Roberto / Anonymous561388. ·Division of Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation, Nephrology Unit, University Hospital "San Giovanni di Dio e Ruggi d'Aragona", Via San Leonardo, 84131, Salerno, Italy. vincenzo.bellizzi@tin.it. · Nephrology Division, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy. · Dept. of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Nephrology Unit, Landolfi Hospital, Solofra, AV, Italy. · Nephrology Division, Brotzu Hospital, Cagliari, Italy. · Nephrology and Dialysis Unit, Ospedale S. Maria della Scaletta, Imola, BO, Italy. · Nephrology Unit, University of Genoa and IRCCS A.O.U. San Martino IST, Genoa, Italy. · Dept. of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Torino, Torino, Italy.; Nephrologie, CH Le Mans, Le Mans, France. · O. U. Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation, Santa Maria della Misericordia Hospital, Perugia, Italy. · Dept. of Internal Medicine, University of Messina, Messina, Italy. · Division of Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation, Nephrology Unit, University Hospital "San Giovanni di Dio e Ruggi d'Aragona", Via San Leonardo, 84131, Salerno, Italy. · ·J Nephrol · Pubmed #27568307.

ABSTRACT: This position paper of the study group "Conservative treatment of Chronic Kidney Disease-CKD" of the Italian Society of Nephrology addresses major practical, unresolved, issues related to the conservative treatment of chronic renal disease. Specifically, controversial topics from everyday clinical nephrology practice which cannot find a clear, definitive answer in the current literature or in nephrology guidelines are discussed. The paper reports the point of view of the study group. Concise and practical advice is given on several common issues: renal biopsy in diabetes; dual blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS); management of iron deficiency; low protein diet; dietary salt intake; bicarbonate supplementation; treatment of obesity; the choice of conservative therapy vs. dialysis. For each topic synthetic statements, guideline-style, are reported.

7 Guideline Clinical Practice Guidelines for Sustained Neuromuscular Blockade in the Adult Critically Ill Patient. 2016

Murray, Michael J / DeBlock, Heidi / Erstad, Brian / Gray, Anthony / Jacobi, Judi / Jordan, Che / McGee, William / McManus, Claire / Meade, Maureen / Nix, Sean / Patterson, Andrew / Sands, M Karen / Pino, Richard / Tescher, Ann / Arbour, Richard / Rochwerg, Bram / Murray, Catherine Friederich / Mehta, Sangeeta. ·1Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, PA. 2Albany Medical Center, Albany, NY. 3University of Arizona College of Pharmacy, Tucson, AZ. 4Clinic Medical Center, Burlington, MA. 5Indiana University, Indiana, IN. 6Grand Strand Medical Center, Myrtle Beach, SC. 7Baystate Medical Center, Springfield, MA. 8Saint Elizabeth's Medical Center, Boston, MA. 9University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. 10Riverside Medical Group, Yorktown, VA. 11University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE. 12Novant Health, Clemmons, NC. 13Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA. 14Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. 15Lancaster General Hospital, Lancaster, PA. 16McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. 17Medscape, New York, NY. 18University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · ·Crit Care Med · Pubmed #27755068.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To update the 2002 version of "Clinical practice guidelines for sustained neuromuscular blockade in the adult critically ill patient." DESIGN: A Task Force comprising 17 members of the Society of Critical Medicine with particular expertise in the use of neuromuscular-blocking agents; a Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation expert; and a medical writer met via teleconference and three face-to-face meetings and communicated via e-mail to examine the evidence and develop these practice guidelines. Annually, all members completed conflict of interest statements; no conflicts were identified. This activity was funded by the Society for Critical Care Medicine, and no industry support was provided. METHODS: Using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation system, the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation expert on the Task Force created profiles for the evidence related to six of the 21 questions and assigned quality-of-evidence scores to these and the additional 15 questions for which insufficient evidence was available to create a profile. Task Force members reviewed this material and all available evidence and provided recommendations, suggestions, or good practice statements for these 21 questions. RESULTS: The Task Force developed a single strong recommendation: we recommend scheduled eye care that includes lubricating drops or gel and eyelid closure for patients receiving continuous infusions of neuromuscular-blocking agents. The Task Force developed 10 weak recommendations. 1) We suggest that a neuromuscular-blocking agent be administered by continuous intravenous infusion early in the course of acute respiratory distress syndrome for patients with a PaO2/FIO2 less than 150. 2) We suggest against the routine administration of an neuromuscular-blocking agents to mechanically ventilated patients with status asthmaticus. 3) We suggest a trial of a neuromuscular-blocking agents in life-threatening situations associated with profound hypoxemia, respiratory acidosis, or hemodynamic compromise. 4) We suggest that neuromuscular-blocking agents may be used to manage overt shivering in therapeutic hypothermia. 5) We suggest that peripheral nerve stimulation with train-of-four monitoring may be a useful tool for monitoring the depth of neuromuscular blockade but only if it is incorporated into a more inclusive assessment of the patient that includes clinical assessment. 6) We suggest against the use of peripheral nerve stimulation with train of four alone for monitoring the depth of neuromuscular blockade in patients receiving continuous infusion of neuromuscular-blocking agents. 7) We suggest that patients receiving a continuous infusion of neuromuscular-blocking agent receive a structured physiotherapy regimen. 8) We suggest that clinicians target a blood glucose level of less than 180 mg/dL in patients receiving neuromuscular-blocking agents. 9) We suggest that clinicians not use actual body weight and instead use a consistent weight (ideal body weight or adjusted body weight) when calculating neuromuscular-blocking agents doses for obese patients. 10) We suggest that neuromuscular-blocking agents be discontinued at the end of life or when life support is withdrawn. In situations in which evidence was lacking or insufficient and the study results were equivocal or optimal clinical practice varies, the Task Force made no recommendations for nine of the topics. 1) We make no recommendation as to whether neuromuscular blockade is beneficial or harmful when used in patients with acute brain injury and raised intracranial pressure. 2) We make no recommendation on the routine use of neuromuscular-blocking agents for patients undergoing therapeutic hypothermia following cardiac arrest. 3) We make no recommendation on the use of peripheral nerve stimulation to monitor degree of block in patients undergoing therapeutic hypothermia. 4) We make no recommendation on the use of neuromuscular blockade to improve the accuracy of intravascular-volume assessment in mechanically ventilated patients. 5) We make no recommendation concerning the use of electroencephalogram-derived parameters as a measure of sedation during continuous administration of neuromuscular-blocking agents. 6) We make no recommendation regarding nutritional requirements specific to patients receiving infusions of neuromuscular-blocking agents. 7) We make no recommendation concerning the use of one measure of consistent weight over another when calculating neuromuscular-blocking agent doses in obese patients. 8) We make no recommendation on the use of neuromuscular-blocking agents in pregnant patients. 9) We make no recommendation on which muscle group should be monitored in patients with myasthenia gravis receiving neuromuscular-blocking agents. Finally, in situations in which evidence was lacking or insufficient but expert consensus was unanimous, the Task Force developed six good practice statements. 1) If peripheral nerve stimulation is used, optimal clinical practice suggests that it should be done in conjunction with assessment of other clinical findings (e.g., triggering of the ventilator and degree of shivering) to assess the degree of neuromuscular blockade in patients undergoing therapeutic hypothermia. 2) Optimal clinical practice suggests that a protocol should include guidance on neuromuscular-blocking agent administration in patients undergoing therapeutic hypothermia. 3) Optimal clinical practice suggests that analgesic and sedative drugs should be used prior to and during neuromuscular blockade, with the goal of achieving deep sedation. 4) Optimal clinical practice suggests that clinicians at the bedside implement measure to attenuate the risk of unintended extubation in patients receiving neuromuscular-blocking agents. 5) Optimal clinical practice suggests that a reduced dose of an neuromuscular-blocking agent be used for patients with myasthenia gravis and that the dose should be based on peripheral nerve stimulation with train-of-four monitoring. 6) Optimal clinical practice suggests that neuromuscular-blocking agents be discontinued prior to the clinical determination of brain death.

8 Guideline Preventing Obesity and Eating Disorders in Adolescents. 2016

Golden, Neville H / Schneider, Marcie / Wood, Christine / Anonymous1391174 / Anonymous1401174 / Anonymous1411174. · ·Pediatrics · Pubmed #27550979.

ABSTRACT: Obesity and eating disorders (EDs) are both prevalent in adolescents. There are concerns that obesity prevention efforts may lead to the development of an ED. Most adolescents who develop an ED did not have obesity previously, but some teenagers, in an attempt to lose weight, may develop an ED. This clinical report addresses the interaction between obesity prevention and EDs in teenagers, provides the pediatrician with evidence-informed tools to identify behaviors that predispose to both obesity and EDs, and provides guidance about obesity and ED prevention messages. The focus should be on a healthy lifestyle rather than on weight. Evidence suggests that obesity prevention and treatment, if conducted correctly, do not predispose to EDs.

9 Guideline Surgical Management of Osteoarthritis of the Knee: Evidence-based Guideline. 2016

McGrory, Brian J / Weber, Kristy L / Jevsevar, David S / Sevarino, Kaitlyn. ·From the Division of Joint Replacement, the Department of Orthopedics and Sports Medicine, Maine Medical Partners, Falmouth, ME (Dr. McGrory), the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (Dr. Weber), the Department of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH (Dr. Jevsevar), and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (Ms. Sevarino). · ·J Am Acad Orthop Surg · Pubmed #27355286.

ABSTRACT: Surgical Management of Osteoarthritis of the Knee: Evidence-based Guideline is based on a systematic review of the current scientific and clinical research. The guideline contains 38 recommendations pertaining to the preoperative, perioperative, and postoperative care of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee who are considering surgical treatment. The purpose of this clinical practice guideline is to help improve surgical management of patients with OA of the knee based on current best evidence. In addition to guideline recommendations, the work group highlighted the need for better research on the surgical management of OA of the knee.

10 Guideline 8 USPSTF recommendations FPs need to know about. 2016

Campos-Outcalt, Doug. ·Medical Director, Mercy Care Plan, Phoenix, AZ, USA. Email: campos-outcaltd@mercycareplan.com. ·J Fam Pract · Pubmed #27275937.

ABSTRACT: Treat high blood pressure only if measurements taken outside of the office confirm an initial high BP reading · Screen blood-glucose levels in overweight/obese individuals 40 to 70 years old · and more.

11 Guideline SIO management algorithm for patients with overweight or obesity: consensus statement of the Italian Society for Obesity (SIO). 2016

Santini, Ferruccio / Busetto, Luca / Cresci, Barbara / Sbraccia, Paolo. ·Obesity Center, Endocrinology Unit, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Medicine, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Section of Diabetology, Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy. · Department of Systems Medicine, Medical School, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via Montpellier 1, 00133, Rome, Italy. sbraccia@med.uniroma2.it. ·Eat Weight Disord · Pubmed #27100225.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Guideline [Obesity: guidelines for clinical management. Executive summary]. 2016

Anonymous251304. · ·Arch Argent Pediatr · Pubmed #27079397.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Guideline American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery position statement on intragastric balloon therapy endorsed by the Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons. 2016

Ali, Mohamed R / Moustarah, Fady / Kim, Julie J / Anonymous481223. ·Department of Surgery, University of California-Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California. Electronic address: mrali@ucdavis.edu. · Faculty of Medical Sciences & Neuroscience Research Center, Lebanese University, Beirut, Lebanon; Department of Surgery, Central Michigan University College of Medicine, Mount Pleasant, Michigan. · Department of Surgery, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts. · ·Surg Obes Relat Dis · Pubmed #27056407.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Guideline Lipids and bariatric procedures Part 2 of 2: scientific statement from the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS), the National Lipid Association (NLA), and Obesity Medicine Association (OMA). 2016

Bays, Harold / Kothari, Shanu N / Azagury, Dan E / Morton, John M / Nguyen, Ninh T / Jones, Peter H / Jacobson, Terry A / Cohen, David E / Orringer, Carl / Westman, Eric C / Horn, Deborah B / Scinta, Wendy / Primack, Craig. ·Louisville Metabolic and Atherosclerosis Research Center, Louisville, Kentucky. · Department of General Surgery, Gundersen Health System, La Crosse, Wisconsin. Electronic address: snkothar@gundersenhealth.org. · Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California. · Department of Surgery, University of California Irvine Medical Center, Orange, California. · Methodist DeBakey Heart and Vascular Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. · Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. · Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · University of Miami Hospital, Miami, Florida. · Duke University Health System, Durham, North Carolina. · University of Texas Medical School, Houston, Texas. · Medical Weight Loss of New York, Fayetteville, New York. · Scottsdale Weight Loss, Scottsdale, Arizona. ·Surg Obes Relat Dis · Pubmed #27050404.

ABSTRACT: Bariatric procedures generally improve dyslipidemia, sometimes substantially so. Bariatric procedures also improve other major cardiovascular risk factors. This 2-part Scientific Statement examines the lipid effects of bariatric procedures and reflects contributions from authors representing the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS), the National Lipid Association (NLA), and the Obesity Medicine Association (OMA). Part 1 was published in the Journal of Clinical Lipidology, and reviewed the impact of bariatric procedures upon adipose tissue endocrine and immune factors, adipose tissue lipid metabolism, as well as the lipid effects of bariatric procedures relative to bile acids and intestinal microbiota. This Part 2 reviews: (1) the importance of nutrients (fats, carbohydrates, and proteins) and their absorption on lipid levels; (2) the effects of bariatric procedures on gut hormones and lipid levels; (3) the effects of bariatric procedures on nonlipid cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors; (4) the effects of bariatric procedures on lipid levels; (5) effects of bariatric procedures on CVD; and finally, (6) the potential lipid effects of vitamin, mineral, and trace element deficiencies, that may occur after bariatric procedures.

15 Guideline American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery position statement on vagal blocking therapy for obesity. 2016

Papasavas, Pavlos / El Chaar, Maher / Kothari, Shanu N / Anonymous441223. ·Department of Surgery, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Connecticut. · The Medical School of Temple University/St Luke's University Hospital and Health Network, Allentown, Pennsylvania. · Department of General Surgery, Gundersen Health System, La Crosse, Wisconsin. Electronic address: snkothar@gundersenhealth.org. · ·Surg Obes Relat Dis · Pubmed #26948945.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Guideline American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery position statement on long-term survival benefit after metabolic and bariatric surgery. 2016

Kim, Julie / Eisenberg, Dan / Azagury, Dan / Rogers, Ann / Campos, Guilherme M. ·Department of Surgery, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: jkim7@tuftsmedicalcenter.org. · Department of Surgery, Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California. · Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California. · Department of Surgery, Penn State University, Hershey, Pennsylvania. · Division of Bariatric and Gastrointestinal Surgery, Department of Surgery, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia. ·Surg Obes Relat Dis · Pubmed #26944548.

ABSTRACT: The following position statement has been issued by the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery in response to numerous inquiries made to the Society by patients, physicians, society members, hospitals, health insurance payors, the media, and others regarding the benefit of metabolic and bariatric surgery on long-term survival. An overview of the current available published peer-reviewed scientific evidence is presented.

17 Guideline Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Adult Critically Ill Patient: Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) and American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.). 2016

McClave, Stephen A / Taylor, Beth E / Martindale, Robert G / Warren, Malissa M / Johnson, Debbie R / Braunschweig, Carol / McCarthy, Mary S / Davanos, Evangelia / Rice, Todd W / Cresci, Gail A / Gervasio, Jane M / Sacks, Gordon S / Roberts, Pamela R / Compher, Charlene / Anonymous1540947 / Anonymous1550947. ·Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky. · Nutrition Support Specialist, Barnes Jewish Hospital, St Louis, Missouri. · Chief Division of General Surgery, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon. · Critical Care Dietitian, Portland VA Medical Center, Portland, Oregon. · Clinical Nurse Specialist: Wound, Skin, Ostomy, UW Health University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin. · Professor, Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition and Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. · Senior Nurse Scientist, Center for Nursing Science and Clinical Inquiry, Madigan Healthcare System, Tacoma, Washington. · Pharmacotherapy Specialist, Nutrition Support, The Brooklyn Hospital Center, Brooklyn, New York. · Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Allergy, Pulmonary, and Critical Care Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee. · Project Research Staff, Digestive Disease Institute, Gastroenterology and Pathobiology, Cleveland, Ohio. · Chair and Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Butler University College of Pharmacy and Health Science, Indianapolis, Indiana. · Professor and Head, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Harrison School of Pharmacy, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama. · Professor and Vice Chair, Division Chief of Critical Care Medicine, Director of Research John A. Moffitt Endowed Chair, Department of Anesthesiology, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. · Professor of Nutrition Science, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania compherc@nursing.upenn.edu. · ·JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr · Pubmed #26773077.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Guideline CONSENSUS STATEMENT BY THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY ON THE COMPREHENSIVE TYPE 2 DIABETES MANAGEMENT ALGORITHM--2016 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY. 2016

Garber, Alan J / Abrahamson, Martin J / Barzilay, Joshua I / Blonde, Lawrence / Bloomgarden, Zachary T / Bush, Michael A / Dagogo-Jack, Samuel / DeFronzo, Ralph A / Einhorn, Daniel / Fonseca, Vivian A / Garber, Jeffrey R / Garvey, W Timothy / Grunberger, George / Handelsman, Yehuda / Henry, Robert R / Hirsch, Irl B / Jellinger, Paul S / McGill, Janet B / Mechanick, Jeffrey I / Rosenblit, Paul D / Umpierrez, Guillermo E / Anonymous211227 / Anonymous221227. · ·Endocr Pract · Pubmed #26731084.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Guideline [Current Guidelines to Prevent Obesity in Childhood and Adolescence]. 2016

Blüher, S / Kromeyer-Hauschild, K / Graf, C / Grünewald-Funk, D / Widhalm, K / Korsten-Reck, U / Markert, J / Güssfeld, C / Müller, M J / Moss, A / Wabitsch, M / Wiegand, S. ·IFB AdipositasErkrankungen, Universität Leipzig. · Institut für Humangenetik, Universität Jena. · Institut für Bewegungs- und Neurowissenschaft, Deutsche Sporthochschule Köln. · Training/Coaching, Grünewald-Funk Consulting, Berlin. · Abteiliung für Kinderheilkunde und Jugendmedizin, Universität Wien. · Abteilung für Rehabilitative und Präventive Sportmedizin, Medizinische Universität Freiburg. · Institut für Humanernährung und Lebensmittelkunde, Christian-Albrechts Universität Kiel. · Abteilung für Pädiatrische Endokrinologie und Diabetes, Klinik für Pädiatrie, Universität Ulm. · Abteilung für Pädiatrsiche Endokrinologie und Diabetes, Interdisziplinäre Adipositas-Abteilung, Klinik für Pädiatrie, Universität Ulm. · Abteilung für Pädiatrische Endokrinologie und Diabetes, Charité Universitätsmedizin, Berlin. ·Klin Padiatr · Pubmed #26302179.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Current guidelines for the prevention of obesity in childhood and adolescence are presented. METHODS: A literature search was performed in Medline via PubMed, and appropriate studies were analysed. RESULTS: Programs to prevent childhood obesity were to date mainly school-based. Effects were limited to date. Analyses tailored to different age groups show that prevention programs have the best effects in younger children (< 12 years). Evidence based recommendations for preschool- and early school age imply the need for interventions addressing parents and teachers alike. During adolescence, school-based interventions were most effective when adolescents were directly addressed. To date, obesity prevention programs have mainly focused on behavior oriented prevention. Recommendations for condition oriented prevention have been suggested by the German Alliance of Non-communicable Diseases and include one hour of physical activity at school, promotion of healthy food choices by taxing unhealthy foods, mandatory quality standards for meals at kindergarten and schools as well as a ban on unhealthy food advertisement addressing children. CONCLUSION: Behavior oriented prevention programs showed hardly any or only limited effects in the long term. Certain risk groups for the development of obesity are not reached effectively by available programs. Due to the heterogeneity of available studies, universally valid conclusions cannot be drawn. The combination with condition oriented prevention, which has to counteract on an obesogenic environment, is crucial for sustainable success of future obesity prevention programs.

20 Guideline An Evidence-based Guide for Obesity Treatment in Primary Care. 2016

Fitzpatrick, Stephanie L / Wischenka, Danielle / Appelhans, Bradley M / Pbert, Lori / Wang, Monica / Wilson, Dawn K / Pagoto, Sherry L / Anonymous6470838. ·Department of Preventive Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Ill. · Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Yeshiva University, Bronx, NY. · Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester. · Department of Community Health Sciences, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Mass. · Department of Psychology, University of South Carolina, Columbia. · Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester. Electronic address: Sherry.Pagoto@umassmed.edu. · ·Am J Med · Pubmed #26239092.

ABSTRACT: On behalf of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, we present a model of obesity management in primary care based on the 5As counseling framework (Assess, Advise, Agree, Assist, and Arrange). Primary care physicians can use the 5As framework to build and coordinate a multidisciplinary team that: 1) addresses patients' psychosocial issues and medical and psychiatric comorbidities associated with obesity treatment failure; 2) delivers intensive counseling that consists of goal setting, self-monitoring, and problem solving; and 3) connects patients with community resources to assist them in making healthy lifestyle changes. This paper outlines reimbursement guidelines and weight-management counseling strategies, and provides a framework for building a multidisciplinary team to maximize the patient's success at weight management.

21 Guideline CONSENSUS STATEMENT BY THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY ON THE COMPREHENSIVE TYPE 2 DIABETES MANAGEMENT ALGORITHM--2015 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY. 2015

Garber, Alan J / Abrahamson, Martin Julian / Barzilay, Joshua I / Blonde, Lawrence / Bloomgarden, Zachary T / Bush, Michael A / Dagogo-Jack, Samuel / Davidson, Michael B / Einhorn, Daniel / Garber, Jeffrey R / Garvey, W Timothy / Grunberger, George / Handelsman, Yehuda / Hirsch, Irl B / Jellinger, Paul S / McGill, Janet B / Mechanick, Jeffrey I / Rosenblit, Paul David / Umpierrez, Guillermo E / Anonymous7140851 / Anonymous7150851. · ·Endocr Pract · Pubmed #26642101.

ABSTRACT: This document represents the official position of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and the American College of Endocrinology. Where there were no randomized controlled trials or specific U.S. FDA labeling for issues in clinical practice, the participating clinical experts utilized their judgment and experience. Every effort was made to achieve consensus among the committee members. Position statements are meant to provide guidance, but they are not to be considered prescriptive for any individual patient and cannot replace the judgment of a clinician.

22 Guideline European Guidelines for Obesity Management in Adults. 2015

Yumuk, Volkan / Tsigos, Constantine / Fried, Martin / Schindler, Karin / Busetto, Luca / Micic, Dragan / Toplak, Hermann / Anonymous7060851. ·Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes, Department of Medicine, Istanbul University Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul, Turkey. · ·Obes Facts · Pubmed #26641646.

ABSTRACT: Obesity is a chronic metabolic disease characterised by an increase of body fat stores. It is a gateway to ill health, and it has become one of the leading causes of disability and death, affecting not only adults but also children and adolescents worldwide. In clinical practice, the body fatness is estimated by BMI, and the accumulation of intra-abdominal fat (marker for higher metabolic and cardiovascular disease risk) can be assessed by waist circumference. Complex interactions between biological, behavioural, social and environmental factors are involved in regulation of energy balance and fat stores. A comprehensive history, physical examination and laboratory assessment relevant to the patient's obesity should be obtained. Appropriate goals of weight management emphasise realistic weight loss to achieve a reduction in health risks and should include promotion of weight loss, maintenance and prevention of weight regain. Management of co-morbidities and improving quality of life of obese patients are also included in treatment aims. Balanced hypocaloric diets result in clinically meaningful weight loss regardless of which macronutrients they emphasise. Aerobic training is the optimal mode of exercise for reducing fat mass while a programme including resistance training is needed for increasing lean mass in middle-aged and overweight/obese individuals. Cognitive behavioural therapy directly addresses behaviours that require change for successful weight loss and weight loss maintenance. Pharmacotherapy can help patients to maintain compliance and ameliorate obesity-related health risks. Surgery is the most effective treatment for morbid obesity in terms of long-term weight loss. A comprehensive obesity management can only be accomplished by a multidisciplinary obesity management team. We conclude that physicians have a responsibility to recognise obesity as a disease and help obese patients with appropriate prevention and treatment. Treatment should be based on good clinical care, and evidence-based interventions; should focus on realistic goals and lifelong multidisciplinary management.

23 Guideline ACOG Practice Bulletin No 156: Obesity in Pregnancy. 2015

Anonymous270975. · ·Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #26595582.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

24 Guideline Obesity and reproduction: a committee opinion. 2015

Anonymous950845. · ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #26434804.

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this ASRM Practice Committee report is to provide clinicians with principles and strategies for the evaluation and treatment of couples with infertility associated with obesity. This revised document replaces the Practice Committee document titled, "Obesity and reproduction: an educational bulletin," last published in 2008 (Fertil Steril 2008;90:S21-9).

25 Guideline [V Consensus Meeting of the Spanish Society for Liver Transplant on high-risk recipients, immunosupression scenarios and management of hepatocarcinoma on the transplant waiting list]. 2015

Pardo, Fernando / Pons, José Antonio / Briceño, Javier / Anonymous431212. ·Servicio de Cirugía Hepatobiliar y Trasplantes, Clínica Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona, España. Electronic address: javibriceno@hotmail.com. · Unidad de Hepatología y Trasplante Hepático, Servicio de Aparato Digestivo, Hospital Clínico Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, Murcia, España. · Servicio de Cirugía General y del Aparato Digestivo, Unidad de Trasplante Hepático, Hospital Universitario Reina Sofía, Córdoba, España. · ·Gastroenterol Hepatol · Pubmed #26404045.

ABSTRACT: With the aim to promote the elaboration of consensus documents on state of the art topics in liver transplantation with multidisciplinary management, the Spanish Society for Liver Transplantation (SETH) organized the V Consensus Meeting with the participation of experts from all the Spanish liver transplant programs. In this edition, the following topics were revised, and we present the summary: 1. High-risk receptors; 2. Immunosuppression scenarios; and 3. Management of the patient with hepatocarcinoma in the waiting list.

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