Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Osteoporosis: HELP
Articles from Austria
Based on 242 articles published since 2008
||||

These are the 242 published articles about Osteoporosis that originated from Austria during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10
1 Guideline The First European Evidence-based Consensus on Extra-intestinal Manifestations in Inflammatory Bowel Disease. 2016

Harbord, Marcus / Annese, Vito / Vavricka, Stephan R / Allez, Matthieu / Barreiro-de Acosta, Manuel / Boberg, Kirsten Muri / Burisch, Johan / De Vos, Martine / De Vries, Anne-Marie / Dick, Andrew D / Juillerat, Pascal / Karlsen, Tom H / Koutroubakis, Ioannis / Lakatos, Peter L / Orchard, Tim / Papay, Pavol / Raine, Tim / Reinshagen, Max / Thaci, Diamant / Tilg, Herbert / Carbonnel, Franck / Anonymous3360850. ·Department of Gastroenterology, Chelsea and Westminster NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Department of Emergency, University Hospital Careggi, Florence, Italy. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Triemli Hospital, Zurich, Switzerland. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hôpital Saint Louis, Sorbonne Paris-Cité University, Paris, France. · Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Santiago De Compostela, A Coruña, Spain. · Department of Transplantation Medicine, Division of Cancer Medicine, Surgery and Transplantation, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Gastro Unit, Hvidovre University Hospital, Hvidovre, and Danish Centre for eHealth & Epidemiology, North Zealand University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Ghent , Ghent, Belgium. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Academic Unit of Ophthalmology, School of Clinical Sciences, Bristol, and National Institute for Health Research, Moorfield's Eye Hospital and UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, London, UK. · Clinic for Visceral Surgery and Medicine, University Hospital Bern, Bern, Switzerland. · Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Heraklion, Heraklion, Greece. · Department of Medicine I, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary. · Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, St Mary's Hospital, London, UK. · Department of Internal Medicine, Hartmannspital Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Gastroenterology, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK. · Medizinische Klinik I, Klinikum Braunschweig, Germany. · Comprehensive Center of Inflammation Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig Holstein, Lubeck, Germany. · Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria. · Service de Gastroentérologie CHU de Bicêtre, Université Paris Sud, Paris, France. ·J Crohns Colitis · Pubmed #26614685.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Guideline [Austrian guidance for the pharmacological treatment of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women--update 2009]. 2009

Dimai, Hans Peter / Pietschmann, Peter / Resch, Heinrich / Preisinger, Elisabeth / Fahrleitner-Pammer, Astrid / Dobnig, Harald / Klaushofer, Klaus / Anonymous2380630. ·Klinische Abteilung für Endokrinologie und Nuklearmedizin, Universitätsklinik für Innere Medizin, Medizinische Universität Graz, Graz, Austria. hans.dimai@meduni-graz.at ·Wien Med Wochenschr Suppl · Pubmed #19484202.

ABSTRACT: Osteoporosis is a systemic skeletal disease characterized by diminished bone mass and deterioration of bone microarchitecture, leading to increased fragility and subsequent increased fracture risk. Therapeutic measures therefore aim at reducing individual fracture risk. In Austria, the following drugs, all of which have been proven to reduce fracture risk, are currently registered for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis: alendronate, risedronate, etidronate, ibandronate, raloxifene, teriparatide (1-34 PTH), 1-84 PTH, strontium ranelate and salmon calcitonin. Fluorides are still available, but their role in daily practice has become negligible. Currently, there is no evidence that a combination of two or more of these drugs could improve anti-fracture potency. However, treatment with PTH should be followed by the treatment with an anticatabolic drug such as bisphosphonates. Calcium and vitamin D constitute an important adjunct to any osteoporosis treatment.

3 Editorial Editorial: Non-coding RNA in aging and age-associated diseases - from intracellular regulators to hormone like actions. 2017

Hackl, Matthias / Suh, Yousin / Grillari, Johannes. ·TAmiRNA GmbH, Muthgasse 18, Vienna, Austria. · Albert Einstein College, USA. · TAmiRNA GmbH, Muthgasse 18, Vienna, Austria; Christian Doppler Laboratory on Biotechnology of Skin Aging, BOKU - University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Muthgasse 18, Austria; Austrian Cluster for Tissue Regeneration. ·Mech Ageing Dev · Pubmed #29246368.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial Osteoporotic fracture fixation - a biomechanical perspective. 2016

Augat, Peter / Goldhahn, Jörg. ·Institute of Biomechanics, Trauma Center Murnau, Germany; Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg, Austria. Electronic address: biomechanik@bgu-murnau.de. · Institute for Biomechanics of ETH Zurich, Leopold-Ruzicka-Weg 4, 8093Zürich, Switzerland. Electronic address: jgoldhahn@ethz.ch. ·Injury · Pubmed #27338220.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial For how long should osteoporosis treatment continue? 2015

Boschitsch, E. ·a KLIMAX Menopause and Osteoporosis Clinic , Vienna , Austria. ·Climacteric · Pubmed #26176687.

ABSTRACT: Studies on the most effective of the commonly used bone-specific drugs, the antiresorptives zoledronic acid and denosumab, as well as up-to-date menopausal hormone therapy for early prevention refer to sound long-term safety data. However, depending on both the patient's characteristics and the properties of the respective regimens, the rates of side-effects, tolerability and persistence differ substantially. They are crucial limiting factors for actual efficacy in the clinical setting and thus determine the length and continuation of treatment.

6 Editorial Cathepsin K inhibitors: emerging treatment options for osteoporosis. 2015

Pietschmann, Peter. ·Department of Pathophysiology and Allergy Research, Center for Pathophysiology, Infectiology and Immunology, Medical University of Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090, Vienna, Austria, peter.pietschmann@meduniwien.ac.at. ·Wien Med Wochenschr · Pubmed #25690879.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Review Spot the silent sufferers: A call for clinical diagnostic criteria for solar and nutritional osteomalacia. 2019

Uday, Suma / Högler, Wolfgang. ·Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Birmingham Women's and Children's Hospital, Birmingham, UK; Institute of Metabolism and Systems Research, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK. · Institute of Metabolism and Systems Research, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK; Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Johannes Kepler University, Linz, Austria. Electronic address: Wolfgang.hoegler@jku.at. ·J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol · Pubmed #30654108.

ABSTRACT: Osteomalacia and rickets result from defective mineralization when the body is deprived of calcium. Globally, the main cause of osteomalacia is a lack of mineral supply for bone modeling and remodeling due to solar vitamin D and/or dietary calcium deficiency. Osteomalacia occurs when existing bone is replaced by unmineralized bone matrix (osteoid) during remodeling in children and adults, or when newly formed bone is not mineralized in time during modeling in children. Rickets occurs when hypomineralization affects the epiphyseal growth plate chondrocytes and adjacent bone metaphysis in growing children. Hence, osteomalacia co-exists with rickets in growing children. Several reports in the last decade highlight the resurgence of so-called "nutritional" rickets in the dark-skinned population living in high-income countries. However, very few studies have ever explored the hidden iceberg of nutritional osteomalacia in the population. Rickets presents with hypocalcaemic (seizures, tetany, cardiomyopathy), or hypophosphataemic complications (leg bowing, knock knees, rachitic rosary, muscle weakness) and is diagnosed on radiographs (cupping and fraying of metaphyses). In contrast, osteomalacia lacks distinctive, non-invasive diagnostic laboratory or imaging criteria and the clinical presentation is non-specific (general fatigue, malaise, muscle weakness and pain). Hence, osteomalacia remains largely undiagnosed, as a hidden disease in millions of dark-skinned people who are at greatest risk. Radiographs may demonstrate Looser's zone fractures in those most severely affected, however to date, osteomalacia remains a histological diagnosis requiring a bone biopsy. Biochemical features of high serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP), high parathyroid hormone (PTH) with or without low 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) concentrations are common to both rickets and osteomalacia. Here, we propose non-invasive diagnostic criteria for osteomalacia. We recommend a diagnosis of osteomalacia in the presence of high ALP, high PTH, low dietary calcium intake (<300 mg/day) and/or low serum 25OHD (<30 nmol/L). Presence of clinical symptoms (as above) or Looser's zone fractures should be used to reaffirm the diagnosis. We call for further studies to explore the true prevalence of nutritional osteomalacia in various populations, specifically the Black and Asian ethnic groups, in order to identify the hidden disease burden and inform public health policies for vitamin D/calcium supplementation and food fortification.

8 Review Adjuvant Bisphosphonate Therapy in Postmenopausal Breast Cancer. 2018

Strobl, Stephanie / Wimmer, Kerstin / Exner, Ruth / Devyatko, Yelena / Bolliger, Michael / Fitzal, Florian / Gnant, Michael. ·Department of Surgery, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090, Wien, Austria. · Department of Surgery, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090, Wien, Austria. michael.gnant@meduniwien.ac.at. ·Curr Treat Options Oncol · Pubmed #29527635.

ABSTRACT: OPINION STATEMENT: Bone health and breast cancer are two connected subjects, because breast cancer patients have a higher prevalence of osteopenia/osteoporosis and reduced bone health parameters than healthy woman of the same age. Therefore, the positive effect of adjuvant bisphosphonate therapy plays an important role in breast cancer treatment. Several randomized trials have studied bisphosphonates in the adjuvant setting in postmenopausal woman and demonstrated their potential to prevent treatment-induced bone loss. The prevention of fractures and the subsequent preservation of patients' quality of life are important arguments for the use of adjuvant bisphosphonates in postmenopausal breast cancer patients. In addition, trials of adjuvant bone-targeted agents showed a reduction of recurrences in and outside bone and an improved outcome in patients treated with bisphosphonates.

9 Review Telomere biology and age-related diseases. 2018

Herrmann, Markus / Pusceddu, Irene / März, Winfried / Herrmann, Wolfgang. ·Department of Clinical Pathology, Bolzano Hospital, Lorenz-Boehler-Str. 5, 39100 Bolzano, Italy. · Clinical Institute of Medical and Chemical Laboratory Diagnostics, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria. · Laboratory of Clinical Pathology, Hospital of Bolzano, Bolzano, Italy. · Medical Clinic V (Nephrology, Hypertensiology, Rheumatology, Endocrinology, Diabetology), Medical Faculty of Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim, Germany. · Synlab Academy, Synlab Holding Deutschland GmbH, Mannheim, Germany. · Department of Clinical Chemistry, University of Saarland, Homburg, Germany. ·Clin Chem Lab Med · Pubmed #29494336.

ABSTRACT: Telomeres are the protective end caps of chromosomes and shorten with every cell division. Telomere length has been proposed as a biomarker of biological age and a risk factor for age-related diseases. Epidemiologic studies show an association between leukocyte telomere length (LTL) and mortality. There is solid evidence that links LTL with cardiovascular disease. Short telomeres promote atherosclerosis and impair the repair of vascular lesions. Alzheimer's disease patients have also a reduced LTL. Telomeres measured in tumor tissue from breast, colon and prostate are shorter than in healthy tissue from the same organ and the same patient. In healthy tissue directly adjacent to these tumors, telomeres are also shorter than in cells that are more distant from the cancerous lesion. A reduced telomere length in cancer tissue from breast, colon and prostate is associated with an advanced disease state at diagnosis, faster disease progression and poorer survival. By contrast, results regarding LTL and cancer are inconsistent. Furthermore, the majority of studies did not find significant associations between LTL, bone mineral density (BMD) and osteoporosis. The present manuscript gives an overview about our current understanding of telomere biology and reviews existing knowledge regarding the relationship between telomere length and age-related diseases.

10 Review [Management of osteoporosis after fragility fractures]. 2018

Gosch, M / Stumpf, U / Kammerlander, C / Böcker, W / Heppner, H J / Wicklein, S. ·Universitätsklinik für Geriatrie, Medizinische Klinik 2 - Schwerpunkt Geriatrie, Klinikum Nürnberg, Paracelsus Medizinische Privatuniversität, Campus Nürnberg, Prof.-Ernst-Nathan-Str. 1, 90419, Nürnberg, Deutschland. markus.gosch@klinikum-nuernberg.de. · Klinik für Allgemeine, Unfall- und Wiederherstellungschirurgie, Klinikum der LMU, München, Deutschland. · Universitätsklinik für Unfallchirurgie, Medizinische Universität Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Deutschland. · Klinik für Geriatrie, HELIOS Klinikum Schwelm, Schwelm, Deutschland. · Lehrstuhl für Geriatrie, Universität Witten/Herdecke, Witten/Herdecke, Deutschland. · Universitätsklinik für Geriatrie, Medizinische Klinik 2 - Schwerpunkt Geriatrie, Klinikum Nürnberg, Paracelsus Medizinische Privatuniversität, Campus Nürnberg, Prof.-Ernst-Nathan-Str. 1, 90419, Nürnberg, Deutschland. ·Z Gerontol Geriatr · Pubmed #29305651.

ABSTRACT: Osteoporosis is defined as a systemic bone disease with decreased bone strength and an increased susceptibility for fractures. Older people in particular face an increased risk of fractures. These kind of fractures are usually caused by an inadequate trauma and are the so-called fragility fractures. In older adults immediate fracture stabilization and early mobilization have become the standard procedure after a fragility fracture. Treatment of the underlying osteoporosis often plays a minor role in clinical practice. Only a small group of patients are already under osteoporosis medication and even after a fracture occurs only few patients receive osteoporosis drug treatment with the aim to reduce the progression of osteoporosis and to reduce subsequent fractures. In the literature this has been described as the osteoporosis care gap. The following article presents an overview of treatment options and answers many different questions from the clinical routine.

11 Review Discontinuation of Denosumab therapy for osteoporosis: A systematic review and position statement by ECTS. 2017

Tsourdi, Elena / Langdahl, Bente / Cohen-Solal, Martine / Aubry-Rozier, Bérengere / Eriksen, Erik Fink / Guañabens, Nuria / Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara / Ralston, Stuart H / Eastell, Richard / Zillikens, M Carola. ·Department of Medicine III, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany; Center for Healthy Aging, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany. · Medical Department of Endocrinology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. · Inserm U1132 and University Paris-Diderot, Department of Rheumatology, Lariboisière Hospital, Paris, France. · Centre of bone diseases, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland. · Department of Clinical Endocrinology, Morbid Obesity and Preventive Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Oslo University, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Rheumatology, Metabolic Bone Diseases Unit, Hospital Clínic, Barcelona, IDIBAPS, CIBERehd, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Medical University Graz, Austria; Center for Biomarker Research in Medicine (CBmed), Graz, Austria. · Centre for Genomic and Experimental Medicine, MRC Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Western General Hospital, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. · Mellanby Centre for Bone Research, University of Sheffield, UK. · Bone Center, Department of Internal Medicine, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: m.c.zillikens@erasmusmc.nl. ·Bone · Pubmed #28789921.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The optimal duration of osteoporosis treatment is controversial. As opposed to bisphosphonates, denosumab does not incorporate into bone matrix and bone turnover is not suppressed after its cessation. Recent reports imply that denosumab discontinuation may lead to an increased risk of multiple vertebral fractures. METHODS: The European Calcified Tissue Society (ECTS) formed a working group to perform a systematic review of existing literature on the effects of stopping denosumab and provide advice on management. RESULTS: Data from phase 2 and 3 clinical trials underscore a rapid decrease of bone mineral density (BMD) and a steep increase in bone turnover markers (BTMs) after discontinuation of denosumab. Clinical case series report multiple vertebral fractures after discontinuation of denosumab and a renewed analysis of FREEDOM and FREEDOM Extension Trial suggests, albeit does not prove, that the risk of multiple vertebral fractures may be increased when denosumab is stopped due to a rebound increase in bone resorption. CONCLUSION: There appears to be an increased risk of multiple vertebral fractures after discontinuation of denosumab although strong evidence for such an effect and for measures to prevent the occurring bone loss is lacking. Clinicians and patients should be aware of this potential risk. Based on available data, a re-evaluation should be performed after 5years of denosumab treatment. Patients considered at high fracture risk should either continue denosumab therapy for up to 10years or be switched to an alternative treatment. For patients at low risk, a decision to discontinue denosumab could be made after 5years, but bisphosphonate therapy should be considered to reduce or prevent the rebound increase in bone turnover. However, since the optimal bisphosphonate regimen post-denosumab is currently unknown continuation of denosumab can also be considered until results from ongoing trials become available. Based on current data, denosumab should not be stopped without considering alternative treatment in order to prevent rapid BMD loss and a potential rebound in vertebral fracture risk.

12 Review Vibrational spectroscopic techniques to assess bone quality. 2017

Paschalis, E P / Gamsjaeger, S / Klaushofer, K. ·Ludwig Boltzmann Institute of Osteology at the Hanusch Hospital of WGKK and AUVA Trauma Centre Meidling, 1st Medical Department, Hanusch Hospital, Heinrich Collin Str. 30, 1140, Vienna, Austria. eleftherios.paschalis@osteologie.at. · Ludwig Boltzmann Institute of Osteology at the Hanusch Hospital of WGKK and AUVA Trauma Centre Meidling, 1st Medical Department, Hanusch Hospital, Heinrich Collin Str. 30, 1140, Vienna, Austria. ·Osteoporos Int · Pubmed #28378291.

ABSTRACT: Although musculoskeletal diseases such as osteoporosis are diagnosed and treatment outcome is evaluated based mainly on routine clinical outcomes of bone mineral density (BMD) by DXA and biochemical markers, it is recognized that these two indicators, as valuable as they have proven to be in the everyday clinical practice, do not fully account for manifested bone strength. Thus, the term bone quality was introduced, to complement considerations based on bone turnover rates and BMD. Bone quality is an "umbrella" term that incorporates the structural and material/compositional characteristics of bone tissue. Vibrational spectroscopic techniques such as Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM) and imaging (FTIRI), and Raman spectroscopy, are suitable analytical tools for the determination of bone quality as they provide simultaneous, quantitative, and qualitative information on all main bone tissue components (mineral, organic matrix, tissue water), in a spatially resolved manner. Moreover, the results of such analyses may be readily combined with the outcomes of other techniques such as histology/histomorphometry, small angle X-ray scattering, quantitative backscattered electron imaging, and nanoindentation.

13 Review Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and its relationship with cardiovascular disease and other extrahepatic diseases. 2017

Adams, Leon A / Anstee, Quentin M / Tilg, Herbert / Targher, Giovanni. ·School of Medicine and Pharmacology, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia. · Faculty of Medical Sciences, Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK. · Liver Unit, Newcastle Upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Trust, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Department of Internal Medicine I, Gastroenterology, Hepatology & Metabolism, Medical University Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria. · Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University and Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Integrata of Verona, Verona, Italy. ·Gut · Pubmed #28314735.

ABSTRACT: Key physiological functions of the liver, including glucose and lipid metabolism, become disturbed in the setting of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and may be associated with a systemic inflammatory '

14 Review Case-Based Review of Osteonecrosis of the Jaw (ONJ) and Application of the International Recommendations for Management From the International Task Force on ONJ. 2017

Khan, Aliya A / Morrison, Archie / Kendler, David L / Rizzoli, Rene / Hanley, David A / Felsenberg, Dieter / McCauley, Laurie K / O'Ryan, Felice / Reid, Ian R / Ruggiero, Salvatore L / Taguchi, Akira / Tetradis, Sotirios / Watts, Nelson B / Brandi, Maria Luisa / Peters, Edmund / Guise, Teresa / Eastell, Richard / Cheung, Angela M / Morin, Suzanne N / Masri, Basel / Cooper, Cyrus / Morgan, Sarah L / Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara / Langdahl, Bente L / Dabagh, Rana Al / Davison, K Shawn / Sándor, George K / Josse, Robert G / Bhandari, Mohit / El Rabbany, Mohamed / Pierroz, Dominique D / Sulimani, Riad / Saunders, Deborah P / Brown, Jacques P / Compston, Juliet / Anonymous3310890. ·Department of Medicine, Divisions of Endocrinology and Metabolism and Geriatrics, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada. Electronic address: Aliya@mcmaster.ca. · Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. · Division of Bone Diseases, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland. · Departments of Medicine, Community Health Sciences and Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. · Centre of Muscle & Bone Research, Charité-University Medicine Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Free University & Humboldt University Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. · Division of Maxillofacial Surgery, Kaiser Permanente Oakland Medical Center, Oakland, CA, USA. · Department of Medicine, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. · Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, Hempstead, NY, USA; Stony Brook School of Dental Medicine, Stony Brook, NY, USA; New York Center for Orthognathic and Maxillofacial Surgery, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Matsumoto Dental University, Shojiri, Japan. · Division of Diagnostic and Surgical Sciences, UCLA School of Dentistry, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Mercy Health Osteoporosis and Bone Health Services, Cincinnati, OH, USA. · Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy. · Department of Dentistry, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology at Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN, USA. · Department of Human Metabolism, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK. · Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; Centre of Excellence in Skeletal Health Assessment, Joint Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network (UHN), Toronto, ON, Canada; Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada. · Jordan Osteoporosis Center, Jordan Hospital & Medical Center, Amman, Jordan. · MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK; NIHR Nutrition Biomedical Research Centre, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK; NIHR Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Division of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham Osteoporosis Prevention and Treatment Clinic, Birmingham, AL, USA. · Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University Graz, Graz, Austria. · Department of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. · Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · Department of Education, University of Victoria,Victoria, BC, Canada. · Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Oulu University Hospital, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. · Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada. · Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF), Nyon, Switzerland. · College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. · Department of Dental Oncology, Northeast Cancer Centre/Health Science North, Sudbury, ON, Canada. · Rheumatology Division, CHU de Québec Research Centre, Laval University, Quebec City, QC, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge, UK. ·J Clin Densitom · Pubmed #27956123.

ABSTRACT: Osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) has been associated with antiresorptive therapy in both oncology and osteoporosis patients. This debilitating condition is very rare and advances in diagnosis and management may now effectively reduce the risk of its development and offer valuable treatment options for affected patients. This paper provides a case-based review of ONJ and application of the International Task Force on ONJ (referred to as the "Task Force") recommendations for the diagnosis and management of ONJ. The Task Force was supported by 14 international societies and achieved consensus from representatives of these multidisciplinary societies on key issues pertaining to the diagnosis and management of ONJ. The frequency of ONJ in oncology patients receiving oncology doses of bisphosphonate (BP) or denosumab is estimated at 1%-15%, and the frequency in the osteoporosis patient population receiving much lower doses of BP or denosumab is estimated at 0.001%-0.01%. Although the diagnosis of ONJ is primarily clinical, imaging may be helpful in confirming the diagnosis and staging. In those with multiple risk factors for ONJ for whom major invasive oral surgery is being planned, interruption of BP or denosumab therapy (in cancer patients) is advised, if possible, before surgery, until the surgical site heals. Major oral surgery in this context could include multiple extractions if surgical extractions are required, not simple forceps extractions. ONJ development may be reduced by optimizing oral hygiene and postoperatively using topical and systemic antibiotics as appropriate. Periodontal disease should be managed before starting oncology doses of BP or denosumab. Local debridement may be successful in disease unresponsive to conservative therapy. Successful surgical intervention has been reported in those with stage 3 disease; less severe disease is best managed conservatively. Teriparatide may be helpful in healing ONJ lesions and may be considered in osteoporosis patients at a high fracture risk in the absence of contraindications. Resumption of BP or denosumab therapy following healing of ONJ lesions is recommended, and there have not been reports of subsequent local recurrence.

15 Review The role of calcium supplementation in healthy musculoskeletal ageing : An expert consensus meeting of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases (ESCEO) and the International Foundation for Osteoporosis (IOF). 2017

Harvey, N C / Biver, E / Kaufman, J-M / Bauer, J / Branco, J / Brandi, M L / Bruyère, O / Coxam, V / Cruz-Jentoft, A / Czerwinski, E / Dimai, H / Fardellone, P / Landi, F / Reginster, J-Y / Dawson-Hughes, B / Kanis, J A / Rizzoli, R / Cooper, C. ·MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK. · NIHR Southampton Biomedical Research Centre, University of Southampton and University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, UK. · Service of Bone Diseases, University Hospitals Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. · Department of Internal Medicine, section Endocrinology, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium. · Department of Geriatric Medicine, Klinikum, Carl von Ossietzky University, Ammerländer Heerstrasse 114-118, 26129, Oldenburg, Germany. · CEDOC - NOVA Medical School, UNL and Rheumatology Department, CHLO/Hospital Egas Moniz, Lisbon, Portugal. · Head, Bone and Mineral Metabolic Unit, Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy. · Department of Public Health, Epidemiology and Health Economics, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium. · INRA, UMR 1019, UNH, CRNH Auvergne, F-63000, Clermont-Ferrand, France. · Clermont Université, Université d'Auvergne, Unité de Nutrition Humaine, BP 10448, F-63000, Clermont-Ferrand, France. · Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, Instituto Ramón y Cajal de Investigación Sanitaria (Irycis), Madrid, Spain. · Department of Bone and Joint Diseases, Faculty of Health Sciences, Krakow Medical Centre, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland. · Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria. · CHU Amiens, Université Picardie - Jules Verne, INSERM U 1088, Amiens, France. · Geriatric Department, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Milan, Italy. · Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, MA, USA. · Centre for Metabolic Bone Diseases, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK. · Institute for Health and Ageing, Catholic University of Australia, Melbourne, Australia. · MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK. cc@mrc.soton.ac.uk. · NIHR Southampton Biomedical Research Centre, University of Southampton and University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, UK. cc@mrc.soton.ac.uk. · Oxford NIHR Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, The Botnar Research Centre, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. cc@mrc.soton.ac.uk. ·Osteoporos Int · Pubmed #27761590.

ABSTRACT: The place of calcium supplementation, with or without concomitant vitamin D supplementation, has been much debated in terms of both efficacy and safety. There have been numerous trials and meta-analyses of supplementation for fracture reduction, and associations with risk of myocardial infarction have been suggested in recent years. In this report, the product of an expert consensus meeting of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases (ESCEO) and the International Foundation for Osteoporosis (IOF), we review the evidence for the value of calcium supplementation, with or without vitamin D supplementation, for healthy musculoskeletal ageing. We conclude that (1) calcium and vitamin D supplementation leads to a modest reduction in fracture risk, although population-level intervention has not been shown to be an effective public health strategy; (2) supplementation with calcium alone for fracture reduction is not supported by the literature; (3) side effects of calcium supplementation include renal stones and gastrointestinal symptoms; (4) vitamin D supplementation, rather than calcium supplementation, may reduce falls risk; and (5) assertions of increased cardiovascular risk consequent to calcium supplementation are not convincingly supported by current evidence. In conclusion, we recommend, on the basis of the current evidence, that calcium supplementation, with concomitant vitamin D supplementation, is supported for patients at high risk of calcium and vitamin D insufficiency, and in those who are receiving treatment for osteoporosis.

16 Review Vitamin D and chronic diseases: the current state of the art. 2017

Muscogiuri, Giovanna / Altieri, Barbara / Annweiler, Cedric / Balercia, Giancarlo / Pal, H B / Boucher, Barbara J / Cannell, John J / Foresta, Carlo / Grübler, Martin R / Kotsa, Kalliopi / Mascitelli, Luca / März, Winfried / Orio, Francesco / Pilz, Stefan / Tirabassi, Giacomo / Colao, Annamaria. ·Ios and Coleman Medicina Futura Medical Center, University "Federico II", Naples, Italy. giovanna.muscogiuri@gmail.com. · Department of Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy. · Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Angers University Hospital, University Memory Clinic, UPRES EA 4638, University of Angers, UNAM, Angers, France. · Department of Medical Biophysics, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Robarts Research Institute, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada. · Division of Endocrinology, Department of Clinical and Molecular Sciences, Umberto I Hospital, Polytechnic University of Marche, Ancona, Italy. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hungary. · The Blizard Institute, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK. · Vitamin D Council, San Luis Obispo, CA, USA. · Department of Medicine, Operative Unit of Andrology and Medicine of Human Reproduction, University of Padova, Padua, Italy. · Department of Cardiology, Swiss Cardiovascular Center Bern, Bern University Hospital, Bern, Switzerland. · Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria. · Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, AHEPA University Hospital, Thessaloníki, Greece. · Comando Brigata Alpina "Julia"/Multinational Land Force, Medical Service, Udine, Italy. · Medical Clinic V (Nephrology, Hypertensiology, Endocrinology, Diabetology, Rheumatology), Mannheim Medical Faculty, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim, Germany. · Clinical Institute of Medical and Chemical Laboratory Diagnostics, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria. · Synlab Academy, Synlab Holding Germany GmbH, Mannheim, Augsburg, Germany. · Department of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Fertility Techniques Structure, University Hospital "S. Giovanni di Dio e Ruggi d'Aragona", Salerno, Italy. · Department of Sports Science and Wellness, "Parthenope" University Naples, Naples, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, University "Federico II", Naples, Italy. ·Arch Toxicol · Pubmed #27425218.

ABSTRACT: The objective was to provide the current state of the art regarding the role of vitamin D in chronic diseases (osteoporosis, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, dementia, autism, type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus, male and female fertility). The document was drawn up by panelists that provided their contribution according to their own scientific expertise. Each scientific expert supplied a first draft manuscript on a specific aspect of the document's topic that was subjected to voting by all experts as "yes" (agreement with the content and/or wording) or "no" (disagreement). The adopted rule was that statements supported by ≥75 % of votes would be immediately accepted, while those with <25 % would be rejected outright. Others would be subjected to further discussion and subsequent voting, where ≥67 % support or, in an eventual third round, a majority of ≥50 % would be needed. This document finds that the current evidence support a role for vitamin D in bone health but not in other health conditions. However, subjects with vitamin D deficiency have been found to be at high risk of developing chronic diseases. Therefore, although at the present time there is not sufficient evidence to recommend vitamin D supplementation as treatment of chronic diseases, the treatment of vitamin D deficiency should be desiderable in order to reduce the risk of developing chronic diseases.

17 Review Imaging in osteoporosis in rheumatic diseases. 2016

Mandl, Peter / Kainberger, Franz / Friberg Hitz, Mette. ·Division of Rheumatology, 3rd Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, 18-20 Währinger Gürtel, 1090 Vienna, Austria. Electronic address: peter.mandl@meduniwien.ac.at. · Division of Neuro- and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, 18-20 Währinger Gürtel, 1090 Vienna, Austria. Electronic address: franz.kainberger@meduniwien.ac.at. · Department of Medicine, Endocrinology, Zealand University Hospital, Lykkebaekvej 1, 4600 Koege, Denmark. Electronic address: mettehitz@hotmail.com. ·Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol · Pubmed #27931966.

ABSTRACT: Osteoporosis is a common comorbidity of all major rheumatic diseases, and manifests itself both systemically and locally. Systemic bone loss manifests because of several factors, primarily inflammation, immobility, and commonly used medical treatment for rheumatic diseases. Local bone loss manifests as periarticular demineralization and bone erosion due to local release of inflammatory agents and cytokines, which promote bone resorption. All these factors contribute to the phenomenon of arthritis-associated osteoporosis. This review summarized the currently available and used methods that play a role in the diagnosis and monitoring of osteoporosis and in the detection of osteoporotic fractures.

18 Review RANKL/RANK: from bone loss to the prevention of breast cancer. 2016

Sigl, Verena / Jones, Laundette P / Penninger, Josef M. ·IMBA, Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Dr Bohrgasse 3, 1030 Vienna, Austria. · School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. · IMBA, Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Dr Bohrgasse 3, 1030 Vienna, Austria josef.penninger@imba.oeaw.ac.at. ·Open Biol · Pubmed #27881737.

ABSTRACT: RANK and RANKL, a receptor ligand pair belonging to the tumour necrosis factor family, are the critical regulators of osteoclast development and bone metabolism. Besides their essential function in bone, RANK and RANKL have also been identified as the key factors for the formation of a lactating mammary gland in pregnancy. Mechanistically, RANK and RANKL link the sex hormone progesterone with stem cell expansion and proliferation of mammary epithelial cells. Based on their normal physiology, RANKL/RANK control the onset of hormone-induced breast cancer through the expansion of mammary progenitor cells. Recently, we and others were able to show that RANK and RANKL are also critical regulators of BRCA1-mutation-driven breast cancer. Currently, the preventive strategy for BRCA1-mutation carriers includes preventive mastectomy, associated with wide-ranging risks and psychosocial effects. The search for an alternative non-invasive prevention strategy is therefore of paramount importance. As our work strongly implicates RANK and RANKL as key molecules involved in the initiation of BRCA1-associated breast cancer, we propose that anti-RANKL therapy could be a feasible preventive strategy for women carrying BRCA1 mutations, and by extension to other women with high risk of breast cancer.

19 Review Multimorbidity in rheumatic conditions. 2016

Radner, Helga. ·Department of Internal Medicine III, Division of Rheumatology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, Vienna, 1090, Austria. helga.radner@meduniwien.ac.at. ·Wien Klin Wochenschr · Pubmed #27738754.

ABSTRACT: In recent years, multimorbidity in rheumatic conditions has gained increasing attention. Rheumatologist care for an aging patient population with multiple diseases, therefore multimorbidity is the rule, not the exception. Owing to the high prevalence and the potential interaction of coexisting diseases, multimorbidity needs to be taken into account when treating patients with chronic inflammatory conditions. In this review we address the most prevalent comorbidities in patients with rheumatic conditions and their impact on important outcomes, such as physical function, quality of life, and mortality.

20 Review Recommendations on hip fractures. 2016

Wendt, K / Heim, D / Josten, C / Kdolsky, R / Oestern, H-J / Palm, H / Sintenie, J B / Komadina, R / Copuroglu, C. ·Trauma Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, P.O. Box 30001, 9700 RB, Groningen, The Netherlands. k.w.wendt@umcg.nl. · Hohmad Privatklinik Thun, Hohmaddstrasse 1, 3600, Thun, Switzerland. · Klinik für Orthopädie, Unfallchirurgie und Plastische Chirurgie, Universitätskliniken Leipzig, Leibigstrasse 20, 04103, Leipzig, Germany. · Departmernt for Emergency Surgery, Medical University of Vienna, AKH Wien, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090, Vienna, Austria. · , Schubertstrasse 12, 29223, Celle, Germany. · Department of Orthopaedics, University Hospital Hovidovre, Kettegard Alle 30, 2650, Hovidovre, Denmark. · Department of Surgery, Elkerliek Ziekenhuis locatie Helmond, Wesselmanlaan 25, 5797 HA, Helmond, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Teaching and General Hospital Celje, Oblakova Ulica 5, 3000, Celje, Slovenia. · Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Faculty of Medicine, Trakya University, Balkan Yerleskesi, 22030, Edirne, Turkey. ·Eur J Trauma Emerg Surg · Pubmed #27418204.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Review The use of augmentation techniques in osteoporotic fracture fixation. 2016

Kammerlander, Christian / Neuerburg, Carl / Verlaan, Jorrit-Jan / Schmoelz, Werner / Miclau, Theodore / Larsson, Sune. ·Department of Trauma Surgery, Munich University Hospital LMU, Nußbaumstr. 20, 80336Munich, Germany; Department of Trauma Surgery and Sportsmedicine, Medical University of Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020Innsbruck, Austria. Electronic address: christian.kammerlander@med.uni-muenchen.de. · Department of Trauma Surgery, Munich University Hospital LMU, Nußbaumstr. 20, 80336Munich, Germany. · Department of Orthopaedics, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Trauma Surgery and Sportsmedicine, Medical University of Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020Innsbruck, Austria. · Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Orthopaedic Trauma Institute, San Francisco, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, United States. · Department of Orthopedics, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. ·Injury · Pubmed #27338226.

ABSTRACT: There are an increasing number of fragility fractures, which present a surgical challenge given the reduced bone quality of underlying osteoporosis. Particularly in aged patients, there is a need for early weight bearing and mobilization to avoid further complications such as loss of function or autonomy. As an attempt to improve fracture stability and ultimate healing, the use of biomaterials for augmentation of osseous voids and fracture fixation is a promising treatment option. Augmentation techniques can be applied in various locations, and fractures of the metaphyseal regions such as proximal humerus, femur, tibia and the distal radius remain the most common areas for its use. The current review, based on the available mechanical and biological data, provides an overview of the relevant treatment options and different composites used for augmentation of osteoporotic fractures.

22 Review Bone mechanical properties and changes with osteoporosis. 2016

Osterhoff, Georg / Morgan, Elise F / Shefelbine, Sandra J / Karim, Lamya / McNamara, Laoise M / Augat, Peter. ·Division of Orthopaedic Trauma, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · Department of Mechanical Engineering, Boston University, Boston, MA02215, USA. · Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA02115, USA. · Center for Advanced Orthopedic Studies, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA02215, USA. · Centre for Biomechanics Research (BMEC), Department of Biomedical Engineering, NUI Galway, Galway, Republic of Ireland; National Centre for Biomedical Engineering Science (NCBES), NUI Galway, Galway, Republic of Ireland. · Institute of Biomechanics, Trauma Center Murnau, Murnau, Germany; Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg, Salzburg, Austria. Electronic address: biomechanik@bgu-murnau.de. ·Injury · Pubmed #27338221.

ABSTRACT: This review will define the role of collagen and within-bone heterogeneity and elaborate the importance of trabecular and cortical architecture with regard to their effect on the mechanical strength of bone. For each of these factors, the changes seen with osteoporosis and ageing will be described and how they can compromise strength and eventually lead to bone fragility.

23 Review [Biochemical markers of bone metabolism and their importance]. 2016

Obermayer-Pietsch, B / Schwetz, V. ·Klinische Abteilung für Endokrinologie und Diabetologie, Univiversitätsklinik für Innere Medizin, Auenbruggerplatz 15, 8036, Graz, Österreich. barbara.obermayer@medunigraz.at. · Klinische Abteilung für Endokrinologie und Diabetologie, Univiversitätsklinik für Innere Medizin, Auenbruggerplatz 15, 8036, Graz, Österreich. ·Z Rheumatol · Pubmed #27146404.

ABSTRACT: Laboratory analyses of biochemical markers for bone and mineral metabolism can play a key role in the assessment of patients with osteoporosis. They may help to assess bone turnover in the diagnostic work-up and aid decision-making as well as selection of pharmaceutical therapy options. Recent publications on therapy response have shown that biochemical markers of bone turnover are valuable tools for the evaluation of therapy success in individual osteoporosis patients and the assessment of bone mineral density gain during therapy.

24 Review Skeletal Implications of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. 2016

Misof, Barbara M / Moreira, Carolina A / Klaushofer, Klaus / Roschger, Paul. ·Ludwig Boltzmann Institute of Osteology at the Hanusch Hospital of WGKK and AUVA Trauma Centre Meidling, 1st Medical Department, Hanusch Hospital, Vienna, Austria. barbara.misof@osteologie.at. · Endocrine Division (SEMPR), Department of Internal Medicine, Clinical Hospital of the Federal University of Parana, Curitiba, PR, Brazil. · Laboratory P.R.O-Bone Histomorphometry Division, Fundação Pro-Renal, Curitiba, PR, Brazil. · Ludwig Boltzmann Institute of Osteology at the Hanusch Hospital of WGKK and AUVA Trauma Centre Meidling, 1st Medical Department, Hanusch Hospital, Vienna, Austria. ·Curr Osteoporos Rep · Pubmed #26861899.

ABSTRACT: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with numerous comorbidities, among which osteoporosis is of high significance. Low bone mass and the occurrence of fragility fractures is a common finding in patients with COPD. Typical risk factors related directly or indirectly to these skeletal complications include systemic inflammation, tobacco smoking, vitamin D deficiency, and treatment with oral or inhaled corticosteroids. In particular, treatment with glucocorticoids appears to be a strong contributor to bone changes in COPD, but does not fully account for all skeletal complications. Additional to the effects of COPD on bone mass, there is evidence for COPD-related changes in bone microstructure and material properties. This review summarizes the clinical outcomes of low bone mass and increased fracture risk, and reports on recent observations in bone tissue and material in COPD patients.

25 Review Prevention and rehabilitation of osteoporosis. 2016

Kerschan-Schindl, Katharina. ·Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Medical University of Vienna, Währinger Güertel 18-20, 1090, Vienna, Austria. katharina.kerschan-schindl@meduniwien.ac.at. ·Wien Med Wochenschr · Pubmed #26769298.

ABSTRACT: Osteoporosis is a frequent disease in postmenopausal women. Despite the fact that fragility fractures cause many problems, osteoporosis is still underdiagnosed and undertreated. This manuscript outlines the topics diagnosis of osteoporosis, fracture risk prevention, and therapy after fracture. Regular physical activities, a sufficient intake of calcium, and a normal vitamin D level are important for bone health. Depending on the personal fracture risk, the patient may also be prescribed bone-specific medication to prevent fragility fractures. In case of a prevalent osteoporotic fracture, the initiation or adaptation of bone-specific therapy is indispensable. Since most osteoporotic fractures occur during a fall, fall risk reduction is an important measure to inhibit a new fracture. Rehabilitation of patients with fragility fractures varies with different localizations of the fracture and should be performed by a multidisciplinary team.

Next