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Osteoporosis: HELP
Articles from Madrid
Based on 154 articles published since 2008
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These are the 154 published articles about Osteoporosis that originated from Madrid during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7
1 Guideline Consensus document on osteoporosis in males. 2018

Varsavsky, Mariela / Romero Muñoz, Manuel / Ávila Rubio, Verónica / Becerra, Antonio / García Martín, Antonia / Martínez Díaz-Guerra, Guillermo / Rozas Moreno, Pedro / Jódar Gimeno, Esteban / Muñoz Torres, Manuel. ·Servicio de Endocrinología, Metabolismo y Medicina Nuclear, Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Electronic address: marie_varsa@hotmail.com. · Unidad de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Hospital General Universitario Rafael Méndez. Lorca, Murcia, España. · Unidad de Metabolismo Óseo, UGC Endocrinología y Nutrición, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Granada, Granada, España. · Unidad de Identidad de Género, Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Hospital Campus de la Salud, Granada, España. · Servicio de Endocrinología, Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Madrid, España. · Sección de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Hospital General Universitario de Ciudad Real, Ciudad Real, España. · Departamento de Endocrinología y Nutrición Clínica, Hospital Universitario Quirón Salud Madrid, Universidad Europea de Madrid, Madrid, España. · UGC de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Hospital Universitario Campus de la Salud, CIBERFES, Granada, España. ·Endocrinol Diabetes Nutr · Pubmed #29530627.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To provide practical recommendations to assess and treat osteoporosis in males. PARTICIPANTS: Members of the Bone Metabolism Working Group of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology. METHODS: Recommendations were formulated using the GRADE system (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) to describe both the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. A systematic search was made in Medline (PubMed) using the following associated terms: «osteoporosis», «men», «fractures», «bone mineral density», «treatment», «hypogonadism», and «prostate cancer». Papers in English and Spanish with publication date before 30 August 2017 were included. Current evidence for each disease was reviewed by 2group members. Finally, recommendations were discussed in a meeting of the working group. CONCLUSIONS: The document provides evidence-based practical recommendations for diagnosis, assessment, and management of osteoporosis in men and special situations such as hypogonadism and prostate cancer.

2 Guideline Recommended vitamin D levels in the general population. 2017

Varsavsky, Mariela / Rozas Moreno, Pedro / Becerra Fernández, Antonio / Luque Fernández, Inés / Quesada Gómez, José Manuel / Ávila Rubio, Verónica / García Martín, Antonia / Cortés Berdonces, María / Naf Cortés, Silvia / Romero Muñoz, Manuel / Reyes García, Rebeca / Jódar Gimeno, Esteban / Muñoz Torres, Manuel / Anonymous810976. ·Servicio de Endocrinología, Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina. · Servicio de Endocrinología, Hospital General Universitario de Ciudad Real, Ciudad Real, España. Electronic address: pedrorozasm@yahoo.es. · Unidad de Identidad de Género, Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal; Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Alcalá, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Hospital Virgen de la Salud, Toledo, España. · Unidad de Metabolismo Mineral, UGC Endocrinología y Nutrición; Instituto Maimónides de Investigación Biomédica de Córdoba (IMIBIC), Hospital Universitario Reina Sofía; RETICEF, Córdoba, España. · Unidad de Metabolismo Óseo, UGC Endocrinología y Nutrición, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Granada; RETICEF, Granada, España. · Servicio de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Hospital Ruber Juan Bravo, Madrid, España. · Hospital Universitari Joan XXIII, IISPV, Universitat Rovira i Virgili; CIBERDEM, Tarragona, España. · Unidad de Endocrinología y Nutrición, HGU Rafael Méndez, Lorca, Murcia, España. · Unidad de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Complejo Hospitalario Torrecárdenas; Servicio de Endocrinología, Clínica San Pedro, Almería, España. · Departamento de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Hospitales Universitarios Quirón Salud Madrid; Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Europea de Madrid, Madrid, España. ·Endocrinol Diabetes Nutr · Pubmed #28440763.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To provide recommendations based on evidence on the management of vitaminD deficiency in the general population. PARTICIPANTS: Members of the Bone Metabolism Working Group of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology. METHODS: Recommendations were formulated using the GRADE system (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) to describe both the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. A systematic search was made in MEDLINE (Pubmed) using the term VitaminD and the name of each issue. Papers in English and Spanish with publication date before 17 March 2016 were included. Recommendations were jointly discussed by the Working Group. CONCLUSIONS: This document summarizes the data about vitaminD deficiency in terms of prevalence, etiology, screening indications, adequate levels and effects of supplementation on bone and non-skeletal health outcomes.

3 Guideline Recommendations on the effect of antidiabetic drugs in bone. 2017

Rozas-Moreno, Pedro / Reyes-García, Rebeca / Jódar-Gimeno, Esteban / Varsavsky, Mariela / Luque-Fernández, Inés / Cortés-Berdonces, María / Muñoz-Torres, Manuel / Anonymous800976. ·Sección de Endocrinología, Hospital General Universitario de Ciudad Real, Ciudad Real, España. Electronic address: pedrorozasm@yahoo.es. · Unidad de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Complejo Hospitalario Torrecárdenas; Servicio de Endocrinología, Clínica San Pedro, Almería, España. · Departamento de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Hospitales Universitarios Quirón Salud (Madrid Pozuelo, San Camilo, San José), Madrid, España. · Servicio de Endocrinología, Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina. · Servicio de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Hospital Virgen de la Salud, Toledo, España. · Servicio de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Hospital Ruber Juan Bravo, Madrid, España. · UGC Endocrinología y Nutrición. Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Granada. Departamento de Medicina. Universidad de Granada. Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria de Granada, Granada, España. ·Endocrinol Diabetes Nutr · Pubmed #28440761.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To provide recommendations on the effect of antidiabetic drugs on bone fragility to help select the most adequate antidiabetic treatment, especially in diabetic patients with high risk of fracture. PARTICIPANTS: Members of the Bone Metabolism Working Group of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology. METHODS: The GRADE system (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) was used to establish both the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. A systematic search was made in MEDLINE (Pubmed) using the following terms associated to the name of each antidiabetic drug: AND "osteoporosis", "fractures", "bone mineral density", "bone markers", "calciotropic hormones". Papers in English with publication date before 30 April 2016 were reviewed. Recommendations were jointly discussed by the Working Group. CONCLUSIONS: The document summaries the data on the potential effects of antidiabetic drugs on bone metabolism and fracture risk.

4 Guideline [SECOT-GEIOS guidelines in osteoporosis and fragility fracture. An update]. 2015

Etxebarria-Foronda, I / Caeiro-Rey, J R / Larrainzar-Garijo, R / Vaquero-Cervino, E / Roca-Ruiz, L / Mesa-Ramos, M / Merino Pérez, J / Carpintero-Benitez, P / Fernández Cebrián, A / Gil-Garay, E. ·Grupo de Estudio e Investigación de la Osteoporosis y la Fractura Osteoporótica de la Sociedad Española de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología (GEIOS-SECOT), España; Servicio de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología, Hospital Alto Deba, Arrasate-Mondragón, Gipuzkoa, España. Electronic address: ietxe@yahoo.es. · Grupo de Estudio e Investigación de la Osteoporosis y la Fractura Osteoporótica de la Sociedad Española de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología (GEIOS-SECOT), España; Servicio de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología, Complexo Hospitalario Universitario Santiago Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, A Coruña, España. · Grupo de Estudio e Investigación de la Osteoporosis y la Fractura Osteoporótica de la Sociedad Española de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología (GEIOS-SECOT), España; Servicio de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología, Hospital Universitario Infanta Leonor, Madrid, España. · Grupo de Estudio e Investigación de la Osteoporosis y la Fractura Osteoporótica de la Sociedad Española de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología (GEIOS-SECOT), España; Servicio de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología, Complexo Hospitalario Pontevedra, Pontevedra, España. · Grupo de Estudio e Investigación de la Osteoporosis y la Fractura Osteoporótica de la Sociedad Española de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología (GEIOS-SECOT), España; Servicio de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilla, España. · Grupo de Estudio e Investigación de la Osteoporosis y la Fractura Osteoporótica de la Sociedad Española de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología (GEIOS-SECOT), España; Unidad de Gestión Clínica del Aparato Locomotor, Área Sanitaria Norte de Córdoba, Pozoblanco, Córdoba, España. · Grupo de Estudio e Investigación de la Osteoporosis y la Fractura Osteoporótica de la Sociedad Española de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología (GEIOS-SECOT), España; Servicio de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología, Hospital Universitario de Cruces, Barakaldo, Bizkaia, España. · Grupo de Estudio e Investigación de la Osteoporosis y la Fractura Osteoporótica de la Sociedad Española de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología (GEIOS-SECOT), España; Cátedra de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología, Facultad de Medicina, Córdoba, España. · Grupo de Estudio e Investigación de la Osteoporosis y la Fractura Osteoporótica de la Sociedad Española de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología (GEIOS-SECOT), España; Servicio de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología, Complejo Hospitalario de Ourense, Ourense, España. · Grupo de Estudio e Investigación de la Osteoporosis y la Fractura Osteoporótica de la Sociedad Española de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología (GEIOS-SECOT), España; Servicio de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, España. ·Rev Esp Cir Ortop Traumatol · Pubmed #26233814.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Guideline [Update of recommendations for evaluation and treatment of osteoporosis associated to endocrine and nutritional conditions. Working Group on Osteoporosis and Mineral Metabolism of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology]. 2015

Reyes-García, Rebeca / García-Martín, Antonia / Varsavsky, Mariela / Rozas-Moreno, Pedro / Cortés-Berdonces, María / Luque-Fernández, Inés / Gómez Sáez, José Manuel / Vidal Casariego, Alfonso / Romero Muñoz, Manuel / Guadalix Iglesias, Sonsoles / Fernández García, Diego / Jódar Gimeno, Esteban / Muñoz Torres, Manuel / Anonymous3690824. ·Unidad de Endocrinología, Hospital General Universitario Rafael Méndez, Lorca, Murcia, España; Unidad de Metabolismo Óseo, Servicio de Endocrinología, Hospital Universitario San Cecilio, Granada, España. Electronic address: rebecarg@yahoo.com. · Unidad de Metabolismo Óseo, Servicio de Endocrinología, Hospital Universitario San Cecilio, Granada, España; Unidad de Endocrinología, Hospital Comarcal del Noroeste, Caravaca de la Cruz, Murcia, España. · Servicio de Endocrinología, Hospital de Sant Pau i Santa Tecla, Tarragona, España. · Unidad de Metabolismo Óseo, Servicio de Endocrinología, Hospital Universitario San Cecilio, Granada, España; Servicio de Endocrinología, Hospital General de Ciudad Real, Ciudad Real, España. · Unidad de Endocrinología, Centro de Endocrinología, Diabetes y Nutrición, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Endocrinología, Hospital Virgen de la Salud de Toledo, Toledo, España. · Servicio de Endocrinología, Hospital Universitario de Bellvitge, Barcelona, España. · Sección de Endocrinología, Complejo Asistencial Universitario de León, León, España. · Unidad de Endocrinología, Hospital General Universitario Rafael Méndez, Lorca, Murcia, España. · Servicio de Endocrinología, Hospital Doce de Octubre, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Endocrinología, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Victoria, Málaga, España. · Servicio de Endocrinología, Hospital Universitario Quiron, Madrid, España. · Unidad de Metabolismo Óseo, Servicio de Endocrinología, Hospital Universitario San Cecilio, Granada, España. ·Endocrinol Nutr · Pubmed #25797189.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To update previous recommendations developed by the Working Group on Osteoporosis and Mineral Metabolism of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology and Nutrition for the evaluation and treatment of osteoporosis associated to different endocrine and nutritional diseases. PARTICIPANTS: Members of the Working Group on Osteoporosis and Mineral Metabolism of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology and Nutrition. METHODS: Recommendations were formulated according to the GRADE system (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) to describe both the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. A systematic search was made in MEDLINE (Pubmed) using the following terms associated to the name of each condition: AND "osteoporosis", "fractures", "bone mineral density", and "treatment". Papers in English with publication date between 18 October 2011 and 30 October 2014 were included. The recommendations were discussed and approved by all members of the Working Group. CONCLUSIONS: This update summarizes the new data regarding evaluation and treatment of osteoporosis associated to endocrine and nutritional conditions.

6 Guideline EMAS position statement: The ten point guide to the integral management of menopausal health. 2015

Neves-E-Castro, Manuel / Birkhauser, Martin / Samsioe, Goran / Lambrinoudaki, Irene / Palacios, Santiago / Borrego, Rafael Sanchez / Llaneza, Placido / Ceausu, Iuliana / Depypere, Herman / Erel, C Tamer / Pérez-López, Faustino R / Schenck-Gustafsson, Karin / van der Schouw, Yvonne T / Simoncini, Tommaso / Tremollieres, Florence / Rees, Margaret. ·Clinica da Menopausa, Av. Luis Bivar, 93c-1 Dt, Lisboa 1050-143, Portugal. · Gynaecological Endocrinology and Reproductive Medicine, University of Berne, Gartenstrasse 67, CH-4052 Basel, Switzerland. · Department of Clinical Sciences, SUS University Hospital Lund, Lund University, SE-221 85 Lund, Sweden. · Second Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, National and Capodestrian University of Athens, Greece. · Instituto Palacios, Salud y Medicina de la Mujer, C/Antonio Acuña, 9, 28009 Madrid, Spain. · DIATROS, Clínica de Atención a la Mujer, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Central Hospital of Asturias, University of Oviedo, 33011 Oviedo, Spain. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 'Carol Davila' University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 'Dr. I. Cantacuzino' Hospital, Bucharest, Romania. · Breast Clinic and Menopause Clinic, University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 9000 Gent, Belgium. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Istanbul University, Cerrahpasa School of Medicine, Valikonagi Cad. No: 93/4, Nisantasi, 34365 Istanbul, Turkey. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Zaragoza University Facultad de Medicina, Hospital Clínico, Zaragoza 50009, Spain. · Department of Medicine, Cardiology Unit, Centre for Gender Medicine, Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital, Thorax N3:05, SE 17176 Stockholm, Sweden. · Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Via Roma, 67, 56100 Pisa, Italy. · Menopause and Metabolic Bone Disease Unit, Hôpital Paule de Viguier, F-31059 Toulouse cedex 09, France. · Women's Centre, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford OX3 9DU, UK. Electronic address: margaret.rees@st-hildas.ox.ac.uk. ·Maturitas · Pubmed #25757366.

ABSTRACT: With increased longevity and more women becoming centenarians, management of the menopause and postreproductive health is of growing importance as it has the potential to help promote health over several decades. Women have individual needs and the approach needs to be personalised. The position statement provides a short integral guide for all those involved in menopausal health. It covers diagnosis, screening for diseases in later life, treatment and follow-up.

7 Guideline [Consensus statement: recommendations for the management of metabolic bone disease in human immunodeficiency virus patients]. 2014

Martínez, Esteban / Jódar Gimeno, Esteban / Reyes García, Rebeca / Carpintero, Pedro / Casado, José Luis / Del Pino Montes, Javier / Domingo Pedrol, Pere / Estrada, Vicente / Maalouf, Jorge / Negredo, Eugenia / Ocampo, Antonio / Muñoz-Torres, Manuel / Anonymous4920778 / Anonymous4930778 / Anonymous4940778 / Anonymous4950778. ·Unidad de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Hospital Clínic, Barcelona, España. · Servicio de Endocrinología, Hospital Universitario Quirón, Madrid, España. · Unidad de Endocrinología, Hospital General Universitario Rafael Méndez, Lorca, Murcia, España. Electronic address: rebecarg@yahoo.com. · Servicio de Traumatología, Hospital Universitario Reina Sofía, Córdoba, España. · Servicio de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Hospital Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Reumatología, Hospital Universitario de Salamanca, Salamanca, España. · Servicio de Medicina Interna, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, España. · Medicina Interna/Enfermedades Infecciosas, Hospital Clínico San Carlos, Madrid, España. · Unidad de Metabolismo Mineral, Departamento de Medicina Interna, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, España. · Servicio de Medicina Interna, Hospital Universitario Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, Barcelona, España. · Unidad VIH, Hospital Xeral-Cies, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Vigo (CHUVI), Vigo, Pontevedra, España. · Unidad de Metabolismo Óseo, Servicio de Endocrinología, Hospital Universitario San Cecilio, Granada, España. ·Enferm Infecc Microbiol Clin · Pubmed #24332711.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To provide practical recommendations for the evaluation and treatment of metabolic bone disease in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients. PARTICIPANTS: Members of scientific societies related to bone metabolism and HIV: Grupo de Estudio de Sida (GeSIDA), Sociedad Española de Endocrinología y Nutrición (SEEN), Sociedad Española de Investigación Ósea y del Metabolismo Mineral (SEIOMM), and Sociedad Española de Fractura Osteoporótica (SEFRAOS). METHODS: A systematic search was carried out in PubMed, and papers in English and Spanish with a publication date before 28 May 2013 were included. Recommendations were formulated according to GRADE system (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) setting both their strength and the quality of supporting evidence. Working groups were established for each major part, and the final resulting document was later discussed in a face-to-face meeting. All the authors reviewed the final written document and agreed with its content. CONCLUSIONS: The document provides evidence-based practical recommendations on the detection and treatment of bone disease in HIV-infected patients.

8 Guideline [Normocalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism: recommendations for management and follow-up]. 2013

Martínez Díaz-Guerra, Guillermo / Jódar Gimeno, Esteban / Reyes García, Rebeca / Gómez Sáez, José Manuel / Muñoz-Torres, Manuel / Anonymous200758. ·Servicio de Endocrinología, Hospital Doce de Octubre, Madrid, España. ·Endocrinol Nutr · Pubmed #23660008.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To provide practical recommendations for evaluation and follow-up of patients with normocalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism. PARTICIPANTS: Members of the Bone Metabolism Working Group of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology. METHODS: A systematic search was made in MEDLINE (PubMed), using the terms normocalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism and primary hyperparathyroidism, for articles in English published before 22 November 2012. Literature was reviewed by 2 members of the Bone Metabolism Working Group of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology, and after development of recommendations, the manuscript was reviewed by all other members of the Group, and their suggestions were incorporated. CONCLUSIONS: The document provides practical recommendations for evaluation and follow-up of patients with normocalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism. There is however little evidence available about different aspects of this disease, mainly progression rate and clinical impact. More data are therefore needed before definite recommendations may be made.

9 Editorial [Osteoporosis: How, when and how far]. 2016

López García-Franco, Alberto. ·Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria, Centro de Salud Dr. Mendiguchía Carriche, Leganés, Madrid, España; Presidente de la Sociedad Madrileña de Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria (SoMaMFyC), Madrid, España; Coordinador del grupo de la mujer del PAPPS, España. Electronic address: alopezgfp@gmail.com. ·Aten Primaria · Pubmed #27049040.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Association between vitamin D and falls in young postmenopausal women. 2016

Palacios, Santiago. ·Palacios Institute of Women's Health, Madrid, Spain. ·Menopause · Pubmed #26818014.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Antiresorptives and anabolic therapy in sequence or combination for postmenopausal osteoporosis. 2015

Palacios, S / Mejía, A. ·Palacios Institute of Women's Health , Madrid , Spain. ·Climacteric · Pubmed #25740608.

ABSTRACT: Osteoporosis is a chronic disease which may require treatment for many years and requires not only individual management but often sequential or combination treatments. Monotherapy with antiresorptives is usually the first choice. Sometimes, it is necessary to modify this option for therapeutic failure or for the time of use and risk of side-effects. Due to their different mode of action, therapy with anabolic drugs has increased our options in the treatment of osteoporosis. Postmenopausal women and men with severe and progressive osteoporosis despite antiresorptive treatment ('therapeutic failure') should be evaluated for treatment with an anabolic option. Moreover, anabolic agents are indicated for 18-24 months in patients at high risk. Then, sequential antiresorptive therapy is recommended to maintain drug increases in bone mass and support secondary mineralization of the newly formed bone. Combination therapies of antiresorptives and anabolic agents have shown a significant increase in bone mineral density compared to monotherapies. However, none of the combinations have been studied for the prevention of fractures. Combination therapy may not be recommended because of the possible increase in cost.

12 Review Increased bone resorption in hemophilia. 2019

Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos / Valentino, Leonard A. ·Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, La Paz University Hospital, Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: ecrmerchan@hotmail.com. · Rush University, 1653 West Congress Parkway, Chicago, IL 60026, USA. ·Blood Rev · Pubmed #29857920.

ABSTRACT: In patients with hemophilia, osteoporosis is frequently observed for which the etiology remains unclear. The aim of this paper is to review the available experimental evidence indicating the presence of this disorder in patients with hemophilia, explore the potential mechanisms which may lead to reduced bone mineral density (BMD) and speculate on useful interventions to circumvent it. A narrative review of the English literature up to April 2018 was performed. The available evidence demonstrates an increased rate of bone resorption and an excess of osteoporosis among patients with hemophilia. FVIII and FIX may act through at least two pathways: promoting bone formation by a thrombin-mediated mitogenic effect on osteoblasts and by cytokine-mediated osteoclast activity. Another potential indirect mechanism mediated through the RANK-RANKL pathway has been suggested but remains controversial. The role of confounders such as lack of activity and immobility must be considered.

13 Review Is Vibration Training Good for Your Bones? An Overview of Systematic Reviews. 2018

Marin-Puyalto, Jorge / Gomez-Cabello, Alba / Gonzalez-Agüero, Alejandro / Gomez-Bruton, Alejandro / Matute-Llorente, Angel / Casajús, Jose A / Vicente-Rodríguez, German. ·Faculty of Health and Sport Science (FCSD), Department of Physiatry and Nursing. Universidad de Zaragoza, Ronda Misericordia 5, 22001 Huesca, Spain. · GENUD (Growth, Exercise, Nutrition and Development) Research Group, Zaragoza, Spain. · Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), Zaragoza, Spain. · EXERNET Red de Investigación en Ejercicio Físico y Salud para Poblaciones Especiales, Spain. · Centro Universitario de la Defensa, Zaragoza, Spain. · Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBEROBN), Spain. ·Biomed Res Int · Pubmed #30519579.

ABSTRACT: Whole-body vibration (WBV) intervention studies and reviews have been increasing lately. However, the results regarding its effects on bone tissue in different populations are still inconclusive. The goal of this overview was to summarize systematic reviews assessing the effects of WBV training on bone parameters. Three electronic databases were scanned for systematic reviews and meta-analyses evaluating the effects of WBV on bone tissue. The search had no time restrictions and was limited to articles written in English. Vibration protocols and the main bone parameters included in each review were extracted. Methodological quality was assessed and analyses were conducted stratifying by age. 17 reviews and meta-analyses fulfilled the inclusion criteria. No increase or small improvements in bone mineral density (BMD) after WBV interventions were observed in reviews regarding postmenopausal women. One intervention study regarding young adults was included and reported no bone-related benefits from WBV. Most reviews including children and adolescents with compromised bone mass showed an improvement of BMD at lower limbs, lumbar spine, and whole body. In conclusion, WBV interventions seem to help children and adolescents with compromised bone mass to increase their BMD, but these improvements are limited in postmenopausal women and there is insufficient evidence for young adults. Further research is also needed to identify the ideal parameters of WBV training focused on bone health.

14 Review Bone management in hematologic stem cell transplant recipients. 2018

Kendler, D L / Body, J J / Brandi, M L / Broady, R / Cannata-Andia, J / Cannata-Ortiz, M J / El Maghraoui, A / Guglielmi, G / Hadji, P / Pierroz, D D / de Villiers, T J / Rizzoli, R / Ebeling, P R / Anonymous1981118. ·Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, University of British Columbia, 150 - 943 W. Broadway, Vancouver, V5Z 4E1, Canada. davidkendler@gmail.com. · CHU Brugmann, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium. · Mineral and Bone Metabolic Unit, Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy. · Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. · Servicio de Metabolismo Óseo y Mineral, Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias, Universidad de Oviedo, Oviedo, Spain. · Haematology Department, IIS Princesa, Hospital de la Princesa, Madrid, Spain. · Rheumatology Department, Military Hospital Mohammed V, Mohammed V-Souissi University, Rabat, Morocco. · Department of Radiology, University of Foggia, Foggia, Italy. · Department of Bone Oncology, Endocrinology and Reproductive Medicine, Nord West Hospital, Frankfurt, Germany. · International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF), Nyon, Switzerland. · Department of Gynaecology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, South Africa. · Mediclinic Panorama, Cape Town, South Africa. · Division of Bone Diseases, Faculty of Medicine, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland. · Department of Medicine, School of Clinical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Australia. ·Osteoporos Int · Pubmed #30178158.

ABSTRACT: Autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the treatment of choice for patients with some malignant and non-malignant hematological diseases. Advances in transplantation techniques and supportive care measures have substantially increased the number of long-term HSCT survivors. This has led to an increasing patient population suffering from the late effects of HSCT, of which, bone loss and its consequent fragility fractures lead to substantial morbidity. Altered bone health, with consequent fragility fractures, and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) are factors affecting long-term quality of life after HSCT. Hypogonadism, HSCT preparative regimens, nutritional factors, and glucocorticoids all contribute to accelerated bone loss and increased fracture risk. Management strategies should include bone mineral density examination, evaluation of clinical risk factors, and general dietary and physical activity measures. Evidence has accumulated permitting recommendations for more attentiveness to evaluation and monitoring of bone health, with appropriate application of osteoporosis pharmacotherapies to patients at increased risk of bone loss and fracture.

15 Review Unhealthy Stem Cells: When Health Conditions Upset Stem Cell Properties. 2018

Pérez, Laura M / de Lucas, Beatriz / Gálvez, Beatriz G. ·Universidad Europea de Madrid, Madrid, Spain. · Instituto de Investigación Hospital 12 de Octubre (i + 12), Madrid, Spain. ·Cell Physiol Biochem · Pubmed #29723858.

ABSTRACT: The stem cell field has grown very rapidly during the last decade, offering the promise of innovative therapies to treat disease. Different stem cell populations have been isolated from various human adult tissues, mainly from bone marrow and adipose tissue, but many other body tissues harbor a stem cell population. Adult tissue stem cells are invariably found in discrete microenvironments termed niches, where they play key roles in tissue homeostasis by enabling lifelong optimization of organ form and function. Some diseases are known to strike at the stem cell population, through alterations in their specific microenvironments, making them non-viable. Furthermore, it has been shown that a transformed stem cell population could prompt the development of certain cancers. This review focuses on the potential negative aspects of a range of diseases on the activity of stem cells and how their potential use in cell therapies may be affected.

16 Review Prevalence and risk factors for osteoporosis and fractures in axial spondyloarthritis: A systematic review and meta-analysis. 2018

Ramírez, Julio / Nieto-González, Juan Carlos / Curbelo Rodríguez, Rafael / Castañeda, Santos / Carmona, Loreto. ·Rheumatology Department, Arthritis Unit, Hospital Clinic and IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: julramga@gmail.com. · Rheumatology Department, Hospital Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, Spain. · Instituto de Salud Musculoesquelética, Madrid, Spain. · Rheumatology Department, Hospital Universitario La Princesa, IIS-Princesa, Madrid, Spain. ·Semin Arthritis Rheum · Pubmed #29290311.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To describe the prevalence of osteoporosis, the prevalence and incidence of fractures, and the frequency of risk factors for low bone mineral density (BMD) in axial spondyloarthritis (Ax-SpA). METHODS: A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies was conducted. Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases were searched with a sensitive strategy. Large cross-sectional and longitudinal studies published in the last 10 years (January 2006-2016) with representative samples of patients with Ax-SpA estimating the frequency of osteoporosis, risk factors or fractures were selected. RESULTS: After screening 3597 titles and abstracts, 46 studies were reviewed in detail, of which 35 studies had a cross-sectional design, 5 were prospective and 6 retrospective; 21 studies compared Ax-SpA patients with a control group-either healthy individuals (18 studies) or subjects with other diseases (6 studies). The prevalence of osteoporosis varied from 11.7% to 34.4% and that of fractures from 11% to 24.6%. Alcohol intake (58-61%), use of corticosteroids (11.7-66.9%), and 25-OH vitamin D deficiency (26-76%) were unexpectedly high in Ax-SpA patients. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of osteoporosis and fractures in Ax-SpA varies between 11.7% and 34.4% and 11-24.6%, respectively. Alcohol intake, steroid use, and low levels of 25-OH-vitamin D should be taken into account in osteoporosis assessment in patients with Ax-SpA. Inconsistent results, lack of bone quality assessment, and high likelihood of bias of the published studies confirm the need for performing well-designed studies.

17 Review Autophagy as a Molecular Target of Flavonoids Underlying their Protective Effects in Human Disease. 2018

Prieto-Domínguez, Nestor / Garcia-Mediavilla, Maria V / Sanchez-Campos, Sonia / Mauriz, Jose L / Gonzalez-Gallego, Javier. ·Institute of Biomedicine (IBIOMED), University of Leon, Leon, Spain. · Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red de Enfermedades Hepaticas y Digestivas (CIBERehd), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain. ·Curr Med Chem · Pubmed #28925866.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Autophagy is a cellular pathway with the ability to maintain cell homeostasis through the elimination of damaged or useless cellular components, and its deregulation may initiate or aggravate different human diseases. Flavonoids, a group of plant metabolites, are able to modulate different molecular and cellular processes including autophagy. OBJECTIVE: To review the effects of flavonoids on autophagy pathway in both invasive and noninvasive human diseases, focusing on the global outcomes in their progression. Moreover, the efficacy of the combination of flavonoids with drugs or other natural nontoxic compounds was also reviewed. METHODS: A literature search was performed to identify and analyze peer-reviewed publications containing RESULTS: Analyzed publications indicated that imbalance between cell death and survival induced by changes in autophagy play an important role in the pathophysiology of a number of human diseases. The use of different flavonoids as autophagy modulators, alone or in combination with other molecules, might be a worthy strategy in the treatment of cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, cardiovascular diseases, hepatic diseases, leishmaniasis, influenza, gastric ulcers produced by CONCLUSION: Flavonoids could potentially constitute important adjuvant agents of conventional therapies in the treatment of autophagy deregulation-related diseases. Moreover, combined therapy may help to diminish the doses of those conventional treatments, leading to reduced drug-derivative side effects and to improved patients' survival.

18 Review Clinical settings in knee osteoarthritis: Pathophysiology guides treatment. 2017

Herrero-Beaumont, Gabriel / Roman-Blas, Jorge A / Bruyère, Olivier / Cooper, Cyrus / Kanis, John / Maggi, Stefania / Rizzoli, René / Reginster, Jean-Yves. ·Joint and Bone Research Unit, Rheumatology Department, Fundación Jiménez Díaz, Autonomous University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: gherrero@fjd.es. · Joint and Bone Research Unit, Rheumatology Department, Fundación Jiménez Díaz, Autonomous University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain. · Support Unit in Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Department of Public Health, Epidemiology and Health Economics, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium. · MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK; NHIR Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · WHO Collaborating Centre for Metabolic Bone Diseases, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK. · Aging Program, National Research Council, Padova, Italy. · Service of Bone Diseases, Geneva University Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland. · Department of Public Health, Epidemiology and Health Economics, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium. ·Maturitas · Pubmed #28041596.

ABSTRACT: Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common chronic joint disorder and its prevalence increases rapidly during midlife. Complex interactions of genetic alterations, sex hormone deficit, and aging with mechanical factors and systemic inflammation-associated metabolic syndrome lead to joint damage. Thus, the expression of a clinical phenotype in the early stages of OA relies on the main underlying pathway and predominant joint tissue involved at a given time. Moreover, OA often coexists with other morbidities in the same patient, which in turn condition the OA process. In this scenario, an appropriate identification of clinical phenotypes, especially in the early stages of the disease, may optimize the design of individualized treatments in OA. An ESCEO-EUGMS (European Union Geriatric Medicine Society) working group has recently suggested possible patient profiles in OA. Hereby, we propose the existence of 4 clinical phenotypes - biomechanical, osteoporotic, metabolic and inflammatory - whose characterization would help to properly stratify patients with OA in clinical trials or studies. Further research in this field is warranted.

19 Review New options for menopausal symptoms after 15 years of WHI Study. 2017

Palacios, Santiago / Coronado, Pluvio J. ·Director of Instituto Palacios, Madrid, Spain - ipalacios@institutopalacios.com. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, San Carlos Clinic Hospital, Madrid, Spain. ·Minerva Ginecol · Pubmed #27973466.

ABSTRACT: Menopausal symptoms include vasomotor symptoms (VMS), vulvar-vaginal atrophy, and loss of bone mass associated with an increased risk of fracture. Treatment of VMS consists of lifestyle changes, hormone treatment (estrogens with and without progestogens, tissue selective estrogens complex or conjugated estrogens and bazedoxifene [CE/BZA], progestogens, and tibolone), and nonhormonal treatments. Genitourinary symptoms due to vulvar-vaginal atrophy are treated with systemic and local hormones, moisturizer creams and gels, CE/BZA, and a selective estrogen receptor modulator (ospemifene). In addition to lifestyle changes, treatments for the risk of fragility fracture include calcium and vitamin D, hormone treatment, selective estrogen receptor modulators (raloxifene, BZA), bisphosphonates, strontium ranelate, denosumab, and teriparatide. This article reviews treatment options and provides treatment algorithms for women with menopausal symptoms.

20 Review The role of calcium supplementation in healthy musculoskeletal ageing : An expert consensus meeting of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases (ESCEO) and the International Foundation for Osteoporosis (IOF). 2017

Harvey, N C / Biver, E / Kaufman, J-M / Bauer, J / Branco, J / Brandi, M L / Bruyère, O / Coxam, V / Cruz-Jentoft, A / Czerwinski, E / Dimai, H / Fardellone, P / Landi, F / Reginster, J-Y / Dawson-Hughes, B / Kanis, J A / Rizzoli, R / Cooper, C. ·MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK. · NIHR Southampton Biomedical Research Centre, University of Southampton and University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, UK. · Service of Bone Diseases, University Hospitals Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. · Department of Internal Medicine, section Endocrinology, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium. · Department of Geriatric Medicine, Klinikum, Carl von Ossietzky University, Ammerländer Heerstrasse 114-118, 26129, Oldenburg, Germany. · CEDOC - NOVA Medical School, UNL and Rheumatology Department, CHLO/Hospital Egas Moniz, Lisbon, Portugal. · Head, Bone and Mineral Metabolic Unit, Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy. · Department of Public Health, Epidemiology and Health Economics, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium. · INRA, UMR 1019, UNH, CRNH Auvergne, F-63000, Clermont-Ferrand, France. · Clermont Université, Université d'Auvergne, Unité de Nutrition Humaine, BP 10448, F-63000, Clermont-Ferrand, France. · Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, Instituto Ramón y Cajal de Investigación Sanitaria (Irycis), Madrid, Spain. · Department of Bone and Joint Diseases, Faculty of Health Sciences, Krakow Medical Centre, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland. · Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria. · CHU Amiens, Université Picardie - Jules Verne, INSERM U 1088, Amiens, France. · Geriatric Department, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Milan, Italy. · Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, MA, USA. · Centre for Metabolic Bone Diseases, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK. · Institute for Health and Ageing, Catholic University of Australia, Melbourne, Australia. · MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK. cc@mrc.soton.ac.uk. · NIHR Southampton Biomedical Research Centre, University of Southampton and University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, UK. cc@mrc.soton.ac.uk. · Oxford NIHR Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, The Botnar Research Centre, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. cc@mrc.soton.ac.uk. ·Osteoporos Int · Pubmed #27761590.

ABSTRACT: The place of calcium supplementation, with or without concomitant vitamin D supplementation, has been much debated in terms of both efficacy and safety. There have been numerous trials and meta-analyses of supplementation for fracture reduction, and associations with risk of myocardial infarction have been suggested in recent years. In this report, the product of an expert consensus meeting of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases (ESCEO) and the International Foundation for Osteoporosis (IOF), we review the evidence for the value of calcium supplementation, with or without vitamin D supplementation, for healthy musculoskeletal ageing. We conclude that (1) calcium and vitamin D supplementation leads to a modest reduction in fracture risk, although population-level intervention has not been shown to be an effective public health strategy; (2) supplementation with calcium alone for fracture reduction is not supported by the literature; (3) side effects of calcium supplementation include renal stones and gastrointestinal symptoms; (4) vitamin D supplementation, rather than calcium supplementation, may reduce falls risk; and (5) assertions of increased cardiovascular risk consequent to calcium supplementation are not convincingly supported by current evidence. In conclusion, we recommend, on the basis of the current evidence, that calcium supplementation, with concomitant vitamin D supplementation, is supported for patients at high risk of calcium and vitamin D insufficiency, and in those who are receiving treatment for osteoporosis.

21 Review Management of atypical femoral fracture: a scoping review and comprehensive algorithm. 2016

Toro, Giuseppe / Ojeda-Thies, Cristina / Calabrò, Giampiero / Toro, Gabriella / Moretti, Antimo / Guerra, Guillermo Martínez-Díaz / Caba-Doussoux, Pedro / Iolascon, Giovanni. ·Department of Medical and Surgical Specialties and Dentistry, Second University of Naples, Via De Crecchio, 4, 80138, Naples, Italy. · Trauma Unit, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology, Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Spain. · Unit of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Villa Malta Hospital, Sarno, Italy. · Unit of Radiology, Santa Maria della Speranza Hospital, Battipaglia, Italy. · Metabolic Bone Disease Unit, Department of Endocrinology, Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Spain. ·BMC Musculoskelet Disord · Pubmed #27215972.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Atypical femoral fractures (AFF) are a rare type of femoral stress fracture recently described, potentially associated with prolonged bisphosphonate therapy. Evidence-based recommendations regarding diagnosis and management of these fractures are scarce. The purpose of this study is to propose an algorithm for the diagnosis and management of AFF. METHODS: We performed a PubMed search of the last ten years using the keywords "atypical femoral fractures" and identified further articles through an evaluation of the publications cited in these articles. Relevant studies were included by agreement between researchers, depending on their specialization. Pertinent points of debate were discussed based on the available literature, allowing for consensus regarding the proposed management algorithm. RESULTS: Using a systematic approach we performed a scoping review that included a total of 137 articles. CONCLUSIONS: A practical guide for diagnosis and management of AFF based on the current concepts is proposed. In spite of the impressive large volume of published literature available since AFF were initially identified, the level of evidence is mostly poor, in particular regarding treatment choice. Therefore, further studies are required.

22 Review Points to consider for reporting, screening for and preventing selected comorbidities in chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases in daily practice: a EULAR initiative. 2016

Baillet, Athan / Gossec, Laure / Carmona, Loreto / Wit, Maarten de / van Eijk-Hustings, Yvonne / Bertheussen, Heidi / Alison, Kent / Toft, Mette / Kouloumas, Marios / Ferreira, Ricardo J O / Oliver, Susan / Rubbert-Roth, Andrea / van Assen, Sander / Dixon, William G / Finckh, Axel / Zink, Angela / Kremer, Joel / Kvien, Tore K / Nurmohamed, Michael / van der Heijde, Desirée / Dougados, Maxime. ·Department of Rheumatology, Université Joseph Fourier, GREPI-CNRS, Grenoble Hospital, France. · Department of Rheumatology, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Institut Pierre Louis d'Epidémiologie et de Santé Publique, GRC-UPMC 08 (EEMOIS); AP-HP, Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, France. · Instituto de Salud Musculoesquelética, Madrid, Spain. · EULAR Standing Committee of People with Arthritis/Rheumatism in Europe (PARE), Zurich, Switzerland. · Integrated Care, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, The Netherlands. · Salisbury NHS Foundation Trust Hospital, Salisbury, UK. · Cyprus League Against Rheumatism, Cyprus, Nikosia, Cyprus. · Department of Rheumatology, Centro Hospitalar e Universitário de Coimbra; Health Sciences Research Unit: Nursing (UICiSA:E), Coimbra, Portugal. · Independent Nurse Consultant, North Devon, UK. · Department of Internal Medicine, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany. · Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. · Arthritis Research UK Centre for Epidemiology, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. · Division of Rheumatology, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland. · Epidemiology Unit, German Rheumatism Research Centre, and Rheumatology, Charité, University Medicine, Berlin, Germany. · Albany Medical College and The Center for Rheumatology, Albany, USA. · Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Amsterdam Rheumatology immunology Center | VUmc and Reade, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Paris Descartes University-Hôpital Cochin. Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris. INSERM (U1153): Clinical epidemiology and biostatistics, PRES Sorbonne Paris-Cité, Paris, France. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #26984008.

ABSTRACT: In chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases, comorbidities such as cardiovascular diseases and infections are suboptimally prevented, screened for and managed. The objective of this European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) initiative was to propose points to consider to collect comorbidities in patients with chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases. We also aimed to develop a pragmatic reporting form to foster the implementation of the points to consider. In accordance with the EULAR Standardised Operating Procedures, the process comprised (1) a systematic literature review of existing recommendations on reporting, screening for or preventing six selected comorbidities: ischaemic cardiovascular diseases, malignancies, infections, gastrointestinal diseases, osteoporosis and depression and (2) a consensus process involving 21 experts (ie, rheumatologists, patients, health professionals). Recommendations on how to treat the comorbidities were not included in the document as they vary across countries. The literature review retrieved 42 articles, most of which were recommendations for reporting or screening for comorbidities in the general population. The consensus process led to three overarching principles and 15 points to consider, related to the six comorbidities, with three sections: (1) reporting (ie, occurrence of the comorbidity and current treatments); (2) screening for disease (eg, mammography) or for risk factors (eg, smoking) and (3) prevention (eg, vaccination). A reporting form (93 questions) corresponding to a practical application of the points to consider was developed. Using an evidence-based approach followed by expert consensus, this EULAR initiative aims to improve the reporting and prevention of comorbidities in chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Next steps include dissemination and implementation.

23 Review Exercise: the lifelong supplement for healthy ageing and slowing down the onset of frailty. 2016

Viña, Jose / Rodriguez-Mañas, Leocadio / Salvador-Pascual, Andrea / Tarazona-Santabalbina, Francisco José / Gomez-Cabrera, Mari Carmen. ·Department of Physiology, University of Valencia, Fundacion Investigacion Hospital Clinico Universitario/INCLIVA, Spain. · Red Temática de Investigación Cooperativa en Envejecimiento y Fragilidad (RETICEF), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Servicio de Geriatría, Hospital Universitario de Getafe, Ministerio de Sanidad y Consumo, Madrid, España. · Hospital Universitario de la Ribera, Catholic University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain. ·J Physiol · Pubmed #26872560.

ABSTRACT: The beneficial effects of exercise have been well recognized for over half a century. Dr Jeremy Morris's pioneering studies in the fifties showed a striking difference in cardiovascular disease between the drivers and conductors on the double-decker buses in London. These studies sparked off a vast amount of research on the effects of exercise in health, and the general consensus is that exercise contributes to improved outcomes and treatment for several diseases including osteoporosis, diabetes, depression and atherosclerosis. Evidence of the beneficial effects of exercise is reviewed here. One way of highlighting the impact of exercise on disease is to consider it from the perspective of good practice. However, the intensity, duration, frequency (dosage) and counter indications of the exercise should be taken into consideration to individually tailor the exercise programme. An important case of the beneficial effect of exercise is that of ageing. Ageing is characterized by a loss of homeostatic mechanisms, on many occasions leading to the development of frailty, and hence frailty is one of the major geriatric syndromes and exercise is very useful to mitigate, or at least delay, it. Since exercise is so effective in reducing frailty, we would like to propose that exercise be considered as a supplement to other treatments. People all over the world have been taking nutritional supplements in the hopes of improving their health. We would like to think of exercise as a physiological supplement not only for treating diseases, but also for improving healthy ageing.

24 Review Adjuvant bisphosphonates in early breast cancer: consensus guidance for clinical practice from a European Panel. 2016

Hadji, P / Coleman, R E / Wilson, C / Powles, T J / Clézardin, P / Aapro, M / Costa, L / Body, J-J / Markopoulos, C / Santini, D / Diel, I / Di Leo, A / Cameron, D / Dodwell, D / Smith, I / Gnant, M / Gray, R / Harbeck, N / Thurlimann, B / Untch, M / Cortes, J / Martin, M / Albert, U-S / Conte, P-F / Ejlertsen, B / Bergh, J / Kaufmann, M / Holen, I. ·Department of Bone Oncology, Endocrinology and Reproductive Medicine, Philipps-University of Marburg, Frankfurt, Germany. · Academic Unit of Clinical Oncology, Weston Park Hospital, University of Sheffield, Sheffield r.e.coleman@sheffield.ac.uk. · Academic Unit of Clinical Oncology, Weston Park Hospital, University of Sheffield, Sheffield. · Cancer Centre London, Wimbledon, UK. · INSERM, Research Unit UMR403, University of Lyon, School of Medicine Lyon-Est, Lyon, France. · Breast Center of the Multidisciplinary Oncology Institute, Genolier, Switzerland. · Hospital de Santa Maria & Lisbon School of Medicine, Institute of Molecular Biology, Lisbon, Potugal. · CHU Brugmann, Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Brussels, Belgium. · Medical School, National University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Medical Oncology, University Campus Bio-medico, Rome, Italy. · Institute for Gynaecological Oncology, Centre for Comprehensive Gynecology, Mannheim, Germany. · Sandro Pitigliani Medical Oncology Unit, Department of Oncology, Hospital of Prato, Prato, Italy. · University of Edinburgh Cancer Research Centre, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh. · Institute of Oncology, Bexley Wing, St James Hospital Leeds, Leeds. · The Royal Marsden Hospital and Institute of Cancer Research, London, UK. · Department of Surgery and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Clinical Trials and Epidemiological Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Breast Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Munich, Munich, Germany. · Kantonsspital St Gallen, Breast Center, St Gallen, Switzerland. · Interdisciplinary Breast Cancer Center HELIOS Klinikum Berlin-Buch Germany, Gynecologic Oncology and Obstetrics, Berlin, Germany. · Department of Oncology, Vall d'Hebron Institute of Oncology (VHIO), Barcelona. · Department of Medical Oncology, Institute of Investigation Sanitaria Gregorio Marañón, University Complutense, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group Statistical Center Department of Oncology Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Karolinska Institute and University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Institute for Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #26681681.

ABSTRACT: Bisphosphonates have been studied in randomised trials in early breast cancer to investigate their ability to prevent cancer treatment-induced bone loss (CTIBL) and reduce the risk of disease recurrence and metastasis. Treatment benefits have been reported but bisphosphonates do not currently have regulatory approval for either of these potential indications. This consensus paper provides a review of the evidence and offers guidance to breast cancer clinicians on the use of bisphosphonates in early breast cancer. Using the nominal group methodology for consensus, a systematic review of the literature was augmented by a workshop held in October 2014 for breast cancer and bone specialists to present and debate the available pre-clinical and clinical evidence for the use of adjuvant bisphosphonates. This was followed by a questionnaire to all members of the writing committee to identify areas of consensus. The panel recommended that bisphosphonates should be considered as part of routine clinical practice for the prevention of CTIBL in all patients with a T score of <-2.0 or ≥2 clinical risk factors for fracture. Compelling evidence from a meta-analysis of trial data of >18,000 patients supports clinically significant benefits of bisphosphonates on the development of bone metastases and breast cancer mortality in post-menopausal women or those receiving ovarian suppression therapy. Therefore, the panel recommends that bisphosphonates (either intravenous zoledronic acid or oral clodronate) are considered as part of the adjuvant breast cancer treatment in this population and the potential benefits and risks discussed with relevant patients.

25 Review Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein Analogs as Osteoporosis Therapies. 2016

Esbrit, Pedro / Herrera, Sabina / Portal-Núñez, Sergio / Nogués, Xavier / Díez-Pérez, Adolfo. ·Laboratorio de Metabolismo Mineral y Óseo, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria (IIS)-Fundación Jiménez Díaz, Avda. Reyes Católicos, 2, 28040, Madrid, Spain. pesbrit@fjd.es. · Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain. pesbrit@fjd.es. · Red Temática de Investigación Cooperativa en Envejecimiento y Fragilidad (RETICEF), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain. pesbrit@fjd.es. · Hospital del Mar-IMIM, Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Red Temática de Investigación Cooperativa en Envejecimiento y Fragilidad (RETICEF), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain. · Laboratorio de Metabolismo Mineral y Óseo, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria (IIS)-Fundación Jiménez Díaz, Avda. Reyes Católicos, 2, 28040, Madrid, Spain. · Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain. ·Calcif Tissue Int · Pubmed #26259869.

ABSTRACT: The only bone anabolic agent currently available for osteoporosis treatment is parathyroid hormone (PTH)-either its N-terminal 1-34 fragment or the whole molecule of 1-84 aminoacids-whose intermittent administration stimulates new bone formation by targeting osteoblastogenesis and osteoblast survival. PTH-related protein (PTHrP) is an abundant factor in bone which shows N-terminal homology with PTH and thus exhibits high affinity for the same PTH type 1 receptor in osteoblasts. Therefore, it is not surprising that intermittently administered N-terminal PTHrP peptides induce bone anabolism in animals and humans. Furthermore, the C-terminal region of PTHrP also elicits osteogenic features in vitro in osteoblastic cells and in various animal models of osteoporosis. In this review, we discuss the current concepts about the cellular and molecular mechanisms whereby PTHrP may induce anabolic actions in bone. Pre-clinical studies and clinical data using N-terminal PTHrP analogs are also summarized, pointing to PTHrP as a promising alternative to current bone anabolic therapies.

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