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Obesity: HELP
Articles from Yale University
Based on 754 articles published since 2010
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These are the 754 published articles about Obesity that originated from Yale University during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Management of Hyperglycemia in Type 2 Diabetes, 2018. A Consensus Report by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD). 2018

Davies, Melanie J / D'Alessio, David A / Fradkin, Judith / Kernan, Walter N / Mathieu, Chantal / Mingrone, Geltrude / Rossing, Peter / Tsapas, Apostolos / Wexler, Deborah J / Buse, John B. ·Diabetes Research Centre, University of Leicester, Leicester, U.K. · Leicester Diabetes Centre, Leicester General Hospital, Leicester, U.K. · Department of Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC. · National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. · Department of Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT. · Clinical and Experimental Endocrinology, UZ Gasthuisberg, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Internal Medicine, Catholic University, Rome, Italy. · Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences, King's College London, London, U.K. · Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen, Gentofte, Denmark. · University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Second Medical Department, Aristotle University Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Department of Medicine and Diabetes Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC jbuse@med.unc.edu. ·Diabetes Care · Pubmed #30291106.

ABSTRACT: The American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes convened a panel to update the prior position statements, published in 2012 and 2015, on the management of type 2 diabetes in adults. A systematic evaluation of the literature since 2014 informed new recommendations. These include additional focus on lifestyle management and diabetes self-management education and support. For those with obesity, efforts targeting weight loss, including lifestyle, medication, and surgical interventions, are recommended. With regards to medication management, for patients with clinical cardiovascular disease, a sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor or a glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist with proven cardiovascular benefit is recommended. For patients with chronic kidney disease or clinical heart failure and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, an SGLT2 inhibitor with proven benefit is recommended. GLP-1 receptor agonists are generally recommended as the first injectable medication.

2 Guideline Practice Policy Statement: Integrating Effective Weight Management Into Practice. 2016

Edshteyn, Ingrid / Uduhiri, Kelechi A / Morgan, Toyosi O / Rhodes, Katrina L / Sherin, Kevin M / Anonymous11910873. ·Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center, Derby, Connecticut. Electronic address: iedshteyn@gmail.com. · Providence Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia. · Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · American Association of Public Health Physicians, Green Cove Springs, Florida. · Department of Family Medicine, Florida State University College of Medicine, Tallahassee, Florida; University of Central Florida College of Medicine, Orlando, Florida; Florida Department of Health in Orange County, Orlando, Florida. ·Am J Prev Med · Pubmed #27374207.

ABSTRACT: The American College of Preventive Medicine Prevention Practice Committee contributes to policy guidelines and recommendations on preventive health topics for clinicians and public health decision makers. As an update to a previously published statement on weight management counseling of overweight adults, the College is providing a consensus-based recommendation designed to more effectively integrate weight management strategies into clinical practice and to incorporate referrals to effective evidence-based community and commercial weight management programs. The goal is to empower providers to include lifestyle interventions as part of the foundation of clinical practice.

3 Editorial Comment on: Operative time as a marker of quality in bariatric surgery. 2019

Ghiassi, Saber. ·Department of Surgery, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut. ·Surg Obes Relat Dis · Pubmed #31427105.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial Comment on: Systematic review and retrospective validation demonstrate prediction models can predict weight loss after bariatric surgery. 2017

Ghiassi, Saber. ·Department of Surgery, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut. ·Surg Obes Relat Dis · Pubmed #29031943.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial Physical Activity Prevents Obesity and Heart Failure: Now What Are We Going to Do About It? 2017

Ahmad, Tariq / Testani, Jeffrey M. ·Section of Cardiovascular Medicine, Yale New Haven Hospital, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut. Electronic address: tariq.ahmad@yale.edu. · Section of Cardiovascular Medicine, Yale New Haven Hospital, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut. ·JACC Heart Fail · Pubmed #28449798.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial We are not in Kansas anymore: The unfamiliar landscape of NASH. 2016

Mehal, Wajahat Z. ·Section of Digestive Diseases, Yale University, New Haven, CT. ·Hepatology · Pubmed #26567082.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Editorial: "Crowning" eosinophils in adipose tissue: does location matter? 2015

Goldberg, Emily L / Dixit, Vishwa Deep. ·Section of Comparative Medicine and Department of Immunobiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. · Section of Comparative Medicine and Department of Immunobiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA vishwa.dixit@yale.edu. ·J Leukoc Biol · Pubmed #26429777.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Obesity increases stroke risk in young adults: opportunity for prevention. 2015

Kernan, Walter N / Dearborn, Jennifer L. ·From the Departments of Internal Medicine (W.N.K.) and Neurology (J.L.D.), Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT. Walter.Kernan@Yale.Edu. · From the Departments of Internal Medicine (W.N.K.) and Neurology (J.L.D.), Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT. ·Stroke · Pubmed #25944321.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Oblivobesity: looking over the overweight that parents keep overlooking. 2015

Katz, David L. ·Editor-in-Chief, Childhood Obesity; Director, Yale University Prevention Research Center, Griffin Hospital, Derby, CT. ·Child Obes · Pubmed #25923983.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Raising kids, in a cultural blind spot. 2015

Katz, David L. ·Editor-in-Chief, Childhood Obesity; Director, Yale University Prevention Research Center , Griffin Hospital, Derby, CT. ·Child Obes · Pubmed #25692866.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Diets, diatribes, and a dearth of data. 2014

Katz, David L. ·From the Department of Medicine, Yale University Prevention Research Center, Griffin Hospital, Derby, CT. davkatz7@gmail.com rockiy.ayettey@yalegriffinprc.org. ·Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes · Pubmed #25387773.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Obesity. Introduction. 2014

Monsey, Melissa S / Gerhard, Danielle M. ·Issue Editors, Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut. ·Yale J Biol Med · Pubmed #24910555.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial Childhood obesity trends: time for champagne? 2014

Katz, David L. ·Editor-in-Chief, Childhood Obesity; Director, Yale University Prevention Research Center , Griffin Hospital, Derby, CT. ·Child Obes · Pubmed #24738484.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial Are our children "diseased"? 2014

Katz, David L. ·Editor-in-Chief, Childhood Obesity; Director, Yale University Prevention Research Center , Griffin Hospital, Derby, CT. ·Child Obes · Pubmed #24450383.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Editorial Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in obese adolescents: a looming marker of cardiac dysfunction. 2014

Santoro, Nicola / Caprio, Sonia. ·Department of Pediatrics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT. ·Hepatology · Pubmed #23913480.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Review Mitochondrial Dynamics and Microglia as New Targets in Metabolism Regulation. 2020

Chiurazzi, Martina / Di Maro, Martina / Cozzolino, Mauro / Colantuoni, Antonio. ·Program in Integrative Cell Signaling and Neurobiology of Metabolism, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA. · Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA. · Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, University of Naples "Federico II", 80131 Naples, Italy. · Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Rey Juan Carlos University, Calle Tulipán, Móstoles, 28933 Madrid, Spain. · IVIRMA, IVI Foundation, Health Research Institute La Fe, Avenida Fernando Abril Martorell, 106, 46026 Valencia, Spain. ·Int J Mol Sci · Pubmed #32414136.

ABSTRACT: Energy homeostasis regulation is essential for the maintenance of life. Neuronal hypothalamic populations are involved in the regulation of energy balance. In order play this role, they require energy: mitochondria, indeed, have a key role in ensuring a constant energy supply to neurons. Mitochondria are cellular organelles that are involved in dynamic processes; their dysfunction has been associated with many diseases, such as obesity and type 2 diabetes, indicating their importance in cellular metabolism and bioenergetics. Food intake excess can induce mitochondrial dysfunction with consequent production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress. Several studies have shown the involvement of mitochondrial dynamics in the modulation of releasing agouti-related protein (AgRP) and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neuronal activity, although the mechanisms are still unclear. However, recent studies have shown that changes in mitochondrial metabolism, such as in inflammation, can contribute also to the activation of the microglial system in several diseases, especially degenerative diseases. This review is aimed to summarize the link between mitochondrial dynamics and hypothalamic neurons in the regulation of glucose and energy homeostasis. Furthermore, we focus on the importance of microglia activation in the pathogenesis of many diseases, such as obesity, and on the relationship with mitochondrial dynamics, although this process is still largely unknown.

17 Review Metabolic Disorders with Kidney Transplant. 2020

Cohen, Elizabeth / Korah, Maria / Callender, Glenda / Belfort de Aguiar, Renata / Haakinson, Danielle. ·Department of Pharmacy, Yale-New Haven Hospital, New Haven, Connecticut. · Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut. · Department of Surgery, Section of Endocrine Surgery, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut. · Department of Medicine, Section of Endocrinology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut. · Department of Surgery, Section of Transplant, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut danielle.haakinson@yale.edu. ·Clin J Am Soc Nephrol · Pubmed #32284323.

ABSTRACT: Metabolic disorders are highly prevalent in kidney transplant candidates and recipients and can adversely affect post-transplant graft outcomes. Management of diabetes, hyperparathyroidism, and obesity presents distinct opportunities to optimize patients both before and after transplant as well as the ability to track objective data over time to assess a patient's ability to partner effectively with the health care team and adhere to complex treatment regimens. Optimization of these particular disorders can most dramatically decrease the risk of surgical and cardiovascular complications post-transplant. Approximately 60% of nondiabetic patients experience hyperglycemia in the immediate post-transplant phase. Multiple risk factors have been identified related to development of new onset diabetes after transplant, and it is estimated that upward of 7%-30% of patients will develop new onset diabetes within the first year post-transplant. There are a number of medications studied in the kidney transplant population for diabetes management, and recent data and the risks and benefits of each regimen should be optimized. Secondary hyperparathyroidism occurs in most patients with CKD and can persist after kidney transplant in up to 66% of patients, despite an initial decrease in parathyroid hormone levels. Parathyroidectomy and medical management are the options for treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism, but there is no randomized, controlled trial providing clear recommendations for optimal management, and patient-specific factors should be considered. Obesity is the most common metabolic disorder affecting the transplant population in both the pre- and post-transplant phases of care. Not only does obesity have associations and interactions with comorbid illnesses, such as diabetes, dyslipidemia, and cardiovascular disease, all of which increase morbidity and mortality post-transplant, but it also is intimately inter-related with access to transplantation for patients with kidney failure. We review these metabolic disorders and their management, including data in patients with kidney transplants.

18 Review Safety and Efficacy of Bariatric and Metabolic Surgery. 2020

Ghiassi, Saber / Morton, John M. ·Department of Surgery, Division of Bariatric and Gastrointestinal Surgery, Yale School of Medicine, P.O. Box 208062, New Haven, CT, 06520, USA. Saber.ghiassi@yale.edu. · Department of Surgery, Division of Bariatric and Gastrointestinal Surgery, Yale School of Medicine, P.O. Box 208062, New Haven, CT, 06520, USA. ·Curr Obes Rep · Pubmed #32253662.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Bariatric surgery is the most effective and durable method for treating obesity. This review highlights the results and safety of bariatric surgery. RECENT FINDINGS: The global prevalence of obesity and its related comorbidities including cancer are on the rise. Bariatric surgery has demonstrated more robust and durable weight loss than current medical treatment. Bariatric surgery also reduces significantly the risk of complications associated with obesity comorbidities, such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease, and the risk of mortality in comparison with medical management. Due to accreditation efforts, the safety profile of bariatric surgery is equivalent or superior to many common operations. Obesity is associated with increased all cause morbidity and mortality. The current bariatric procedures produce significant and durable weight loss and reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with obesity-related diseases substantially. The risk/benefit ratio for bariatric surgery is decidedly in favor for the benefit for bariatric surgery.

19 Review The Role of the General Nephrologist in Evaluating Patients for Kidney Transplantation: Core Curriculum 2020. 2020

Virmani, Sarthak / Asch, William S. ·Section of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT. · Section of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT. Electronic address: william.asch@yale.edu. ·Am J Kidney Dis · Pubmed #32199707.

ABSTRACT: Transplantation is the preferred modality of replacement therapy for most patients with kidney failure. In the United States, more than 3,000 new patients are registered each month on the kidney transplant waiting list for this life-saving therapy. A potential kidney transplant recipient's evaluation typically begins with a referral by the general nephrologist to a transplantation center. In this installment in the Core Curriculum in Nephrology, we endeavor to achieve a shared understanding of the patient factors that contribute to optimal patient and allograft outcomes following kidney transplantation. In addition, we provide a primer on the routine listing, evaluation, testing, and candidate selection process in an effort to demystify the current criteria commonly used by transplantation centers. Issues common to a majority of candidates, including cardiovascular health, frailty as a measure of biological age, history of prior malignancy, and high body mass index are reviewed in detail. With this knowledge, we hope to facilitate improved communication between general and transplantation nephrologists.

20 Review Cardiometabolic risk reduction after metabolic surgery. 2019

Pareek, Manan / Bhatt, Deepak L. ·Brigham and Women's Hospital Heart & Vascular Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Internal Medicine, Yale New Haven Hospital, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. · Department of Cardiology, North Zealand Hospital, Hilleroed, Denmark. ·Curr Opin Cardiol · Pubmed #31524661.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Metabolic surgery provides the largest and most durable weight loss in persons with obesity. There is abundant randomized evidence to show its superiority over medical treatment alone in achieving improved glycemic control. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent trials have also demonstrated a significant reduction in cardiovascular risk factor burden, whereas data from observational studies suggest an ability to reduce overt cardiovascular events and mortality. SUMMARY: In this review, we briefly describe the surgical procedures involved and their indications. We further provide a summary of the effects of metabolic surgery on weight loss, glycemic control, and clinical outcomes.

21 Review Changes in Alcohol Use after Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery: Predictors and Mechanisms. 2019

Ivezaj, Valentina / Benoit, Stephen C / Davis, Jon / Engel, Scott / Lloret-Linares, Celia / Mitchell, James E / Pepino, M Yanina / Rogers, Ann M / Steffen, Kristine / Sogg, Stephanie. ·Yale School of Medicine, 301 Cedar Street, 2nd Floor, New Haven, CT, 06519, USA. valentina.ivezaj@yale.edu. · University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, 45237, USA. · Washington State University, Pullman, WA, 99164, USA. · Sanford Research, Fargo, ND, 58103, USA. · Maladies Nutritionnelles et métaboliques, Ramsay-Générale de Santé, Hôpital Privé Pays de Savoie, 74105, Annemasse, France. · University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Fargo, ND, 58202, USA. · University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, Urbana, IL, 61801, USA. · Penn State Health Milton S Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA, 17033, USA. · Massachusetts General Hospital Weight Center, Boston, MA, 02114, USA. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. ·Curr Psychiatry Rep · Pubmed #31410716.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review synthesized the literature on predictors and mechanisms of post-bariatric alcohol problems, in order to guide future research on prevention and treatment targets. RECENT FINDINGS: Consistent evidence suggests an elevated risk of developing problems with alcohol following bariatric surgery. While there is a paucity of empirical data on predictors of problematic alcohol use after bariatric surgery, being male, a younger age, smoking, regular alcohol consumption, pre-surgical alcohol use disorder, and a lower sense of belonging have predicted alcohol misuse post-operatively. This review synthesizes potential mechanisms including specific bariatric surgical procedures, peptides and reinforcement/reward pathways, pharmacokinetics, and genetic influences. Finally, potential misperceptions regarding mechanisms are explored. Certain bariatric procedures elevate the risk of alcohol misuse post-operatively. Future research should serve to elucidate the complexities of reward signaling, genetically mediated mechanisms, and pharmacokinetics in relation to alcohol use across gender and developmental period by surgery type.

22 Review Risk Factors of Obesity in Veterans of Recent Conflicts: Need for Diabetes Prevention. 2019

Wischik, Dora Lendvai / Magny-Normilus, Cherlie / Whittemore, Robin. ·Yale School of Nursing, 400 West Campus Drive, Orange, CT, 06477, USA. dora.wischik@yale.edu. · Yale School of Nursing, 400 West Campus Drive, Orange, CT, 06477, USA. ·Curr Diab Rep · Pubmed #31368008.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To identify factors associated with obesity in veterans of the recent, Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), and Operation New Dawn (OND) war conflicts. RECENT FINDINGS: Over 44% OEF/OIF/OND veterans are obese (BMI > 30 kg/m

23 Review Challenges of Robotic Gynecologic Surgery in Morbidly Obese Patients and How to Optimize Success. 2019

Menderes, Gulden / Gysler, Stefan M / Vadivelu, Nalini / Silasi, Dan-Arin. ·Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Yale University School of Medicine, PO Box 208063, New Haven, CT, 06520-806, USA. gulden.menderes@yale.edu. · Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Yale University School of Medicine, PO Box 208063, New Haven, CT, 06520-806, USA. · Department of Anesthesiology, Yale University School of Medicine, PO Box 20805, New Haven, CT, 06520-8051, USA. ·Curr Pain Headache Rep · Pubmed #31263977.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Robotic surgery has been shown to have a significant benefit in obese gynecologic patients over open surgery. However, robotic surgery in these patients requires a thorough understanding of the physiologic adaptations caused by obesity, adequate preoperative optimization, specialized equipment and techniques, and careful attention to intra- and postoperative management in order to minimize complications. This article reviews the benefits of a minimally invasive approach in obese patients and provides a thorough guide to perioperative management of obese patients undergoing robotic gynecologic surgery. A useful set of tips and tricks to overcome many of the technical challenges in performing robotic surgery in the obese patients is included. RECENT FINDINGS: In the USA, obesity has risen to affect 39.8% of the population, which leads to increased incidence of mortality, hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. Moreover, obese patients are at greater risk of perioperative complications during gynecologic surgery. With the use of laparoscopy, many of the perioperative risks of surgery in obese patients can be ameliorated. However, minimally invasive surgery in obese patients is technically challenging. Robotic-assisted laparoscopy addresses several of these challenges, allowing surgeons to offer minimally invasive approaches to patients with extreme BMIs while reducing perioperative risk. Obese patients undergoing gynecologic surgery receive a greater benefit than their non-obese counterparts from a laparoscopic approach, and current data support the safety and feasibility of robotic surgery in the obese population. Therefore, every effort to offer a minimally invasive surgery to obese patients should be made.

24 Review Promises of Nanotherapeutics in Obesity. 2019

Ash, Garrett I / Kim, Dongin / Choudhury, Mahua. ·School of Nursing, Yale University, West Haven, CT, USA. · Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Irma Lerma Rangel College of Pharmacy, Texas A&M Health Science Center, College Station, TX, USA. · Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Irma Lerma Rangel College of Pharmacy, Texas A&M Health Science Center, College Station, TX, USA. Electronic address: mchoudhury@pharmacy.tamhsc.edu. ·Trends Endocrinol Metab · Pubmed #31126754.

ABSTRACT: The application of nanotechnology to medicine promises a wide range of new tools and possibilities, from earlier diagnostics and improved imaging, to better, more efficient, and more targeted therapies. This emerging field could help address obesity, with advances in drug delivery, nutraceuticals, and genetic and epigenetic therapeutics. Its application to obesity is still largely in the development phase. Here, we review the novel angle of nanotech applied to human consumable products and their specific applications to addressing obesity through nutraceuticals, with respect to benefits and limitations of current nanotechnology methods. Further, we review potential future applications to deliver genetic and epigenetic miRNA therapeutics. Finally, we discuss future directions, including theranostics, combinatory therapy, and personalized medicine.

25 Review Assembling the adipose organ: adipocyte lineage segregation and adipogenesis 2019

Sebo, Zachary L / Rodeheffer, Matthew S. ·Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8103, USA. · Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8103, USA matthew.rodeheffer@yale.edu. · Department of Comparative Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520-8016, USA. · Yale Stem Cell Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520-8073, USA. · Program in Integrative Cell Signaling and Neurobiology of Metabolism, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510, USA. ·Development · Pubmed #30948523.

ABSTRACT: Adipose tissue is composed of anatomically distinct depots that mediate several important aspects of energy homeostasis. The past two decades have witnessed increased research effort to elucidate the ontogenetic basis of adipose form and function. In this Review, we discuss advances in our understanding of adipose tissue development with particular emphasis on the embryonic patterning of depot-specific adipocyte lineages and adipocyte differentiation

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