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Osteoporosis: HELP
Articles by X. Wang
Based on 6 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, X. Wang wrote the following 6 articles about Osteoporosis.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Fracture risk and bone mineral density levels in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: a systematic review and meta-analysis. 2016

Wang, X / Yan, S / Liu, C / Xu, Y / Wan, L / Wang, Y / Gao, W / Meng, S / Liu, Y / Liu, R / Xu, D. ·Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, The Affiliated Hospital of Weifang Medical University, Weifang, 261000, Shandong Province, China. · Department of Anorectal Surgery, The Affiliated Hospital of Weifang Medical University, Weifang, 261000, China. · Clinical Laboratory, First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, 210029, China. · Occupational Safety and Health Research Center of the State Administration of Work Safety, Beijing, 100000, China. · Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, The Affiliated Hospital of Weifang Medical University, Weifang, 261000, Shandong Province, China. lrr20003@sina.com. · Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, The Affiliated Hospital of Weifang Medical University, Weifang, 261000, Shandong Province, China. flower322@163.com. ·Osteoporos Int · Pubmed #26753541.

ABSTRACT: Previous studies suggested possible bone loss and fracture risk in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to assess the strength of the relationship of SLE with fracture risk and the mean difference of bone mineral density (BMD) levels between SLE patients and controls. Literature search was undertaken in multiple indexing databases on September 26, 2015. Studies on the relationship of SLE with fracture risk and the mean difference of BMD levels between SLE patients and controls were included. Data were combined using standard methods of meta-analysis. Twenty-one studies were finally included into the meta-analysis, including 15 studies on the mean difference of BMD levels between SLE patients and controls, and 6 studies were on fracture risk associated with SLE. The meta-analysis showed that SLE patients had significantly lower BMD levels than controls in the whole body (weighted mean difference [WMD] = -0.04; 95 % CI -0.06 to -0.02; P < 0.001), femoral neck (WMD = -0.06; 95 % CI -0.07 to -0.04; P < 0.001), lumbar spine (WMD = -0.06; 95 % CI -0.09 to -0.03; P < 0.001), and total hip (WMD = -0.05; 95 % CI -0.06 to -0.03; P < 0.001). In addition, the meta-analysis also showed that SLE was significantly associated with increased fracture risk of all sites (relative risk [RR] = 1.97, 95 % CI 1.20-3.25; P = 0.008). Subgroup analysis by adjustment showed that SLE was significantly associated with increased fracture risk of all sites before and after adjusting for confounding factors (unadjusted RR = 2.07, 95 % CI 1.46-2.94, P < 0.001; adjusted RR = 1.22, 95 % CI 1.05-1.42, P = 0.01). Subgroup analysis by types of fracture showed that SLE was significantly associated with increased risks of hip fracture (RR = 1.99, 95 % CI 1.55-2.57; P < 0.001), osteoporotic fracture (RR = 1.36, 95 % CI 1.21-1.53; P < 0.001), and vertebral fracture (RR = 2.97, 95 % CI 1.71-5.16; P < 0.001). This systematic review and meta-analysis provides strong evidence for the relationship of SLE with bone loss and fracture risk.

2 Article Vertebral fracture in postmenopausal Chinese women: a population-based study. 2017

Cui, L / Chen, L / Xia, W / Jiang, Y / Cui, L / Huang, W / Wang, W / Wang, X / Pei, Y / Zheng, X / Wang, Q / Ning, Z / Li, M / Wang, O / Xing, X / Lin, Q / Yu, W / Weng, X / Xu, L / Cummings, S R. ·Department of Endocrinology, Key Laboratory of Endocrinology, Ministry of Health, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Science, Beijing, 100730, China. · Department of Surgery, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Science, Beijing, 100730, China. · Department of Endocrinology, Key Laboratory of Endocrinology, Ministry of Health, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Science, Beijing, 100730, China. xiaweibo@medmail.com.cn. · Department of Endocrinology, BeiJing HaiDian Hospital, Beijing, 100080, China. · Department of Endocrinology, Peking University Shougang Hospital, Beijing, 100144, China. · Department of Cadre Unit, General Hospital of the Second Artillery Force, Beijing, 100088, China. · Department of Geriatric Endocrinology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, 100853, China. · Department of Endocrinology, China Rehabilitation Research Center, Beijing, 100068, China. · Department of Endocrinology, Beijing Liangxiang Hospital, Beijing, 102401, China. · Department of Endocrinology, Beijing Chaoyang Hospital, Beijing, 100020, China. · Department of Radiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Science, Beijing, 100730, China. · Department of Orthopedics, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Science, Beijing, 100730, China. · Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Science, Beijing, 100730, China. · San Francisco Coordinating Center, CPMC Research Institute and Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, USA. ·Osteoporos Int · Pubmed #28560474.

ABSTRACT: In a random sample of postmenopausal Chinese women, the prevalence of radiographic vertebral fractures increased from 13% between ages 50 and 59 to over 50% after age 80 years. A model with seven clinical risk factors predicted the probability of vertebral fractures as well with as without BMD and better than a model with only three risk factors. More than half an hour of outdoor activity per day might correlate with lower risk of vertebral fracture in this population. INTRODUCTION: We aimed to describe the prevalence and develop a model for prediction of radiographic vertebral fractures in a large random sample of postmenopausal Chinese women. METHODS: We enrolled 1760 women from an age-stratified random sample of postmenopausal women in Beijing, China. The presence of vertebral fracture was assessed by semi-quantitative grading of lateral thoracolumbar radiographs, risk factors by interview, bone mineral density (BMD) of the proximal femur and lumbar spine by dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and markers of bone turnover from a fasting blood sample. Associations of these factors were analyzed in logistic models and discrimination by areas of receiver operating characteristics curves (AUC). RESULTS: The prevalence of vertebral fracture, ranged from 13.4% ages 50 to 59 years old to 58.1% at age 80 years or older. Older age, a history of non-vertebral fracture, lower femoral neck BMD T-score, body mass index (BMI), height loss, housework, and less than half an hour of outdoor activity were significantly associated with increased probability of having a vertebral fracture. A model with those seven factors had a similar AUC with or without BMD and performed better than a simple model with three factors. CONCLUSION: This study is from a true random sample of postmenopausal women in urban China with high response rate. The prevalence of vertebral fractures in postmenopausal women in Beijing increases from 13% under age 60 to over 50% by age 80 years. A model with seven clinical risk factors with or without BMD is better than simple models and may guide the use of spine x-rays to identify women with vertebral fractures. More than half an hour of outdoor activity might correlate with lower risk of vertebral fracture in this population.

3 Article Peptide 11R-VIVIT stimulates osteoblastogenesis through regulating the expression of nuclear factor of activated T cells cytoplasmic 1. 2017

Li, M / Wang, X / Bian, Z / Yao, W / He, Q / Tian, F / Zhang, J / Zhu, L. ·Department of Orthopaedic surgery, Nanjing Medical University Affiliated Hangzhou First People's Hospital, Hangzhou 310006, Zhejiang Province, China. ·Cell Mol Biol (Noisy-le-grand) · Pubmed #28478803.

ABSTRACT: Osteoporosis is characterized by the imbalance of two relatively independent processes-osteoblastogenesis and osteoclastogenesis. Calcineurin (Cn)/nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT)(Cn/NFAT) signaling pathway is involved in these two processes in bone metabolism, but its potential as a target to treat osteoporosis needs to be defined. The aim of this study is to investigate the inhibition of polypeptide 11R-VIVIT onCn/NFAT signaling pathway. Rat calvaria (RC) cells were prepared from experimental model of osteoporosis in rat.11R-VIVIT wasused to treat cultured RC cells from wide type (WT) rat or from osteoporosis (OP) rat, we then measured the expressions of NFATc1, osteopontin (OPN), osteocalcin (OC), cytokines, NFκB subunit p65 by real time PCR, western blot or immunofluorescence. Then ALP expression and staining, and alizarin red S (ARS) staining were employed to study the osteoblastodifferentiation. 11R-VIVIT regulates the expression of NFATc1, and some other molecules in Cn/NFAT signaling pathway, such as OPN and OC, at transcriptional level and protein level. Further, it can regulate the expression of inflammatory cytokine like IL-1beta, IL-10 and TNF-alpha and NFκB activity. Further, 11R-VIVIT can accelerate osteoblastodifferentiation of RC cells demonstrated by ALP and ARS staining.11R-VIVIT can stimulate the bone formation by decreasing NFATc1 expression and regulating the expression of inflammation related molecules.

4 Article Three doses of vitamin D, bone mineral density, and geometry in older women during modest weight control in a 1-year randomized controlled trial. 2017

Pop, L C / Sukumar, D / Schneider, S H / Schlussel, Y / Stahl, T / Gordon, C / Wang, X / Papathomas, T V / Shapses, S A. ·Department of Nutritional Sciences, Rutgers University, 96 Lipman Drive, New Brunswick, NJ, 08901-8525, USA. · Department of Nutritional Sciences, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Nutrition, Department of Medicine, Rutgers-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ, USA. · Department of Radiology, Rutgers-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ, USA. · Department of Radiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Biomedical Engineering & Center for Cognitive Science, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, USA. · Department of Nutritional Sciences, Rutgers University, 96 Lipman Drive, New Brunswick, NJ, 08901-8525, USA. shapses@aesop.rutgers.edu. ·Osteoporos Int · Pubmed #27535752.

ABSTRACT: The effects of higher than recommended vitamin D doses on bone mineral density (BMD) and quality are not known. In this study, higher intakes, in postmenopausal women undergoing weight control over 1 year, had no effect on areal or volumetric BMD but prevented the deterioration in cortical bone geometry. INTRODUCTION: Studies examining how bone responds to a standard dose of vitamin D supplementation have been inconsistent. In addition, the effects of higher doses on BMD and quality are not known. Postmenopausal women undergoing weight control to improve health outcomes are particularly at risk for bone loss and might benefit from supplemental vitamin D intake above the recommended allowance. METHODS: This 1-year-long, randomized, double-blind controlled study addresses whether vitamin D supplementation, in healthy overweight/obese older women, affects BMD and bone structural parameters. In addition, bone turnover and serum total, free, and bioavailable 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) responses to one of three daily levels of vitamin D RESULTS: Fifty-eight women (age, 58 ± 6 years; body mass index, 30.2 ± 3.8 kg/m CONCLUSION: The decline in Ct thickness was prevented with higher vitamin D

5 Article Zoledronic acid suppresses callus remodeling but enhances callus strength in an osteoporotic rat model of fracture healing. 2015

Hao, Y / Wang, X / Wang, L / Lu, Y / Mao, Z / Ge, S / Dai, K. ·Department of Orthopaedics, Ninth People's Hospital, Shanghai JiaoTong University School of Medicine, 639 Zhizaoju Road, Shanghai 200011, People's Republic of China. Electronic address: hao_yongqiang@hotmail.com. · Department of Orthopaedics, Ninth People's Hospital, Shanghai JiaoTong University School of Medicine, 639 Zhizaoju Road, Shanghai 200011, People's Republic of China. · Department of Ophthalmology, Ninth People's Hospital, Shanghai JiaoTong University School of Medicine, 639 Zhizaoju Road, Shanghai 200011, People's Republic of China. ·Bone · Pubmed #26434668.

ABSTRACT: MINI-ABSTRACT: In this study, we demonstrated that the use of zoledronic acid does not impair fracture healing, but results in superior callus size and resistance at the fracture site, which could be the consequence of a lower rate of bone turnover due to its anti-catabolic effect. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of inhibition of bone remodeling by the bisphosphonate, zoledronic acid, on callus properties in an osteoporotic rat model of fracture healing. METHODS: Ovariectomized (OVX) rats were randomly divided into four treatment groups (n=24 per group): saline control (CNT); and three systemic zoledronic acid-injected groups (0.1mg/kg), administered 1 day (ZOLD1), 1 week (ZOLW1), and 2 weeks (ZOLW2) after fracture. Rats were killed at either 6 or 12 weeks postoperatively. Postmortem analyses included radiography, microcomputed tomography, histology, histomorphometry, biomechanical tests, and nanoindentation tests. RESULTS: Treatment with zoledronic acid led to a significant increase in trabecular bone volume within the callus, as well as in callus resistance, compared to those in the saline control rats; delayed administration (ZOLW2) reduced intrinsic material properties, including ultimate stress and elastic modulus, and microarchitecture parameters, including bone volume/total volume (BV/TV), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th), and connectivity density (Conn.D), compared with ZOLD1 at 12 weeks after surgery. OVX had a negative effect on the progression of endochondral ossification at 6 weeks. Zoledronic acid administration at an early stage following fracture may bind to early callus, and thus not affect subsequent callus formation and endochondral ossification, while delayed administration (ZOLW2) mildly suppresses bony callus remodeling. CONCLUSION: The superior results obtained with zoledronic acid (ZOLD1, ZOLW1, and ZOLW2) compared to CNT in terms of callus size and resistance could be the consequence of a lower rate of bone turnover at the fracture site due to the anti-catabolic effect of zoledronic acid. Mild suppression of callus remodeling by delayed administration did not impair the initial phase of the fracture healing process.

6 Article A missense mutation, p.V132G, in the X-linked spermine synthase gene (SMS) causes Snyder-Robinson syndrome. 2009

Becerra-Solano, L E / Butler, J / Castañeda-Cisneros, G / McCloskey, D E / Wang, X / Pegg, A E / Schwartz, C E / Sánchez-Corona, J / García-Ortiz, J E. ·División de Genética, Centro de Investigación Biomédica de Occidente, CMNO-IMSS, Guadalajara, Mexico. ·Am J Med Genet A · Pubmed #19206178.

ABSTRACT: Snyder-Robinson syndrome (SRS, OMIM 309583) is a rare X-linked syndrome characterized by mental retardation, marfanoid habitus, skeletal defects, osteoporosis, and facial asymmetry. Linkage analysis localized the related gene to Xp21.3-p22.12, and a G-to-A transition at point +5 of intron 4 of the spermine synthase gene, which caused truncation of the SMS protein and loss of enzyme activity, was identified in the original family. Here we describe another family with Snyder-Robinson syndrome in two Mexican brothers and a novel mutation (c.496T>G) in the exon 5 of the SMS gene confirming its involvement in this rare X-linked mental retardation syndrome.