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Obesity: HELP
Articles from California
Based on 4,334 articles published since 2008
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These are the 4334 published articles about Obesity that originated from California during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Joint AAD-NPF guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with awareness and attention to comorbidities. 2019

Elmets, Craig A / Leonardi, Craig L / Davis, Dawn M R / Gelfand, Joel M / Lichten, Jason / Mehta, Nehal N / Armstrong, April W / Connor, Cody / Cordoro, Kelly M / Elewski, Boni E / Gordon, Kenneth B / Gottlieb, Alice B / Kaplan, Daniel H / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Kivelevitch, Dario / Kiselica, Matthew / Korman, Neil J / Kroshinsky, Daniela / Lebwohl, Mark / Lim, Henry W / Paller, Amy S / Parra, Sylvia L / Pathy, Arun L / Prater, Elizabeth Farley / Rupani, Reena / Siegel, Michael / Stoff, Benjamin / Strober, Bruce E / Wong, Emily B / Wu, Jashin J / Hariharan, Vidhya / Menter, Alan. ·University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama. · Central Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Dermatology, University of California San Francisco School of MedicineSan Francisco, California. · Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York, New York. · University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · University of California San Diego, San Diego, California. · Baylor Scott and White, Dallas, Texas. · University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Dermatology and Skin Surgery, Sumter, South Carolina. · Colorado Permanente Medical Group, Centennial, Colorado. · University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Connecticut, Farmington, Connecticut; Probity Medical Research, Waterloo, Canada. · San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, Joint-Base San Antonio, Texas. · Dermatology Research and Education Foundation, Irvine, California. · American Academy of Dermatology, Rosemont, Illinois. Electronic address: vhariharan@aad.org. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30772097.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory, multisystem disease that affects up to 3.2% of the US population. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in psoriasis management and care, providing recommendations on the basis of available evidence.

2 Guideline Behavioral Weight Loss Interventions to Prevent Obesity-Related Morbidity and Mortality in Adults: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. 2018

Anonymous2681258 / Curry, Susan J / Krist, Alex H / Owens, Douglas K / Barry, Michael J / Caughey, Aaron B / Davidson, Karina W / Doubeni, Chyke A / Epling, John W / Grossman, David C / Kemper, Alex R / Kubik, Martha / Landefeld, C Seth / Mangione, Carol M / Phipps, Maureen G / Silverstein, Michael / Simon, Melissa A / Tseng, Chien-Wen / Wong, John B. ·University of Iowa, Iowa City. · Fairfax Family Practice Residency, Fairfax, Virginia. · Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond. · Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California. · Stanford University, Stanford, California. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Oregon Health & Science University, Portland. · Columbia University, New York, New York. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, Roanoke. · Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, Seattle. · Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio. · Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · University of Alabama at Birmingham. · University of California, Los Angeles. · Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island. · Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts. · Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois. · University of Hawaii, Honolulu. · Pacific Health Research and Education Institute, Honolulu, Hawaii. · Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts. ·JAMA · Pubmed #30326502.

ABSTRACT: Importance: More than 35% of men and 40% of women in the United States are obese. Obesity is associated with health problems such as increased risk for coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, various types of cancer, gallstones, and disability. Obesity is also associated with an increased risk for death, particularly among adults younger than 65 years. Objective: To update the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) 2012 recommendation on screening for obesity in adults. Evidence Review: The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on interventions (behavioral and pharmacotherapy) for weight loss or weight loss maintenance that can be provided in or referred from a primary care setting. Surgical weight loss interventions and nonsurgical weight loss devices (eg, gastric balloons) are considered to be outside the scope of the primary care setting. Findings: The USPSTF found adequate evidence that intensive, multicomponent behavioral interventions in adults with obesity can lead to clinically significant improvements in weight status and reduce the incidence of type 2 diabetes among adults with obesity and elevated plasma glucose levels; these interventions are of moderate benefit. The USPSTF found adequate evidence that behavior-based weight loss maintenance interventions are of moderate benefit. The USPSTF found adequate evidence that the harms of intensive, multicomponent behavioral interventions (including weight loss maintenance interventions) in adults with obesity are small to none. Therefore, the USPSTF concludes with moderate certainty that offering or referring adults with obesity to intensive behavioral interventions or behavior-based weight loss maintenance interventions has a moderate net benefit. Conclusions and Recommendation: The USPSTF recommends that clinicians offer or refer adults with a body mass index of 30 or higher to intensive, multicomponent behavioral interventions. (B recommendation).

3 Guideline American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery and American Hernia Society consensus guideline on bariatric surgery and hernia surgery. 2018

Menzo, Emanuele Lo / Hinojosa, Marcelo / Carbonell, Alfredo / Krpata, David / Carter, Jonathan / Rogers, Ann M. ·Section of Minimally Invasive and Endoscopic Surgery, Cleveland Clinic Florida, The Bariatric and Metabolic Institute, Weston, Florida. · Department of Surgery, University of California, Irvine Medical Center, Irvine, California. · Department of Surgery, Division of Minimal Access and Bariatric Surgery, Greenville Health System, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Greenville, South Carolina. · Comprehensive Hernia Center, Digestive Disease and Surgical Institute, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio. · Department of Surgery, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, California. · Department of Surgery, The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania. Electronic address: arogers@pennstatehealth.psu.edu. ·Surg Obes Relat Dis · Pubmed #30154033.

ABSTRACT: The American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery issues the following guidelines for the purpose of enhancing quality of care in hernia treatment through metabolic and bariatric surgery. In this statement, suggestions for management are presented that are derived from available knowledge, peer-reviewed scientific literature, and expert opinion. This was accomplished by performing a review of currently available literature regarding obesity, obesity treatments, and hernia surgery. The intent of issuing such a guideline is to provide objective information regarding the impact of obesity treatment on effective and durable hernia repair. The guideline may be revised in the future should additional evidence become available.

4 Guideline Pediatric Obesity-Assessment, Treatment, and Prevention: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline. 2017

Styne, Dennis M / Arslanian, Silva A / Connor, Ellen L / Farooqi, Ismaa Sadaf / Murad, M Hassan / Silverstein, Janet H / Yanovski, Jack A. ·University of California Davis, Sacramento, California 95817. · University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15224. · University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53792. · University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, United Kingdom. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905. · University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32607; and. · National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892. ·J Clin Endocrinol Metab · Pubmed #28359099.

ABSTRACT: Cosponsoring Associations: The European Society of Endocrinology and the Pediatric Endocrine Society. This guideline was funded by the Endocrine Society. Objective: To formulate clinical practice guidelines for the assessment, treatment, and prevention of pediatric obesity. Participants: The participants include an Endocrine Society-appointed Task Force of 6 experts, a methodologist, and a medical writer. Evidence: This evidence-based guideline was developed using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach to describe the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. The Task Force commissioned 2 systematic reviews and used the best available evidence from other published systematic reviews and individual studies. Consensus Process: One group meeting, several conference calls, and e-mail communications enabled consensus. Endocrine Society committees and members and co-sponsoring organizations reviewed and commented on preliminary drafts of this guideline. Conclusion: Pediatric obesity remains an ongoing serious international health concern affecting ∼17% of US children and adolescents, threatening their adult health and longevity. Pediatric obesity has its basis in genetic susceptibilities influenced by a permissive environment starting in utero and extending through childhood and adolescence. Endocrine etiologies for obesity are rare and usually are accompanied by attenuated growth patterns. Pediatric comorbidities are common and long-term health complications often result; screening for comorbidities of obesity should be applied in a hierarchal, logical manner for early identification before more serious complications result. Genetic screening for rare syndromes is indicated only in the presence of specific historical or physical features. The psychological toll of pediatric obesity on the individual and family necessitates screening for mental health issues and counseling as indicated. The prevention of pediatric obesity by promoting healthful diet, activity, and environment should be a primary goal, as achieving effective, long-lasting results with lifestyle modification once obesity occurs is difficult. Although some behavioral and pharmacotherapy studies report modest success, additional research into accessible and effective methods for preventing and treating pediatric obesity is needed. The use of weight loss medications during childhood and adolescence should be restricted to clinical trials. Increasing evidence demonstrates the effectiveness of bariatric surgery in the most seriously affected mature teenagers who have failed lifestyle modification, but the use of surgery requires experienced teams with resources for long-term follow-up. Adolescents undergoing lifestyle therapy, medication regimens, or bariatric surgery for obesity will need cohesive planning to help them effectively transition to adult care, with continued necessary monitoring, support, and intervention. Transition programs for obesity are an uncharted area requiring further research for efficacy. Despite a significant increase in research on pediatric obesity since the initial publication of these guidelines 8 years ago, further study is needed of the genetic and biological factors that increase the risk of weight gain and influence the response to therapeutic interventions. Also needed are more studies to better understand the genetic and biological factors that cause an obese individual to manifest one comorbidity vs another or to be free of comorbidities. Furthermore, continued investigation into the most effective methods of preventing and treating obesity and into methods for changing environmental and economic factors that will lead to worldwide cultural changes in diet and activity should be priorities. Particular attention to determining ways to effect systemic changes in food environments and total daily mobility, as well as methods for sustaining healthy body mass index changes, is of importance.

5 Guideline White Paper AGA: POWER - Practice Guide on Obesity and Weight Management, Education, and Resources. 2017

Acosta, Andres / Streett, Sarah / Kroh, Mathew D / Cheskin, Lawrence J / Saunders, Katherine H / Kurian, Marina / Schofield, Marsha / Barlow, Sarah E / Aronne, Louis. ·Clinical Enteric Neuroscience Translational and Epidemiological Research (C.E.N.T.E.R.), Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. Electronic address: acostacardenas.andres@mayo.edu. · Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California. · Department of Surgical Endoscopy, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio. · Johns Hopkins Weight Management Center, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland. · Comprehensive Weight Control Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York and representative of The Obesity Society. · Department of Minimally Invasive Surgery, New York University, New York, New York. · Nutrition Services Coverage, Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Chicago, Illinois. · Baylor College of Medicine and Center for Childhood Obesity, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas and representative of North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. ·Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol · Pubmed #28242319.

ABSTRACT: The epidemic of obesity continues at alarming rates, with a high burden to our economy and society. The American Gastroenterological Association understands the importance of embracing obesity as a chronic, relapsing disease and supports a multidisciplinary approach to the management of obesity. Because gastrointestinal disorders resulting from obesity are more frequent and often present sooner than type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease, gastroenterologists have an opportunity to address obesity and provide an effective therapy early. Patients who are overweight or obese already fill gastroenterology clinics with gastroesophageal reflux disease and its associated risks of Barrett's esophagus and esophageal cancer, gallstone disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, and colon cancer. Obesity is a major modifiable cause of diseases of the digestive tract that frequently goes unaddressed. As internists, specialists in digestive disorders, and endoscopists, gastroenterologists are in a unique position to play an important role in the multidisciplinary treatment of obesity. This American Gastroenterological Association paper was developed with content contribution from Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons, The Obesity Society, Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, and North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, endorsed with input by American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, and Obesity Medicine Association, and describes POWER: Practice Guide on Obesity and Weight Management, Education and Resources. Its objective is to provide physicians with a comprehensive, multidisciplinary process to guide and personalize innovative obesity care for safe and effective weight management.

6 Guideline American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery position statement on intragastric balloon therapy endorsed by the Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons. 2016

Ali, Mohamed R / Moustarah, Fady / Kim, Julie J / Anonymous1150864. ·Department of Surgery, University of California-Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California. Electronic address: mrali@ucdavis.edu. · Faculty of Medical Sciences & Neuroscience Research Center, Lebanese University, Beirut, Lebanon; Department of Surgery, Central Michigan University College of Medicine, Mount Pleasant, Michigan. · Department of Surgery, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts. ·Surg Obes Relat Dis · Pubmed #27056407.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Guideline Lipids and bariatric procedures Part 2 of 2: scientific statement from the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS), the National Lipid Association (NLA), and Obesity Medicine Association (OMA). 2016

Bays, Harold / Kothari, Shanu N / Azagury, Dan E / Morton, John M / Nguyen, Ninh T / Jones, Peter H / Jacobson, Terry A / Cohen, David E / Orringer, Carl / Westman, Eric C / Horn, Deborah B / Scinta, Wendy / Primack, Craig. ·Louisville Metabolic and Atherosclerosis Research Center, Louisville, Kentucky. · Department of General Surgery, Gundersen Health System, La Crosse, Wisconsin. Electronic address: snkothar@gundersenhealth.org. · Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California. · Department of Surgery, University of California Irvine Medical Center, Orange, California. · Methodist DeBakey Heart and Vascular Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. · Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. · Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · University of Miami Hospital, Miami, Florida. · Duke University Health System, Durham, North Carolina. · University of Texas Medical School, Houston, Texas. · Medical Weight Loss of New York, Fayetteville, New York. · Scottsdale Weight Loss, Scottsdale, Arizona. ·Surg Obes Relat Dis · Pubmed #27050404.

ABSTRACT: Bariatric procedures generally improve dyslipidemia, sometimes substantially so. Bariatric procedures also improve other major cardiovascular risk factors. This 2-part Scientific Statement examines the lipid effects of bariatric procedures and reflects contributions from authors representing the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS), the National Lipid Association (NLA), and the Obesity Medicine Association (OMA). Part 1 was published in the Journal of Clinical Lipidology, and reviewed the impact of bariatric procedures upon adipose tissue endocrine and immune factors, adipose tissue lipid metabolism, as well as the lipid effects of bariatric procedures relative to bile acids and intestinal microbiota. This Part 2 reviews: (1) the importance of nutrients (fats, carbohydrates, and proteins) and their absorption on lipid levels; (2) the effects of bariatric procedures on gut hormones and lipid levels; (3) the effects of bariatric procedures on nonlipid cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors; (4) the effects of bariatric procedures on lipid levels; (5) effects of bariatric procedures on CVD; and finally, (6) the potential lipid effects of vitamin, mineral, and trace element deficiencies, that may occur after bariatric procedures.

8 Guideline American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery position statement on long-term survival benefit after metabolic and bariatric surgery. 2016

Kim, Julie / Eisenberg, Dan / Azagury, Dan / Rogers, Ann / Campos, Guilherme M. ·Department of Surgery, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: jkim7@tuftsmedicalcenter.org. · Department of Surgery, Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California. · Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California. · Department of Surgery, Penn State University, Hershey, Pennsylvania. · Division of Bariatric and Gastrointestinal Surgery, Department of Surgery, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia. ·Surg Obes Relat Dis · Pubmed #26944548.

ABSTRACT: The following position statement has been issued by the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery in response to numerous inquiries made to the Society by patients, physicians, society members, hospitals, health insurance payors, the media, and others regarding the benefit of metabolic and bariatric surgery on long-term survival. An overview of the current available published peer-reviewed scientific evidence is presented.

9 Guideline Endocrine and nutritional management of the post-bariatric surgery patient: an Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline. 2010

Heber, David / Greenway, Frank L / Kaplan, Lee M / Livingston, Edward / Salvador, Javier / Still, Christopher / Anonymous3110678. ·David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA. ·J Clin Endocrinol Metab · Pubmed #21051578.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: We sought to provide guidelines for the nutritional and endocrine management of adults after bariatric surgery, including those with diabetes mellitus. The focus is on the immediate postoperative period and long-term management to prevent complications, weight regain, and progression of obesity-associated comorbidities. The treatment of specific disorders is only summarized. PARTICIPANTS: The Task Force was composed of a chair, five additional experts, a methodologist, and a medical writer. It received no corporate funding or remuneration. CONCLUSIONS: Bariatric surgery is not a guarantee of successful weight loss and maintenance. Increasingly, patients regain weight, especially those undergoing restrictive surgeries such as laparoscopic banding rather than malabsorptive surgeries such as Roux-en-Y bypass. Active nutritional patient education and clinical management to prevent and detect nutritional deficiencies are recommended for all patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Management of potential nutritional deficiencies is particularly important for patients undergoing malabsorptive procedures, and strategies should be employed to compensate for food intolerance in patients who have had a malabsorptive procedure to reduce the risk for clinically important nutritional deficiencies. To enhance the transition to life after bariatric surgery and to prevent weight regain and nutritional complications, all patients should receive care from a multidisciplinary team including an experienced primary care physician, endocrinologist, or gastroenterologist and consider enrolling postoperatively in a comprehensive program for nutrition and lifestyle management. Future research should address the effectiveness of intensive postoperative nutritional and endocrine care in reducing morbidity and mortality from obesity-associated chronic diseases.

10 Editorial Comment on: Adipose tissue and the physiologic underpinnings of metabolic disease. 2018

Wisbach, Gordon G. ·Department of General Surgery, Naval Medical Center San Diego, San Diego, California. ·Surg Obes Relat Dis · Pubmed #30340866.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Comment on: postoperative outcomes based on patient participation in a presurgery education and weight management program. 2018

Felix, Edward L. ·Marian Hospital, Santa Maria, California. ·Surg Obes Relat Dis · Pubmed #30279079.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Can Real World Evidence on Body Mass Index Trajectories Inform Clinical Practice? 2018

Addala, Ananta / Maahs, David M. ·Pediatrics/Endocrinology Stanford University Stanford, California. · Pediatrics/Endocrinology Stanford University Stanford, California. Electronic address: dmaahs@stanford.edu. ·J Pediatr · Pubmed #30025670.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial Comment on: insurance-mandated preoperative diet and outcomes after bariatric surgery. 2018

Billy, Helmuth / DeMaria, Eric J. ·Ventura, California. · Department of Bariatric Surgery Bon Secours Maryview Medical Center Richmond, Virginia. ·Surg Obes Relat Dis · Pubmed #29776491.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial Comment on: the incidence of complications associated with loop duodeno-ileostomy after single-anastomosis duodenal switch procedures among 1328 patients: a multicenter experience. 2018

Felix, Edward L. ·Marian Hospital, Santa Maria, California. ·Surg Obes Relat Dis · Pubmed #29477375.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Editorial The Value of the National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research: Past, Present, and Future. 2018

Sallis, James F. ·Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, California. Electronic address: jsallis@ucsd.edu. ·Am J Prev Med · Pubmed #29455761.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Editorial Growing Insights into Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema. 2018

Rockson, Stanley G. ·Stanford University School of Medicine , Stanford, California. ·Lymphat Res Biol · Pubmed #29432070.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Editorial Comment on: cost analysis and risk factors for interval cholecystectomy following bariatric surgery: a national study. 2018

Felix, Edward L. ·Marian Hospital, Santa Maria, California. ·Surg Obes Relat Dis · Pubmed #29306611.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Editorial Comment on: improving the side-to-side stapled anastomosis: comparison of staplers for robust crotch formation. 2018

Juo, Yen-Yi / Dutson, Erik. ·Center for Advanced Surgical and Interventional Technology (CASIT), Los Angeles, California; Department of Surgery, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California. ·Surg Obes Relat Dis · Pubmed #29287755.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Editorial Comment on: resected gastric volume has no influence on early weight loss after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. 2018

Pakula, Andrea M / Martin, Matthew J. ·Bariatric Surgery Service Department of Surgery Kern Medical Center Bakersfield, California. · Bariatric Surgery Service Department of Surgery Madigan Army Medical Center Tacoma, Washington. ·Surg Obes Relat Dis · Pubmed #29287735.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Editorial ASGE EndoVators Summit: Defining the role and value of endoscopic therapies in obesity management. 2018

Anonymous571120. ·San Francisco VA Healthcare System, University of California San Francisco, United States. ·Metabolism · Pubmed #29191455.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Editorial Who is too fat? 2017

Hoffman, J I. ·Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco, USA. ·Cardiovasc J Afr · Pubmed #29144531.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Editorial Comment on: comparison of the effect by which gastric plication and sleeve gastrectomy procedures alter metabolic and physical parameters in an obese type 2 diabetes mellitus rodent modelretain-->. 2017

Ali, Mohamed R. ·University of California at Davis Davis, California. ·Surg Obes Relat Dis · Pubmed #28967619.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

23 Editorial Growing Economic Inequality Sustains Health Disparities. 2017

Vega, William A / Sribney, William M. ·William A. Vega is with the School of Social Work, University of Southern California, Los Angeles. William M. Sribney is with Third Way Statistics, Houston, TX. ·Am J Public Health · Pubmed #28902538.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

24 Editorial Comment on: bleeding during laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery as a risk factor for less favorable outcome. A cohort study from the Scandinavian obesity surgery registry. 2017

Wisbach, Gordon G. ·Department of General Surgery, Naval Medical Center San Diego, San Diego, California. ·Surg Obes Relat Dis · Pubmed #28826794.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

25 Editorial Sugar, Sugar . . . Not So Sweet for the Liver. 2017

Vos, Miriam B / Goran, Michael I. ·Emory University School of Medicine and Laney Graduate School and Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, Georgia. Electronic address: mvos@emory.edu. · University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #28757270.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

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