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Osteoporosis: HELP
Articles from Switzerland
Based on 490 articles published since 2008
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These are the 490 published articles about Osteoporosis that originated from Switzerland during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Executive summary of European guidance for the diagnosis and management of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. 2019

Kanis, J A / Cooper, C / Rizzoli, R / Reginster, J-Y / Anonymous1811088. ·Centre for metabolic bone diseases, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK. · University of Sheffield Medical School, Sheffield, UK. · Mary McKillop Health Institute, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, Australia. · MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK. · NIHR Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · University Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. · Chair for Biomarkers of Chronic Diseses, Department of Biochemistry, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. jyr.ch@bluewin.ch. · Department of Public Health, Epidemiology and Health Economics, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium. jyr.ch@bluewin.ch. ·Aging Clin Exp Res · Pubmed #30612282.

ABSTRACT: A guidance on the assessment and treatment of postmenopausal women at risk from fractures due to osteoporosis was recently published in Osteoporosis International as a joint effort of the International Osteoporosis Foundation and European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (Kanis et al. Osteoporos Int, https://doi.org/10.1007/s00198-018-4704-5 , 2018). This manuscript updates the previous guideline document, published in 2013 (Kanis et al. Osteoporos Int 24:23-57, 2013) and is written from a European perspective. The present article reports and summarizes the main recommendations included in this 2018 guidance document (Fig. 1).

2 Guideline European guidance for the diagnosis and management of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. 2019

Kanis, J A / Cooper, C / Rizzoli, R / Reginster, J-Y / Anonymous1931159. ·Centre for Metabolic Bone Diseases, University of Sheffield Medical School, Beech Hill Road, Sheffield, S10 2RX, UK. w.j.Pontefract@shef.ac.uk. · Mary McKillop Health Institute, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, Australia. w.j.Pontefract@shef.ac.uk. · MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK. · NIHR Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · University Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. · Department of Public Health, Epidemiology and Health Economics, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium. · Prince Mutaib Chair for Biomarkers of Osteoporosis, Biochemistry Department, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. ·Osteoporos Int · Pubmed #30324412.

ABSTRACT: Guidance is provided in a European setting on the assessment and treatment of postmenopausal women at risk from fractures due to osteoporosis. INTRODUCTION: The International Osteoporosis Foundation and European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis published guidance for the diagnosis and management of osteoporosis in 2013. This manuscript updates these in a European setting. METHODS: Systematic reviews were updated. RESULTS: The following areas are reviewed: the role of bone mineral density measurement for the diagnosis of osteoporosis and assessment of fracture risk; general and pharmacological management of osteoporosis; monitoring of treatment; assessment of fracture risk; case-finding strategies; investigation of patients; health economics of treatment. The update includes new information on the evaluation of bone microstructure evaluation in facture risk assessment, the role of FRAX® and Fracture Liaison Services in secondary fracture prevention, long-term effects on fracture risk of dietary intakes, and increased fracture risk on stopping drug treatment. CONCLUSIONS: A platform is provided on which specific guidelines can be developed for national use.

3 Guideline Osteoporosis management in patients with breast cancer: EMAS position statement. 2017

Trémollieres, Florence A / Ceausu, Iuliana / Depypere, Herman / Lambrinoudaki, Irene / Mueck, Alfred / Pérez-López, Faustino R / van der Schouw, Yvonne T / Senturk, Levent M / Simoncini, Tommaso / Stevenson, John C / Stute, Petra / Rees, Margaret. ·Menopause and Metabolic Bone Disease Unit, Hôpital Paule de Viguier, CHU Toulouse, Toulouse, France. Electronic address: tremollieres.fr@chu-toulouse.fr. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 'Carol Davila' University of Medicine and Pharmacy, and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 'Dr. I. Cantacuzino' Hospital, Bucharest, Romania. · Breast Clinic and Menopause Clinic, University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 9000 Gent, Belgium. · Second Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, National and Kapodestrian University of Athens, Greece. · University Women's Hospital of Tuebingen, Calwer Street 7, 72076 Tuebingen, Germany. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Zaragoza University Faculty of Medicine, Lozano-Blesa University Hospital, Zaragoza 50009, Spain. · Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Istanbul University Cerrahpasa School of Medicine. Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Reproductive Endocrinology, IVF Unit, Istanbul, Turkey. · Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Via Roma, 67, 56100, Pisa, Italy. · National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, Royal Brompton Campus Hospital, London SW3 6NP, UK. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Women's Hospital, Bern, Switzerland. · Women's Centre, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford OX3 9DU, UK. ·Maturitas · Pubmed #27802892.

ABSTRACT: Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are the first-line recommended standard of care for postmenopausal estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. Because they cause a profound suppression of estrogen levels, concerns regarding their potential to increase the risk of fracture were rapidly raised. There is currently a general consensus that a careful baseline evaluation is needed of the risk of fracture in postmenopausal women about to start treatment with AIs but also in all premenopausal women with early disease. Bisphosphonates have been shown in several phase III trials to prevent the bone loss induced by cancer treatment, although no fracture data are available. Even though they do not have regulatory approval for this indication, their use must be discussed with women at high risk of fracture. Accordingly, several guidelines recommend considering treatment in women with a T-score ≤-2 or those with two or more clinical risk factors. Moreover, recent data suggest that bisphosphonates, especially intravenous zoledronic acid, may have an anticancer effect, in that they reduce bone recurrence as well as extra-skeletal metastasis and breast cancer mortality in postmenopausal women. The anti-RANK ligand antibody denosumab is also emerging as a new adjuvant therapeutic option to prevent AI-induced bone loss. It has been shown to extend the time to first fracture in postmenopausal women treated with AIs. Several issues still need to be addressed regarding the use of these different agents in an adjuvant setting. The purpose of this position statement is to review the literature on antifracture therapy and to discuss the current guidelines for the management of osteoporosis in women with early breast cancer.

4 Guideline The First European Evidence-based Consensus on Extra-intestinal Manifestations in Inflammatory Bowel Disease. 2016

Harbord, Marcus / Annese, Vito / Vavricka, Stephan R / Allez, Matthieu / Barreiro-de Acosta, Manuel / Boberg, Kirsten Muri / Burisch, Johan / De Vos, Martine / De Vries, Anne-Marie / Dick, Andrew D / Juillerat, Pascal / Karlsen, Tom H / Koutroubakis, Ioannis / Lakatos, Peter L / Orchard, Tim / Papay, Pavol / Raine, Tim / Reinshagen, Max / Thaci, Diamant / Tilg, Herbert / Carbonnel, Franck / Anonymous3360850. ·Department of Gastroenterology, Chelsea and Westminster NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Department of Emergency, University Hospital Careggi, Florence, Italy. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Triemli Hospital, Zurich, Switzerland. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hôpital Saint Louis, Sorbonne Paris-Cité University, Paris, France. · Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Santiago De Compostela, A Coruña, Spain. · Department of Transplantation Medicine, Division of Cancer Medicine, Surgery and Transplantation, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Gastro Unit, Hvidovre University Hospital, Hvidovre, and Danish Centre for eHealth & Epidemiology, North Zealand University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Ghent , Ghent, Belgium. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Academic Unit of Ophthalmology, School of Clinical Sciences, Bristol, and National Institute for Health Research, Moorfield's Eye Hospital and UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, London, UK. · Clinic for Visceral Surgery and Medicine, University Hospital Bern, Bern, Switzerland. · Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Heraklion, Heraklion, Greece. · Department of Medicine I, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary. · Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, St Mary's Hospital, London, UK. · Department of Internal Medicine, Hartmannspital Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Gastroenterology, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK. · Medizinische Klinik I, Klinikum Braunschweig, Germany. · Comprehensive Center of Inflammation Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig Holstein, Lubeck, Germany. · Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria. · Service de Gastroentérologie CHU de Bicêtre, Université Paris Sud, Paris, France. ·J Crohns Colitis · Pubmed #26614685.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Guideline EMAS position statement: The ten point guide to the integral management of menopausal health. 2015

Neves-E-Castro, Manuel / Birkhauser, Martin / Samsioe, Goran / Lambrinoudaki, Irene / Palacios, Santiago / Borrego, Rafael Sanchez / Llaneza, Placido / Ceausu, Iuliana / Depypere, Herman / Erel, C Tamer / Pérez-López, Faustino R / Schenck-Gustafsson, Karin / van der Schouw, Yvonne T / Simoncini, Tommaso / Tremollieres, Florence / Rees, Margaret. ·Clinica da Menopausa, Av. Luis Bivar, 93c-1 Dt, Lisboa 1050-143, Portugal. · Gynaecological Endocrinology and Reproductive Medicine, University of Berne, Gartenstrasse 67, CH-4052 Basel, Switzerland. · Department of Clinical Sciences, SUS University Hospital Lund, Lund University, SE-221 85 Lund, Sweden. · Second Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, National and Capodestrian University of Athens, Greece. · Instituto Palacios, Salud y Medicina de la Mujer, C/Antonio Acuña, 9, 28009 Madrid, Spain. · DIATROS, Clínica de Atención a la Mujer, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Central Hospital of Asturias, University of Oviedo, 33011 Oviedo, Spain. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 'Carol Davila' University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 'Dr. I. Cantacuzino' Hospital, Bucharest, Romania. · Breast Clinic and Menopause Clinic, University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 9000 Gent, Belgium. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Istanbul University, Cerrahpasa School of Medicine, Valikonagi Cad. No: 93/4, Nisantasi, 34365 Istanbul, Turkey. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Zaragoza University Facultad de Medicina, Hospital Clínico, Zaragoza 50009, Spain. · Department of Medicine, Cardiology Unit, Centre for Gender Medicine, Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital, Thorax N3:05, SE 17176 Stockholm, Sweden. · Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Via Roma, 67, 56100 Pisa, Italy. · Menopause and Metabolic Bone Disease Unit, Hôpital Paule de Viguier, F-31059 Toulouse cedex 09, France. · Women's Centre, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford OX3 9DU, UK. Electronic address: margaret.rees@st-hildas.ox.ac.uk. ·Maturitas · Pubmed #25757366.

ABSTRACT: With increased longevity and more women becoming centenarians, management of the menopause and postreproductive health is of growing importance as it has the potential to help promote health over several decades. Women have individual needs and the approach needs to be personalised. The position statement provides a short integral guide for all those involved in menopausal health. It covers diagnosis, screening for diseases in later life, treatment and follow-up.

6 Guideline Bone health in cancer patients: ESMO Clinical Practice Guidelines. 2014

Coleman, R / Body, J J / Aapro, M / Hadji, P / Herrstedt, J / Anonymous4740792. ·Weston Park Hospital, Cancer Research-UK/Yorkshire Cancer Research Sheffield Cancer Research Centre, Sheffield, UK. · CHU Brugmann, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium. · Multidisciplinary Oncology Institute, Genolier, Switzerland. · Department of Gynecology, Endocrinology and Oncology, Philipps-University of Marburg, Marburg, Germany. · Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #24782453.

ABSTRACT: There are three distinct areas of cancer management that make bone health in cancer patients of increasing clinical importance. First, bone metastases are common in many solid tumours, notably those arising from the breast, prostate and lung, as well as multiple myeloma, and may cause major morbidity including fractures, severe pain, nerve compression and hypercalcaemia. Through optimum multidisciplinary management of patients with bone metastases, including the use of bone-targeted treatments such as potent bisphosphonates or denosumab, it has been possible to transform the course of advanced cancer for many patients resulting in a major reduction in skeletal complications, reduced bone pain and improved quality of life. Secondly, many of the treatments we use to treat cancer patients have effects on reproductive hormones, which are critical for the maintenance of normal bone remodelling. This endocrine disturbance results in accelerated bone loss and an increased risk of osteoporosis and fractures that can have a significant negative impact on the lives of the rapidly expanding number of long-term cancer survivors. Finally, the bone marrow micro-environment is also intimately involved in the metastatic processes required for cancer dissemination, and there are emerging data showing that, at least in some clinical situations, the use of bone-targeted treatments can reduce metastasis to bone and has potential impact on patient survival.

7 Guideline European guidance for the diagnosis and management of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. 2013

Kanis, J A / McCloskey, E V / Johansson, H / Cooper, C / Rizzoli, R / Reginster, J-Y / Anonymous1041055. ·WHO Collaborating Centre, UK University of Sheffield Medical School, Sheffield, UK. w.j.pontefract@sheffield.ac.uk ·Osteoporos Int · Pubmed #23079689.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The International Osteoporosis Foundation and European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis published guidance for the diagnosis and management of osteoporosis in 2008. This manuscript updates these in a European setting. METHODS: Systematic literature reviews. RESULTS: The following areas are reviewed: the role of bone mineral density measurement for the diagnosis of osteoporosis and assessment of fracture risk, general and pharmacological management of osteoporosis, monitoring of treatment, assessment of fracture risk, case finding strategies, investigation of patients and health economics of treatment. CONCLUSIONS: A platform is provided on which specific guidelines can be developed for national use.

8 Guideline Guidance for the prevention of bone loss and fractures in postmenopausal women treated with aromatase inhibitors for breast cancer: an ESCEO position paper. 2012

Rizzoli, R / Body, J J / DeCensi, A / Reginster, J Y / Piscitelli, P / Brandi, M L / Anonymous2040716. ·Division of Bone Diseases, Geneva University Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland. ·Osteoporos Int · Pubmed #22270857.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are now the standard treatment for hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. However, deleterious effects of AIs on bone health have been reported. An ESCEO working group proposes guidance for the prevention of bone loss and fragility fractures in post-menopausal women with breast cancer receiving AIs. METHODS: A panel of experts addressed the issue of skeletal effects of AIs and effectiveness of antifracture therapies for the prevention of AI-induced bone loss and fractures. Recommendations by national and international organizations, and experts' opinions on this topic were evaluated. RESULTS: All aromatase inhibitors are associated with negative effects on the skeleton, resulting in bone loss and increased risk of fragility fractures. Current guidelines suggest approaches that differ both in terms of drugs proposed for fracture prevention and duration of treatment. CONCLUSION: The ESCEO working group recommends that all AI-treated women should be evaluated for fracture risk. Besides general recommendations, zoledronic acid 4 mg i.v. every 6 months, denosumab s.c., or possibly oral bisphosphonates should be administered for the entire period of AI treatment to all osteoporotic women (T-score hip/spine <-2.5 or ≥ 1 prevalent fragility fracture), to women aged ≥ 75 irrespective of BMD, and to patients with T-score <-1.5 + ≥ 1 clinical risk factor or T-score <-1.0 + ≥ 2 clinical risk factors. Alternatively, therapy could be considered in patients with a FRAX-determined 10-year hip fracture probability ≥ 3%.

9 Guideline Peripheral dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in the management of osteoporosis: the 2007 ISCD Official Positions. 2008

Hans, Didier B / Shepherd, John A / Schwartz, Elliott N / Reid, David M / Blake, Glen M / Fordham, John N / Fuerst, Thomas / Hadji, Peyman / Itabashi, Akira / Krieg, Marc-Antoine / Lewiecki, E Michael. ·Geneva University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland. didier.hans@ascendys.ch ·J Clin Densitom · Pubmed #18442759.

ABSTRACT: Peripheral assessment of bone density using photon absorptiometry techniques has been available for over 40 yr. The initial use of radio-isotopes as the photon source has been replaced by the use of X-ray technology. A wide variety of models of single- or dual-energy X-ray measurement tools have been made available for purchase, although not all are still commercially available. The Official Positions of the International Society for Clinical Densitometry (ISCD) have been developed following a systematic review of the literature by an ISCD task force and a subsequent Position Development Conference. These cover the technological diversity among peripheral dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (pDXA) devices; define whether pDXA can be used for fracture risk assessment and/or to diagnose osteoporosis; examine whether pDXA can be used to initiate treatment and/or monitor treatment; provide recommendations for pDXA reporting; and review quality assurance and quality control necessary for effective use of pDXA.

10 Guideline Quantitative ultrasound in the management of osteoporosis: the 2007 ISCD Official Positions. 2008

Krieg, Marc-Antoine / Barkmann, Reinhart / Gonnelli, Stefano / Stewart, Alison / Bauer, Douglas C / Del Rio Barquero, Luis / Kaufman, Jonathan J / Lorenc, Roman / Miller, Paul D / Olszynski, Wojciech P / Poiana, Catalina / Schott, Anne-Marie / Lewiecki, E Michael / Hans, Didier. ·Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland. marc-antoine.krieg@chuv.ch ·J Clin Densitom · Pubmed #18442758.

ABSTRACT: Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is commonly used in the care of patients for diagnostic classification of osteoporosis, low bone mass (osteopenia), or normal bone density; assessment of fracture risk; and monitoring changes in bone density over time. The development of other technologies for the evaluation of skeletal health has been associated with uncertainties regarding their applications in clinical practice. Quantitative ultrasound (QUS), a technology for measuring properties of bone at peripheral skeletal sites, is more portable and less expensive than DXA, without the use of ionizing radiation. The proliferation of QUS devices that are technologically diverse, measuring and reporting variable bone parameters in different ways, examining different skeletal sites, and having differing levels of validating data for association with DXA-measured bone density and fracture risk, has created many challenges in applying QUS for use in clinical practice. The International Society for Clinical Densitometry (ISCD) 2007 Position Development Conference (PDC) addressed clinical applications of QUS for fracture risk assessment, diagnosis of osteoporosis, treatment initiation, monitoring of treatment, and quality assurance/quality control. The ISCD Official Positions on QUS resulting from this PDC, the rationale for their establishment, and recommendations for further study are presented here.

11 Guideline European guidance for the diagnosis and management of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. 2008

Kanis, J A / Burlet, N / Cooper, C / Delmas, P D / Reginster, J-Y / Borgstrom, F / Rizzoli, R / Anonymous1920592. ·WHO Collaborating Centre for Metabolic Bone Diseases, University of Sheffield Medical School, Beech Hill Road, Sheffield S10 2RX, UK. w.j.Pontefract@shef.ac.uk ·Osteoporos Int · Pubmed #18266020.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The European Foundation for Osteoporosis and Bone disease (subsequently the International Osteoporosis Foundation) published guidelines for the diagnosis and management of osteoporosis in 1997. This manuscript updates these in a European setting. METHODS: The following areas are reviewed: the role of bone mineral density measurement for the diagnosis of osteoporosis and assessment of fracture risk; general and pharmacological management of osteoporosis; monitoring of treatment; assessment of fracture risk; case finding strategies; investigation of patients; health economics of treatment. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: A platform is provided on which specific guidelines can be developed for national use.

12 Editorial None 2017

Ferrari, Serge / Lamy, Olivier. ·Service des maladies osseuses, Département des spécialités de médecine, HUG, Genève. · Centre des maladies osseuses, CHUV, Lausanne. ·Rev Med Suisse · Pubmed #28727339.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial Osteoporotic fracture fixation - a biomechanical perspective. 2016

Augat, Peter / Goldhahn, Jörg. ·Institute of Biomechanics, Trauma Center Murnau, Germany; Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg, Austria. Electronic address: biomechanik@bgu-murnau.de. · Institute for Biomechanics of ETH Zurich, Leopold-Ruzicka-Weg 4, 8093Zürich, Switzerland. Electronic address: jgoldhahn@ethz.ch. ·Injury · Pubmed #27338220.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial Standardising biochemical assessment of bone turnover in osteoporosis. 2011

Vasikaran, Samuel D / Morris, Howard A / Cooper, Cyrus / Kanis, John A. ·Department of Core Clinical Pathology and Biochemistry, PathWest Laboratory Medicine-Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, WA, Australia; School of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA, Australia. Electronic address: samuel.vasikaran@health.wa.gov.au. · School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide South Australia 5000, Australia. · MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK; NIHR Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Institute of Musculoskeletal Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7LD, UK. · Centre for Metabolic Bone Diseases (WHO Collaborating Centre), University of Sheffield Medical School, Beech Hill Road, Sheffield, S10 2RX, UK. ·Clin Biochem · Pubmed #21784064.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Editorial Evidence for anti-osteoporosis therapy in acute fracture situations--recommendations of a multidisciplinary workshop of the International Society for Fracture Repair. 2010

Goldhahn, J / Little, D / Mitchell, P / Fazzalari, N L / Reid, I R / Aspenberg, P / Marsh, D / Anonymous5110640. ·AO Clinical Priority Program Fracture Fixation in Osteoporotic Bone, Schulthess Klinik Zurich, Switzerland. goj@kws.ch ·Bone · Pubmed #19833244.

ABSTRACT: The International Society for Fracture Repair convened a multidisciplinary workshop to assess the current evidence around the interaction between anti-osteoporosis drugs and the healing of incident fractures, with a view to making recommendations for clinical practice. The consensus was that there is no evidence-based reason to withhold anti-resorptive therapy while a fracture heals, whether or not the patient was taking such therapy when the fracture occurred. The workshop also considered existing models of service provision for secondary prevention and concluded that the essential ingredient for reliable delivery is the inclusion of a dedicated coordinator role. Several unresolved issues were defined as subjects for further research, including the question of whether continuous long-term administration of anti-resorptives may impair bone quality. The rapidly changing area requires re-assessment of drugs and their interaction with fracture healing in the near future.

16 Review Osteoporosis: a clinical and pharmacological update. 2019

Vidal, Maritza / Thibodaux, Ross J / Neira, Luis Fernando Vidal / Messina, Osvaldo Daniel. ·Centro de Diagnóstico de Osteoporosis y Enfermedades Reumáticas (CEDOR), Lima, Peru. maritzavw@gmail.com. · Division of Rheumatology, LSU Health Sciences Center - New Orleans, New Orleans, LA, USA. · Centro de Diagnóstico de Osteoporosis y Enfermedades Reumáticas (CEDOR), Lima, Peru. · Hospital María Auxiliadora, Lima, Peru. · International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF), Nyon, Switzerland. · Hospital Cosme Argerich, Buenos Aires, Argentina. · International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF), Buenos Aires, Argentina. ·Clin Rheumatol · Pubmed #30542797.

ABSTRACT: Osteoporosis is characterized by the loss of bone mass, deterioration of the bone microarchitecture, and an increased risk of fractures; these later complications are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The asymptomatic and progressive nature of osteoporosis underscores the importance of identifying this entity in early stages. Despite the various treatments available, the prevention of the disease represents the most important aspect of management. An adequate intake of calcium and vitamin D as well as a healthy lifestyle is the basis for maintaining bone health. When osteoporosis is diagnosed, the choice of medications must be individualized considering characteristics of the patient and the risk of fractures. In this article, we review the main causes of osteoporosis, when and how to start treatment, and appropriate therapy and monitoring.

17 Review Postmenopausal osteoporosis: Assessment and management. 2018

Rizzoli, René. ·Service of Bone Diseases, Geneva University Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, 1211 Geneva 14, Switzerland. Electronic address: rene.rizzoli@unige.ch. ·Best Pract Res Clin Endocrinol Metab · Pubmed #30449552.

ABSTRACT: Osteoporosis increases the risk of fractures, which are associated with increased mortality and lower quality of life. Patients with prevalent fracture are at high risk to of sustaining another one. Optimal protein and calcium intakes, and vitamin D supplies, together with regular weight bearing physical exercise are the corner stones of fracture prevention. Evidence for anti-fracture efficacy of pharmacological interventions relies on results from randomised controlled trials in postmenopausal women with fractures as the primary outcome. Treatments with bone resorption inhibitors, like bisphosphonates or denosumab, and bone formation stimulator like teriparatide, reduce vertebral and non-vertebral fracture risk. A reduction in vertebral fracture risk can already be detected within a year after starting therapy.

18 Review Bone management in hematologic stem cell transplant recipients. 2018

Kendler, D L / Body, J J / Brandi, M L / Broady, R / Cannata-Andia, J / Cannata-Ortiz, M J / El Maghraoui, A / Guglielmi, G / Hadji, P / Pierroz, D D / de Villiers, T J / Rizzoli, R / Ebeling, P R / Anonymous1981118. ·Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, University of British Columbia, 150 - 943 W. Broadway, Vancouver, V5Z 4E1, Canada. davidkendler@gmail.com. · CHU Brugmann, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium. · Mineral and Bone Metabolic Unit, Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy. · Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. · Servicio de Metabolismo Óseo y Mineral, Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias, Universidad de Oviedo, Oviedo, Spain. · Haematology Department, IIS Princesa, Hospital de la Princesa, Madrid, Spain. · Rheumatology Department, Military Hospital Mohammed V, Mohammed V-Souissi University, Rabat, Morocco. · Department of Radiology, University of Foggia, Foggia, Italy. · Department of Bone Oncology, Endocrinology and Reproductive Medicine, Nord West Hospital, Frankfurt, Germany. · International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF), Nyon, Switzerland. · Department of Gynaecology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, South Africa. · Mediclinic Panorama, Cape Town, South Africa. · Division of Bone Diseases, Faculty of Medicine, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland. · Department of Medicine, School of Clinical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Australia. ·Osteoporos Int · Pubmed #30178158.

ABSTRACT: Autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the treatment of choice for patients with some malignant and non-malignant hematological diseases. Advances in transplantation techniques and supportive care measures have substantially increased the number of long-term HSCT survivors. This has led to an increasing patient population suffering from the late effects of HSCT, of which, bone loss and its consequent fragility fractures lead to substantial morbidity. Altered bone health, with consequent fragility fractures, and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) are factors affecting long-term quality of life after HSCT. Hypogonadism, HSCT preparative regimens, nutritional factors, and glucocorticoids all contribute to accelerated bone loss and increased fracture risk. Management strategies should include bone mineral density examination, evaluation of clinical risk factors, and general dietary and physical activity measures. Evidence has accumulated permitting recommendations for more attentiveness to evaluation and monitoring of bone health, with appropriate application of osteoporosis pharmacotherapies to patients at increased risk of bone loss and fracture.

19 Review Diagnosis and management of bone fragility in diabetes: an emerging challenge. 2018

Ferrari, S L / Abrahamsen, B / Napoli, N / Akesson, K / Chandran, M / Eastell, R / El-Hajj Fuleihan, G / Josse, R / Kendler, D L / Kraenzlin, M / Suzuki, A / Pierroz, D D / Schwartz, A V / Leslie, W D / Anonymous1841118. ·Division of Bone Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine Specialties, Geneva University Hospital & Faculty of Medicine, 1205, Geneva, Switzerland. serge.ferrari@unige.ch. · Department of Medicine, Holbaek Hospital, Holbaek, Denmark. · OPEN, Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. · Unit of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Department of Medicine, Università Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, Rome, Italy. · Division of Bone and Mineral Diseases, Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, MO, USA. · Department of Clinical Sciences, Clinical and Molecular Osteoporosis Unit, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. · Osteoporosis and Bone Metabolism Unit, Department of Endocrinology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore, Singapore. · Academic Unit of Bone Metabolism, Mellanby Centre for Bone Research, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK. · Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Calcium Metabolism and Osteoporosis Program, WHO Collaborating Center for Metabolic Bone Disorders, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Riad El Solh, Beirut, Lebanon. · Department of Medicine and Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. · Endonet, Endocrine Clinic and Laboratory, Basel, Switzerland. · Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Fujita Health University, Toyoake, Aichi, Japan. · International Osteoporosis Foundation, Nyon, Switzerland. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Department of Internal Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ·Osteoporos Int · Pubmed #30066131.

ABSTRACT: Fragility fractures are increasingly recognized as a complication of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, with fracture risk that increases with disease duration and poor glycemic control. Yet the identification and management of fracture risk in these patients remains challenging. This review explores the clinical characteristics of bone fragility in adults with diabetes and highlights recent studies that have evaluated bone mineral density (BMD), bone microstructure and material properties, biochemical markers, and fracture prediction algorithms (i.e., FRAX) in these patients. It further reviews the impact of diabetes drugs on bone as well as the efficacy of osteoporosis treatments in this population. We finally propose an algorithm for the identification and management of diabetic patients at increased fracture risk.

20 Review Benefits and safety of dietary protein for bone health-an expert consensus paper endorsed by the European Society for Clinical and Economical Aspects of Osteopororosis, Osteoarthritis, and Musculoskeletal Diseases and by the International Osteoporosis Foundation. 2018

Rizzoli, R / Biver, E / Bonjour, J-P / Coxam, V / Goltzman, D / Kanis, J A / Lappe, J / Rejnmark, L / Sahni, S / Weaver, C / Weiler, H / Reginster, J-Y. ·Division of Bone Diseases, Geneva University Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, 1211, Geneva 14, Switzerland. rene.rizzoli@unige.ch. · Division of Bone Diseases, Geneva University Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, 1211, Geneva 14, Switzerland. · INRA, Unité de Nutrition Humaine, CRNH Auvergne, Université Clermont Auvergne, F-63000, Clermont-Ferrand, France. · McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Canada. · University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK. · Institute for Health and Ageing, Catholic University of Australia, Melbourne, Australia. · College of Nursing, Creighton University, Creighton, NE, USA. · Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. · Hebrew SeniorLife and Harvard Medical School, Institute for Aging Research, Boston, MA, USA. · Women's Global Health Institute, Department of Nutrition Science, Purdue University, Purdue, West Lafayette, IN, USA. · School of Human Nutrition, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada. · Department of Public Health, Epidemiology and Health Economics, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium. ·Osteoporos Int · Pubmed #29740667.

ABSTRACT: A summary of systematic reviews and meta-analyses addressing the benefits and risks of dietary protein intakes for bone health in adults suggests that dietary protein levels even above the current RDA may be beneficial in reducing bone loss and hip fracture risk, provided calcium intakes are adequate. Several systematic reviews and meta-analyses have addressed the benefits and risks of dietary protein intakes for bone health in adults. This narrative review of the literature summarizes and synthesizes recent systematic reviews and meta-analyses and highlights key messages. Adequate supplies of dietary protein are required for optimal bone growth and maintenance of healthy bone. Variation in protein intakes within the "normal" range accounts for 2-4% of BMD variance in adults. In older people with osteoporosis, higher protein intake (≥ 0.8-g/kg body weight/day, i.e., above the current RDA) is associated with higher BMD, a slower rate of bone loss, and reduced risk of hip fracture, provided that dietary calcium intakes are adequate. Intervention with dietary protein supplements attenuate age-related BMD decrease and reduce bone turnover marker levels, together with an increase in IGF-I and a decrease in PTH. There is no evidence that diet-derived acid load is deleterious for bone health. Thus, insufficient dietary protein intakes may be a more severe problem than protein excess in the elderly. Long-term, well-controlled randomized trials are required to further assess the influence of dietary protein intakes on fracture risk.

21 Review Inappropriate claims from non-equivalent medications in osteoarthritis: a position paper endorsed by the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases (ESCEO). 2018

Bruyère, Olivier / Cooper, Cyrus / Al-Daghri, Nasser M / Dennison, Elaine M / Rizzoli, René / Reginster, Jean-Yves. ·Department of Public Health, Epidemiology and Health Economics, University of Liège, CHU Sart Tilman B23, 4000, Liège, Belgium. · WHO Collaborating Centre for Public Health Aspects of Musculoskeletal Health and Aging, Liège, Belgium. · MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton, UK. · NIHR Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Prince Mutaib Chair for Biomarkers of Osteoporosis, Biochemistry Department, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, 11451, Saudi Arabia. · Division of Bone Diseases, Geneva University Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland. · Department of Public Health, Epidemiology and Health Economics, University of Liège, CHU Sart Tilman B23, 4000, Liège, Belgium. jyreginster@ulg.ac.be. · WHO Collaborating Centre for Public Health Aspects of Musculoskeletal Health and Aging, Liège, Belgium. jyreginster@ulg.ac.be. ·Aging Clin Exp Res · Pubmed #29177637.

ABSTRACT: Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive joint disease, that occurs frequently in the aging population and is a major cause of disability worldwide. Both glucosamine and chondroitin are biologically active molecules that are substrates for proteoglycan, an essential component of the cartilage matrix. Evidence supports the use of glucosamine and chondroitin as symptomatic slow-acting drugs for osteoarthritis (SYSADOAs) with impact on OA symptoms and disease-modifying effects in the long term. Glucosamine and chondroitin are administered in exogenous form as a sulfate salt and multiple formulations of these agents are available, both as prescription-grade products and nutritional supplements. However, while all preparations may claim to deliver a therapeutic level of glucosamine or chondroitin not all are supported by clinical evidence. Only patented crystalline glucosamine sulfate (pCGS) is shown to deliver consistently high glucosamine bioavailability and plasma concentration in humans, which corresponds to demonstrated clinical efficacy. Similarly, clinical evidence supports only the pharmaceutical-grade chondroitin sulfate. The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases (ESCEO) advocates, through careful consideration of the evidence base, that judicious choice of glucosamine and chondroitin formulation is essential to maximize clinical benefit, patient adherence and satisfaction with treatment. In future, the ESCEO recommends that complex molecules with biological activity such as pCGS may be treated as "biosimilars" akin to the European Medicines Agency guidance on biological medicinal products. It seems likely that for all other complex molecules classed as SYSADOAs, the recommendation to use only formulations clearly supported by the evidence-base should apply.

22 Review Effects of growth hormone therapy on bone density and fracture risk in age-related osteoporosis in the absence of growth hormone deficiency: a systematic review and meta-analysis. 2018

Barake, Maya / Arabi, Asma / Nakhoul, Nancy / El-Hajj Fuleihan, Ghada / El Ghandour, Sarah / Klibanski, Anne / Tritos, Nicholas A. ·Scholars in HeAlth Research Program, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon. maya.barake@cmc.com.lb. · Clemenceau Medical Center, Beirut, Lebanon. maya.barake@cmc.com.lb. · Scholars in HeAlth Research Program, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon. · Calcium Metabolism and Osteoporosis Program, WHO Collaborating Center for Metabolic Bone Diseases, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon. · Department of Internal Medicine, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon. · Bareen International Hospital, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. · Massacchusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. ·Endocrine · Pubmed #29030774.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: In adults, growth hormone deficiency (GHD) has been associated with low bone mineral density (BMD), an effect counteracted by growth hormone (GH) replacement. Whether GH is beneficial in adults with age-related bone loss and without hypopituitarism is unclear. METHODS: We conducted a systematic literature search using Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials. We extracted and analyzed data according to the bone outcome included [bone mineral content (BMC), BMD, and bone biomarker, fracture risk]. We performed a meta-analysis when possible. RESULTS: We included eight studies. Seven randomized 272 post-menopausal women, 61-69 years, to GH or control, for 6-24 months, and the eighth was an extension trial. Except for one study, all women received concurrent osteoporosis therapies. There was no significant effect of GH, as compared to control, on BMD at the lumbar spine (Weighted mean difference WMD = -0.01 [-0.04, 0.02]), total hip (WMD = 0 [-0.05, 0.06]) or femoral neck (WMD = 0 [-0.03, 0.04]). Similarly, no effect was seen on BMC. GH significantly increased the bone formation marker procollagen type-I carboxy-terminal propeptide (PICP) (WMD = 14.03 [2.68, 25.38]). GH resulted in a trend for increase in osteocalcin and in bone resorption markers. Patients who received GH had a significant decrease in fracture risk as compared to control (RR = 0.63 [0.46, 0.87]). Reported adverse events were not major, mostly related to fluid retention. CONCLUSION: GH may not improve bone density in women with age-related bone loss but may decrease fracture risk. Larger studies of longer duration are needed to further explore these findings in both genders, and to investigate the effect of GH on bone quality.

23 Review Bone remodeling and mechanobiology around implants: Insights from small animal imaging. 2018

Li, Zihui / Müller, Ralph / Ruffoni, Davide. ·Institute for Biomechanics, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. · Mechanics of Biological and Bioinspired Materials Laboratory, Department of Aerospaceand Mechanical Engineering, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium. ·J Orthop Res · Pubmed #28975660.

ABSTRACT: Anchorage of orthopedic implants depends on the interfacial bonding between the implant and the host bone as well as on the mass and microstructure of peri-implant bone, with all these factors being continuously regulated by the biological process of bone (re)modeling. In osteoporotic bone, implant integration may be jeopardized not only by lower peri-implant bone quality but also by reduced intrinsic regeneration ability. The first aim of this review is to provide a critical overview of the influence of osteoporosis on bone regeneration post-implantation. Mechanical stimulation can trigger bone formation and inhibit bone resorption; thus, judicious administration of mechanical loading can be used as an effective non-pharmacological treatment to enhance implant anchorage. Our second aim is to report recent achievements on the application of external mechanical stimulation to improve the quantity of peri-implant bone. The review focuses on peri-implant bone changes in osteoporotic conditions and following mechanical loading, prevalently using small animals and in vivo monitoring approaches. We intend to demonstrate the necessity to reveal new biological information on peri-implant bone mechanobiology to better target implant anchorage and fracture fixation in osteoporotic conditions. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 36:584-593, 2018.

24 Review Quality of life assessment in musculo-skeletal health. 2018

Beaudart, Charlotte / Biver, Emmanuel / Bruyère, Olivier / Cooper, Cyrus / Al-Daghri, Nasser / Reginster, Jean-Yves / Rizzoli, René. ·Department of Public Health, Epidemiology and Health Economics, University of Liège, Quartier Hôpital, Avenue Hippocrate 13, CHUB23, 4000, Liège, Belgium. c.beaudart@ulg.ac.be. · Division of Bone Diseases, Faculty of Medicine, Geneva University Hospitals, Rue Gabrielle Perret-Gentil 4, 1211, Geneva 14, Switzerland. · Department of Public Health, Epidemiology and Health Economics, University of Liège, Quartier Hôpital, Avenue Hippocrate 13, CHUB23, 4000, Liège, Belgium. · MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK. · NIHR Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Prince Mutaib Chair for Biomarkers of Osteoporosis, Biochemistry Department, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, 11451, Saudi Arabia. · Director of the Bone, Cartilage and Muscle Metabolism Unit and Chair of the Department of Public Health Sciences, CHU Liège, Quai Godefroid Kurth 45, 4000, Liège, Belgium. ·Aging Clin Exp Res · Pubmed #28664458.

ABSTRACT: Musculoskeletal disorders affect morbidity, quality of life and mortality, and represent an increasing economic and societal burden in the context of population aging and increased life expectancy. Improvement of quality of life should be one of the priorities of any interventions to prevent and treat musculoskeletal disorders in the ageing population. Two main approaches, namely generic and disease-specific instruments, can be applied to measure health-related quality of life. Among the generic tools available in scientific literature, the short form 36 questionnaire (SF-36) and the Euroqol five item questionnaire (EQ-5D) are two of the most popular questionnaires used to quantify the health related quality of life in people with musculoskeletal disorders. However, because generic tools may not always be able to detect subtle effects of a specific condition on quality of life, a specific tool is highly valuable. Specific tools improve the ability to clinically characterize quality of life in subjects with a specific musculoskeletal disorder, as well as the capacity to assess changes over time in the QoL of these subjects. The recent development of specific tools should help to validate preventive and therapeutic interventions in this field.

25 Review The Trabecular Bone Score (TBS) Complements DXA and the FRAX as a Fracture Risk Assessment Tool in Routine Clinical Practice. 2017

Hans, Didier / Šteňová, Emőke / Lamy, Olivier. ·Centre of Bone diseases, Bone and Joint Department, Lausanne University Hospital, Avenue Pierre-Decker, 4, CH-1011, Lausanne, Switzerland. didier.hans@chuv.ch. · 1st Department of Internal Medicine, Comenius University, Faculty of Medicine in Bratislava, University Hospital, Bratislava, Staré Mesto, Bratislava, Slovakia. · Centre of Bone diseases, Bone and Joint Department, Lausanne University Hospital, Avenue Pierre-Decker, 4, CH-1011, Lausanne, Switzerland. · Internal Medicine Unit, Internal Medicine Department, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland. ·Curr Osteoporos Rep · Pubmed #28988401.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF THE REVIEW: There is an increasing body of evidence that the trabecular bone score (TBS), a surrogate of bone microarchitecture extracted from spine DXA, could play an important role in the management of patients with osteoporosis or at risk of fracture. The current paper reviews this published body of scientific literature on TBS and answers the most relevant clinical questions. RECENT FINDINGS: TBS has repeatedly been proven to be predictive of fragility fractures, current and future, and this is largely independent of BMD, CRF, and the FRAX, and when used in conjunction with any one of these measures, it consistently enhances their accuracy. There also is a growing body of evidence indicating that the TBS has particular advantages over BMD for specific causes of increased fracture risk, like chronic corticosteroid excess, type-2 diabetes, and chronic kidney disease, and patients being treated with anti-aromatase and primary hyperparathyroidism, conditions wherein BMD readings are often misleading. TBS enhances performance of the FRAX tool, where its greatest utility appears to lie in its ability to accurately classify those patients whose BMD level lies close to the intervention threshold, aiding in decisions on whether treatment is warranted or not. Furthermore, TBS has also particular advantages over BMD in secondary osteoporosis. While the role of TBS with monitoring could be important as the different molecules impact logically TBS to various degrees, large clinical trials are still needed.

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