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Osteoporosis: HELP
Articles by Stephanie M. Kaiser
Based on 15 articles published since 2010
(Why 15 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, S. Kaiser wrote the following 15 articles about Osteoporosis.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline Osteoporosis Canada 2010 guidelines for the assessment of fracture risk. 2011

Lentle, Brian / Cheung, Angela M / Hanley, David A / Leslie, William D / Lyons, David / Papaioannou, Alexandra / Atkinson, Stephanie / Brown, Jacques P / Feldman, Sidney / Hodsman, Anthony B / Jamal, Abida Sophina / Josse, Robert G / Kaiser, Stephanie M / Kvern, Brent / Morin, Suzanne / Siminoski, Kerry / Anonymous2500703. ·Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. blentle@shaw.ca ·Can Assoc Radiol J · Pubmed #21852066.

ABSTRACT: Osteoporosis Canada's 2010 Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Osteoporosis in Canada focus on the clinical impact of fragility fractures, and on the assessment and management of women and men at high risk for fragility fracture. These guidelines now integrate a 10-year absolute fracture risk prediction into an overall management approach by using validated risk assessment tools. There currently is a large gap between optimal practices and those that are now being provided to Canadians with osteoporosis. These guidelines are part of a concerted effort to close this gap. Key changes from the 2002 guidelines of interest and relevance to radiologists are highlighted in this report.

2 Guideline 2010 clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of osteoporosis in Canada: summary. 2010

Papaioannou, Alexandra / Morin, Suzanne / Cheung, Angela M / Atkinson, Stephanie / Brown, Jacques P / Feldman, Sidney / Hanley, David A / Hodsman, Anthony / Jamal, Sophie A / Kaiser, Stephanie M / Kvern, Brent / Siminoski, Kerry / Leslie, William D / Anonymous19420674. ·Department of Medicine, Division of Geriatrics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont. papaioannou@hhsc.ca ·CMAJ · Pubmed #20940232.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Review Primary hyperparathyroidism: review and recommendations on evaluation, diagnosis, and management. A Canadian and international consensus. 2017

Khan, A A / Hanley, D A / Rizzoli, R / Bollerslev, J / Young, J E M / Rejnmark, L / Thakker, R / D'Amour, P / Paul, T / Van Uum, S / Shrayyef, M Zakaria / Goltzman, D / Kaiser, S / Cusano, N E / Bouillon, R / Mosekilde, L / Kung, A W / Rao, S D / Bhadada, S K / Clarke, B L / Liu, J / Duh, Q / Lewiecki, E Michael / Bandeira, F / Eastell, R / Marcocci, C / Silverberg, S J / Udelsman, R / Davison, K Shawn / Potts, J T / Brandi, M L / Bilezikian, J P. ·McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada. Aliya@mcmaster.ca. · Bone Research and Education Center, 223-3075 Hospital Gate, Oakville, ON, Canada. Aliya@mcmaster.ca. · University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. · Division of Bone Diseases, Geneva University Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland. · University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada. · Department of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. · University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · CHUM, Montreal, Canada. · Western University, London, ON, Canada. · Division of Endocrinology, University of Toronto, Mississauga, ON, Canada. · McGill University, Montreal, Canada. · Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada. · Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY, USA. · KU, Leuven, Belgium. · University of Aarhus, Aarhus, Denmark. · University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. · Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI, USA. · Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarth, India. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · Rui-Jin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao-Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China. · University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA. · New Mexico Clinical Research and Osteoporosis Center, University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, NM, USA. · Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolic Bone Diseases, Agamenon Magalhaes Hospital, Brazilian Ministry of Health, University of Pernambuco Medical School, Recife, Brazil. · Department of Human Metabolism, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK. · Department for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Endocrine Unit 2, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Division of Endocrinology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Surgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. · University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard University, Boston, MA, USA. · University of Florence, Florence, Italy. ·Osteoporos Int · Pubmed #27613721.

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this review is to assess the most recent evidence in the management of primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) and provide updated recommendations for its evaluation, diagnosis and treatment. A Medline search of "Hyperparathyroidism. Primary" was conducted and the literature with the highest levels of evidence were reviewed and used to formulate recommendations. PHPT is a common endocrine disorder usually discovered by routine biochemical screening. PHPT is defined as hypercalcemia with increased or inappropriately normal plasma parathyroid hormone (PTH). It is most commonly seen after the age of 50 years, with women predominating by three to fourfold. In countries with routine multichannel screening, PHPT is identified earlier and may be asymptomatic. Where biochemical testing is not routine, PHPT is more likely to present with skeletal complications, or nephrolithiasis. Parathyroidectomy (PTx) is indicated for those with symptomatic disease. For asymptomatic patients, recent guidelines have recommended criteria for surgery, however PTx can also be considered in those who do not meet criteria, and prefer surgery. Non-surgical therapies are available when surgery is not appropriate. This review presents the current state of the art in the diagnosis and management of PHPT and updates the Canadian Position paper on PHPT. An overview of the impact of PHPT on the skeleton and other target organs is presented with international consensus. Differences in the international presentation of this condition are also summarized.

4 Review Bisphosphonates for treatment of osteoporosis: expected benefits, potential harms, and drug holidays. 2014

Brown, Jacques P / Morin, Suzanne / Leslie, William / Papaioannou, Alexandra / Cheung, Angela M / Davison, Kenneth S / Goltzman, David / Hanley, David Arthur / Hodsman, Anthony / Josse, Robert / Jovaisas, Algis / Juby, Angela / Kaiser, Stephanie / Karaplis, Andrew / Kendler, David / Khan, Aliya / Ngui, Daniel / Olszynski, Wojciech / Ste-Marie, Louis-Georges / Adachi, Jonathan. ·2086 Byron St, Victoria, BC V8R 1L9. ebmedicine@gmail.com. ·Can Fam Physician · Pubmed #24733321.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To outline the efficacy and risks of bisphosphonate therapy for the management of osteoporosis and describe which patients might be eligible for bisphosphonate "drug holiday." QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: MEDLINE (PubMed, through December 31, 2012) was used to identify relevant publications for inclusion. Most of the evidence cited is level II evidence (non-randomized, cohort, and other comparisons trials). MAIN MESSAGE: The antifracture efficacy of approved first-line bisphosphonates has been proven in randomized controlled clinical trials. However, with more extensive and prolonged clinical use of bisphosphonates, associations have been reported between their administration and the occurrence of rare, but serious, adverse events. Osteonecrosis of the jaw and atypical subtrochanteric and diaphyseal femur fractures might be related to the use of bisphosphonates in osteoporosis, but they are exceedingly rare and they often occur with other comorbidities or concomitant medication use. Drug holidays should only be considered in low-risk patients and in select patients at moderate risk of fracture after 3 to 5 years of therapy. CONCLUSION: When bisphosphonates are prescribed to patients at high risk of fracture, their antifracture benefits considerably outweigh their potential for harm. For patients taking bisphosphonates for 3 to 5 years, reassess the need for ongoing therapy.

5 Article Predictors of imminent non-vertebral fracture in elderly women with osteoporosis, low bone mass, or a history of fracture, based on data from the population-based Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos). 2019

Adachi, Jonathan D / Berger, Claudie / Barron, Rich / Weycker, Derek / Anastassiades, Tassos P / Davison, K Shawn / Hanley, David A / Ioannidis, George / Jackson, Stuart A / Josse, Robert G / Kaiser, Stephanie M / Kovacs, Christopher S / Leslie, William D / Morin, Suzanne N / Papaioannou, Alexandra / Prior, Jerilynn C / Shyta, Erinda / Silvia, Amanda / Towheed, Tanveer / Goltzman, David. ·McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada. · Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC, Canada. · Amgen Inc., Thousand Oaks, CA, USA. · Policy Analysis Inc. (PAI), Four Davis Court, Brookline, MA, 02445, USA. dweycker@pai2.com. · Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada. · University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada. · Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AL, Canada. · University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada. · University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada. · Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, NL, Canada. · University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. · McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada. · University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. · Policy Analysis Inc. (PAI), Four Davis Court, Brookline, MA, 02445, USA. ·Arch Osteoporos · Pubmed #31098708.

ABSTRACT: Using data from the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study, several risk factors predictive of imminent (2-year) risk of low-trauma non-vertebral fracture among high-risk women were identified, including history of falls, history of low-trauma fracture, poorer physical function, and lower T score. Careful consideration should be given to targeting this population for therapy. PURPOSE: Fracture risk assessment has focused on a long-term horizon and populations with a broad risk range. For elderly women with osteoporosis or low bone mass, or a history of fragility fractures ("high-risk women"), risk prediction over a shorter horizon may have greater clinical relevance. METHODS: A repeated-observations design and data from the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study were employed. Study population comprised women aged ≥ 65 years with T score (total hip, femoral neck, spine) ≤ - 1.0 or prior fracture. Hazard ratios (HR) for predictors of low-trauma non-vertebral fracture during 2-year follow-up were estimated using multivariable shared frailty model. RESULTS: The study population included 3228 women who contributed 5004 observations; 4.8% experienced low-trauma non-vertebral fracture during the 2-year follow-up. In bivariate analyses, important risk factors included age, back pain, history of falls, history of low-trauma fracture, physical function, health status, and total hip T score. In multivariable analyses, only four independent predictors were identified: falls in past 12 months (≥ 2 falls: HR = 1.9; 1 fall: HR = 1.5), low-trauma fracture in past 12 months (≥ 1 fracture: HR = 1.7), SF-36 physical component summary score (≤ 42.0: HR = 1.6), and total hip T score (≤ - 3.5: HR = 3.7; > - 3.5 to ≤ - 2.5: HR = 2.5; > - 2.5 to ≤ - 1: HR = 1.3). CONCLUSIONS: Imminent risk of low-trauma non-vertebral fracture is elevated among high-risk women with a history of falls or low-trauma fracture, poorer physical function, and lower T score. Careful consideration should be given to identifying and targeting this population for therapy.

6 Article Parity and lactation are not associated with incident fragility fractures or radiographic vertebral fractures over 16 years of follow-up: Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos). 2019

Cooke-Hubley, Sandra / Gao, Zhiwei / Mugford, Gerald / Kaiser, Stephanie M / Goltzman, David / Leslie, William D / Davison, K Shawn / Brown, Jacques P / Probyn, Linda / Lentle, Brian / Prior, Jerilynn C / Kovacs, Christopher S. ·Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, 300 Prince Philip Drive, St. John's, NL, A1B 3V6, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, B3H 2Y9, Canada. · Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, QC, H4A 3J1, Canada. · Department of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R2H 2A6, Canada. · a priori medical sciences Inc., Victoria, BC, V8R 3E3, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, CHU de Quebec Research Centre, Laval University, Quebec City, QC, G1V 4G2, Canada. · Department of Medical Imaging, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M4R 1K5, Canada. · Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V9A 6T5, Canada. · Centre for Menstrual Cycle and Ovulation Research, Medicine/Endocrinology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V5Z 1M9, Canada. · Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, 300 Prince Philip Drive, St. John's, NL, A1B 3V6, Canada. ckovacs@mun.ca. ·Arch Osteoporos · Pubmed #31037359.

ABSTRACT: Parity and lactation showed no associations with incident clinical fragility fractures or radiographic vertebral compression fractures in the 16-year CaMos prospective study. Parity was associated with slightly greater decline in femoral neck but not hip or spine areal bone mineral density (aBMD), while lactation showed no associations with aBMD change. PURPOSE: Pregnancy and especially lactation cause loss of bone mass and microarchitectural changes, which temporarily increase fracture risk. After weaning, aBMD increases but skeletal microarchitecture may be incompletely restored. Most retrospective clinical studies found neutral or even protective associations of parity and lactation with fragility fractures, but prospective data are sparse. CaMos is a randomly selected observational cohort that includes ~ 6500 women followed prospectively for over 16 years. METHODS: We determined whether parity or lactation were related to incident clinical fragility fractures over 16 years, radiographic (morphometric and morphologic) vertebral fractures over 10 years, and aBMD change (spine, total hip, and femoral neck) over 10 years. Parity and lactation duration were analyzed as continuous variables in predicting these outcomes using univariate and multivariate regression analyses. RESULTS: Three thousand four hundred thirty-seven women completed 16 years of follow-up for incident clinical fractures, 3839 completed 10 years of morphometric vertebral fracture assessment, 3788 completed 10 years of morphologic vertebral fracture assessment, and 4464 completed 10 years of follow-up for change in aBMD. In the multivariate analyses, parity and lactation duration showed no associations with clinical fragility fractures, radiographic vertebral fractures, or change in aBMD, except that parity associated with a probable chance finding of a slightly greater decline in femoral neck aBMD. CONCLUSIONS: Parity and lactation have no adverse associations with clinical fragility or radiographic vertebral fractures, or the rate of BMD decline over 10 years, in this prospective, multicenter study of a randomly selected, population-based cohort of women.

7 Article Frailty and Risk of Fractures in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes. 2019

Li, Guowei / Prior, Jerilynn C / Leslie, William D / Thabane, Lehana / Papaioannou, Alexandra / Josse, Robert G / Kaiser, Stephanie M / Kovacs, Christopher S / Anastassiades, Tassos / Towheed, Tanveer / Davison, K Shawn / Levine, Mitchell / Goltzman, David / Adachi, Jonathan D / Anonymous531028. ·Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Methodology, Guangdong Second Provincial General Hospital, Guangzhou, China lig28@mcmaster.ca. · Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence, and Impact, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · Departments of Medicine and Radiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. · Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. · Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. · Saskatoon Osteoporosis and CaMos Centre, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. · Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada. ·Diabetes Care · Pubmed #30692240.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: We aimed to explore whether frailty was associated with fracture risk and whether frailty could modify the propensity of type 2 diabetes toward increased risk of fractures. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Data were from a prospective cohort study. Our primary outcome was time to the first incident clinical fragility fracture; secondary outcomes included time to hip fracture and to clinical spine fracture. Frailty status was measured by a Frailty Index (FI) of deficit accumulation. The Cox model incorporating an interaction term (frailty × diabetes) was used for analyses. RESULTS: The analysis included 3,149 (70% women) participants; 138 (60% women) had diabetes. Higher bone mineral density and FI were observed in participants with diabetes compared with control subjects. A significant relationship between the FI and the risk of incident fragility fractures was found, with a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.02 (95% CI 1.01-1.03) and 1.19 (95% CI 1.10-1.33) for per-0.01 and per-0.10 FI increase, respectively. The interaction was also statistically significant ( CONCLUSIONS: Participants with type 2 diabetes were significantly frailer than individuals without diabetes. Frailty increases the risk of fragility fracture and enhances the effect of diabetes on fragility fractures. Particular attention should be paid to diabetes as a risk factor for fragility fractures in those who are frail.

8 Article Mortality risk reduction differs according to bisphosphonate class: a 15-year observational study. 2019

Bliuc, D / Tran, T / van Geel, T / Adachi, J D / Berger, C / van den Bergh, J / Eisman, J A / Geusens, P / Goltzman, D / Hanley, D A / Josse, R G / Kaiser, S / Kovacs, C S / Langsetmo, L / Prior, J C / Nguyen, T V / Center, J R / Anonymous2171017. ·Osteoporosis and Bone Biology, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, Australia. d.bliuc@garvan.org.au. · Osteoporosis and Bone Biology, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, Australia. · Maastricht University Medical Center, Research School CAPHRI, Care and Public Health Research Institute, Maastricht, The Netherlands. · Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · CaMos National Coordinating Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Research School Nutrim, Department of Internal Medicine, Subdivision of Rheumatology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, The Netherlands. · Department of Internal Medicine, VieCuri Medical Centre of Noord-Limburg, Venlo, The Netherlands. · School of Medicine Sydney, University of Notre Dame Australia, Sydney, Australia. · Biomedical Research Institute, University Hasselt, Hasselt, Belgium. · Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. · Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University, St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada. · School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, Minneapolis, MN, USA. · Department of Medicine and Endocrinology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, St Vincent's Hospital, UNSW, Sydney, Australia. · School of Biomedical Engineering, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, Australia. ·Osteoporos Int · Pubmed #30607457.

ABSTRACT: In this prospective cohort of 6120 participants aged 50+, nitrogen-bisphosphonates but not non-nitrogen bisphosphonates were associated with a significant 34% mortality risk reduction compared to non-treated propensity score matched controls. These findings open new avenues for research into mechanistic pathways. INTRODUCTION: Emerging evidence suggests that bisphosphonates (BP), first-line treatment of osteoporosis, are associated with reduced risks for all-cause mortality. This study aimed to determine the association between different BP types and mortality risk in participants with or without a fracture. METHODS: A prospective cohort study of users of different BPs matched to non-users by propensity score (age, gender, co-morbidities, fragility fracture status) and time to starting the BP medication from the population-based Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study from nine Canadian centres followed from 1995 to 2013. Mortality risk for bisphosphonate users vs matched non-users was assessed using pairwise multivariable Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS: There were 2048 women and 308 men on BP and 1970 women and 1794 men who did not receive medication for osteoporosis. The relationship between BP and mortality risk was explored in three separate 1:1 propensity score-matched cohorts of BP users and no treatment (etidronate, n = 599, alendronate, n = 498, and risedronate n = 213). Nitrogen BP (n-BP) (alendronate and risedronate) was associated with lower mortality risks [pairwise HR, 0.66 (95% CI, 0.48-0.91)] while the less potent non-n-BP, etidronate, was not [pairwise HR: 0.89 (95% CI, 0.66-1.20)]. A direct comparison between n-BP and etidronate (n = 340 pairs) also suggested a better survival for n-BP [paired HR, 0.47 (95%CI, (95% CI, 031-0.70)] for n-BP vs. etidronate]. CONCLUSION: Compared to no treatment, nitrogen but not non-nitrogen bisphosphonates appear to be associated with better survival.

9 Article Comparative Analysis of the Radiology of Osteoporotic Vertebral Fractures in Women and Men: Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Observations from the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos). 2018

Lentle, Brian C / Berger, Claudie / Probyn, Linda / Brown, Jacques P / Langsetmo, Lisa / Fine, Ben / Lian, Kevin / Shergill, Arvind K / Trollip, Jacques / Jackson, Stuart / Leslie, William D / Prior, Jerilynn C / Kaiser, Stephanie M / Hanley, David A / Adachi, Jonathan D / Towheed, Tanveer / Davison, K Shawn / Cheung, Angela M / Goltzman, David / Anonymous2310913. ·Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. · CaMos Methods Centre, Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Canada. · Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto,, and Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, CHU de Québec Research Centre, Laval University, Quebec City, Canada. · Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA. · Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, and St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Canada. · Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · Division of Endocrinology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. · Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. · Department of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada. · Departments of Medicine, Community Health Sciences, and Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. · Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, Canada. · A Priori Medical Sciences Inc., Victoria, Canada. · Department of Medicine and Joint Department of Medical Imaging, Centre of Excellence in Skeletal Health Assessment, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · Department of Medicine, McGill University and McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Canada. ·J Bone Miner Res · Pubmed #28722766.

ABSTRACT: We compared two methods for osteoporotic vertebral fracture (VF) assessment on lateral spine radiographs, the Genant semiquantitative (GSQ) technique and a modified algorithm-based qualitative (mABQ) approach. We evaluated 4465 women and 1771 men aged ≥50 years from the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study with available X-ray images at baseline. Observer agreement was lowest for grade 1 VFs determined by GSQ. Among physician readers, agreement was greater for VFs diagnosed by mABQ (ranging from 0.62 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.00-1.00] to 0.88 [0.76-1.00]) than by GSQ (ranging from 0.38 [0.17-0.60] to 0.69 [0.54-0.85]). GSQ VF prevalence (16.4% [95% CI 15.4-17.4]) and incidence (10.2/1000 person-years [9.2; 11.2]) were higher than with the mABQ method (prevalence 6.7% [6.1-7.4] and incidence 6.3/1000 person-years [5.5-7.1]). Women had more prevalent and incident VFs relative to men as defined by mABQ but not as defined by GSQ. Prevalent GSQ VFs were predominantly found in the mid-thoracic spine, whereas prevalent mABQ and incident VFs by both methods co-localized to the junction of the thoracic and lumbar spine. Prevalent mABQ VFs compared with GSQ VFs were more highly associated with reduced adjusted L

10 Article Atypical femoral fracture. 2017

Khan, Aliya Aziz / Kaiser, Stephanie. ·Divisions of Endocrinology and Medicine, and Geriatric Medicine (Khan), Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Oakville, Ont.; Nova Scotia Health Authority, and Division of Endocrinology & Metabolism (Kaiser), School of Health and Human Performance, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS draliyakhan@gmail.com. · Divisions of Endocrinology and Medicine, and Geriatric Medicine (Khan), Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Oakville, Ont.; Nova Scotia Health Authority, and Division of Endocrinology & Metabolism (Kaiser), School of Health and Human Performance, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS. ·CMAJ · Pubmed #28396331.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Article Associations of Protein Intake and Protein Source with Bone Mineral Density and Fracture Risk: A Population-Based Cohort Study. 2015

Langsetmo, L / Barr, S I / Berger, C / Kreiger, N / Rahme, E / Adachi, J D / Papaioannou, A / Kaiser, S M / Prior, J C / Hanley, D A / Kovacs, C S / Josse, R G / Goltzman, D / Anonymous7090843. ·David Goltzman, Royal Victoria Hospital, CaMos, 687 Pine Ave W, Room E1.64, Montreal, QC H3A 1A1, Email: david.goltzman@mcgill.ca, Telephone: 514-843-1632, FAX: 514-843-1651. ·J Nutr Health Aging · Pubmed #26412291.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To determine associations between total protein intake, and protein intake by source (dairy, non-dairy animal, plant) with BMD, BMD change, and incident osteoporotic fracture. DESIGN/SETTING: Prospective cohort study (Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study). Participants/Measures: Protein intake was assessed as percent of total energy intake (TEI) at Year 2 (1997-99) using a food frequency questionnaire (N=6510). Participants were contacted annually to ascertain incident fracture. Total hip and lumbar spine BMD was measured at baseline and Year 5. Analyses were stratified by group (men 25-49 y, men 50+ y, premenopausal women 25-49 y, and postmenopausal women 50+ y) and adjusted for major confounders. Fracture analyses were limited to those 50+ y. RESULTS: Intakes of dairy protein (with adjustment for BMI) were positively associated with total hip BMD among men and women aged 50+ y, and in men aged 25-49. Among adults aged 50+ y, those with protein intakes of <12% TEI (women) and <11% TEI (men) had increased fracture risk compared to those with intakes of 15% TEI. Fracture risk did not significantly change as intake increased above 15% TEI, and was not significantly associated with protein source. CONCLUSIONS: In contrast to hypothesized risk of high protein, we found that for adults 50+ y, low protein intake (below 15% TEI) may lead to increased fracture risk. Source of protein was a determinant of BMD, but not fracture risk.

12 Article Characteristics of hyperparathyroid states in the Canadian multicentre osteoporosis study (CaMos) and relationship to skeletal markers. 2015

Berger, C / Almohareb, O / Langsetmo, L / Hanley, D A / Kovacs, C S / Josse, R G / Adachi, J D / Prior, J C / Towheed, T / Davison, K S / Kaiser, S M / Brown, J P / Goltzman, D / Anonymous2650801. ·CaMos Coordinating Centre, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada. ·Clin Endocrinol (Oxf) · Pubmed #25059283.

ABSTRACT: CONTEXT: PTH is an essential regulator of mineral metabolism; PTH hypersecretion may result in hyperparathyroidism including normocalcaemic, primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism. OBJECTIVE: To examine the characteristics of participants with hyperparathyroid states and the relationship to bone mineral density (BMD). DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: A cross-sectional study of 1872 community-dwelling men and women aged 35+ years (mostly Caucasian) with available serum PTH from Year 10 Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study follow-up (2005-07). PTH was determined using a second-generation chemiluminescence immunoassay. OUTCOME MEASURES: L1-L4, femoral neck and total hip BMD. RESULTS: We established a PTH reference range (2·7-10·2 pmol/l) based on healthy participants (i.e. normal serum calcium, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, kidney function and body mass index, who were nonusers of antiresorptives, glucocorticoids and diuretics and not diagnosed with diabetes or thyroid disease). Participants with PTH levels in the upper reference range (5·6-10·2 pmol/l), representing a prevalence of 10·7%, had lower femoral neck and total hip BMD, by 0·030 g/cm(2) [95% confidence interval: 0·009; 0·051] and 0·025 g/cm(2) (0·001; 0·049), respectively, than those with levels 2·7-5·6 pmol/l. Participants with normocalcaemic and secondary hyperparathyroidism also had lower total hip BMD than those with levels 2·7-5·6 pmol/l, and CaMos prevalences of normocalcaemic, primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism were 3·3%, 1·4% and 5·2%, respectively. CONCLUSION: We found reduced BMD in participants with accepted hyperparathyroid states but also a notable proportion of other participants that might benefit from having lower PTH levels.

13 Article Longitudinal changes in calcium and vitamin D intakes and relationship to bone mineral density in a prospective population-based study: the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos). 2013

Zhou, W / Langsetmo, L / Berger, C / Poliquin, S / Kreiger, N / Barr, S I / Kaiser, S M / Josse, R G / Prior, J C / Towheed, T E / Anastassiades, T / Davison, K S / Kovacs, C S / Hanley, D A / Papadimitropoulos, E A / Goltzman, D / Anonymous3220777. ·CaMos Coordinating Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ·J Musculoskelet Neuronal Interact · Pubmed #24292617.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Our objective was to study changes in calcium and vitamin D intakes over time, and their cross-sectional and longitudinal associations with bone mineral density (BMD). METHODS: We followed 9382 women and men aged ≥25 and 899 aged 16-24, for 10 and 2 years respectively. RESULTS: Calcium and vitamin D intakes increased over time in adults, but decreased in women aged 16-18. The increased intakes in adults were largely attributable to the increased use of calcium and/or vitamin D supplements. Both the percentage of supplement users and average dose among users increased over time. There was nevertheless a high prevalence of calcium and vitamin D intake below the estimated average requirement. At baseline, higher calcium and vitamin D intakes were associated with higher total hip and femoral neck BMD in young men, and cumulatively high levels of calcium and vitamin D intakes over time contributed to better BMD maintenance at lumbar spine and hip sites in adult women. CONCLUSIONS: Although total intakes, particularly of vitamin D, frequently fell below the Institute of Medicine recommendations despite an increase over time in supplement use, we found some positive associations between total calcium and vitamin D intake and bone health.

14 Article The relationship between proton pump inhibitor use and longitudinal change in bone mineral density: a population-based study [corrected] from the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos). 2012

Targownik, Laura E / Leslie, William D / Davison, K Shawn / Goltzman, David / Jamal, Sophie A / Kreiger, Nancy / Josse, Robert G / Kaiser, Stephanie M / Kovacs, Christopher S / Prior, Jerilynn C / Zhou, Wei / Anonymous1200731. ·University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. targowni@cc.umanitoba.ca ·Am J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #22777336.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use has been identified as a risk factor for hip and vertebral fractures. Evidence supporting a relationship between PPI use and osteoporosis remains scant. Demonstrating that PPIs are associated with accelerated bone mineral density (BMD) loss would provide supportive evidence for a mechanism through which PPIs could increase fracture risk. METHODS: We used the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study data set, which enrolled a population-based sample of Canadians who underwent BMD testing of the femoral neck, total hip, and lumbar spine (L1-L4) at baseline, and then again at 5 and 10 years. Participants also reported drug use and exposure to risk factors for osteoporosis and fracture. Multivariate linear regression was used to determine the independent association of PPI exposure and baseline BMD, and on change in BMD at 5 and 10 years. RESULTS: In all, 8,340 subjects were included in the baseline analysis, with 4,512 (55%) undergoing year 10 BMD testing. After adjusting for potential confounders, PPI use was associated with significantly lower baseline BMD at the femoral neck and total hip. PPI use was not associated with a significant acceleration in covariate-adjusted BMD loss at any measurement site after 5 and 10 years of follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: PPI users had lower BMD at baseline than PPI non-users, but PPI use over 10 years did not appear to be associated with accelerated BMD loss. The reasons for discordant findings between PPI use at baseline and during follow-up require further study.

15 Article Fragility fractures and the osteoporosis care gap in women: the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study. 2011

Fraser, L-A / Ioannidis, G / Adachi, J D / Pickard, L / Kaiser, S M / Prior, J / Brown, J P / Hanley, D A / Olszynski, W P / Anastassiades, T / Jamal, S / Josse, R / Goltzman, D / Papaioannou, A / Anonymous2630667. ·Departments of Epidemiology and Medicine, Hamilton Health Sciences-Chedoke Site, McMaster University, 1200 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON L8N3Z5, Canada. ·Osteoporos Int · Pubmed #20683706.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Prevalent fragility fracture strongly predicts future fracture. Previous studies have indicated that women with fragility fractures are not receiving the indicated treatment. We aimed to describe post fracture care in Canadian women using a large, population-based prospective cohort that began in 1995-1997. METHODS: We followed 5,566 women over 50 years of age from across Canada over a period of 10 years in the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study. Information on medication use and incident clinical fragility fractures was obtained during a yearly questionnaire or interview and fractures were confirmed by radiographic/medical reports. RESULTS: Over the 10-year study period, 42-56% of women with yearly incident clinical fragility fractures were not treated with an osteoporosis medication. During year 1 of the study, 22% of the women who had experienced a fragility fracture were on treatment with a bisphosphonate and 26% were on hormone therapy (HT). We were not able to differentiate HT use for menopause symptoms vs osteoporosis. Use of bisphosphonate therapy increased over time; odds ratio (OR) for use at year 10 compared to use at year 1 was 3.65 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.83-7.26). In contrast, HT use declined, with an OR of 0.07 (95%CI 0.02-0.24) at year 10 compared to year 1 of the study. CONCLUSION: In a large population-based cohort study, we found a therapeutic care gap in women with osteoporosis and fragility fractures. Although bisphosphonate therapy usage improved over time, a substantial gap remains.