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Obesity: HELP
Articles from Gainesville
Based on 370 articles published since 2009
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These are the 370 published articles about Obesity that originated from Gainesville during 2009-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15
1 Guideline The diagnosis and management of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: Practice guidance from the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases. 2018

Chalasani, Naga / Younossi, Zobair / Lavine, Joel E / Charlton, Michael / Cusi, Kenneth / Rinella, Mary / Harrison, Stephen A / Brunt, Elizabeth M / Sanyal, Arun J. ·Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN. · Center for Liver Disease and Department of Medicine, Inova Fairfax Hospital, Falls Church, VA. · Columbia University, New York, NY. · University of Chicago, Chicago, IL. · University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. · Northwestern University, Chicago, IL. · Pinnacle Clinical Research, San Antonio, TX. · Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO. · Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA. ·Hepatology · Pubmed #28714183.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Guideline Pediatric Obesity-Assessment, Treatment, and Prevention: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline. 2017

Styne, Dennis M / Arslanian, Silva A / Connor, Ellen L / Farooqi, Ismaa Sadaf / Murad, M Hassan / Silverstein, Janet H / Yanovski, Jack A. ·University of California Davis, Sacramento, California 95817. · University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15224. · University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53792. · University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, United Kingdom. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905. · University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32607; and. · National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892. ·J Clin Endocrinol Metab · Pubmed #28359099.

ABSTRACT: Cosponsoring Associations: The European Society of Endocrinology and the Pediatric Endocrine Society. This guideline was funded by the Endocrine Society. Objective: To formulate clinical practice guidelines for the assessment, treatment, and prevention of pediatric obesity. Participants: The participants include an Endocrine Society-appointed Task Force of 6 experts, a methodologist, and a medical writer. Evidence: This evidence-based guideline was developed using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach to describe the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. The Task Force commissioned 2 systematic reviews and used the best available evidence from other published systematic reviews and individual studies. Consensus Process: One group meeting, several conference calls, and e-mail communications enabled consensus. Endocrine Society committees and members and co-sponsoring organizations reviewed and commented on preliminary drafts of this guideline. Conclusion: Pediatric obesity remains an ongoing serious international health concern affecting ∼17% of US children and adolescents, threatening their adult health and longevity. Pediatric obesity has its basis in genetic susceptibilities influenced by a permissive environment starting in utero and extending through childhood and adolescence. Endocrine etiologies for obesity are rare and usually are accompanied by attenuated growth patterns. Pediatric comorbidities are common and long-term health complications often result; screening for comorbidities of obesity should be applied in a hierarchal, logical manner for early identification before more serious complications result. Genetic screening for rare syndromes is indicated only in the presence of specific historical or physical features. The psychological toll of pediatric obesity on the individual and family necessitates screening for mental health issues and counseling as indicated. The prevention of pediatric obesity by promoting healthful diet, activity, and environment should be a primary goal, as achieving effective, long-lasting results with lifestyle modification once obesity occurs is difficult. Although some behavioral and pharmacotherapy studies report modest success, additional research into accessible and effective methods for preventing and treating pediatric obesity is needed. The use of weight loss medications during childhood and adolescence should be restricted to clinical trials. Increasing evidence demonstrates the effectiveness of bariatric surgery in the most seriously affected mature teenagers who have failed lifestyle modification, but the use of surgery requires experienced teams with resources for long-term follow-up. Adolescents undergoing lifestyle therapy, medication regimens, or bariatric surgery for obesity will need cohesive planning to help them effectively transition to adult care, with continued necessary monitoring, support, and intervention. Transition programs for obesity are an uncharted area requiring further research for efficacy. Despite a significant increase in research on pediatric obesity since the initial publication of these guidelines 8 years ago, further study is needed of the genetic and biological factors that increase the risk of weight gain and influence the response to therapeutic interventions. Also needed are more studies to better understand the genetic and biological factors that cause an obese individual to manifest one comorbidity vs another or to be free of comorbidities. Furthermore, continued investigation into the most effective methods of preventing and treating obesity and into methods for changing environmental and economic factors that will lead to worldwide cultural changes in diet and activity should be priorities. Particular attention to determining ways to effect systemic changes in food environments and total daily mobility, as well as methods for sustaining healthy body mass index changes, is of importance.

3 Editorial Editorial: diabetes, obesity and clinical inertia-the recipe for advanced NASH. 2018

Leey, J / Cusi, K. ·Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, The University of Florida and the Malcom Randall Veterans Administration Medical Center, Gainesville, FL, USA. ·Aliment Pharmacol Ther · Pubmed #29574870.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial Editorial. 2017

Krause, Eric G / Reagan, Lawrence P / Tamashiro, Kellie L. ·University of Florida College of Pharmacy, United States. Electronic address: ekrause@cop.ufl.edu. · University of South Carolina School of Medicine, United States. Electronic address: Lawrence.Reagan@uscmed.sc.edu. · Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, United States. Electronic address: ktamashiro@jhmi.edu. ·Physiol Behav · Pubmed #28476286.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial Comment On: Prospective evaluation of urinary metabolic indices in severely obese adolescents after weight loss surgery. 2016

Canales, Benjamin K. ·Department of Urology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida; North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Gainesville, Florida. ·Surg Obes Relat Dis · Pubmed #26077698.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Comment on: gastric bypass surgery as a primary treatment of recalcitrant gastroparesis. 2014

Ben-David, Kfir. ·Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. Electronic address: kfir.bendavid@surgery.ufl.edu. ·Surg Obes Relat Dis · Pubmed #24837558.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Review An update on obesity: Mental consequences and psychological interventions. 2019

Chu, Dinh-Toi / Minh Nguyet, Nguyen Thi / Nga, Vu Thi / Thai Lien, Nguyen Vu / Vo, Duc Duy / Lien, Nguyen / Nhu Ngoc, Vo Truong / Son, Le Hoang / Le, Duc-Hau / Nga, Vu Bich / Van Tu, Pham / Van To, Ta / Ha, Luu Song / Tao, Yang / Pham, Van-Huy. ·Faculty of Biology, Hanoi National University of Education, Hanoi, Viet Nam. · Center for Environment and Health Studies, Hanoi, Viet Nam. · Institute for Research and Development, Duy Tan University, 03 Quang Trung, Danang, Viet Nam. Electronic address: vuthinga1@duytan.edu.vn. · School of Odonto Stomatology, Hanoi Medical University, Hanoi, Viet Nam. · Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Department of Chemistry, BMC, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. · Center for NeuroGenetics, Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, USA. · VNU University of Science, Vietnam National University, Hanoi, Viet Nam. · Thuyloi University, 175 Tay Son, Dong Da, Hanoi, Viet Nam. · National Institute of Diabetes and Metabolic Disorders, Hanoi, Viet Nam. · Faculty of Social Work, Hanoi National University of Education, Hanoi, Viet Nam. · Pathology and Molecular Biology Center, National Cancer Hospital, Hanoi, Viet Nam. · Vietnam Women's Academy, Hanoi, Viet Nam. · College of Food Science and Technology, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 8, 210095, China. · Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, Faculty of Information Technology, Ton Duc Thang University, Ho Chi Minh City, Viet Nam. Electronic address: phamvanhuy@tdt.edu.vn. ·Diabetes Metab Syndr · Pubmed #30641689.

ABSTRACT: Besides physical consequences, obesity has negative psychological effects, thereby lowering human life quality. Major psychological consequences of this disorder includes depression, impaired body image, low self-esteem, eating disorders, stress and poor quality of life, which are correlated with age and gender. Physical interventions, mainly diet control and energy balance, have been widely applied to treat obesity; and some psychological interventions including behavioral therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy and hypnotherapy have showed some effects on obesity treatment. Other psychological therapies, such as relaxation and psychodynamic therapies, are paid less attention. This review aims to update scientific evidence regarding the mental consequences and psychological interventions for obesity.

8 Review Preventive mechanism of bioactive dietary foods on obesity-related inflammation and diseases. 2018

Sung, Jeehye / Ho, Chi-Tang / Wang, Yu. ·Food Science and Human Nutrition, Citrus Research and Education Center, University of Florida, 700 Experiment Station Rd, Lake Alfred, Florida 33850, USA. yu.wang@ufl.edu. ·Food Funct · Pubmed #30403220.

ABSTRACT: Obesity is associated with low-grade chronic inflammation of adipose tissue, which leads to the development of metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and cancer. Obesity and a high calorie diet are associated with altered endocrine and metabolic functions of adipose tissue, contributing to systemic inflammation as a result of the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines/adipokines into the circulation and metabolic endotoxemia. Furthermore, the accumulation of proinflammatory macrophages within the visceral adipose tissue may also be a major cause of chronic inflammation of adipocytes. Thus, it is important to understand the factors that regulate the function of both adipocytes and macrophages to find attractive strategies against the burden of obesity-induced health problems. Although the vast range of activities of dietary bioactive compounds on obesity and inflammation have been widely investigated, the mechanisms underlying their beneficial effects on obesity-associated inflammatory response are still poorly understood. This review focuses on the molecular biology mechanism of obesity-induced inflammation and the reciprocal interactions between the major molecular mechanisms and a range of dietary bioactive compounds.

9 Review Metabolic syndrome severity and lifestyle factors among adolescents. 2018

Wang, Linda X / Gurka, Matthew J / Deboer, Mark D. ·Department of Pediatrics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA. · Department of Health Outcomes and Biomedical Informatics, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. · Department of Pediatrics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA - deboer@virginia.edu. ·Minerva Pediatr · Pubmed #29968453.

ABSTRACT: The continued rise of pediatric obesity globally has raised concerns for related sequalae. One marker of risk is the metabolic syndrome, a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors that is associated with future cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. MetS has at its core visceral adipocytes exhibiting dysfunction as a result of excess fat content. MetS in children and adolescents is linked to unhealthy lifestyle practices such as sedentary lifestyles and excess consumption calories. As such, the optimal means of addressing MetS is targeting a decrease in adiposity through lifestyle modification, a decrease in MetS following increases in physical activity and improvements in the quality and content of food intake. Efforts remain needed in increasing motivation to these changes and maintaining adherence to avoid long-term sequelae.

10 Review Finding treatable genetic obesity: strategies for success. 2018

Dayton, Kristin / Miller, Jennifer. ·Department of Pediatrics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA. ·Curr Opin Pediatr · Pubmed #29771759.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Genetic obesity is responsible for up to 7% of severe childhood obesity. Although current Pediatric Endocrine Society guidelines recommend assessment of children with early-onset morbid obesity and hyperphagia for underlying genetic disorders, a vast majority of patients are not being appropriately screened for genetic obesity syndromes. RECENT FINDINGS: With advances in genetic testing, more genetic causes of obesity are being identified. Treatments are likely to be individualized, depending on the cause of the obesity, and must be targeted at addressing the underlying cause. Investigational therapies include melanocortin-4 receptor antagonists, oxytocin and medications targeting the endocannabinoid system. SUMMARY: Improved identification of patients with genetic obesity syndromes will lead to development of new treatments and personalized management of these diseases.

11 Review Prader-Willi syndrome and early-onset morbid obesity NIH rare disease consortium: A review of natural history study. 2018

Butler, Merlin G / Kimonis, Virginia / Dykens, Elisabeth / Gold, June A / Miller, Jennifer / Tamura, Roy / Driscoll, Daniel J. ·University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas. · University of California, Irvine, California. · Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee. · University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. · University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida. ·Am J Med Genet A · Pubmed #29271568.

ABSTRACT: We describe the National Institutes of Health rare disease consortium for Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) developed to address concerns regarding medical care, diagnosis, growth and development, awareness, and natural history. PWS results from errors in genomic imprinting leading to loss of paternally expressed genes due to 15q11-q13 deletion, maternal disomy 15 or imprinting defects. The 8 year study was conducted at four national sites on individuals with genetically confirmed PWS and early-onset morbid obesity (EMO) with data accumulated to gain a better understanding of the natural history, cause and treatment of PWS. Enrollment of 355 subjects with PWS and 36 subjects with EMO began in September 2006 with study completion in July 2014. Clinical, genetic, cognitive, behavior, and natural history data were systematically collected along with PWS genetic subtypes, pregnancy and birth history, mortality, obesity, and cognitive status with study details as important endpoints in both subject groups. Of the 355 individuals with PWS, 217 (61%) had the 15q11-q13 deletion, 127 (36%) had maternal disomy 15, and 11 (3%) had imprinting defects. Six deaths were reported in our PWS cohort with 598 cumulative years of study exposure and one death in the EMO group with 42 years of exposure. To our knowledge, this description of a longitudinal study in PWS represents the largest and most comprehensive cohort useful for investigators in planning comparable studies in other rare disorders. Ongoing studies utilizing this database should have a direct impact on care and services, diagnosis, treatment, genotype-phenotype correlations, and clinical outcomes in PWS.

12 Review Whole Transcriptome Profiling: An RNA-Seq Primer and Implications for Pharmacogenomics Research. 2018

Sá, Ana Caroline C / Sadee, Wolfgang / Johnson, Julie A. ·Center for Pharmacogenomics & Department of Pharmacotherapy and Translational Research, College of Pharmacy, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA. · Genetics & Genomic Graduate Program, Genetics Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA. · Center for Pharmacogenomics, Department of Cancer Biology and Genetic, College of Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA. · Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Colleges of Pharmacy and Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA. ·Clin Transl Sci · Pubmed #28945944.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Review Glucagon like peptide-1 receptor agonists for the management of obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a novel therapeutic option. 2018

Dhir, Gauri / Cusi, Kenneth. ·Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA. · Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Malcom Randall VA Medical Center, Gainesville, Florida, USA. ·J Investig Med · Pubmed #28918389.

ABSTRACT: Obesity is a major risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and is associated with a cluster of metabolic factors that lead to poor cardiovascular outcomes. In non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), liver fat (triglyceride) accumulation closely mirrors adipose tissue dysfunction and insulin resistance in obesity and T2DM. It is now recognized as the most common chronic liver disease in Westernized societies, often progressing to more severe forms of the disease such as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), or cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. However, NAFLD remains largely overlooked by healthcare providers although it affects about two-thirds of patients with obesity and it promotes the development of T2DM. NAFLD mirrors adipose tissue and systemic insulin resistance, the liver being a 'barometer' of metabolic health. Although pioglitazone is emerging as the treatment of choice for NASH in patients with insulin-resistance, or those with T2DM, many other options are being tested. Due to their overall safety and efficacy, glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) are becoming one of the cornerstones for the management of both obesity and T2DM, and a novel alternative for the treatment of NAFLD. In this review, we will briefly summarize the status of GLP-1RA for the treatment of obesity and NAFLD.

14 Review The Food and Drug Addiction Epidemic: Targeting Dopamine Homeostasis. 2018

Blum, Kenneth / Thanos, Panayotis K / Wang, Gene-Jack / Febo, Marcelo / Demetrovics, Zsolt / Modestino, Edward Justin / Braverman, Eric R / Baron, David / Badgaiyan, Rajendra D / Gold, Mark S. ·Department of Psychiatry & McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL, United States. · Department of Psychiatry, Wright State University Boonshoft School of Medicine and Dayton VA Medical Center, Dayton, OH (IE), United States. · Department of Psychology, University of Buffalo, the State University of New York, Buffalo, NY, United States. · Laboratory of Neuroimaging, National Institute of Alcohol Abuse & Alcoholism, Bethesda, MD, United States. · Institute of Psychology, Eotvos Lorand University Budapest, Budapest, Hungary. · Department of Psychology, Curry College, Milton, MA, United States. · Departments of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Keck School of Medicine of USC, Los Angeles, CA, United States. · Department of Clinical Neurology, PATH Foundation NY, New York, NY, United States. · Department of Psychiatry, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, United States. ·Curr Pharm Des · Pubmed #28831923.

ABSTRACT: Obesity is damaging the lives of more than 300 million people worldwide and maintaining a healthy weight using popular weight loss tactics remains a very difficult undertaking. Managing the obesity problem seems within reach, as better understanding develops, of the function of our genome in drug/nutrient responses. Strategies indicated by this understanding of nutriepigenomics and neurogenetics in the treatment and prevention of metabolic syndrome and obesity include moderation of mRNA expression by DNA methylation, and inhibition of histone deacetylation. Based on an individual's genetic makeup, deficient metabolic pathways can be targeted epigenetically by, for example, the provision of dietary supplementation that includes phytochemicals, vitamins, and importantly functional amino acids. Also, the chromatin structure of imprinted genes that control nutrients during fetal development can be modified. Pathways affecting dopamine signaling, molecular transport and nervous system development are implicated in these strategies. Obesity is a subtype of Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS) and these new strategies in the treatment and prevention of obesity target improved dopamine function. It is not merely a matter of gastrointestinal signaling linked to hypothalamic peptides, but alternatively, finding novel ways to improve ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopaminergic function and homeostasis.

15 Review The role of artificial and natural sweeteners in reducing the consumption of table sugar: A narrative review. 2017

Mooradian, Arshag D / Smith, Meridith / Tokuda, Masaaki. ·Department of Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, FL 32209, United States. Electronic address: Arshag.mooradian@jax.ufl.edu. · Department of Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, FL 32209, United States. · Department of Cell Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Kagawa, Japan. ·Clin Nutr ESPEN · Pubmed #29132732.

ABSTRACT: The rapid increase in the prevalence of obesity worldwide has been partially attributed to the overconsumption of added sugars. Recent guidelines call for limiting the consumption of simple sugars to less than 10% of daily caloric consumption. High intensity sweeteners are regulated as food additives and include aspartame, acesulfame-k, neotame, saccharin, sucralose, cyclamate and alitame. Steviol glycosides and Luo Han Guo fruit extracts are high intensity sweeteners that are designated as generally recognized as safe (GRAS). Commonly used non-caloric artificial sweeteners may have unfavorable effect on health including glucose intolerance and failure to cause weight reduction. The nutritive sweeteners include sugar alcohols such as sorbitol, xylitol, lactitol, mannitol, erythritol, trehalose and maltitol. Naturally occurring rare sugars have recently emerged as an alternative category of sweeteners. These monosaccharides and their derivatives are found in nature in small quantities and lack significant calories. This category includes d-allulose (d-psicose), d-tagatose, d-sorbose and d-allose. Limiting consumption of any sweetener may well be the best health advice. Identifying natural sweeteners that have favorable effects on body weight and metabolism may help achieving the current recommendations of restricting simple sugar consumption.

16 Review Effects of Popular Diets without Specific Calorie Targets on Weight Loss Outcomes: Systematic Review of Findings from Clinical Trials. 2017

Anton, Stephen D / Hida, Azumi / Heekin, Kacey / Sowalsky, Kristen / Karabetian, Christy / Mutchie, Heather / Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan / Manini, Todd M / Barnett, Tracey E. ·Department of Aging and Geriatric Research, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA. santon@ufl.edu. · Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA. santon@ufl.edu. · Department of Aging and Geriatric Research, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA. a3hida@nodai.ac.jp. · Department of Nutritional Science, Faculty of Applied Bioscience, Tokyo University of Agriculture, Tokyo 1568502, Japan. a3hida@nodai.ac.jp. · Department of Aging and Geriatric Research, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA. kaceydheekin@ufl.edu. · Department of Applied Physiology and Kinesiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA. ksowalsky@ufl.edu. · Department of Aging and Geriatric Research, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA. ckarabetian@phhp.ufl.edu. · Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA. ckarabetian@phhp.ufl.edu. · Department of Aging and Geriatric Research, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA. heather.mutchie@som.umaryland.edu. · Department of Gerontology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. heather.mutchie@som.umaryland.edu. · Department of Aging and Geriatric Research, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA. cleeuwen@ufl.edu. · Department of Aging and Geriatric Research, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA. tmanini@ufl.edu. · Department of Health Behavior and Health Systems, School of Public Health, University of North Texas Health Science Center, 3500 Camp Bowie Dr., Fort Worth, TX 76107, USA. Tracey.Barnett@unthsc.edu. ·Nutrients · Pubmed #28758964.

ABSTRACT: The present review examined the evidence base for current popular diets, as listed in the 2016 U.S. News & World Report, on short-term (≤six months) and long-term (≥one year) weight loss outcomes in overweight and obese adults. For the present review, all diets in the 2016 U.S. News & World Report Rankings for "Best Weight-Loss Diets", which did not involve specific calorie targets, meal replacements, supplementation with commercial products, and/or were not categorized as "low-calorie" diets were examined. Of the 38 popular diets listed in the U.S. News & World Report, 20 met our pre-defined criteria. Literature searches were conducted through PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science using preset key terms to identify all relevant clinical trials for these 20 diets. A total of 16 articles were identified which reported findings of clinical trials for seven of these 20 diets: (1) Atkins; (2) Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH); (3) Glycemic-Index; (4) Mediterranean; (5) Ornish; (6) Paleolithic; and (7) Zone. Of the diets evaluated, the Atkins Diet showed the most evidence in producing clinically meaningful short-term (≤six months) and long-term (≥one-year) weight loss. Other popular diets may be equally or even more effective at producing weight loss, but this is unknown at the present time since there is a paucity of studies on these diets.

17 Review Management of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Call to Action. 2017

Bril, Fernando / Cusi, Kenneth. ·Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. · Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida kenneth.cusi@medicine.ufl.edu. · Malcom Randall Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Gainesville, Florida. ·Diabetes Care · Pubmed #28223446.

ABSTRACT: Traditionally a disease of hepatologists, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has recently become a major concern for a broad spectrum of health care providers. Endocrinologists and those caring for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are at center stage, as T2DM appears to worsen the course of NAFLD and the liver disease makes diabetes management more challenging. However, the nature of this relationship remains incompletely understood. Although the increasing prevalence of NAFLD is frequently attributed to the epidemic of obesity and is often oversimplified as the "hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome," it is a much more complex disease process that may also be observed in nonobese individuals and in patients without clinical manifestations of the metabolic syndrome. It carries both metabolic and liver-specific complications that make its approach unique among medical conditions. Diabetes appears to promote the development of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), the more severe form of the disease, and increases the risk of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Patients and physicians face many uncertainties, including fragmented information on the natural history of the disease, challenges in the diagnosis of NASH, and few pharmacological agents with proven efficacy. However, recent advances in diagnosis and treatment, combined with the risk of serious consequences from inaction, call for health care providers to be more proactive in the management of patients with T2DM and NASH.

18 Review Tracheostomy in the Morbidly Obese: Difficulties and Challenges. 2017

Fattahi, Tirbod / Chafin, Christopher / Bunnell, Anthony. ·Chair, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Florida, Jacksonville, FL. Electronic address: Tirbod.Fattahi@Jax.Ufl.Edu. · Chief Resident, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Florida, Jacksonville, FL. · Fellow in Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Florida, Jacksonville, FL. ·J Oral Maxillofac Surg · Pubmed #28063276.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: This study evaluated the difficulties and challenges associated with open tracheostomy in the morbidly obese patient (body mass index [BMI] ≥30 kg/m PATIENTS AND METHODS: Forty patients met all the inclusion criteria. A retrospective chart review was performed to evaluate indications for tracheostomy, duration of intubation before tracheostomy, history of tracheostomy, duration of operative procedure, duration in the operating room, and all perioperative complications. RESULTS: Complications were classified as intraoperative (5%) and postoperative (17.5%). The average BMI was 46 kg/m CONCLUSION: This study shows that although open tracheostomy in the morbidly obese patient is increasing in demand, the procedure can be predictably performed albeit at a much longer duration and a higher perioperative complication rate compared with the traditional tracheostomy.

19 Review Mitochondrial Adaptation in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Novel Mechanisms and Treatment Strategies. 2017

Sunny, Nishanth E / Bril, Fernando / Cusi, Kenneth. ·Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, University of Florida, 1600 SW Archer Road, Room H-2, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA. · Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, University of Florida, 1600 SW Archer Road, Room H-2, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA; Malcom Randall Veterans Administration Medical Center, Gainesville, FL, USA. Electronic address: Kenneth.Cusi@medicine.ufl.edu. ·Trends Endocrinol Metab · Pubmed #27986466.

ABSTRACT: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is prevalent in patients with obesity or type 2 diabetes. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), encompassing steatosis with inflammation, hepatocyte injury, and fibrosis, predisposes to cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and even cardiovascular disease. In rodent models and humans with NAFLD/NASH, maladaptation of mitochondrial oxidative flux is a central feature of simple steatosis to NASH transition. Induction of hepatic tricarboxylic acid cycle closely mirrors the severity of oxidative stress and inflammation in NASH. Reactive oxygen species generation and inflammation are driven by upregulated, but inefficient oxidative flux and accumulating lipotoxic intermediates. Successful therapies for NASH (weight loss alone or with incretin therapy, or pioglitazone) likely attenuate mitochondrial oxidative flux and halt hepatocellular injury. Agents targeting mitochondrial dysfunction may provide a novel treatment strategy for NAFLD.

20 Review Technology-based interventions for weight management: current randomized controlled trial evidence and future directions. 2017

Kozak, Andrea T / Buscemi, Joanna / Hawkins, Misty A W / Wang, Monica L / Breland, Jessica Y / Ross, Kathryn M / Kommu, Anupama. ·Department of Psychology, Oakland University, Rochester, MI, 48309, USA. kozak@oakland.edu. · Department of Psychology, DePaul University, Chicago, IL, USA. · Department of Psychology, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, USA. · Department of Community Health Sciences, Boston University, Boston, MA, USA. · Center for Innovation to Implementation, VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Menlo Park, CA, USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA. · Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. · Mind Body Connection, Inc., Manassas, VA, USA. ·J Behav Med · Pubmed #27783259.

ABSTRACT: Obesity is a prevalent health care issue associated with disability, premature morality, and high costs. Behavioral weight management interventions lead to clinically significant weight losses in overweight and obese individuals; however, many individuals are not able to participate in these face-to-face treatments due to limited access, cost, and/or time constraints. Technological advances such as widespread access to the Internet, increased use of smartphones, and newer behavioral self-monitoring tools have resulted in the development of a variety of eHealth weight management programs. In the present paper, a summary of the most current literature is provided along with potential solutions to methodological challenges (e.g., high attrition, minimal participant racial/ethnic diversity, heterogeneity of technology delivery modes). Dissemination and policy implications will be highlighted as future directions for the field of eHealth weight management.

21 Review Exercise Benefits for Chronic Low Back Pain in Overweight and Obese Individuals. 2017

Wasser, Joseph G / Vasilopoulos, Terrie / Zdziarski, Laura Ann / Vincent, Heather K. ·Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Division of Research, Interdisciplinary Center for Musculoskeletal Training and Research, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL∗. · Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Division of Research, Interdisciplinary Center for Musculoskeletal Training and Research, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL(†). · Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Division of Research, Interdisciplinary Center for Musculoskeletal Training and Research, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL(‡). · Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, Division of Research, UF Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine Institute (OSMI), PO Box 112727, Gainesville, FL 32611(§). Electronic address: vincehk@ortho.ufl.edu. ·PM R · Pubmed #27346092.

ABSTRACT: Overweight and obese individuals with chronic low back pain (LBP) struggle with the combined physical challenges of physical activity and pain interference during daily life; perceived disability increases, pain symptoms worsen, and performance of functional tasks and quality of life (QOL) decline. Consistent participation in exercise programs positively affects several factors including musculoskeletal pain, perceptions of disability due to pain, functional ability, QOL, and body composition. It is not yet clear, however, what differential effects occur among different easily accessible exercise modalities in the overweight-obese population with chronic LBP. This narrative review synopsizes available randomized and controlled, or controlled and comparative, studies of easily accessible exercise programs on pain severity, QOL, and other outcomes, such as physical function or body composition change, in overweight-obese persons with chronic LBP. We identified 16 studies (N = 1,351) of various exercise programs (aerobic exercise [AX], resistance exercise [RX], aquatic exercise [AQU], and yoga-Pilates) that measured efficacy on LBP symptoms, and at least one other outcome such as perceived disability, QOL, physical function, and body composition. RX, AQU, and Pilates exercise programs demonstrated the greatest effects on pain reduction, perceived disability, QOL, and other health components. The highest adherence rate occurred with RX and AQU exercise programs, indicating that these types of programs may provide a greater overall impact on relevant outcomes for overweight-obese LBP patients. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: V.

22 Review Prediabetes: A Worldwide Epidemic. 2016

Edwards, Catherine M / Cusi, Kenneth. ·Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine, 1600 Southwest Archer Road, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA. Electronic address: catherine.edwards@medicine.ufl.edu. · Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine, 1600 Southwest Archer Road, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA; Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Malcom Randall Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 1601 South West Archer Road, Gainesville, FL 32608, USA. ·Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am · Pubmed #27823603.

ABSTRACT: Prediabetes, defined by blood glucose levels between normal and diabetic levels, is increasing rapidly worldwide. This abnormal physiologic state reflects the rapidly changing access to high-calorie food and decreasing levels of physical activity occurring worldwide, with resultant obesity and metabolic consequences. This is particularly marked in developing countries. Prediabetes poses several threats; there is increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and there are risks inherent to the prediabetes state, including microvascular and macrovascular disease. Studies have helped to elucidate the underlying pathophysiology of prediabetes and to establish the potential for treating prediabetes and preventing T2DM.

23 Review Potential of Natural Products in the Inhibition of Adipogenesis through Regulation of PPARγ Expression and/or Its Transcriptional Activity. 2016

Feng, Shi / Reuss, Laura / Wang, Yu. ·Citrus Research and Education Center, Food Science and Human Nutrition, University of Florida, 700 Experiment Station Road, Lake Alfred, FL 33850, USA. fsophias@ufl.edu. · Citrus Research and Education Center, Food Science and Human Nutrition, University of Florida, 700 Experiment Station Road, Lake Alfred, FL 33850, USA. lereuss@ufl.edu. · Citrus Research and Education Center, Food Science and Human Nutrition, University of Florida, 700 Experiment Station Road, Lake Alfred, FL 33850, USA. yu.wang@ufl.edu. ·Molecules · Pubmed #27669202.

ABSTRACT: Obesity is a global health problem characterized as an increase in the mass of adipose tissue. Adipogenesis is one of the key pathways that increases the mass of adipose tissue, by which preadipocytes mature into adipocytes through cell differentiation. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), the chief regulator of adipogenesis, has been acutely investigated as a molecular target for natural products in the development of anti-obesity treatments. In this review, the regulation of PPARγ expression by natural products through inhibition of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) and the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), increased expression of GATA-2 and GATA-3 and activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway were analyzed. Furthermore, the regulation of PPARγ transcriptional activity associated with natural products through the antagonism of PPARγ and activation of Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) were discussed. Lastly, regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) by natural products, which might regulate both PPARγ expression and PPARγ transcriptional activity, was summarized. Understanding the role natural products play, as well as the mechanisms behind their regulation of PPARγ activity is critical for future research into their therapeutic potential for fighting obesity.

24 Review Improvements in Metabolic Health with Consumption of Ellagic Acid and Subsequent Conversion into Urolithins: Evidence and Mechanisms. 2016

Kang, Inhae / Buckner, Teresa / Shay, Neil F / Gu, Liwei / Chung, Soonkyu. ·Department of Nutrition and Health Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE; · Department of Food Science and Technology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR; and. · Food Science and Human Nutrition Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. · Department of Nutrition and Health Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE; schung4@unl.edu. ·Adv Nutr · Pubmed #27633111.

ABSTRACT: Ellagic acid (EA) is a naturally occurring polyphenol found in some fruits and nuts, including berries, pomegranates, grapes, and walnuts. EA has been investigated extensively because of its antiproliferative action in some cancers, along with its anti-inflammatory effects. A growing body of evidence suggests that the intake of EA is effective in attenuating obesity and ameliorating obesity-mediated metabolic complications, such as insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and atherosclerosis. In this review, we summarize how intake of EA regulates lipid metabolism in vitro and in vivo, and delineate the potential mechanisms of action of EA on obesity-mediated metabolic complications. We also discuss EA as an epigenetic effector, as well as a modulator of the gut microbiome, suggesting that EA may exert a broader spectrum of health benefits than has been demonstrated to date. Therefore, this review aims to suggest the potential metabolic benefits of consumption of EA-containing fruits and nuts against obesity-associated health conditions.

25 Review Exploring the contribution of maternal antibiotics and breastfeeding to development of the infant microbiome and pediatric obesity. 2016

Lemas, Dominick J / Yee, Shanique / Cacho, Nicole / Miller, Darci / Cardel, Michelle / Gurka, Matthew / Janicke, David / Shenkman, Elizabeth. ·University of Florida, Department of Health Outcomes and Policy, Gainesville, FL, USA. Electronic address: djlemas@ufl.edu. · University of Florida, Department of Health Outcomes and Policy, Gainesville, FL, USA. · University of Florida, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Gainesville, FL, USA. · University of Florida, Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, Gainesville, FL, USA. ·Semin Fetal Neonatal Med · Pubmed #27424917.

ABSTRACT: Pediatric obesity, a significant public health concern, has been associated with adult premature mortality and the development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Evidence has suggested that the gut microbiota is associated with pediatric obesity. Establishment of the infant gut microbiome is dependent on a dynamic maternal-infant microbiota exchange during early life. The objective of this review is to describe maternal factors such as feeding practices and antibiotic use that may influence the infant gut microbiome and risk for obesity. The complex components in human milk have many nutritional benefits to the infant; however, the microbiome in human milk may be an important factor to help regulate the infant's weight. We discuss maternal antibiotics and the effects on breast milk as critical exposures that alter the infant's gut microbiome and influence the risk of pediatric obesity.

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