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Obesity: HELP
Articles by William H. Dietz
Based on 39 articles published since 2010
(Why 39 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, W. Dietz wrote the following 39 articles about Obesity.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2
1 Editorial Research on Childhood Obesity: Building the Foundation for a Healthier Future. 2018

Rodgers, Griffin P / Dietz, William / Lavizzo-Mourey, Risa. ·National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland. Electronic address: gr5n@nih.gov. · Sumner M. Redstone Global Center for Prevention and Wellness, George Washington University, Washington, District of Columbia. · Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Princeton, New Jersey. ·Am J Prev Med · Pubmed #29455758.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Editorial Obesity and Excessive Weight Gain in Young Adults: New Targets for Prevention. 2017

Dietz, William H. ·Redstone Global Center for Prevention and Wellness, Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University, Washington, DC. ·JAMA · Pubmed #28719674.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Review From biology to behavior: a cross-disciplinary seminar series surrounding added sugar and low-calorie sweetener consumption. 2019

Sylvetsky, A C / Hiedacavage, A / Shah, N / Pokorney, P / Baldauf, S / Merrigan, K / Smith, V / Long, M W / Black, R / Robien, K / Avena, N / Gaine, C / Greenberg, D / Wootan, M G / Talegawkar, S / Colon-Ramos, U / Leahy, M / Ohmes, A / Mennella, J A / Sacheck, J / Dietz, W H. ·Milken Institute School of Public Health The George Washington University. · Swette Center for Sustainable Food Systems Arizona State University. · Department of Agricultural Economics Montana State University. · Quadrant D Consulting, LLC Tufts University Friedman School of Nutrition Science & Policy. · Department of Neuroscience Mount Sinai School of Medicine. · Department of Psychology Princeton University. · The Sugar Association. · PepsiCo Inc. (Current affiliation NutriSci Inc.). · Center for Science in the Public Interest. · Food, Nutrition & Policy Solutions LLC. · Cargill, Incorporated. · Monell Chemical Senses Center Philadelphia PA. ·Obes Sci Pract · Pubmed #31275594.

ABSTRACT: Introduction: This report presents a synopsis of a three-part, cross-sector, seminar series held at the George Washington University (GWU) in Washington, DC from February-April, 2018. The overarching goal of the seminar series was to provide a neutral forum for diverse stakeholders to discuss and critically evaluate approaches to address added sugar intake, with a key focus on the role of low-calorie sweeteners (LCS). Methods: During three seminars, twelve speakers from academic institutions, federal agencies, non-profit organizations, and the food and beverage industries participated in six interactive panel discussions to address: 1) Do Farm Bill Policies Impact Population Sugar Intake? 2) What is the Impact of Sugar-sweetened Beverage (SSB) Taxes on Health and Business? 3) Is Sugar Addictive? 4) Product Reformulation Efforts: Progress, Challenges, and Concerns? 5) Low-calorie Sweeteners: Helpful or Harmful, and 6) Are Novel Sweeteners a Plausible Solution? Discussion of each topic involved brief 15-minute presentations from the speakers, which were followed by a 25-minute panel discussion moderated by GWU faculty members and addressed questions generated by the audience. Sessions were designed to represent opposing views and stimulate meaningful debate. Given the provocative nature of the seminar series, attendee questions were gathered anonymously using Pigeonhole™, an interactive, online, question and answer platform. Results: This report summarizes each presentation and recapitulates key perspectives offered by the speakers and moderators. Conclusions: The seminar series set the foundation for robust cross-sector dialogue necessary to inform meaningful future research, and ultimately, effective policies for lowering added sugar intakes.

4 Review Public Policies to Reduce Sugary Drink Consumption in Children and Adolescents. 2019

Muth, Natalie D / Dietz, William H / Magge, Sheela N / Johnson, Rachel K / Anonymous4750984 / Anonymous4760984 / Anonymous4770984 / Anonymous4780984. · ·Pediatrics · Pubmed #30910915.

ABSTRACT: Excess consumption of added sugars, especially from sugary drinks, poses a grave health threat to children and adolescents, disproportionately affecting children of minority and low-income communities. Public policies, such as those detailed in this statement, are needed to decrease child and adolescent consumption of added sugars and improve health.

5 Review The Global Syndemic of Obesity, Undernutrition, and Climate Change: The Lancet Commission report. 2019

Swinburn, Boyd A / Kraak, Vivica I / Allender, Steven / Atkins, Vincent J / Baker, Phillip I / Bogard, Jessica R / Brinsden, Hannah / Calvillo, Alejandro / De Schutter, Olivier / Devarajan, Raji / Ezzati, Majid / Friel, Sharon / Goenka, Shifalika / Hammond, Ross A / Hastings, Gerard / Hawkes, Corinna / Herrero, Mario / Hovmand, Peter S / Howden, Mark / Jaacks, Lindsay M / Kapetanaki, Ariadne B / Kasman, Matt / Kuhnlein, Harriet V / Kumanyika, Shiriki K / Larijani, Bagher / Lobstein, Tim / Long, Michael W / Matsudo, Victor K R / Mills, Susanna D H / Morgan, Gareth / Morshed, Alexandra / Nece, Patricia M / Pan, An / Patterson, David W / Sacks, Gary / Shekar, Meera / Simmons, Geoff L / Smit, Warren / Tootee, Ali / Vandevijvere, Stefanie / Waterlander, Wilma E / Wolfenden, Luke / Dietz, William H. ·School of Population Health, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; Global Obesity Centre, School of Health & Social Development, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC, Australia. Electronic address: boyd.swinburn@auckland.ac.nz. · Department of Human Nutrition, Foods, and Exercise, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, USA. · Global Obesity Centre, School of Health & Social Development, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC, Australia. · Caribbean Community Secretariat, Bridgetown, Barbados. · Institute for Physical Activity and Nutrition, Deakin University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. · Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. · World Obesity Federation, London, UK. · El Poder del Consumidor, Mexico City, Mexico. · Institute for Interdisciplinary Research in Legal Sciences, Catholic University of Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium. · Public Health Foundation of India, Centre for Chronic Disease Control, New Delhi, India. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · School of Regulation and Global Governance, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia. · Center on Social Dynamics & Policy, The Brookings Institution, Washington, DC, USA; Public Health & Social Policy Department, Brown School, Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, MO, USA. · Institute for Social Marketing, University of Stirling, Stirling, UK. · Centre for Food Policy, City University, University of London, London, UK. · Social System Design Lab, Brown School, Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, MO, USA. · Climate Change Institute, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia. · Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Harvard University, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Marketing and Enterprise, Hertfordshire Business School, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, UK. · Center on Social Dynamics & Policy, The Brookings Institution, Washington, DC, USA. · Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada. · Dornsife School of Public Health, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. · Milken Institute School of Public Health, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA. · Physical Fitness Research Laboratory of São Caetano do Sul, São Caetano do Sul, São Paulo, Brazil. · Institute of Health & Society, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · The Morgan Foundation, Wellington, New Zealand. · Prevention Research Center, Brown School, Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, MO, USA. · Obesity Action Coalition, Tampa, FL, USA. · School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China. · International Development Law Organization, The Hague, Netherlands. · Global Obesity Centre, School of Health and Social Development, Deakin University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. · Health, Nutrition, and Population Global Practice, The World Bank, Washington, DC, USA. · African Centre for Cities, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa. · Diabetes Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. · School of Population Health, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; Scientific Institute of Public Health (Sciensano), Brussels, Belgium. · Department of Public Health Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · School of Medicine and Public Health, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. ·Lancet · Pubmed #30700377.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Review The Science of Obesity Management: An Endocrine Society Scientific Statement. 2018

Bray, George A / Heisel, William E / Afshin, Ashkan / Jensen, Michael D / Dietz, William H / Long, Michael / Kushner, Robert F / Daniels, Stephen R / Wadden, Thomas A / Tsai, Adam G / Hu, Frank B / Jakicic, John M / Ryan, Donna H / Wolfe, Bruce M / Inge, Thomas H. ·Department of Clinical Obesity, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. · Institute of Health Metrics and Evaluation University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. · Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Redstone Global Center for Prevention and Wellness, Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University, Washington, District of Columbia. · Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado Children Hospital, Denver, Colorado. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Kaiser Permanente Colorado, Denver, Colorado. · Department of Nutrition and Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. · University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon. · Department of Surgery, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado. · Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, Colorado. ·Endocr Rev · Pubmed #29518206.

ABSTRACT: The prevalence of obesity, measured by body mass index, has risen to unacceptable levels in both men and women in the United States and worldwide with resultant hazardous health implications. Genetic, environmental, and behavioral factors influence the development of obesity, and both the general public and health professionals stigmatize those who suffer from the disease. Obesity is associated with and contributes to a shortened life span, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, some cancers, kidney disease, obstructive sleep apnea, gout, osteoarthritis, and hepatobiliary disease, among others. Weight loss reduces all of these diseases in a dose-related manner-the more weight lost, the better the outcome. The phenotype of "medically healthy obesity" appears to be a transient state that progresses over time to an unhealthy phenotype, especially in children and adolescents. Weight loss is best achieved by reducing energy intake and increasing energy expenditure. Programs that are effective for weight loss include peer-reviewed and approved lifestyle modification programs, diets, commercial weight-loss programs, exercise programs, medications, and surgery. Over-the-counter herbal preparations that some patients use to treat obesity have limited, if any, data documenting their efficacy or safety, and there are few regulatory requirements. Weight regain is expected in all patients, especially when treatment is discontinued. When making treatment decisions, clinicians should consider body fat distribution and individual health risks in addition to body mass index.

7 Review Weight management and physical activity throughout the cancer care continuum. 2018

Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy / Schmitz, Kathryn H / Alfano, Catherine M / Bail, Jennifer R / Goodwin, Pamela J / Thomson, Cynthia A / Bradley, Don W / Courneya, Kerry S / Befort, Christie A / Denlinger, Crystal S / Ligibel, Jennifer A / Dietz, William H / Stolley, Melinda R / Irwin, Melinda L / Bamman, Marcas M / Apovian, Caroline M / Pinto, Bernardine M / Wolin, Kathleen Y / Ballard, Rachel M / Dannenberg, Andrew J / Eakin, Elizabeth G / Longjohn, Matt M / Raffa, Susan D / Adams-Campbell, Lucile L / Buzaglo, Joanne S / Nass, Sharyl J / Massetti, Greta M / Balogh, Erin P / Kraft, Elizabeth S / Parekh, Anand K / Sanghavi, Darshak M / Morris, G Stephen / Basen-Engquist, Karen. ·Professor of Nutrition Sciences, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL. · Professor of Public Health Sciences, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA. · Vice President, Survivorship, American Cancer Society, Inc., Washington, DC. · Post-Doctoral Fellow, Department of Nutrition Sciences, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL. · Professor of Medicine, Mount Sinai Hospital, Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute at the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Professor of Health Promotion Sciences, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ. · Associate Consulting Professor, Community and Family Medicine, Duke School of Medicine, Durham, NC. · Professor of Physical Education and Recreation, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. · Associate Professor of Preventive Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS. · Associate Professor of Hematology/Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA. · Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Chair, Redstone Global Center for Prevention and Wellness, George Washington University, Washington, DC. · Professor of Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI. · Professor of Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT. · Professor of Cell Developmental and Integrative Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL. · Professor of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA. · Professor of Nursing, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC. · CEO, Coeus Health, Chicago, IL. · Director, Prevention Research Coordination, Office of Disease Prevention, Office of the Director, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. · Professor of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY. · Professor and Director, Cancer Prevention Research Centre, School of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Vice President and National Health Officer, YMCA of the USA, Chicago, IL. · National Program Director for Weight Management, Veterans Health Administration, Durham, NC. · Professor of Oncology, Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Washington, DC. · Senior Vice President, Research and Training Institute, Cancer Support Community, Philadelphia, PA. · Director, National Cancer Policy Forum and Board on Health Care Services, Health and Medicine Division, National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine, Washington, DC. · Associate Director for Science, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA. · Senior Program Officer, National Cancer Policy Forum, Health and Medicine Division, National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine, Washington, DC. · Senior Clinical Officer, Anthem Blue Cross Colorado, Denver, CO. · Chief Medical Advisor, Bipartisan Policy Center, Washington, DC. · Chief Medical Officer, Senior Vice President, Translation, Optum Labs, Cambridge, MA. · Professor of Physical Therapy, Wingate University, Wingate, NC. · Professor of Behavioral Science, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. ·CA Cancer J Clin · Pubmed #29165798.

ABSTRACT: Mounting evidence suggests that weight management and physical activity (PA) improve overall health and well being, and reduce the risk of morbidity and mortality among cancer survivors. Although many opportunities exist to include weight management and PA in routine cancer care, several barriers remain. This review summarizes key topics addressed in a recent National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine workshop entitled, "Incorporating Weight Management and Physical Activity Throughout the Cancer Care Continuum." Discussions related to body weight and PA among cancer survivors included: 1) current knowledge and gaps related to health outcomes; 2) effective intervention approaches; 3) addressing the needs of diverse populations of cancer survivors; 4) opportunities and challenges of workforce, care coordination, and technologies for program implementation; 5) models of care; and 6) program coverage. While more discoveries are still needed for the provision of optimal weight-management and PA programs for cancer survivors, obesity and inactivity currently jeopardize their overall health and quality of life. Actionable future directions are presented for research; practice and policy changes required to assure the availability of effective, affordable, and feasible weight management; and PA services for all cancer survivors as a part of their routine cancer care. CA Cancer J Clin 2018;68:64-89. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

8 Review Partnership for a Healthier America: Creating Change Through Private Sector Partnerships. 2017

Simon, Caitlin / Kocot, S Lawrence / Dietz, William H. ·Partnership for a Healthier America, 2001 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, 9th Floor, Washington, DC, 20006, USA. csimon@ahealthieramerica.org. · Center for Healthcare Regulatory Insight, KPMG, LLP, Washington, DC, USA. · Sumner M. Redstone Center, Milken Institute School of Public Health, Washington, DC, USA. ·Curr Obes Rep · Pubmed #28439846.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review provides background on the formation of the Partnership for a Healthier America (PHA), that was created in conjunction with the Let's Move! initiative, and an overview of its work to date. RECENT FINDINGS: To encourage industry to offer and promote healthier options, PHA partners with the private sector. Principles that guide PHA partnerships include ensuring that partnerships represent meaningful change, partners sign a legally binding contract and progress is monitored and publicly reported. Since 2010, PHA has established private sector partnerships in an effort to transform the marketplace to ensure that every child has the chance to grow up at a healthy weight. Many agreements between PHA and its industry partners align with the White House Task Force Report on Childhood Obesity. The reach and impact of over 200 partnerships attest to the success of this initiative.

9 Review Improving access and systems of care for evidence-based childhood obesity treatment: Conference key findings and next steps. 2017

Wilfley, Denise E / Staiano, Amanda E / Altman, Myra / Lindros, Jeanne / Lima, Angela / Hassink, Sandra G / Dietz, William H / Cook, Stephen / Anonymous6990889. ·Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA. · Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA. · Institute for Healthy Childhood Weight, American Academy of Pediatrics, Chicago, Illinois, USA. · Redstone Global Center for Prevention and Wellness, Milken Institute School of Public Health, Washington, DC, USA. · Golisano Children's Hospital, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York, USA. ·Obesity (Silver Spring) · Pubmed #27925451.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To improve systems of care to advance implementation of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendations for childhood obesity treatment (i.e., clinicians offer/refer children with obesity to intensive, multicomponent behavioral interventions of >25 h over 6 to 12 months to improve weight status) and to expand payment for these services. METHODS: In July 2015, 43 cross-sector stakeholders attended a conference supported by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, American Academy of Pediatrics Institute for Healthy Childhood Weight, and The Obesity Society. Plenary sessions presenting scientific evidence and clinical and payment practices were interspersed with breakout sessions to identify consensus recommendations. RESULTS: Consensus recommendations for childhood obesity treatment included: family-based multicomponent behavioral therapy; integrated care model; and multidisciplinary care team. The use of evidence-based protocols, a well-trained healthcare team, medical oversight, and treatment at or above the minimum dose (e.g., >25 h) are critical components to ensure effective delivery of high-quality care and to achieve clinically meaningful weight loss. Approaches to secure reimbursement for evidence-based obesity treatment within payment models were recommended. CONCLUSIONS: Continued cross-sector collaboration is crucial to ensure a unified approach to increase payment and access for childhood obesity treatment and to scale up training to ensure quality of care.

10 Review An Integrated Framework For The Prevention And Treatment Of Obesity And Its Related Chronic Diseases. 2015

Dietz, William H / Solomon, Loel S / Pronk, Nico / Ziegenhorn, Sarah K / Standish, Marion / Longjohn, Matt M / Fukuzawa, David D / Eneli, Ihuoma U / Loy, Lisel / Muth, Natalie D / Sanchez, Eduardo J / Bogard, Jenny / Bradley, Don W. ·William H. Dietz (dietzwcd4@gmail.com) is the director of the Redstone Global Center for Prevention and Wellness at the George Washington University, in Washington, D.C. · Loel S. Solomon is vice president of community health at Kaiser Permanente, in Oakland, California. · Nico Pronk is vice president of health promotion at HealthPartners, in Bloomington, Minnesota. · Sarah K. Ziegenhorn is a research associate at the National Academy of Medicine, in Washington, D.C. · Marion Standish is vice president of enterprise programs at the California Endowment, in Oakland. · Matt M. Longjohn is the national health officer at the YMCA of the USA, in Chicago, Illinois. · David D. Fukuzawa is health program director at the Kresge Foundation, in Troy, Michigan. · Ihuoma U. Eneli is medical director at the Center for Healthy Weight and Nutrition at Nationwide Children's Hospital, in Columbus, Ohio. · Lisel Loy is director of the Nutrition and Physical Activity Initiative at the Bipartisan Policy Center, in Washington, D.C. · Natalie D. Muth is a senior adviser for health care solutions at the American Council on Exercise, in San Diego, California. · Eduardo J. Sanchez is chief medical officer for prevention at the American Heart Association, in Dallas, Texas. · Jenny Bogard is a senior manager for health care at the Alliance for a Healthier Generation, in Washington, D.C. · Don W. Bradley is an associate consulting professor in the Department of Community and Family Medicine at the Duke University School of Medicine, in Durham, North Carolina. ·Health Aff (Millwood) · Pubmed #26355046.

ABSTRACT: Improved patient experience, population health, and reduced cost of care for patients with obesity and other chronic diseases will not be achieved by clinical interventions alone. We offer here a new iteration of the Chronic Care Model that integrates clinical and community systems to address chronic diseases. Obesity contributes substantially to cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and cancer. Dietary and physical activity interventions will prevent, mitigate, and treat obesity and its related diseases. Challenges with the implementation of this model include provider training, the need to provide incentives for health systems to move beyond clinical care to link with community systems, and addressing the multiple elements necessary for integration within clinical care and with social systems. The Affordable Care Act, with its emphasis on prevention and new systems for care delivery, provides support for innovative strategies such as those proposed here.

11 Review Management of obesity: improvement of health-care training and systems for prevention and care. 2015

Dietz, William H / Baur, Louise A / Hall, Kevin / Puhl, Rebecca M / Taveras, Elsie M / Uauy, Ricardo / Kopelman, Peter. ·Sumner M Redstone Global Center for Prevention and Wellness, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA. Electronic address: dietzwcd4@gmail.com. · Weight Management Services, The Children's Hospital at Westmead Clinical School, The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Westmead, NSW, Australia. · Laboratory of Biological Modeling, Diabetes Endocrinology and Obesity Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. · Rudd Centre for Food Policy & Obesity, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA. · Division of General Academic Pediatrics, Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Universidad Católica de Chile, División de Pediatría, Escuela de Medicina, Santiago, Chile. · St George's University of London, London, UK. ·Lancet · Pubmed #25703112.

ABSTRACT: Although the caloric deficits achieved by increased awareness, policy, and environmental approaches have begun to achieve reductions in the prevalence of obesity in some countries, these approaches are insufficient to achieve weight loss in patients with severe obesity. Because the prevalence of obesity poses an enormous clinical burden, innovative treatment and care-delivery strategies are needed. Nonetheless, health professionals are poorly prepared to address obesity. In addition to biases and unfounded assumptions about patients with obesity, absence of training in behaviour-change strategies and scarce experience working within interprofessional teams impairs care of patients with obesity. Modalities available for the treatment of adult obesity include clinical counselling focused on diet, physical activity, and behaviour change, pharmacotherapy, and bariatric surgery. Few options, few published reports of treatment, and no large randomised trials are available for paediatric patients. Improved care for patients with obesity will need alignment of the intensity of therapy with the severity of disease and integration of therapy with environmental changes that reinforce clinical strategies. New treatment strategies, such as the use of technology and innovative means of health-care delivery that rely on health professionals other than physicians, represent promising options, particularly for patients with overweight and patients with mild to moderate obesity. The co-occurrence of undernutrition and obesity in low-income and middle-income countries poses unique challenges that might not be amenable to the same strategies as those that can be used in high-income countries.

12 Review Progress in the control of childhood obesity. 2015

Dietz, William H / Economos, Christina D. ·School of Public Health, George Washington University, Washington, District of Columbia; and dietzwcd4@gmail.com. · ChildObesity180, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts. ·Pediatrics · Pubmed #25667238.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Review The response of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to the obesity epidemic. 2015

Dietz, William H. ·Sumner M. Redstone Global Center for Prevention and Wellness, Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052; email: dietzwcd4@gmail.com. ·Annu Rev Public Health · Pubmed #25581155.

ABSTRACT: The recognition of the obesity epidemic as a national problem began in 1999 with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) publication of a series of annual state-based maps that demonstrated the rapid changes in the prevalence of obesity. Increasing rates of obesity had been noted in earlier CDC studies, but the maps provided evidence of a rapid, nationwide increase. The urgent need to respond to the epidemic led to the identification of state targets and the first generation of interventions for obesity prevention and control. The CDC's role was to provide setting- and intervention-specific guidance on implementing these strategies, and to assess changes in targeted policies and behaviors. The CDC's efforts were augmented by Congressional funding for community initiatives to improve nutrition and increase physical activity. Complementary investments by Kaiser Permanente, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the Institute of Medicine improved the evidence base and provided policy recommendations that reinforced the need for a multisectoral approach. Legislative, regulatory, and voluntary initiatives enacted by President Obama's administration translated many of the strategies into effective practice. Whether current efforts to address obesity can be sustained will depend on whether they can be translated into greater grass-roots engagement consistent with a social movement.

14 Guideline Current Knowledge of Obesity Treatment Guidelines by Health Care Professionals. 2018

Turner, Monique / Jannah, Nichole / Kahan, Scott / Gallagher, Christine / Dietz, William. ·Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University, Washington, DC. ·Obesity (Silver Spring) · Pubmed #29570250.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess health care professionals' knowledge of evidence-based guidelines for the nonsurgical treatment of obesity. METHODS: A nationally representative sample of internists, family practitioners, obstetricians/gynecologists, and nurse practitioners completed a web-based survey between June 9 and July 1, 2016 (n = 1,506). RESULTS: Only 16% of respondents indicated that obesity counseling should be provided approximately twice monthly in an individual or group setting for at least 6 months, in accordance with United States Preventive Services Task Force and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services guidelines. Only 15% of respondents identified BMI ≥ 27 kg/m CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that provider understanding of appropriate clinical care for obesity is inconsistent with evidence-based recommendations. As coverage for behavioral counseling services and pharmacotherapy expands, it is imperative that health care professionals understand how to effectively leverage these treatment modalities to optimize health outcomes for patients with obesity.

15 Article The Obesity (Under) Treatment Conundrum. 2019

Dietz, William H. ·Sumner M. Redstone Global Center for Prevention and Wellness, Milken Institute School of Public Health, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA. ·Obesity (Silver Spring) · Pubmed #31696629.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Article The challenge for global health systems in preventing and managing obesity. 2019

Wolfenden, Luke / Ezzati, Majid / Larijani, Bagher / Dietz, William. ·School of Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, Australia. · Hunter New England Local Health District, Hunter New England Population Health, Wallsend, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · WHO Collaborating Centre on NCD Surveillance and Epidemiology, Imperial College London, London, UK. · Diabetes Research Centre, Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinical Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. · Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Centre, Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinical Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. · Redstone Global Centre for Prevention and Wellness, George Washington University, Washington, DC, US. ·Obes Rev · Pubmed #31317659.

ABSTRACT: Few health crises have been as predictable as the unfolding obesity pandemic. Clinical and public health services remain the front line of efforts to reduce the burden of obesity. While a range of clinical practice guidelines exist, the need for clinical interventions exceeds the capacity of health systems to provide care for those affected with obesity, and routine clinical practices fall far short of guidelines recommendations even in high-income countries. In this manuscript, we discuss current recommendations regarding obesity interventions and key challenges facing global health systems in managing the health needs of people with obesity. Improving the provision of obesity-related health care is a considerable challenge and will require changing existing perceptions of obesity as a matter of personal failure to its recognition as a disease, innovative approaches to health system reform, clinician capacity building and implementation support, a focus on prevention, and wise resource allocation. Leadership from governments, the medical profession, and patient and community groups to address the issues raised in this manuscript is urgently needed to address the growing health concern.

17 Article A Proposed Standard of Obesity Care for All Providers and Payers. 2019

Dietz, William H / Gallagher, Christine. ·Milken Institute School of Public Health, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA. ·Obesity (Silver Spring) · Pubmed #31231954.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The aim of this work is to develop a practical, tangible, measurable, and simple standard of care for the treatment of adult obesity that provides guidance for both clinical providers and community settings. METHODS: Three roundtables with relevant stakeholder groups were convened by the STOP Obesity Alliance at The George Washington University to develop the proposed standard of care. RESULTS: The proposed standard of care for adult obesity treatment proposes practices for the spectrum of clinical, community, and digitally based entities and for clinical providers. Coverage and payment policy standards are also provided. CONCLUSIONS: These standards are intended to augment published guidelines developed for obesity care providers and can also be viewed as the first step to define an optimal benefit package.

18 Article Engaging Children to Support Parental Weight Loss: A Randomized Trial. 2019

Winston, Ginger / Sifat, Munjireen / Phillips, Erica / Dietz, William / Wikner, Emily / Barrow, Maya / Khurana, Kunal / Charlson, Mary. ·George Washington University Medical Faculty Associates, Washington, DC, USA. · University of Maryland School of Public Health, College Park, MD, USA. · Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA. · George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health, Washington, DC, USA. ·Health Educ Behav · Pubmed #31220933.

ABSTRACT:

19 Article We Need a New Approach to Prevent Obesity in Low-Income Minority Populations. 2019

Dietz, William H. ·Sumner M. Redstone Global Center for Prevention and Wellness, Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University, Washington, District of Columbia bdietz@email.gwu.edu. ·Pediatrics · Pubmed #31126970.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Article Coverage for Obesity Prevention and Treatment Services: Analysis of Medicaid and State Employee Health Insurance Programs. 2018

Jannah, Nichole / Hild, Jeff / Gallagher, Christine / Dietz, William. ·Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA. ·Obesity (Silver Spring) · Pubmed #30426721.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This study examined changes in coverage for adult obesity treatment services in Medicaid and state employee health insurance programs between 2009 and 2017. METHODS: Administrative materials from Medicaid and state employee health insurance programs in all 50 states and the District of Columbia were reviewed for indications of coverage and payment policies specific to evidence-based treatment modalities for adults (≥ 21 years of age) with obesity, including nutritional counseling, pharmacotherapy, and bariatric surgery. RESULTS: From 2009 to 2017, the proportion of state employee programs indicating coverage increased by 75% for nutritional counseling (from 24 to 42 states), 64% for pharmacotherapy (from 14 to 23 states), and 23% for bariatric surgery (from 35 to 43 states). The proportion of Medicaid programs indicating coverage increased by 133% for nutritional counseling (from 9 to 21 states) and 9% for bariatric surgery (from 45 to 49 states), with no net increase for pharmacotherapy (16 states in both plan years). CONCLUSIONS: Coverage for adult obesity care improved substantially in Medicaid and state employee insurance programs since 2009. However, recommended treatment modalities are still not covered in many states. Where coverage has expanded, educating providers and beneficiaries on the availability and proper use of evidence-based obesity treatments may improve health outcomes.

21 Article Prevalence trends tell us what did not precipitate the US obesity epidemic. 2018

Rodgers, Anthony / Woodward, Alistair / Swinburn, Boyd / Dietz, William H. ·University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Section of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand. Electronic address: a.woodward@auckland.ac.nz. · Section of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand. · George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA. ·Lancet Public Health · Pubmed #29501260.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Article Double-duty solutions for the double burden of malnutrition. 2017

Dietz, William H. ·Sumner M Redstone Global Center for Prevention and Wellness, Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052, USA. Electronic address: bdietz@gwu.edu. ·Lancet · Pubmed #29029895.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

23 Article Excessive Weight Gain, Obesity, and Cancer: Opportunities for Clinical Intervention. 2017

Massetti, Greta M / Dietz, William H / Richardson, Lisa C. ·Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia. · Redstone Global Center for Prevention and Wellness, Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University, Washington, DC. ·JAMA · Pubmed #28973170.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

24 Article Time to Adopt New Measures of Severe Obesity in Children and Adolescents. 2017

Dietz, William H. ·Sumner M. Redstone Global Center for Prevention and Wellness, Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University, Washington, District of Columbia dietzwcd4@gmail.com. ·Pediatrics · Pubmed #28830921.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

25 Article Current attitudes and practices of obesity counselling by health care providers. 2017

Petrin, Christine / Kahan, Scott / Turner, Monique / Gallagher, Christine / Dietz, William H. ·George Washington University, 950 New Hampshire Ave. 3rd floor, Washington, D.C. 20037, United States. Electronic address: cepetrin@gwmail.gwu.edu. · George Washington University, 950 New Hampshire Ave. 3rd floor, Washington, D.C. 20037, United States. Electronic address: kahan@gwu.edu. · George Washington University, 950 New Hampshire Ave. 3rd floor, Washington, D.C. 20037, United States. Electronic address: mmturner@email.gwu.edu. · George Washington University, 950 New Hampshire Ave. 3rd floor, Washington, D.C. 20037, United States. Electronic address: cqgallagher@email.gwu.edu. · George Washington University, 950 New Hampshire Ave. 3rd floor, Washington, D.C. 20037, United States. Electronic address: bdietz@email.gwu.edu. ·Obes Res Clin Pract · Pubmed #27569863.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Relatively few patients receive obesity counselling consistent with the USPSTF guidelines, and many health care professionals (HCPs) are biased in their attitudes towards obesity management. METHODS: A national sample of family physicians, internists, OB/GYN physicians, and nurse practitioners (NPs) completed a web-based survey of beliefs, practice, and knowledge regarding obesity management. RESULTS: A majority of HCPs believe that it is both the patient's and the provider's responsibility to ensure that the patient is counselled about obesity. Obesity (77%), obesity-related diseases (79%), or obesity-related risk factors (71%) prompt HCPs to offer obesity counselling; 59% of HCPs wait for the patient to broach the subject of their weight. Increased blood pressure (89%) and heart disease risks (90%) are the most common themes in counselling. Across all HCPs except NPs "exercise" is discussed more frequently than "physical activity" (85% vs 81%), "diet" more frequently than "eating habits" (77% vs 75%), and "obesity" more frequently than "unhealthy weight" (60% vs 45%). NPs are more likely to discuss physical activity, eating habits, and unhealthy weight instead. To improve counselling for obesity, HCPs reported needing more time (70%), training in obesity management (53%), improved reimbursement (53%), and better tools to help patients recognise obesity risks (50%). Obesity-related diseases, risk factors, or obesity alone predict obesity counselling amongst HCPs. CONCLUSION: Better training in weight management and tools to help patients recognise risks appear to be key elements in helping patients compare the risks of what they may consider invasive therapy against the risks of continued obesity.

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