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Orbital Diseases HELP
Based on 8,470 articles published since 2010
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These are the 8470 published articles about Orbital Diseases that originated from Worldwide during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Executive summary of the SEORL CCC-SEEN consensus statement on post-thyroidectomy hypoparathyroidism. 2019

Castro, Alejandro / Oleaga, Amelia / Parente Arias, Pablo / Paja, Miguel / Gil Carcedo, Elisa / Álvarez Escolá, Cristina. ·Servicio de Otorrinolaringología, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, España. Electronic address: alejandro.castroc@salud.madrid.org. · Servicio de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Hospital Universitario de Basurto, Bilbao, España. · Servicio de Otorrinolaringología, Hospital Universitario Lucus Augusti, Lugo, España. · Servicio de Otorrinolaringología, Hospital Universitario Río Hortega, Valladolid, España. · Servicio de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, España. ·Acta Otorrinolaringol Esp · Pubmed #31387688.

ABSTRACT: Hypoparathyroidism is the most common complication after total or completion thyroidectomy. It is defined as the presence of hypocalcemia accompanied by low or inappropriately normal parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels. Acute hypocalcemia is a potential lethal complication. Hypocalcemia treatment is based on endovenous or oral calcium supplements as well as oral calcitriol, depending on the severity of the symptoms. The risk of clinical hypocalcemia after bilateral thyroidectomy is considered very low if postoperative intact PTH decrease less than 80% with respect to preoperative levels. These patients could be discharged home without treatment, although this threshold may vary between institutions, and we recommend close surveillance in cases with increased risk (Graves disease, large goiters, reinterventions or evidence of parathyroid gland removal). Long-term treatment objectives are to control the symptoms and to keep serum calcium levels at the lower limit of the normal range, while preserving the calcium phosphate product and avoiding hypercalciuria.

2 Guideline Executive summary of the SEORL CCC-SEEN consensus statement on post-thyroidectomy hypoparathyroidism. 2019

Castro, Alejandro / Oleaga, Amelia / Parente Arias, Pablo / Paja, Miguel / Gil Carcedo, Elisa / Álvarez Escolá, Cristina. ·Servicio de Otorrinolaringología, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, España. Electronic address: alejandro.castroc@salud.madrid.org. · Servicio de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Hospital Universitario de Basurto, Bilbao, España. · Servicio de Otorrinolaringología, Hospital Universitario Lucus Augusti, Lugo, España. · Servicio de Otorrinolaringología, Hospital Universitario Río Hortega, Valladolid, España. · Servicio de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, España. ·Endocrinol Diabetes Nutr · Pubmed #31182347.

ABSTRACT: Hypoparathyroidism is the most common complication after total or completion thyroidectomy. It is defined as the presence of hypocalcemia accompanied by low or inappropriately normal parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels. Acute hypocalcemia is a potential lethal complication. Hypocalcemia treatment is based on endovenous or oral calcium supplements as well as oral calcitriol, depending on the severity of the symptoms. The risk of clinical hypocalcemia after bilateral thyroidectomy is considered very low if postoperative intact PTH decrease less than 80% with respect to preoperative levels. These patients could be discharged home without treatment, although this threshold may vary between institutions, and we recommend close surveillance in cases with increased risk (Graves disease, large goiters, reinterventions or evidence of parathyroid gland removal). Long-term treatment objectives are to control the symptoms and to keep serum calcium levels at the lower limit of the normal range, while preserving the calcium phosphate product and avoiding hypercalciuria.

3 Guideline Graves' disease and pregnancy. 2018

Illouz, Frédéric / Luton, Dominique / Polak, Michel / Besançon, Alix / Bournaud, Claire. ·Service d'endocrinologie diabète nutrition, centre de référence des maladies rares de la thyroïde et des récepteurs hormonaux, CHU d'Angers, 49933 Angers cedex 09, France. Electronic address: Frillouz@chu-angers.fr. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, DHU risque et grossesse, hôpital Bichat-Beaujon, université Denis-Diderot-Paris VII, 46, rue Henri-Huchard, 75018 Paris, France. · Endocrinologie gynécologie diabétologie pédiatriques, Inserm U1016, institut Imagine, centre de référence des maladies endocriniennes rares de la croissance et du développement, hôpital universitaire Necker Enfants malades, Assistance publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, université Paris Descartes, 75743 75743 Paris, France. · Service de médecine nucléaire, hospices civils de lyon, groupement hospitalier Est, 69677 Bron cedex, France. ·Ann Endocrinol (Paris) · Pubmed #30224035.

ABSTRACT: This section deals with the specificities of managing Graves' disease during pregnancy. Graves' disease incurs risks of fetal, neonatal and maternal complications that are rare but may be severe: fetal hyper- or hypothyroidism, usually first showing as fetal goiter, neonatal dysthyroidism, premature birth and pre-eclampsia. Treatment during pregnancy is based on antithyroid drugs alone, without association to levothyroxine. An history of Graves' disease, whether treated radically or not, with persistent maternal anti-TSH-receptor antibodies must be well identified. Fetal monitoring should be initiated in a multidisciplinary framework that should be continued throughout pregnancy. Neonatal monitoring is also crucial if the mother still shows anti-TSH-receptor antibodies at end of pregnancy or underwent antithyroid treatment. The risk of recurrence of hyperthyroidism in the weeks following delivery requires maternal monitoring. The long-term neuropsychological progression of children of mothers with Graves' disease is poorly known.

4 Guideline Diagnostic procedure in suspected Graves' disease. 2018

Goichot, Bernard / Leenhardt, Laurence / Massart, Catherine / Raverot, Véronique / Tramalloni, Jean / Iraqi, Hinde / Anonymous20962. ·Service de médecine interne, endocrinologie et nutrition, hôpital de Hautepierre, hôpitaux universitaires de Strasbourg, avenue Molière, 67098 Strasbourg cedex, France. Electronic address: bernard.goichot@chru-strasbourg.fr. · Unité thyroïde tumeurs endocrines, institut E3M, hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière, 75013 Paris, France. · Service de biochimie-toxicologie, laboratoire d'hormonologie, CHU de Rennes, 35033 Rennes Cedex 09, France. · Service de biochimie et biologie moléculaire, laboratoire d'hormonologie, groupement hospitalier Est, CHU de Lyon, 69500 Bron, France. · Cabinet de radiologie, 92200 Neuilly-sur-Seine, France. · Service d'endocrinologie, CHU de Rabat, Rabat, Morocco. ·Ann Endocrinol (Paris) · Pubmed #30220410.

ABSTRACT: Diagnostic procedure in suspected Graves' disease has never been studied scientifically and actual practice seems quite variable, notably between countries. Recommendations are few and weak (expert opinion). This article presents the recommendations of an expert consensus meeting organized by the French Society of Endocrinology in 2016. In case of clinically suspected thyrotoxicosis, the first-line biological assessment is of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). Free T4 and possibly free T3 assays assess biological severity and are necessary for treatment efficacy monitoring. Positive diagnosis of Graves' disease after biological confirmation of thyrotoxicosis does not always require complementary etiological examinations if clinical presentation is unambiguous, notably including extra-thyroid signs. Otherwise, first-line anti-TSH-receptor (TSH-R) antibody screening is recommended for its good intrinsic performance (sensitivity and specificity) and ease of access in France. Scintigraphy is reserved to rare cases of Graves' disease with negative antibody findings or when another etiology is suspected. Thyroid ultrasound scan may be contributive, but is not recommended in first line.

5 Guideline Treatment of adult Graves' disease. 2018

Corvilain, Bernard / Hamy, Antoine / Brunaud, Laurent / Borson-Chazot, Françoise / Orgiazzi, Jacques / Bensalem Hachmi, Leila / Semrouni, Mourad / Rodien, Patrice / Lussey-Lepoutre, Charlotte. ·Department of Endocrinology, Erasme University Hospital, université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium. · Service de chirurgie viscérale et endocrine, CHU d'Angers, 49000 Angers, France. · Service de chirurgie, unité de chirurgie endocrinienne, thyroïdienne et métabolique, unité multidisciplinaire de chirurgie de l'obésité, université de Lorraine, CHU Nancy, hôpital Brabois adultes, 11, allée du Morvan, 54511 Vandœuvre-les-Nancy, France. · HESPER EA 7425, hospices civils de Lyon, fédération d'endocrinologie, université Claude-Bernard Lyon 1, 69008 Lyon, France. · CERMEP-imagerie du vivant, université Claude-Bernard Lyon 1, Lyon, France. · Service d'endocrinologie à l'Institut national de nutrition de Tunis, faculté de médecine de Tunis, Tunisia. · Departement de médecine, CHU Beni Messous, Alger, Algeria. · Service EDN, centre de référence des maladies rares de la thyroïde et des récepteurs hormonaux, CHU d'Angers, 49000 Angers, France. Electronic address: Parodien@chu-angers.fr. · Service de médecine nucléaire, Inserm U970, Sorbonne université, groupe hospitalier Pitié-Salpétrière, 75013 Paris, France. ·Ann Endocrinol (Paris) · Pubmed #30193753.

ABSTRACT: Treatment strategy in Graves' disease firstly requires recovery of euthyroid status by antithyroid therapy. Treatment modalities, precautions, advantages and side-effects are to be discussed with the patient. No particular treatment modality has demonstrated superiority. Pregnancy or pregnancy project affects choice of treatment and monitoring. Graves' orbitopathy is liable to be aggravated by iodine-131 treatment and requires pre-treatment assessment. Iodine-131 treatment aims at achieving hypothyroidism. Thyroid surgery for Graves' disease should preferably be performed by an expert team. In case of recurrence of hyperthyroidism, the various treatment options should be discussed with the patient. Empiric treatment of thyroid dermopathy uses local corticosteroids in occlusive dressing.

6 Guideline Graves' disease in children. 2018

Léger, Juliane / Oliver, Isabelle / Rodrigue, Danielle / Lambert, Anne-Sophie / Coutant, Régis. ·Department of Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology and Reference Center for rare Diseases of Growth and Development, CHU Robert-Debre, 75019 Paris, France. · Endocrine, Bone Diseases, Genetics, Obesity, and Gynecology Unit, Children's Hospital, University Hospital, 31000 Toulouse, France. · Department of Pediatric Endocrinology, CHU Bicêtre, 94275 Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France. · Department of Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology and Reference Center for Rare Diseases of Thyroid and Hormone Receptivity, University hospital of Angers, 4, rue Larrey, 49933 Angers cedex 9, France. Electronic address: recoutant@chu-angers.fr. ·Ann Endocrinol (Paris) · Pubmed #30180972.

ABSTRACT: R1 The diagnosis of Graves' disease in children is based on detecting a suppression of serum TSH concentrations and the presence of anti-TSH receptor antibodies. 1/+++. R2 Thyroid ultrasound is unnecessary for diagnosis, but can be useful for assessing the size and homogeneity of the goiter. 2/+. R3. Thyroid scintigraphy is not required for the diagnosis of Graves' disease. 1/+++. R4. The measurement of T4L and T3L levels is not necessary for the diagnosis of Graves' disease in children but can be useful for the management and assessment of prognosis. 1/++. R5. In the absence of TSH receptor autoantibodies, the possibility of genetically inherited hyperthyroidism must be considered. 1/++. R6. Drug therapy is the primary line of treatment for children and consists of imidazole, carbimazole or thiamazole, with an initial dosage of 0.4 to 0.8mg/kg/day (0.3 to 0.6mg/kg/day for thiamazole) depending on the initial severity, up to maximum of 30mg. 1/++. R7. Propylthiouracil is contraindicated for children with Grave's disease. 1/+++. R8. Before starting treatment, it may be useful to perform a CBC in order to assess the degree of neutropenia caused by hyperthyroidism. It is not necessary to perform systematic CBCs during follow-up. 2/+. R9. An emergency CBC should be performed if symptoms include fever or angina. If neutrophil counts are <1000/mm

7 Guideline Graves' orbitopathy: Diagnosis and treatment. 2018

Drui, Delphine / Du Pasquier Fediaevski, Laurence / Vignal Clermont, Catherine / Daumerie, Chantal. ·Service endocrinologie, diabétologie, maladies métaboliques, CHU de Nantes, boulevard J.-Monod, Saint-Herblain, 44092 Nantes cedex, France. Electronic address: Delphine.drui@chu-nantes.fr. · CHNO des Quinze-Vingts, 28, rue de Charenton, 75012 Paris, France. Electronic address: ldupasquier@15-20.fr. · Fondation Rothschild, 29, rue Manin, 75019 Paris, France. Electronic address: cvignal@for.paris. · Endocrinologie, cliniques universitaires Saint-Luc, université catholique de Louvain, 10, avenue Hippocrate, 1200 Brussels, Belgium. Electronic address: chantal.daumerie@uclouvain.be. ·Ann Endocrinol (Paris) · Pubmed #30177259.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Guideline ACR Appropriateness Criteria 2018

Anonymous5300945 / Kennedy, Tabassum A / Corey, Amanda S / Policeni, Bruno / Agarwal, Vikas / Burns, Judah / Harvey, H Benjamin / Hoang, Jenny / Hunt, Christopher H / Juliano, Amy F / Mack, William / Moonis, Gul / Murad, Gregory J A / Pannell, Jeffrey S / Parsons, Matthew S / Powers, William J / Schroeder, Jason W / Setzen, Gavin / Whitehead, Matthew T / Bykowski, Julie. ·Principal Author, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinic, Madison, Wisconsin. Electronic address: tkennedy@uwhealth.org. · Panel Chair, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. · Panel Vice-Chair, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa. · University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California; neurosurgical consultant. · Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York. · University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida; neurosurgical consultant. · University of California San Diego Medical Center, San Diego, California. · Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Saint Louis, Missouri. · University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; American Academy of Neurology. · Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland. · Albany ENT & Allergy Services, PC, Albany, New York; American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. · Children's National Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia. · Specialty Chair, UC San Diego Health, San Diego, California. ·J Am Coll Radiol · Pubmed #29724415.

ABSTRACT: Visual loss can be the result of an abnormality anywhere along the visual pathway including the globe, optic nerve, optic chiasm, optic tract, thalamus, optic radiations or primary visual cortex. Appropriate imaging analysis of visual loss is facilitated by a compartmental approach that establishes a differential diagnosis on the basis of suspected lesion location and specific clinical features. CT and MRI are the primary imaging modalities used to evaluate patients with visual loss and are often complementary in evaluating these patients. One modality may be preferred over the other depending on the specific clinical scenario. Depending on the pattern of visual loss and differential diagnosis, imaging coverage may require targeted evaluation of the orbits and/or assessment of the brain. Contrast is preferred when masses and inflammatory processes are differential considerations. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.

9 Guideline Modern radiation therapy for extranodal lymphomas: field and dose guidelines from the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group. 2015

Yahalom, Joachim / Illidge, Tim / Specht, Lena / Hoppe, Richard T / Li, Ye-Xiong / Tsang, Richard / Wirth, Andrew / Anonymous5380826. ·Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. Electronic address: yahalomj@mskcc.org. · Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, The Christie National Health Service Foundation Trust, Manchester, United Kingdom. · Department of Oncology and Hematology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, People's Republic of China. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, St. Andrews Place, East Melbourne, Australia. ·Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys · Pubmed #25863750.

ABSTRACT: Extranodal lymphomas (ENLs) comprise about a third of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Radiation therapy (RT) is frequently used as either primary therapy (particularly for indolent ENL), consolidation after systemic therapy, salvage treatment, or palliation. The wide range of presentations of ENL, involving any organ in the body and the spectrum of histological sub-types, poses a challenge both for routine clinical care and for the conduct of prospective and retrospective studies. This has led to uncertainty and lack of consistency in RT approaches between centers and clinicians. Thus far there is a lack of guidelines for the use of RT in the management of ENL. This report presents an effort by the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) to harmonize and standardize the principles of treatment of ENL, and to address the technical challenges of simulation, volume definition and treatment planning for the most frequently involved organs. Specifically, detailed recommendations for RT volumes are provided. We have applied the same modern principles of involved site radiation therapy as previously developed and published as guidelines for Hodgkin lymphoma and nodal NHL. We have adopted RT volume definitions based on the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), as has been widely adopted by the field of radiation oncology for solid tumors. Organ-specific recommendations take into account histological subtype, anatomy, the treatment intent, and other treatment modalities that may be have been used before RT.

10 Guideline The Brazilian consensus for the diagnosis and treatment of hyperthyroidism: recommendations by the Thyroid Department of the Brazilian Society of Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2013

Maia, Ana Luiza / Scheffel, Rafael S / Meyer, Erika Laurini Souza / Mazeto, Glaucia M F S / Carvalho, Gisah Amaral de / Graf, Hans / Vaisman, Mario / Maciel, Lea M Z / Ramos, Helton E / Tincani, Alfio José / Andrada, Nathalia Carvalho de / Ward, Laura S / Anonymous4230758. ·Unidade de Tireoide, Serviço de Endocrinologia, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil. almaia@ufrgs.br ·Arq Bras Endocrinol Metabol · Pubmed #23681266.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Hyperthyroidism is characterized by increased synthesis and release of thyroid hormones by the thyroid gland. Thyrotoxicosis refers to the clinical syndrome resulting from excessive circulating thyroid hormones, secondary to hyperthyroidism or due to other causes. This article describes evidence-based guidelines for the clinical management of thyrotoxicosis. OBJECTIVE: This consensus, developed by Brazilian experts and sponsored by the Department of Thyroid Brazilian Society of Endocrinology and Metabolism, aims to address the management, diagnosis and treatment of patients with thyrotoxicosis, according to the most recent evidence from the literature and appropriate for the clinical reality of Brazil. MATERIALS AND METHODS: After structuring clinical questions, search for evidence was made available in the literature, initially in the database MedLine, PubMed and Embase databases and subsequently in SciELO - Lilacs. The strength of evidence was evaluated by Oxford classification system was established from the study design used, considering the best available evidence for each question. RESULTS: We have defined 13 questions about the initial clinical approach for the diagnosis and treatment that resulted in 53 recommendations, including the etiology, treatment with antithyroid drugs, radioactive iodine and surgery. We also addressed hyperthyroidism in children, teenagers or pregnant patients, and management of hyperthyroidism in patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy and various other causes of thyrotoxicosis. CONCLUSIONS: The clinical diagnosis of hyperthyroidism usually offers no difficulty and should be made with measurements of serum TSH and thyroid hormones. The treatment can be performed with antithyroid drugs, surgery or administration of radioactive iodine according to the etiology of thyrotoxicosis, local availability of methods and preferences of the attending physician and patient.

11 Guideline The use of propranolol in the management of periocular capillary haemangioma--a systematic review. 2011

Spiteri Cornish, K / Reddy, A R. ·Department of Ophthalmology, Royal Aberdeen Children's Hospital, Aberdeen, UK. ·Eye (Lond) · Pubmed #21738233.

ABSTRACT: Capillary haemangioma or infantile haemangioma (IH) is the most common congenital vascular tumour in the periocular region. Several treatment modalities have been documented, with variable degree of success. Propranolol has recently been reported to be an effective and safe alternative. The aim of this systematic review is to examine the evidence base for the use of propranolol administered orally in the management of periocular capillary haemangioma, and use this information to guide future research. A systematic review of literature was carried out by two independent reviewers using the search strategies highlighted below. A total of 100 cases of oral propranolol use in periorbital or orbital capillary haemangiomas have been documented in the literature. Of the 85 cases that had details of previous treatment, it was used as first-line treatment in 50 (58.8%). The commonest dose used was 2 mg/kg/day. Adverse events were documented in one-third of cases; in most cases these were minor. Improvement or complete resolution of the lesions occurred in 96% of cases. Recurrence was noted in one-fifth of cases. Propranolol has shown a lot of promise in the therapy of IH and further research in the form of properly designed randomized trials is certainly warranted. Treatment guidelines based on literature available to date is included in this review.

12 Guideline Hyperthyroidism and other causes of thyrotoxicosis: management guidelines of the American Thyroid Association and American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. 2011

Bahn, Rebecca S / Burch, Henry B / Cooper, David S / Garber, Jeffrey R / Greenlee, M Carol / Klein, Irwin / Laurberg, Peter / McDougall, I Ross / Montori, Victor M / Rivkees, Scott A / Ross, Douglas S / Sosa, Julie Ann / Stan, Marius N / Anonymous3420698 / Anonymous3430698. ·Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism, and Nutrition, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. ·Endocr Pract · Pubmed #21700562.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Thyrotoxicosis has multiple etiologies, manifestations, and potential therapies. Appropriate treatment requires an accurate diagnosis and is influenced by coexisting medical conditions and patient preference. This article describes evidence-based clinical guidelines for the management of thyrotoxicosis that would be useful to generalist and subspeciality physicians and others providing care for patients with this condition. METHODS: The development of these guidelines was commissioned by the American Thyroid Association in association with the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. The American Thyroid Association and American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists assembled a task force of expert clinicians who authored this report. The task force examined relevant literature using a systematic PubMed search supplemented with additional published materials. An evidence-based medicine approach that incorporated the knowledge and experience of the panel was used to develop the text and a series of specific recommendations. The strength of the recommendations and the quality of evidence supporting each was rated according to the approach recommended by the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation Group. RESULTS: Clinical topics addressed include the initial evaluation and management of thyrotoxicosis; management of Graves' hyperthyroidism using radioactive iodine, antithyroid drugs, or surgery; management of toxic multinodular goiter or toxic adenoma using radioactive iodine or surgery; Graves' disease in children, adolescents, or pregnant patients; subclinical hyperthyroidism; hyperthyroidism in patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy; and management of other miscellaneous causes of thyrotoxicosis. CONCLUSIONS: One hundred evidence-based recommendations were developed to aid in the care of patients with thyrotoxicosis and to share what the task force believes is current, rational, and optimal medical practice.

13 Guideline Hyperthyroidism and other causes of thyrotoxicosis: management guidelines of the American Thyroid Association and American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. 2011

Bahn Chair, Rebecca S / Burch, Henry B / Cooper, David S / Garber, Jeffrey R / Greenlee, M Carol / Klein, Irwin / Laurberg, Peter / McDougall, I Ross / Montori, Victor M / Rivkees, Scott A / Ross, Douglas S / Sosa, Julie Ann / Stan, Marius N / Anonymous4780692 / Anonymous4790692. ·Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism, and Nutrition, Mayo Clinic , Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA. bahn.rebecca@mayo.edu ·Thyroid · Pubmed #21510801.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Thyrotoxicosis has multiple etiologies, manifestations, and potential therapies. Appropriate treatment requires an accurate diagnosis and is influenced by coexisting medical conditions and patient preference. This article describes evidence-based clinical guidelines for the management of thyrotoxicosis that would be useful to generalist and subspeciality physicians and others providing care for patients with this condition. METHODS: The development of these guidelines was commissioned by the American Thyroid Association in association with the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. The American Thyroid Association and American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists assembled a task force of expert clinicians who authored this report. The task force examined relevant literature using a systematic PubMed search supplemented with additional published materials. An evidence-based medicine approach that incorporated the knowledge and experience of the panel was used to develop the text and a series of specific recommendations. The strength of the recommendations and the quality of evidence supporting each was rated according to the approach recommended by the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation Group. RESULTS: Clinical topics addressed include the initial evaluation and management of thyrotoxicosis; management of Graves' hyperthyroidism using radioactive iodine, antithyroid drugs, or surgery; management of toxic multinodular goiter or toxic adenoma using radioactive iodine or surgery; Graves' disease in children, adolescents, or pregnant patients; subclinical hyperthyroidism; hyperthyroidism in patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy; and management of other miscellaneous causes of thyrotoxicosis. CONCLUSIONS: One hundred evidence-based recommendations were developed to aid in the care of patients with thyrotoxicosis and to share what the task force believes is current, rational, and optimal medical practice.

14 Guideline Orbits, vision, and visual loss. 2010

Wippold, F J / Anonymous3490648. ·Neuroradiology Section, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, 510 S Kingshighway Blvd, St. Louis, MO 63110-1076, USA. wippold@mir.wustl.edu ·AJNR Am J Neuroradiol · Pubmed #20075107.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Editorial Optical Coherence Tomography as an Adjunct to Assess Muscle Thickness in Graves' Ophthalmopathy. 2019

Nelson, Leonard B. · ·J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus · Pubmed #31545860.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Editorial Cambridge Ophthalmological Symposium 2018: introduction and reflections on the day. 2019

Ludgate, Marian. ·Professor Emerita, Institute of Infection & Immunity, School of Medicine, Cardiff, UK. Ludgate@cardiff.ac.uk. ·Eye (Lond) · Pubmed #30568255.

ABSTRACT: I was privileged to be one of the co-chairs, along with Professor Tim Sullivan (Brisbane, Australia), for the Cambridge Ophthalmological Society (COS) annual international symposium, which, this year, was dedicated to thyroid eye disease (TED). Together with the organisers, Miss Rachna Murthy and Professor Keith Martin from COS, we compiled an impressive programme covering all aspects of the condition from events happening in a single orbital cell to improved surgical approaches.

17 Editorial A history of Graves and St. John's. 2019

Williams, David L. ·St John's College, University of Cambridge, St John's Street, Cambridge, UK. dlw33@cam.ac.uk. ·Eye (Lond) · Pubmed #30390054.

ABSTRACT:

18 Editorial Pain in and Around the Eye: How Big is the Problem? 2018

Bhattarai, Balkrishna / Badhu, Badri Prasad. ·BP Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal. · BP Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan. ·Nepal J Ophthalmol · Pubmed #31056552.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Editorial Diagnosing and Treating Thyroid Ophthalmopathy. 2018

Wagner, Rudolph S. · ·J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus · Pubmed #30452765.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Editorial The Graves' disease, consensus of the French Society of Endocrinology. 2018

Bartes, Beate / Rodien, Patrice. ·Association vivre sans thyroïde 31490 Leguevin, France. · Service EDN, centre de référence des maladies rares de la thyroïde et des recepteurs hormonaux, CHU d'Angers, 4, rue Larrey, 49000 Angers, France. Electronic address: PaRodien@chu-angers.fr. ·Ann Endocrinol (Paris) · Pubmed #30340757.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Editorial Epstein-Barr Virus and Grave's Disease. 2018

Woodland, David L. ·Trudeau Institute , Saranac Lake, New York. ·Viral Immunol · Pubmed #30312148.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Editorial Coned Radial Forearm Free Flap for Improved Retention of Orbital Prosthesis following Orbital Exenteration. 2018

Zhou, Kiane / Luong, Jason K / Clark, Jonathan R / Ch'ng, Sydney. ·Royal Prince Alfred Hospital Westmead Clinical School, Westmead and, Institute of Academic Surgery, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, University of Sydney Institute of Academic Surgery, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, University of Sydney and Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Chris O'Brien Lifehouse Cancer Centre Institute of Academic Surgery, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, University of Sydney, Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Chris O'Brien Lifehouse Cancer Centre, and Department of Plastic Surgery, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. ·Plast Reconstr Surg · Pubmed #30119127.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

23 Editorial Viral Epitope Escape in Acute HIV-1 Infection. 2018

Woodland, David L. ·Trudeau Institute , Saranac Lake, New York. ·Viral Immunol · Pubmed #30118396.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

24 Editorial Management of graves myopathy: Understanding and managing vertical strabismus from thyroid eye disease. 2018

Dagi, Linda R. ·Boston Children's Hospital Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: Linda.Dagi@childrens.harvard.edu. ·J AAPOS · Pubmed #30056089.

ABSTRACT: This step-by-step approach to the evaluation and treatment of vertical strabismus from thyroid eye disease addresses (1) the diverse causes of late overcorrection after inferior rectus recession and methods to minimize its occurrence; (2) when to consider unilateral versus bilateral inferior rectus surgery; (3) management of A patterns associated with bilateral inferior rectus recessions; and (4) sensorimotor clues, including torsional features, which indicate excessive superior rectus or superior oblique tone and should be considered in the surgical plan.

25 Editorial In the Eye of the Maximal Storm: Surgery Versus Radiation? 2018

Janopaul-Naylor, James / Yom, Sue S. ·Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California. ·Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys · Pubmed #29976480.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

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