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Osteoporosis: HELP
Articles by Elizabeth G. Holliday
Based on 3 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, E. Holliday wrote the following 3 articles about Osteoporosis.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article A Serological Diagnosis of Coeliac Disease Is Associated with Osteoporosis in Older Australian Adults. 2018

Potter, Michael D E / Walker, Marjorie M / Hancock, Stephen / Holliday, Elizabeth / Brogan, Gregory / Jones, Michael / McEvoy, Mark / Boyle, Michael / Talley, Nicholas J / Attia, John. ·Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Level 3 East, HMRI Building, Lookout Road, New Lambton Heights 2305, Australia. michael.potter@newcastle.edu.au. · Australian Gastrointestinal Research Alliance (AGIRA), Newcastle 2305, Australia. michael.potter@newcastle.edu.au. · Department of Medicine, John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle 2305, Australia. michael.potter@newcastle.edu.au. · Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Level 3 East, HMRI Building, Lookout Road, New Lambton Heights 2305, Australia. marjorie.walker@newcastle.edu.au. · Australian Gastrointestinal Research Alliance (AGIRA), Newcastle 2305, Australia. marjorie.walker@newcastle.edu.au. · Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Level 3 East, HMRI Building, Lookout Road, New Lambton Heights 2305, Australia. Stephen.hancock@newcastle.edu.au. · Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Level 3 East, HMRI Building, Lookout Road, New Lambton Heights 2305, Australia. liz.holliday@newcastle.edu.au. · Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Level 3 East, HMRI Building, Lookout Road, New Lambton Heights 2305, Australia. gregory.brogan@hnehealth.nsw.gov.au. · Australian Gastrointestinal Research Alliance (AGIRA), Newcastle 2305, Australia. gregory.brogan@hnehealth.nsw.gov.au. · Department of Psychology, Macquarie University, Sydney 2109, Australia. mike.jones@mq.edu.au. · Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Level 3 East, HMRI Building, Lookout Road, New Lambton Heights 2305, Australia. Mark.McEvoy@newcastle.edu.au. · Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Level 3 East, HMRI Building, Lookout Road, New Lambton Heights 2305, Australia. Michael.boyle@hnehealth.nsw.gov.au. · Department of Medicine, John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle 2305, Australia. Michael.boyle@hnehealth.nsw.gov.au. · Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Level 3 East, HMRI Building, Lookout Road, New Lambton Heights 2305, Australia. nicholas.talley@newcastle.edu.au. · Australian Gastrointestinal Research Alliance (AGIRA), Newcastle 2305, Australia. nicholas.talley@newcastle.edu.au. · Department of Medicine, John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle 2305, Australia. nicholas.talley@newcastle.edu.au. · Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Level 3 East, HMRI Building, Lookout Road, New Lambton Heights 2305, Australia. john.attia@newcastle.edu.au. · Department of Medicine, John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle 2305, Australia. john.attia@newcastle.edu.au. ·Nutrients · Pubmed #29966287.

ABSTRACT: Previously thought to be mainly a disorder of childhood and early adult life, coeliac disease (CeD) is increasingly diagnosed in older adults. This may be important given the association between CeD and osteoporosis. The primary aim of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of undiagnosed CeD (‘at-risk serology’) in an older Australian community and relate this to a diagnosis of osteoporosis and fractures during a follow-up period of 12 years. We included participants from the Hunter Community Study (2004⁻2007) aged 55⁻85, who had anti-tissue transglutaminase (tTG) titres, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotypes, and bone mineral density measurements at baseline. Follow-up data included subsequent diagnosis of CeD and fractures using hospital information. ‘At-risk’ serology was defined as both tTG and HLA positivity. Complete results were obtained from 2122 patients. The prevalence of ‘at-risk’ serology was 5%. At baseline, 3.4% fulfilled criteria for a diagnosis of osteoporosis. During a mean of 9.7 years of follow-up, 7.4% of the cohort suffered at least one fracture and 0.7% were subsequently diagnosed with CeD. At-risk serology was significantly associated with osteoporosis in a multivariate model (odds ratio 2.83, 95% confidence interval 1.29⁻6.22); there was insufficient power to look at the outcome of fractures. The results of this study demonstrate that at-risk CeD serology was significantly associated with concurrent osteoporosis but not future fractures. Most individuals with a serological diagnosis of CeD were not diagnosed with CeD during the follow-up period according to medical records. Coeliac disease likely remains under-diagnosed.

2 Article Evidence of effectiveness of a fracture liaison service to reduce the re-fracture rate. 2016

Nakayama, A / Major, G / Holliday, E / Attia, J / Bogduk, N. ·Department of Rheumatology, Bone and Joint Centre Royal Newcastle Centre/John Hunter Hospital, Lookout Road, New Lambton Heights, Newcastle, New South Wales, 2305, Australia. · Department of Rheumatology, Bone and Joint Centre Royal Newcastle Centre/John Hunter Hospital, Lookout Road, New Lambton Heights, Newcastle, New South Wales, 2305, Australia. gabor.major@hnehealth.nsw.gov.au. · Faculty of Medicine University of Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales, 2308, Australia. gabor.major@hnehealth.nsw.gov.au. · Faculty of Medicine University of Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales, 2308, Australia. · Hunter Medical Research Institute, Newcastle, New South Wales, 2308, Australia. ·Osteoporos Int · Pubmed #26650377.

ABSTRACT: SUMMARY: We assessed the ability of a fracture liaison service (FLS) to directly reduce re-fracture risk. Having a FLS is associated with a ∼40% reduction in the 3-year risk of major bone and ∼30% of any bone re-fracture. The number needed to treat to prevent a re-fracture is 20. INTRODUCTION: FLS have been promoted as the most effective interventions for secondary fracture prevention, and while there is evidence of increased rate of investigation and treatment at institutions with a FLS, only a few studies have considered fracture outcomes directly. We therefore sought to evaluate the ability of our FLS to reduce re-fracture risk. METHODS: Historical cohort study of all patients ≥50 years presenting over a 6-month period with a minimal trauma fracture (MTF) to the emergency departments of a tertiary hospital with a FLS, and one without a FLS. Baseline characteristics, mortality and MTFs over a 3-year follow-up were recorded. RESULTS: Five hundred fifteen patients at the FLS hospital and 416 patients at the non-FLS hospital were studied. Over 3 years, 63/515 (12%) patients at the FLS hospital and 70/416 (17%) at the non-FLS hospital had a MTF. All patients were analysed in an intention-to-treat analysis regardless of whether they were seen in the FLS follow-up clinic. Statistical analysis using Cox proportional hazard models in the presence of a competing risk of death from any cause was used. After adjustment for baseline characteristics, there was a ∼30% reduction in rate of any re-fracture at the FLS hospital (hazard ratio (HR) 0.67, confidence interval (CI) 0.47-0.95, p value 0.025) and a ∼40% reduction in major re-fractures (hip, spine, femur, pelvis or humerus) (HR 0.59, CI 0.39-0.90, p value 0.013). CONCLUSIONS: We found a ∼30% reduction in any re-fractures and a ∼40% reduction in major re-fractures at the FLS hospital compared with a similar non-FLS hospital. The number of patients needed to treat to prevent one new fracture over 3 years is 20.

3 Article Genetic determinants of heel bone properties: genome-wide association meta-analysis and replication in the GEFOS/GENOMOS consortium. 2014

Moayyeri, Alireza / Hsu, Yi-Hsiang / Karasik, David / Estrada, Karol / Xiao, Su-Mei / Nielson, Carrie / Srikanth, Priya / Giroux, Sylvie / Wilson, Scott G / Zheng, Hou-Feng / Smith, Albert V / Pye, Stephen R / Leo, Paul J / Teumer, Alexander / Hwang, Joo-Yeon / Ohlsson, Claes / McGuigan, Fiona / Minster, Ryan L / Hayward, Caroline / Olmos, José M / Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka / Lewis, Joshua R / Swart, Karin M A / Masi, Laura / Oldmeadow, Chris / Holliday, Elizabeth G / Cheng, Sulin / van Schoor, Natasja M / Harvey, Nicholas C / Kruk, Marcin / del Greco M, Fabiola / Igl, Wilmar / Trummer, Olivia / Grigoriou, Efi / Luben, Robert / Liu, Ching-Ti / Zhou, Yanhua / Oei, Ling / Medina-Gomez, Carolina / Zmuda, Joseph / Tranah, Greg / Brown, Suzanne J / Williams, Frances M / Soranzo, Nicole / Jakobsdottir, Johanna / Siggeirsdottir, Kristin / Holliday, Kate L / Hannemann, Anke / Go, Min Jin / Garcia, Melissa / Polasek, Ozren / Laaksonen, Marika / Zhu, Kun / Enneman, Anke W / McEvoy, Mark / Peel, Roseanne / Sham, Pak Chung / Jaworski, Maciej / Johansson, Åsa / Hicks, Andrew A / Pludowski, Pawel / Scott, Rodney / Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie A M / van der Velde, Nathalie / Kähönen, Mika / Viikari, Jorma S / Sievänen, Harri / Raitakari, Olli T / González-Macías, Jesús / Hernández, Jose L / Mellström, Dan / Ljunggren, Osten / Cho, Yoon Shin / Völker, Uwe / Nauck, Matthias / Homuth, Georg / Völzke, Henry / Haring, Robin / Brown, Matthew A / McCloskey, Eugene / Nicholson, Geoffrey C / Eastell, Richard / Eisman, John A / Jones, Graeme / Reid, Ian R / Dennison, Elaine M / Wark, John / Boonen, Steven / Vanderschueren, Dirk / Wu, Frederick C W / Aspelund, Thor / Richards, J Brent / Bauer, Doug / Hofman, Albert / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Dedoussis, George / Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara / Gyllensten, Ulf / Pramstaller, Peter P / Lorenc, Roman S / Cooper, Cyrus / Kung, Annie Wai Chee / Lips, Paul / Alen, Markku / Attia, John / Brandi, Maria Luisa / de Groot, Lisette C P G M / Lehtimäki, Terho / Riancho, José A / Campbell, Harry / Liu, Yongmei / Harris, Tamara B / Akesson, Kristina / Karlsson, Magnus / Lee, Jong-Young / Wallaschofski, Henri / Duncan, Emma L / O'Neill, Terence W / Gudnason, Vilmundur / Spector, Timothy D / Rousseau, François / Orwoll, Eric / Cummings, Steven R / Wareham, Nick J / Rivadeneira, Fernando / Uitterlinden, Andre G / Prince, Richard L / Kiel, Douglas P / Reeve, Jonathan / Kaptoge, Stephen K. ·Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. ·Hum Mol Genet · Pubmed #24430505.

ABSTRACT: Quantitative ultrasound of the heel captures heel bone properties that independently predict fracture risk and, with bone mineral density (BMD) assessed by X-ray (DXA), may be convenient alternatives for evaluating osteoporosis and fracture risk. We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association (GWA) studies to assess the genetic determinants of heel broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA; n = 14 260), velocity of sound (VOS; n = 15 514) and BMD (n = 4566) in 13 discovery cohorts. Independent replication involved seven cohorts with GWA data (in silico n = 11 452) and new genotyping in 15 cohorts (de novo n = 24 902). In combined random effects, meta-analysis of the discovery and replication cohorts, nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) had genome-wide significant (P < 5 × 10(-8)) associations with heel bone properties. Alongside SNPs within or near previously identified osteoporosis susceptibility genes including ESR1 (6q25.1: rs4869739, rs3020331, rs2982552), SPTBN1 (2p16.2: rs11898505), RSPO3 (6q22.33: rs7741021), WNT16 (7q31.31: rs2908007), DKK1 (10q21.1: rs7902708) and GPATCH1 (19q13.11: rs10416265), we identified a new locus on chromosome 11q14.2 (rs597319 close to TMEM135, a gene recently linked to osteoblastogenesis and longevity) significantly associated with both BUA and VOS (P < 8.23 × 10(-14)). In meta-analyses involving 25 cohorts with up to 14 985 fracture cases, six of 10 SNPs associated with heel bone properties at P < 5 × 10(-6) also had the expected direction of association with any fracture (P < 0.05), including three SNPs with P < 0.005: 6q22.33 (rs7741021), 7q31.31 (rs2908007) and 10q21.1 (rs7902708). In conclusion, this GWA study reveals the effect of several genes common to central DXA-derived BMD and heel ultrasound/DXA measures and points to a new genetic locus with potential implications for better understanding of osteoporosis pathophysiology.