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Osteoporosis HELP
Based on 20,100 articles published since 2007
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These are the 20100 published articles about Osteoporosis that originated from Worldwide during 2007-2017.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY POSITION STATEMENT ON MENOPAUSE-2017 UPDATE. 2017

Cobin, Rhoda H / Goodman, Neil F / Anonymous1491290. · ·Endocr Pract · Pubmed #28703650.

ABSTRACT: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE)/American College of Endocrinology (ACE) Position Statement is designed to update the previous menopause clinical practice guidelines published in 2011 but does not replace them. The current document reviews new clinical trials published since then as well as new information regarding possible risks and benefits of therapies available for the treatment of menopausal symptoms. AACE reinforces the recommendations made in its previous guidelines and provides additional recommendations on the basis of new data. A summary regarding this position statement is listed below: New information available from randomized clinical trials and epidemiologic studies reported after 2011 was critically reviewed. No previous recommendations from the 2011 menopause clinical practice guidelines have been reversed or changed. Newer information enhances AACE's guidance for the use of hormone therapy in different subsets of women. Newer information helps to support the use of various types of estrogens, selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), and progesterone, as well as the route of delivery. Newer information supports the previous recommendation against the use of bioidentical hormones. The use of nonhormonal therapies for the symptomatic relief of menopausal symptoms is supported. Newer information enhances AACE's guidance for the use of hormone therapy in different subsets of women. Newer information helps to support the use of various types of estrogens, SERMs, and progesterone, as well as the route of delivery. Newer information supports the previous recommendation against the use of bioidentical hormones. The use of nonhormonal therapies for the symptomatic relief of menopausal symptoms is supported. New recommendations in this position statement include: 1. RECOMMENDATION: the use of menopausal hormone therapy in symptomatic postmenopausal women should be based on consideration of all risk factors for cardiovascular disease, age, and time from menopause. 2. RECOMMENDATION: the use of transdermal as compared with oral estrogen preparations may be considered less likely to produce thrombotic risk and perhaps the risk of stroke and coronary artery disease. 3. RECOMMENDATION: when the use of progesterone is necessary, micronized progesterone is considered the safer alternative. 4. RECOMMENDATION: in symptomatic menopausal women who are at significant risk from the use of hormone replacement therapy, the use of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors and possibly other nonhormonal agents may offer significant symptom relief. 5. RECOMMENDATION: AACE does not recommend use of bioidentical hormone therapy. 6. RECOMMENDATION: AACE fully supports the recommendations of the Comité de l'Évolution des Pratiques en Oncologie regarding the management of menopause in women with breast cancer. 7. RECOMMENDATION: HRT is not recommended for the prevention of diabetes. 8. RECOMMENDATION: In women with previously diagnosed diabetes, the use of HRT should be individualized, taking in to account age, metabolic, and cardiovascular risk factors. ABBREVIATIONS: AACE = American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists; ACE = American College of Endocrinology; BMI = body mass index; CAC = coronary artery calcification; CEE = conjugated equine estrogen; CEPO = Comité de l'Évolution des Pratiques en Oncologie; CAD = coronary artery disease; CIMT = carotid intima media thickness; CVD = cardiovascular disease; FDA = Food and Drug Administration; HDL = high-density lipoprotein; HRT = hormone replacement therapy; HT = hypertension; KEEPS = Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study; LDL = low-density lipoprotein; MBS = metabolic syndrome; MPA = medroxyprogesterone acetate; RR = relative risk; SERM = selective estrogen-receptor modulator; SSRI = selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor; VTE = venous thrombo-embolism; WHI = Women's Health Initiative.

2 Guideline 2017 American College of Rheumatology Guideline for the Prevention and Treatment of Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteoporosis. 2017

Buckley, Lenore / Guyatt, Gordon / Fink, Howard A / Cannon, Michael / Grossman, Jennifer / Hansen, Karen E / Humphrey, Mary Beth / Lane, Nancy E / Magrey, Marina / Miller, Marc / Morrison, Lake / Rao, Madhumathi / Robinson, Angela Byun / Saha, Sumona / Wolver, Susan / Bannuru, Raveendhara R / Vaysbrot, Elizaveta / Osani, Mikala / Turgunbaev, Marat / Miller, Amy S / McAlindon, Timothy. ·Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut. · McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, VA Health Care System, Minneapolis, Minnesota. · Arthritis Consultants of Tidewater, Virginia Beach, Virginia. · University of California, Los Angeles. · University of Wisconsin, Madison. · Oklahoma University Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City. · University of California Davis, Sacramento. · Case Western Reserve University, MetroHealth System, Cleveland, Ohio. · Rheumatology Associates, Portland, Maine. · Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina. · Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts. · Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, Cleveland, Ohio. · Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond. · American College of Rheumatology, Atlanta, Georgia. ·Arthritis Rheumatol · Pubmed #28585373.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To develop recommendations for prevention and treatment of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIOP). METHODS: We conducted a systematic review to synthesize the evidence for the benefits and harms of GIOP prevention and treatment options. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology was used to rate the quality of evidence. We used a group consensus process to determine the final recommendations and grade their strength. The guideline addresses initial assessment and reassessment in patients beginning or continuing long-term (≥3 months) glucocorticoid (GC) treatment, as well as the relative benefits and harms of lifestyle modification and of calcium, vitamin D, bisphosphonate, raloxifene, teriparatide, and denosumab treatment in the general adult population receiving long-term GC treatment, as well as in special populations of long-term GC users. RESULTS: Because of limited evidence regarding the benefits and harms of interventions in GC users, most recommendations in this guideline are conditional (uncertain balance between benefits and harms). Recommendations include treating only with calcium and vitamin D in adults at low fracture risk, treating with calcium and vitamin D plus an additional osteoporosis medication (oral bisphosphonate preferred) in adults at moderate-to-high fracture risk, continuing calcium plus vitamin D but switching from an oral bisphosphonate to another antifracture medication in adults in whom oral bisphosphonate treatment is not appropriate, and continuing oral bisphosphonate treatment or switching to another antifracture medication in adults who complete a planned oral bisphosphonate regimen but continue to receive GC treatment. Recommendations for special populations, including children, people with organ transplants, women of childbearing potential, and people receiving very high-dose GC treatment, are also made. CONCLUSION: This guideline provides direction for clinicians and patients making treatment decisions. Clinicians and patients should use a shared decision-making process that accounts for patients' values, preferences, and comorbidities. These recommendations should not be used to limit or deny access to therapies.

3 Guideline Committee Opinion No.702: Female Athlete Triad. 2017

Anonymous2161202. · ·Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #28538496.

ABSTRACT: The female athlete triad is a medical condition observed in physically active females involving three components: 1) low energy availability with or without disordered eating, 2) menstrual dysfunction, and 3) low bone density. An individual does not need to show clinical manifestations of all three components of the female athlete triad simultaneously to be affected by the condition. Consequences of these clinical conditions may not be completely reversible, so prevention, early diagnosis, and intervention are critical. All athletes are at risk of the female athlete triad, regardless of body build or sport. All active females should be assessed for components of the triad and further evaluation should be performed if one or more components are identified. The obstetrician-gynecologist has the opportunity to screen athletes for components of the female athlete triad at comprehensive visits for preventive care. Using the menstrual cycle as a vital sign is a useful tool for identifying athletes at risk of female athlete triad and should be an integral part of the preparticipatory sports physical. The goal of treatment for those diagnosed with female athlete triad is restoration of regular menses as a clinical marker of reestablishment of energy balance and enhancement of bone mineral density. The female athlete triad is a result of energy imbalance; thus, adjusting the energy expenditure and energy availability is the main intervention. Pharmacologic treat-ment may be considered when nonpharmacologic treatment has failed. A team approach involving the patient, obstetrician-gynecologist, sports nutritionist, coaches, parents, and mental health care provider, if indicated, is optimal.

4 Guideline Committee Opinion No. 702 Summary: Female Athlete Triad. 2017

Anonymous2121202. · ·Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #28538492.

ABSTRACT: The female athlete triad is a medical condition observed in physically active females involving three components: 1) low energy availability with or without disordered eating, 2) menstrual dysfunction, and 3) low bone density. An individual does not need to show clinical manifestations of all three components of the female athlete triad simultaneously to be affected by the condition. Consequences of these clinical conditions may not be completely reversible, so prevention, early diagnosis, and intervention are critical. All athletes are at risk of the female athlete triad, regardless of body build or sport. All active females should be assessed for components of the triad and further evaluation should be performed if one or more components are identified. The obstetrician-gynecologist has the opportunity to screen athletes for components of the female athlete triad at comprehensive visits for preventive care. Using the menstrual cycle as a vital sign is a useful tool for identifying athletes at risk of female athlete triad and should be an integral part of the preparticipatory sports physical. The goal of treatment for those diagnosed with female athlete triad is restoration of regular menses as a clinical marker of reestablishment of energy balance and enhancement of bone mineral density. The female athlete triad is a result of energy imbalance; thus, adjusting the energy expenditure and energy availability is the main intervention. Pharmacologic treat-ment may be considered when nonpharmacologic treatment has failed. A team approach involving the patient, obstetrician-gynecologist, sports nutritionist, coaches, parents, and mental health care provider, if indicated, is optimal.

5 Guideline Treatment of Low Bone Density or Osteoporosis to Prevent Fractures in Men and Women: A Clinical Practice Guideline Update From the American College of Physicians. 2017

Qaseem, Amir / Forciea, Mary Ann / McLean, Robert M / Denberg, Thomas D / Anonymous4481172. ·From the American College of Physicians and University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut. · ·Ann Intern Med · Pubmed #28492856.

ABSTRACT: Description: This guideline updates the 2008 American College of Physicians (ACP) recommendations on treatment of low bone density and osteoporosis to prevent fractures in men and women. This guideline is endorsed by the American Academy of Family Physicians. Methods: The ACP Clinical Guidelines Committee based these recommendations on a systematic review of randomized controlled trials; systematic reviews; large observational studies (for adverse events); and case reports (for rare events) that were published between 2 January 2005 and 3 June 2011. The review was updated to July 2016 by using a machine-learning method, and a limited update to October 2016 was done. Clinical outcomes evaluated were fractures and adverse events. This guideline focuses on the comparative benefits and risks of short- and long-term pharmacologic treatments for low bone density, including pharmaceutical prescriptions, calcium, vitamin D, and estrogen. Evidence was graded according to the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) system. Target Audience and Patient Population: The target audience for this guideline includes all clinicians. The target patient population includes men and women with low bone density and osteoporosis. Recommendation 1: ACP recommends that clinicians offer pharmacologic treatment with alendronate, risedronate, zoledronic acid, or denosumab to reduce the risk for hip and vertebral fractures in women who have known osteoporosis. (Grade: strong recommendation; high-quality evidence). Recommendation 2: ACP recommends that clinicians treat osteoporotic women with pharmacologic therapy for 5 years. (Grade: weak recommendation; low-quality evidence). Recommendation 3: ACP recommends that clinicians offer pharmacologic treatment with bisphosphonates to reduce the risk for vertebral fracture in men who have clinically recognized osteoporosis. (Grade: weak recommendation; low-quality evidence). Recommendation 4: ACP recommends against bone density monitoring during the 5-year pharmacologic treatment period for osteoporosis in women. (Grade: weak recommendation; low-quality evidence). Recommendation 5: ACP recommends against using menopausal estrogen therapy or menopausal estrogen plus progestogen therapy or raloxifene for the treatment of osteoporosis in women. (Grade: strong recommendation; moderate-quality evidence). Recommendation 6: ACP recommends that clinicians should make the decision whether to treat osteopenic women 65 years of age or older who are at a high risk for fracture based on a discussion of patient preferences, fracture risk profile, and benefits, harms, and costs of medications. (Grade: weak recommendation; low-quality evidence).

6 Guideline ACG Clinical Guideline: Preventive Care in Inflammatory Bowel Disease. 2017

Farraye, Francis A / Melmed, Gil Y / Lichtenstein, Gary R / Kane, Sunanda V. ·Section of Gastroenterology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. ·Am J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #28071656.

ABSTRACT: Recent data suggest that inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients do not receive preventive services at the same rate as general medical patients. Patients with IBD often consider their gastroenterologist to be the primary provider of care. To improve the care delivered to IBD patients, health maintenance issues need to be co-managed by both the gastroenterologist and primary care team. Gastroenterologists need to explicitly inform the primary care provider of the unique needs of the IBD patient, especially those on immunomodulators and biologics or being considered for such therapy. In particular, documentation of up to date vaccinations are crucial as IBD patients are often treated with long-term immune-suppressive therapies and may be at increased risk for infections, many of which are preventable with vaccinations. Health maintenance issues addressed in this guideline include identification, safety and appropriate timing of vaccinations, screening for osteoporosis, cervical cancer, melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer as well as identification of depression and anxiety and smoking cessation. To accomplish these health maintenance goals, coordination between the primary care provider, gastroenterology team and other specialists is necessary.

7 Guideline Exercise and Sports Science Australia (ESSA) position statement on exercise prescription for the prevention and management of osteoporosis. 2017

Beck, Belinda R / Daly, Robin M / Singh, Maria A Fiatarone / Taaffe, Dennis R. ·School of Allied Health Sciences, Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, Australia. Electronic address: b.beck@griffith.edu.au. · Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Australia. · Exercise, Health and Performance Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences and Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Australia. · School of Medical and Health Sciences and the Exercise Medicine Research Institute, Edith Cowan University, Australia; School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences, University of Queensland, Australia. ·J Sci Med Sport · Pubmed #27840033.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Osteoporotic fractures are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Although exercise has long been recommended for the prevention and management of osteoporosis, existing guidelines are often non-specific and do not account for individual differences in bone health, fracture risk and functional capacity. The aim of the current position statement is to provide health practitioners with specific, evidence-based guidelines for safe and effective exercise prescription for the prevention or management of osteoporosis, accommodating a range of potential comorbidities. DESIGN: Position statement. METHODS: Interpretation and application of research reports describing the effects of exercise interventions for the prevention and management of low bone mass, osteoporosis and osteoporotic fracture. RESULTS: Evidence from animal and human trials indicates that bone responds positively to impact activities and high intensity progressive resistance training. Furthermore, the optimisation of muscle strength, balance and mobility minimises the risk of falls (and thereby fracture), which is particularly relevant for individuals with limited functional capacity and/or a very high risk of osteoporotic fracture. It is important that all exercise programs be accompanied by sufficient calcium and vitamin D, and address issues of comorbidity and safety. For example, loaded spine flexion is not recommended, and impact activities may require modification in the presence of osteoarthritis or frailty. CONCLUSIONS: Specific guidelines for safe and effective exercise for bone health are presented. Individual exercise prescription must take into account existing bone health status, co-morbidities, and functional or clinical risk factors for falls and fracture.

8 Guideline Osteoporosis management in patients with breast cancer: EMAS position statement. 2017

Trémollieres, Florence A / Ceausu, Iuliana / Depypere, Herman / Lambrinoudaki, Irene / Mueck, Alfred / Pérez-López, Faustino R / van der Schouw, Yvonne T / Senturk, Levent M / Simoncini, Tommaso / Stevenson, John C / Stute, Petra / Rees, Margaret. ·Menopause and Metabolic Bone Disease Unit, Hôpital Paule de Viguier, CHU Toulouse, Toulouse, France. Electronic address: tremollieres.fr@chu-toulouse.fr. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 'Carol Davila' University of Medicine and Pharmacy, and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 'Dr. I. Cantacuzino' Hospital, Bucharest, Romania. · Breast Clinic and Menopause Clinic, University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 9000 Gent, Belgium. · Second Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, National and Kapodestrian University of Athens, Greece. · University Women's Hospital of Tuebingen, Calwer Street 7, 72076 Tuebingen, Germany. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Zaragoza University Faculty of Medicine, Lozano-Blesa University Hospital, Zaragoza 50009, Spain. · Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Istanbul University Cerrahpasa School of Medicine. Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Reproductive Endocrinology, IVF Unit, Istanbul, Turkey. · Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Via Roma, 67, 56100, Pisa, Italy. · National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, Royal Brompton Campus Hospital, London SW3 6NP, UK. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Women's Hospital, Bern, Switzerland. · Women's Centre, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford OX3 9DU, UK. ·Maturitas · Pubmed #27802892.

ABSTRACT: Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are the first-line recommended standard of care for postmenopausal estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. Because they cause a profound suppression of estrogen levels, concerns regarding their potential to increase the risk of fracture were rapidly raised. There is currently a general consensus that a careful baseline evaluation is needed of the risk of fracture in postmenopausal women about to start treatment with AIs but also in all premenopausal women with early disease. Bisphosphonates have been shown in several phase III trials to prevent the bone loss induced by cancer treatment, although no fracture data are available. Even though they do not have regulatory approval for this indication, their use must be discussed with women at high risk of fracture. Accordingly, several guidelines recommend considering treatment in women with a T-score ≤-2 or those with two or more clinical risk factors. Moreover, recent data suggest that bisphosphonates, especially intravenous zoledronic acid, may have an anticancer effect, in that they reduce bone recurrence as well as extra-skeletal metastasis and breast cancer mortality in postmenopausal women. The anti-RANK ligand antibody denosumab is also emerging as a new adjuvant therapeutic option to prevent AI-induced bone loss. It has been shown to extend the time to first fracture in postmenopausal women treated with AIs. Several issues still need to be addressed regarding the use of these different agents in an adjuvant setting. The purpose of this position statement is to review the literature on antifracture therapy and to discuss the current guidelines for the management of osteoporosis in women with early breast cancer.

9 Guideline AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES FOR THE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF POSTMENOPAUSAL OSTEOPOROSIS - 2016--EXECUTIVE SUMMARY. 2016

Camacho, Pauline M / Petak, Steven M / Binkley, Neil / Clarke, Bart L / Harris, Steven T / Hurley, Daniel L / Kleerekoper, Michael / Lewiecki, E Michael / Miller, Paul D / Narula, Harmeet S / Pessah-Pollack, Rachel / Tangpricha, Vin / Wimalawansa, Sunil J / Watts, Nelson B. · ·Endocr Pract · Pubmed #27643923.

ABSTRACT: ABBREVIATIONS: AACE = American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists AFF = atypical femur fracture ASBMR = American Society for Bone and Mineral Research BEL = best evidence level BMD = bone mineral density BTM = bone turnover marker CBC = complete blood count CI = confidence interval DXA = dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry EL = evidence level FDA = U.S. Food and Drug Administration FLEX = Fracture Intervention Trial (FIT) Long-term Extension FRAX(®) = Fracture Risk Assessment Tool GFR = glomerular filtration rate GI = gastrointestinal HORIZON = Health Outcomes and Reduced Incidence with Zoledronic Acid Once Yearly IOF = International Osteoporosis Foundation ISCD = International Society for Clinical Densitometry IU = international units IV = intravenous LSC = least significant change NBHA = National Bone Health Alliance NOF = National Osteoporosis Foundation 25(OH)D = 25-hydroxy vitamin D ONJ = osteonecrosis of the jaw PINP = serum carboxy-terminal propeptide of type I collagen PTH = parathyroid hormone R = recommendation RANK = receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B RANKL = receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand RCT = randomized controlled trial RR = relative risk S-CTX = serum C-terminal telopeptide SQ = subcutaneous VFA = vertebral fracture assessment WHO = World Health Organization.

10 Guideline Best Practices for Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry Measurement and Reporting: International Society for Clinical Densitometry Guidance. 2016

Lewiecki, E Michael / Binkley, Neil / Morgan, Sarah L / Shuhart, Christopher R / Camargos, Bruno Muzzi / Carey, John J / Gordon, Catherine M / Jankowski, Lawrence G / Lee, Joon-Kiong / Leslie, William D / Anonymous3330863. ·New Mexico Clinical Research & Osteoporosis Center, Albuquerque, NM, USA. Electronic address: mlewiecki@gmail.com. · Osteoporosis Clinical Center and Research Program, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USA. · Division of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, UAB Osteoporosis Prevention and Treatment Clinic, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA. · Swedish Medical Group, Seattle, WA, USA. · Rede Mater Dei de Saúde - Densimater, Belo Horizonte, Brazil. · Galway University Hospitals, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland. · Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, USA. · Illinois Bone and Joint Institute, LLC., Morton Grove, IL, USA. · JK Lee Orthopaedics & Traumatology, Petaling Jaya, Malaysia. · University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. · ·J Clin Densitom · Pubmed #27020004.

ABSTRACT: Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is a technology that is widely used to diagnose osteoporosis, assess fracture risk, and monitor changes in bone mineral density (BMD). The clinical utility of DXA is highly dependent on the quality of the scan acquisition, analysis, and interpretation. Clinicians are best equipped to manage patients when BMD measurements are correct and interpretation follows well-established standards. Poor-quality acquisition, analysis, or interpretation of DXA data may mislead referring clinicians, resulting in unnecessary diagnostic evaluations, failure to evaluate when needed, inappropriate treatment, or failure to provide medical treatment, with potentially ineffective, harmful, or costly consequences. Misallocation of limited healthcare resources and poor treatment decisions can be minimized, and patient care optimized, through meticulous attention to DXA instrument calibration, data acquisition and analysis, interpretation, and reporting. This document from the International Society for Clinical Densitometry describes quality standards for BMD testing at DXA facilities worldwide to provide guidance for DXA supervisors, technologists, interpreters, and clinicians. High-quality DXA testing is necessary for correct diagnostic classification and optimal fracture risk assessment, and is essential for BMD monitoring.

11 Guideline American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. 2016

Runowicz, Carolyn D / Leach, Corinne R / Henry, N Lynn / Henry, Karen S / Mackey, Heather T / Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L / Cannady, Rachel S / Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L / Edge, Stephen B / Jacobs, Linda A / Hurria, Arti / Marks, Lawrence B / LaMonte, Samuel J / Warner, Ellen / Lyman, Gary H / Ganz, Patricia A. ·Carolyn D. Runowicz, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, Florida International University; Karen S. Henry, Sylvester Cancer Center at the University of Miami, Miami, FL; Corinne R. Leach, Rebecca L. Cowens-Alvarado, Rachel S. Cannady, and Samuel J. LaMonte, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA; N. Lynn Henry, University of Michigan, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, MI; Heather T. Mackey, Oncology Nursing Society, Pittsburgh; Linda A. Jacobs, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA; Mandi L. Pratt-Chapman, The George Washington University Cancer Institute, Washington, DC; Stephen B. Edge, Baptist Cancer Center, Memphis, TN; Arti Hurria, City of Hope, Duarte; Patricia A. Ganz, Schools of Medicine and Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles, CA; Lawrence B. Marks, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC; Ellen Warner, University of Toronto, Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; and Gary H. Lyman, Hutchinson Institute for Cancer Outcomes Research, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA doi: 10.3322/caac.21319. Available online at cacancerjournal.com. · Carolyn D. Runowicz, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, Florida International University; Karen S. Henry, Sylvester Cancer Center at the University of Miami, Miami, FL; Corinne R. Leach, Rebecca L. Cowens-Alvarado, Rachel S. Cannady, and Samuel J. LaMonte, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA; N. Lynn Henry, University of Michigan, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, MI; Heather T. Mackey, Oncology Nursing Society, Pittsburgh; Linda A. Jacobs, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA; Mandi L. Pratt-Chapman, The George Washington University Cancer Institute, Washington, DC; Stephen B. Edge, Baptist Cancer Center, Memphis, TN; Arti Hurria, City of Hope, Duarte; Patricia A. Ganz, Schools of Medicine and Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles, CA; Lawrence B. Marks, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC; Ellen Warner, University of Toronto, Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; and Gary H. Lyman, Hutchinson Institute for Cancer Outcomes Research, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA doi: 10.3322/caac.21319. Available online at cacancerjournal.com. corinne.leach@cancer.org. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #26644543.

ABSTRACT: The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1,073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.This guideline was developed through a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has been published jointly by invitation and consent in both CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians and Journal of Clinical Oncology. All rights reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without written permission by the American Cancer Society or the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

12 Guideline The First European Evidence-based Consensus on Extra-intestinal Manifestations in Inflammatory Bowel Disease. 2016

Harbord, Marcus / Annese, Vito / Vavricka, Stephan R / Allez, Matthieu / Barreiro-de Acosta, Manuel / Boberg, Kirsten Muri / Burisch, Johan / De Vos, Martine / De Vries, Anne-Marie / Dick, Andrew D / Juillerat, Pascal / Karlsen, Tom H / Koutroubakis, Ioannis / Lakatos, Peter L / Orchard, Tim / Papay, Pavol / Raine, Tim / Reinshagen, Max / Thaci, Diamant / Tilg, Herbert / Carbonnel, Franck / Anonymous1101069. ·Department of Gastroenterology, Chelsea and Westminster NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Department of Emergency, University Hospital Careggi, Florence, Italy. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Triemli Hospital, Zurich, Switzerland. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hôpital Saint Louis, Sorbonne Paris-Cité University, Paris, France. · Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Santiago De Compostela, A Coruña, Spain. · Department of Transplantation Medicine, Division of Cancer Medicine, Surgery and Transplantation, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Gastro Unit, Hvidovre University Hospital, Hvidovre, and Danish Centre for eHealth & Epidemiology, North Zealand University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Ghent , Ghent, Belgium. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Academic Unit of Ophthalmology, School of Clinical Sciences, Bristol, and National Institute for Health Research, Moorfield's Eye Hospital and UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, London, UK. · Clinic for Visceral Surgery and Medicine, University Hospital Bern, Bern, Switzerland. · Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Heraklion, Heraklion, Greece. · Department of Medicine I, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary. · Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, St Mary's Hospital, London, UK. · Department of Internal Medicine, Hartmannspital Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Gastroenterology, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK. · Medizinische Klinik I, Klinikum Braunschweig, Germany. · Comprehensive Center of Inflammation Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig Holstein, Lubeck, Germany. · Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria. · Service de Gastroentérologie CHU de Bicêtre, Université Paris Sud, Paris, France. · ·J Crohns Colitis · Pubmed #26614685.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Guideline Singapore Cancer Network (SCAN) Guidelines for Bisphosphonate Use in the Adjuvant Breast Cancer Setting. 2015

Anonymous661041. · ·Ann Acad Med Singapore · Pubmed #26763054.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The SCAN breast cancer workgroup aimed to develop Singapore Cancer Network (SCAN) clinical practice guidelines regarding the optimal time-point for initiation of bisphosphonates when using adjuvant aromatase inhibitors (AIs) and provide a consensus for their role in modifying clinical breast cancer outcomes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The workgroup utilised a modified ADAPTE process to calibrate high quality international evidence-based clinical practice guidelines to our local setting. RESULTS: Six international guidelines were evaluated-those developed by the National Cancer Comprehensive Network (2015), the European Society of Medical Oncology (2014), the National Institute for Clinical Evidence (2012), the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (2013), the British Columbia Cancer Agency (2013) and the treatment algorithm based on the National Osteoporosis Foundation guidelines (2006). Recommendations on the use of bisphosphonates in postmenopausal women initiating adjuvant AIs in breast cancer to preserve bone health and the use of adjuvant bisphosphonates to improve breast cancer outcomes were developed. CONCLUSION: These adapted guidelines form the SCAN Guidelines on the use of adjuvant bisphosphonates to influence breast cancer outcomes and maintenance of bone health when on AIs.

14 Guideline Diagnosis and management of menopause: summary of NICE guidance. 2015

Sarri, Grammati / Davies, Melanie / Lumsden, Mary Ann / Anonymous1620849. ·National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health, Royal College of Gynaecologists and Obstetricians, London NW1 4RG, UK gsarri@rcog.org.uk. · National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health, Royal College of Gynaecologists and Obstetricians; University College London Hospitals, London, UK. · Reproductive and Maternal Medicine, University of Glasgow; Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, UK. · ·BMJ · Pubmed #26563259.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Guideline Recommendations for preventing fracture in long-term care. 2015

Papaioannou, Alexandra / Santesso, Nancy / Morin, Suzanne N / Feldman, Sidney / Adachi, Jonathan D / Crilly, Richard / Giangregorio, Lora M / Jaglal, Susan / Josse, Robert G / Kaasalainen, Sharon / Katz, Paul / Moser, Andrea / Pickard, Laura / Weiler, Hope / Whiting, Susan / Skidmore, Carly J / Cheung, Angela M / Anonymous360843. ·Department of Medicine (Papaioannou, Adachi, Pickard), Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics (Papaioannou, Santesso) and School of Nursing (Kaasalainen), Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont.; Geriatric Education and Research in Aging Sciences Centre (Papaioannou, Pickard, Skidmore), St. Peter's Hospital, Hamilton, Ont.; Department of Medicine (Morin), McGill University Health Centre, Montréal, Que.; Montreal General Hospital (Morin), Montréal, Que.; Department of Medicine (Feldman, Josse, Moser, Cheung) and Department of Physical Therapy (Jaglal), University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont.; Baycrest Geriatric Health Care System (Feldman, Katz, Moser), Toronto, Ont.; St. Joseph's Healthcare (Adachi), Hamilton, Ont.; Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Medicine (Crilly), University of Western Ontario, London, Ont.; Department of Kinesiology (Giangregorio), University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ont.; Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (Jaglal), Toronto, Ont.; Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute (Josse), St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ont.; School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition (Weiler), McGill University, Montréal. Que.; Department of Nutrition and Dietetics (Whiting), University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Sask.; Toronto General Hospital (Cheung), Toronto, Ont. papaioannou@hhsc.ca. · Department of Medicine (Papaioannou, Adachi, Pickard), Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics (Papaioannou, Santesso) and School of Nursing (Kaasalainen), Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont.; Geriatric Education and Research in Aging Sciences Centre (Papaioannou, Pickard, Skidmore), St. Peter's Hospital, Hamilton, Ont.; Department of Medicine (Morin), McGill University Health Centre, Montréal, Que.; Montreal General Hospital (Morin), Montréal, Que.; Department of Medicine (Feldman, Josse, Moser, Cheung) and Department of Physical Therapy (Jaglal), University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont.; Baycrest Geriatric Health Care System (Feldman, Katz, Moser), Toronto, Ont.; St. Joseph's Healthcare (Adachi), Hamilton, Ont.; Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Medicine (Crilly), University of Western Ontario, London, Ont.; Department of Kinesiology (Giangregorio), University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ont.; Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (Jaglal), Toronto, Ont.; Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute (Josse), St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ont.; School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition (Weiler), McGill University, Montréal. Que.; Department of Nutrition and Dietetics (Whiting), University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Sask.; Toronto General Hospital (Cheung), Toronto, Ont. · ·CMAJ · Pubmed #26370055.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Guideline [SECOT-GEIOS guidelines in osteoporosis and fragility fracture. An update]. 2015

Etxebarria-Foronda, I / Caeiro-Rey, J R / Larrainzar-Garijo, R / Vaquero-Cervino, E / Roca-Ruiz, L / Mesa-Ramos, M / Merino Pérez, J / Carpintero-Benitez, P / Fernández Cebrián, A / Gil-Garay, E. ·Grupo de Estudio e Investigación de la Osteoporosis y la Fractura Osteoporótica de la Sociedad Española de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología (GEIOS-SECOT), España; Servicio de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología, Hospital Alto Deba, Arrasate-Mondragón, Gipuzkoa, España. Electronic address: ietxe@yahoo.es. · Grupo de Estudio e Investigación de la Osteoporosis y la Fractura Osteoporótica de la Sociedad Española de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología (GEIOS-SECOT), España; Servicio de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología, Complexo Hospitalario Universitario Santiago Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, A Coruña, España. · Grupo de Estudio e Investigación de la Osteoporosis y la Fractura Osteoporótica de la Sociedad Española de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología (GEIOS-SECOT), España; Servicio de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología, Hospital Universitario Infanta Leonor, Madrid, España. · Grupo de Estudio e Investigación de la Osteoporosis y la Fractura Osteoporótica de la Sociedad Española de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología (GEIOS-SECOT), España; Servicio de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología, Complexo Hospitalario Pontevedra, Pontevedra, España. · Grupo de Estudio e Investigación de la Osteoporosis y la Fractura Osteoporótica de la Sociedad Española de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología (GEIOS-SECOT), España; Servicio de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilla, España. · Grupo de Estudio e Investigación de la Osteoporosis y la Fractura Osteoporótica de la Sociedad Española de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología (GEIOS-SECOT), España; Unidad de Gestión Clínica del Aparato Locomotor, Área Sanitaria Norte de Córdoba, Pozoblanco, Córdoba, España. · Grupo de Estudio e Investigación de la Osteoporosis y la Fractura Osteoporótica de la Sociedad Española de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología (GEIOS-SECOT), España; Servicio de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología, Hospital Universitario de Cruces, Barakaldo, Bizkaia, España. · Grupo de Estudio e Investigación de la Osteoporosis y la Fractura Osteoporótica de la Sociedad Española de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología (GEIOS-SECOT), España; Cátedra de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología, Facultad de Medicina, Córdoba, España. · Grupo de Estudio e Investigación de la Osteoporosis y la Fractura Osteoporótica de la Sociedad Española de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología (GEIOS-SECOT), España; Servicio de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología, Complejo Hospitalario de Ourense, Ourense, España. · Grupo de Estudio e Investigación de la Osteoporosis y la Fractura Osteoporótica de la Sociedad Española de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología (GEIOS-SECOT), España; Servicio de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, España. ·Rev Esp Cir Ortop Traumatol · Pubmed #26233814.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Guideline 2015 Guidelines for Osteoporosis in Saudi Arabia: Recommendations from the Saudi Osteoporosis Society. 2015

Al-Saleh, Yousef / Sulimani, Riad / Sabico, Shaun / Raef, Hussein / Fouda, Mona / Alshahrani, Fahad / Al Shaker, Mohammad / Al Wahabi, Basma / Sadat-Ali, Mir / Al Rayes, Hanan / Al Aidarous, Salwa / Saleh, Siham / Al Ayoubi, Fakhr / Al-Daghri, Nasser M. ·Yousef Al-Saleh, MD, Assistant Professor,, College of Medicine,, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences,, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, T: +966(11)8011111 Ext.13056, F: +966(11)8011111 Ext. 14229, alaslawi@hotmail.com. · ·Ann Saudi Med · Pubmed #26142931.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: To provide guidelines for medical professionals in Saudi Arabia regarding osteoporosis. DESIGN AND SETTINGS: A panel of 14 local experts in osteoporosis assembled to provide consensus based on the strength of evidence and expert opinions on osteoporosis treatment. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The Saudi Osteoporosis Society (SOS) formed a panel of experts who performed an extensive published studies search to formulate recommendations regarding prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of osteoporosis in Saudi Arabia. Both local and international published studies were utilized whenever available. RESULTS: Dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scanning is still the golden standard for assessing bone mineral density (BMD). In the absence of local, country-specific fracture risk assessment tool (FRAX), the SOS recommends using the USA (White) version of the FRAX tool. All women above 60 years of age should be evaluated for BMD. This is because the panel recognized that osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures occur at a younger age in Saudi Arabia. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is not recommended for treating postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. BMD evaluation should be performed 1-2 years after initiating intervention, and the assessment of bone turnover biomarkers should be performed whenever available to determine the efficacy of intervention. CONCLUSION: All Saudi women above the age of 60 years must undergo a BMD assessment using DXA. Therapy decisions should be formulated with the use of the USA (White) version of the FRAX tool.

18 Guideline [Update of recommendations for evaluation and treatment of osteoporosis associated to endocrine and nutritional conditions. Working Group on Osteoporosis and Mineral Metabolism of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology]. 2015

Reyes-García, Rebeca / García-Martín, Antonia / Varsavsky, Mariela / Rozas-Moreno, Pedro / Cortés-Berdonces, María / Luque-Fernández, Inés / Gómez Sáez, José Manuel / Vidal Casariego, Alfonso / Romero Muñoz, Manuel / Guadalix Iglesias, Sonsoles / Fernández García, Diego / Jódar Gimeno, Esteban / Muñoz Torres, Manuel / Anonymous310993. ·Unidad de Endocrinología, Hospital General Universitario Rafael Méndez, Lorca, Murcia, España; Unidad de Metabolismo Óseo, Servicio de Endocrinología, Hospital Universitario San Cecilio, Granada, España. Electronic address: rebecarg@yahoo.com. · Unidad de Metabolismo Óseo, Servicio de Endocrinología, Hospital Universitario San Cecilio, Granada, España; Unidad de Endocrinología, Hospital Comarcal del Noroeste, Caravaca de la Cruz, Murcia, España. · Servicio de Endocrinología, Hospital de Sant Pau i Santa Tecla, Tarragona, España. · Unidad de Metabolismo Óseo, Servicio de Endocrinología, Hospital Universitario San Cecilio, Granada, España; Servicio de Endocrinología, Hospital General de Ciudad Real, Ciudad Real, España. · Unidad de Endocrinología, Centro de Endocrinología, Diabetes y Nutrición, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Endocrinología, Hospital Virgen de la Salud de Toledo, Toledo, España. · Servicio de Endocrinología, Hospital Universitario de Bellvitge, Barcelona, España. · Sección de Endocrinología, Complejo Asistencial Universitario de León, León, España. · Unidad de Endocrinología, Hospital General Universitario Rafael Méndez, Lorca, Murcia, España. · Servicio de Endocrinología, Hospital Doce de Octubre, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Endocrinología, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Victoria, Málaga, España. · Servicio de Endocrinología, Hospital Universitario Quiron, Madrid, España. · Unidad de Metabolismo Óseo, Servicio de Endocrinología, Hospital Universitario San Cecilio, Granada, España. · ·Endocrinol Nutr · Pubmed #25797189.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To update previous recommendations developed by the Working Group on Osteoporosis and Mineral Metabolism of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology and Nutrition for the evaluation and treatment of osteoporosis associated to different endocrine and nutritional diseases. PARTICIPANTS: Members of the Working Group on Osteoporosis and Mineral Metabolism of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology and Nutrition. METHODS: Recommendations were formulated according to the GRADE system (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) to describe both the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. A systematic search was made in MEDLINE (Pubmed) using the following terms associated to the name of each condition: AND "osteoporosis", "fractures", "bone mineral density", and "treatment". Papers in English with publication date between 18 October 2011 and 30 October 2014 were included. The recommendations were discussed and approved by all members of the Working Group. CONCLUSIONS: This update summarizes the new data regarding evaluation and treatment of osteoporosis associated to endocrine and nutritional conditions.

19 Guideline [Clinical practice guideline. Diagnosis and treatment of postmenopausal and perinemopausia]. 2015

Alvarado-García, Alberto / Hernández-Quijano, Tomás / Hernández-Valencia, Marcelino / Negrín-Pérez, Miriam Concepción / Ríos-Castillo, Brendha / Valencia-Pérez, Gregorio Urbano / Vital-Reyes, Víctor Saúl / Basavilvazo-Rodríguez, María Antonia / Torres-Arreola, Laura Pilar / Ortiz-Luna, Guillermo Federico / Sánchez-Aguirre, Fernando / Montaño-Uscanga, Armando. ·Asociación Mexicana para el Estudio del Climaterio, Distrito Federal, México. dra.basa06@gmail.com. · ·Rev Med Inst Mex Seguro Soc · Pubmed #25760751.

ABSTRACT: Post-menopause is the period of life where a deep decline occurs in circulating estrogen levels, inducing the appearance of psycho and somatic symptoms. The classification to understand the chronology of reproductive aging in women (known as STRAW) determines the clinical and endocrine changes contemplating menstrual cycles, symptoms, measurements of FSH, LH, inhibin B, anti-Mullerian hormone , and follicular account. The diagnosis of menopause is established by the absence of menstruation for 12 months or more. The most frequent clinical manifestations of the climacteric syndrome transition to menopause are menstrual disorders, vasomotor symptoms (flushes and/or sweats) and genitourinary manifestations. The assessment of women in the peri- or postmenopause aims to develop: cervicovaginal cytology , lipid profile , serum glucose, basal Mammography at least a year before, pelvic ultrasound, urinalysis, serum TSH, Densitometry in patients older than 60 years if there is no recourse can be applied and FRAX. Drug therapy for the treatment of disorders of the transition to menopause or menopause is divided into: hormone therapy (HT) based estrogens and progestin hormone not being the most recommended the serotonin reuptake inhibitors and norepinephrine, clonidine, gabapentin or veralipride.

20 Guideline EMAS position statement: The ten point guide to the integral management of menopausal health. 2015

Neves-E-Castro, Manuel / Birkhauser, Martin / Samsioe, Goran / Lambrinoudaki, Irene / Palacios, Santiago / Borrego, Rafael Sanchez / Llaneza, Placido / Ceausu, Iuliana / Depypere, Herman / Erel, C Tamer / Pérez-López, Faustino R / Schenck-Gustafsson, Karin / van der Schouw, Yvonne T / Simoncini, Tommaso / Tremollieres, Florence / Rees, Margaret. ·Clinica da Menopausa, Av. Luis Bivar, 93c-1 Dt, Lisboa 1050-143, Portugal. · Gynaecological Endocrinology and Reproductive Medicine, University of Berne, Gartenstrasse 67, CH-4052 Basel, Switzerland. · Department of Clinical Sciences, SUS University Hospital Lund, Lund University, SE-221 85 Lund, Sweden. · Second Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, National and Capodestrian University of Athens, Greece. · Instituto Palacios, Salud y Medicina de la Mujer, C/Antonio Acuña, 9, 28009 Madrid, Spain. · DIATROS, Clínica de Atención a la Mujer, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Central Hospital of Asturias, University of Oviedo, 33011 Oviedo, Spain. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 'Carol Davila' University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 'Dr. I. Cantacuzino' Hospital, Bucharest, Romania. · Breast Clinic and Menopause Clinic, University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 9000 Gent, Belgium. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Istanbul University, Cerrahpasa School of Medicine, Valikonagi Cad. No: 93/4, Nisantasi, 34365 Istanbul, Turkey. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Zaragoza University Facultad de Medicina, Hospital Clínico, Zaragoza 50009, Spain. · Department of Medicine, Cardiology Unit, Centre for Gender Medicine, Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital, Thorax N3:05, SE 17176 Stockholm, Sweden. · Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Via Roma, 67, 56100 Pisa, Italy. · Menopause and Metabolic Bone Disease Unit, Hôpital Paule de Viguier, F-31059 Toulouse cedex 09, France. · Women's Centre, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford OX3 9DU, UK. Electronic address: margaret.rees@st-hildas.ox.ac.uk. ·Maturitas · Pubmed #25757366.

ABSTRACT: With increased longevity and more women becoming centenarians, management of the menopause and postreproductive health is of growing importance as it has the potential to help promote health over several decades. Women have individual needs and the approach needs to be personalised. The position statement provides a short integral guide for all those involved in menopausal health. It covers diagnosis, screening for diseases in later life, treatment and follow-up.

21 Guideline 2014 update of recommendations on the prevention and treatment of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. 2014

Briot, Karine / Cortet, Bernard / Roux, Christian / Fardet, Laurence / Abitbol, Vered / Bacchetta, Justine / Buchon, Daniel / Debiais, Francoise / Guggenbuhl, Pascal / Laroche, Michel / Legrand, Erik / Lespessailles, Eric / Marcelli, Christian / Weryha, Georges / Thomas, Thierry / Anonymous340814. · ·Joint Bone Spine · Pubmed #25455041.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To update the recommendations on the prevention and treatment of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis issued in 2003 by the French National Authority for Health (HAS). This update was performed under the aegis of the Bone Section of the French Society for Rheumatology (SFR) and Osteoporosis Research and Information Group (GRIO), in collaboration with four French learned societies (primary-care, gastroenterology, internal medicine, and nephrology). METHODS: A task force composed of members of the medical specialties involved in managing patients with glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis conducted a systematic literature review according to the method developed by the HAS then used the results to develop updated recommendations. RESULTS: These recommendations are intended for all physicians involved in the management of patients who are scheduled to start, or are taking, long-term glucocorticoid therapy (≥ 3 months) in any dose and for any reason. In postmenopausal women and men older than 50 years of age, treatment is warranted in the presence of any of the following risk factors for fracture: history of bone frailty fracture after 50 years of age, bone mineral density T-score ≤ −2.5 at one or more sites, age ≥ 70 years, and dosage ≥ 7.5 mg/d prednisone-equivalent for longer than 3 months. Bisphosphonates can be used in all these situations; teriparatide can be given as first-line therapy in patients at high fracture risk but is reimbursed by the French statutory health insurance system only in patients having two or more prevalent vertebral fractures. The fracture risk is lower in non-menopausal women and in men younger than 50 years of age,in whom treatment decisions should rest on a case-by-case evaluation. CONCLUSION: These recommendations are intended to clarify the pharmacological management of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis.

22 Guideline American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons position paper on medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw--2014 update. 2014

Ruggiero, Salvatore L / Dodson, Thomas B / Fantasia, John / Goodday, Reginald / Aghaloo, Tara / Mehrotra, Bhoomi / O'Ryan, Felice / Anonymous1480807. ·Clinical Professor, Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Stony Brook School of Dental Medicine, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, New York Center for Orthognathic and Maxillofacial Surgery, Lake Success, NY. Electronic address: sruggie@optonline.net. · Professor and Chair, Associate Dean for Hospital Affairs, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Washington School of Dentistry, Seattle, WA. · Chief, Division of Oral Pathology, Department of Dental Medicine, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine , New Hyde Park, NY. · Professor, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Sciences, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada. · Associate Professor, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Assistant Dean for Clinical Research, UCLA School of Dentistry, Los Angeles, CA. · Director, Cancer Institute at St Francis Hospital, Roslyn, NY. · Director, Division of Maxillofacial Surgery, Kaiser Permanente Oakland Medical Center, Oakland, CA. · ·J Oral Maxillofac Surg · Pubmed #25234529.

ABSTRACT: Strategies for management of patients with, or at risk for, medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (MRONJ) were set forth in the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAOMS) position papers in 2007 and 2009. The position papers were developed by a special committee appointed by the board and composed of clinicians with extensive experience in caring for these patients and basic science researchers. The knowledge base and experience in addressing MRONJ has expanded, necessitating modifications and refinements to the previous position paper. This special committee met in September 2013 to appraise the current literature and revise the guidelines as indicated to reflect current knowledge in this field. This update contains revisions to diagnosis, staging, and management strategies and highlights current research status. The AAOMS considers it vitally important that this information be disseminated to other relevant health care professionals and organizations.

23 Guideline Osteoporosis in menopause. 2014

Khan, Aliya / Fortier, Michel / Anonymous761111. ·Hamilton ON. · Quebec QC. · ·J Obstet Gynaecol Can · Pubmed #25222365.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To provide guidelines for the health care provider on the prevention, diagnosis, and clinical management of postmenopausal osteoporosis. OUTCOMES: Strategies for identifying and evaluating high-risk individuals, the use of bone mineral density (BMD) and bone turnover markers in assessing diagnosis and response to management, and recommendations regarding nutrition, physical activity, and the selection of pharmacologic therapy to prevent and manage osteoporosis. EVIDENCE: Published literature was retrieved through searches of PubMed and The Cochrane Library on August 30 and September 18, 2012, respectively. The strategy included the use of appropriate controlled vocabulary (e.g., oteoporosis, bone density, menopause) and key words (e.g., bone health, bone loss, BMD). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, practice guidelines, randomized and controlled clinical trials, and observational studies published in English or French. The search was limited to the publication years 2009 and following, and updates were incorporated into the guideline to March 2013. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology assessment-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies.

24 Guideline [German Society for Rheumatology S3 guidelines on axial spondyloarthritis including Bechterew's disease and early forms: 3 Clinical symptoms]. 2014

Kiltz, U / Rudwaleit, M / Sieper, J / Krause, D / Chenot, J-F / Stallmach, A / Jaresch, S / Oberschelp, U / Schneider, E / Swoboda, B / Böhm, H / Heiligenhaus, A / Pleyer, U / Böhncke, W-H / Stemmer, M / Braun, J / Anonymous2301318. ·Deutsche Gesellschaft für Rheumatologie (DGRh), -, -, Uta.Kiltz@elisabethgruppe.de. · ·Z Rheumatol · Pubmed #25181971.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

25 Guideline Recommendations of the Brazilian Society of Endocrinology and Metabology (SBEM) for the diagnosis and treatment of hypovitaminosis D. 2014

Maeda, Sergio Setsuo / Borba, Victoria Z C / Camargo, Marília Brasilio Rodrigues / Silva, Dalisbor Marcelo Weber / Borges, João Lindolfo Cunha / Bandeira, Francisco / Lazaretti-Castro, Marise / Anonymous10805. ·Disciplina de Endocrinologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Escola Paulista de Medicina, São Paulo, SP, Brasil. · Departamento de Clínica Médica, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba, PR, Brasil. · Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina da Univille, Joinville, SC, Brasil. · Disciplina de Endocrinologia, Universidade Católica de Brasília, Brasília, DF, Brasil. · Disciplina de Endocrinologia, Hospital Agamenon Magalhães, Escola de Medicina, Universidade de Pernambuco, Recife, PE, Brasil. · ·Arq Bras Endocrinol Metabol · Pubmed #25166032.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The objective is to present an update on the diagnosis and treatment of hypovitaminosis D, based on the most recent scientific evidence. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The Department of Bone and Mineral Metabolism of the Brazilian Society of Endocrinology and Metabology (SBEM) was invited to generate a document following the rules of the Brazilian Medical Association (AMB) Guidelines Program. Data search was performed using PubMed, Lilacs and SciELO and the evidence was classified in recommendation levels, according to the scientific strength and study type. CONCLUSION: A scientific update regarding hypovitaminosis D was presented to serve as the basis for the diagnosis and treatment of this condition in Brazil.

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