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Osteoporosis: HELP
Articles from Seoul area
Based on 1,329 articles published since 2009
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These are the 1329 published articles about Osteoporosis that originated from Seoul area during 2009-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Editorial A coordination project for improvement of osteoporosis medication use among patients who sustained osteoporotic fracture(s). 2019

Kim, Kwang Joon. ·Division of Geriatrics, Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50-1 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul, Korea. ·Osteoporos Sarcopenia · Pubmed #31008370.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Editorial Is Trabecular Bone Score a More Sensitive Marker for Osteoporosis in Asthmatics? 2019

Kim, Cheol Woo. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon, Korea. cwkim1805@inha.ac.kr. ·Allergy Asthma Immunol Res · Pubmed #30912320.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Editorial Overcoming osteoporosis and beyond: Locomotive syndrome or dysmobility syndrome. 2018

Yi, Hyon-Seung / Lee, Sihoon. ·Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon, Korea. · Department of Internal Medicine, Gachon University School of Medicine, Incheon, Korea. ·Osteoporos Sarcopenia · Pubmed #30775547.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial The importance of updating osteoporotic femur fracture data: Asian Federation of Osteoporosis Societies study. 2018

Kim, Kwang Joon. ·Division of Geriatrics, Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50-1 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 03722, Korea. ·Osteoporos Sarcopenia · Pubmed #30775540.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial Factors associated with osteoporosis medication initiation and adherence. 2018

Rhee, Yumie. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Severance Hospital, Endocrine Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 03722, South Korea. ·Osteoporos Sarcopenia · Pubmed #30775533.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Is Osteoporosis a Common Comorbidity in Different Chronic Airway Diseases? 2018

Lee, Seung Hyeun. ·Division of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. humanmd04@hanmail.net. ·Tuberc Respir Dis (Seoul) · Pubmed #29256217.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial The Asian Federation of Osteoporosis Societies' call to action to improve the undertreatment of osteoporosis in Asia. 2017

Yeap, Swan Sim / Jaisamrarn, Unnop / Park, Ye-Soo / Takeuchi, Yasuhiro / Xia, Weibo / Anonymous11161064. ·Department of Medicine, Subang Jaya Medical Centre, Subang Jaya, Selangor, Malaysia. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand. · Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Guri Hospital, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Guri, Korea. · Toranomon Hospital Endocrine Center, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Endocrinology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing, China. ·Osteoporos Sarcopenia · Pubmed #30775524.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial New Biological Markers of Bone Metabolism in Osteoporosis Treatment. 2016

Cho, Sun Wook. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. swchomd@snu.ac.kr. ·Endocrinol Metab (Seoul) · Pubmed #27704739.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Proper time to initiate antiosteoporotic treatment in rheumatoid arthritis with or without glucocorticoid use. 2014

Lee, Sang-Won. ·Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. ·Korean J Intern Med · Pubmed #25045290.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Review Bone Diseases in Patients with Chronic Liver Disease. 2019

Jeong, Hae Min / Kim, Dong Joon. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Hallym University Chuncheon Sacred Heart Hospital, Chuncheon, Gangwon-do 24253, Korea. · Institute for Liver and Digestive Diseases, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Gangwon-do 24253, Korea. · Institute for Liver and Digestive Diseases, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Gangwon-do 24253, Korea. djkim@hallym.ac.kr. · Department of Internal Medicine, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul 05355, Korea. djkim@hallym.ac.kr. ·Int J Mol Sci · Pubmed #31480433.

ABSTRACT: Osteoporosis is a frequently observed complication in patients with chronic liver disease, particularly liver cirrhosis and cholestatic liver diseases. In addition, osteoporosis is critical in patients receiving a liver transplant. Nevertheless, few studies have evaluated bone diseases in patients with more frequently observed chronic liver disease, such as chronic viral hepatitis, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and alcoholic liver disease. Osteoporosis is a disease caused by an imbalance in the activities of osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Over the last few decades, many advances have improved our knowledge of the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. Importantly, activated immune cells affect the progression of osteoporosis, and chronic inflammation may exert an additional effect on the existing pathophysiology of osteoporosis. The microbiota of the intestinal tract may also affect the progression of bone loss in patients with chronic liver disease. Recently, studies regarding the effects of chronic inflammation on dysbiosis in bone diseases have been conducted. However, mechanisms underlying osteoporosis in patients with chronic liver disease are complex and precise mechanisms remain unknown. The following special considerations in patients with chronic liver disease are reviewed: bone diseases in patients who underwent a liver transplant, the association between chronic hepatitis B virus infection treatment and bone diseases, the association between sarcopenia and bone diseases in patients with chronic liver disease, and the association between chronic liver disease and avascular necrosis of the hip. Few guidelines are currently available for the management of low bone mineral density or bone diseases in patients with chronic liver disease. Due to increased life expectancy and therapeutic advances in chronic liver disease, the importance of managing osteoporosis and other bone diseases in patients with chronic liver disease is expected to increase. Consequently, specific guidelines need to be established in the near future.

11 Review Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry Monitoring with Trabecular Bone Score: 2019 ISCD Official Position. 2019

Krohn, Kelly / Schwartz, Elliott N / Chung, Yoon-Sok / Lewiecki, E Michael. ·Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Arizona College of Medicine Phoenix, AZ, USA. · Northern California Institute For Bone Health, Orinda, CA, USA. · Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, South Korea. · New Mexico Clinical Research & Osteoporosis Center, Albuquerque, NM, USA. Electronic address: mlewiecki@gmail.com. ·J Clin Densitom · Pubmed #31383412.

ABSTRACT: Trabecular bone score (TBS) is a textural index that evaluates pixel gray-level variations in the lumbar spine image by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. It provides an indirect assessment of trabecular microarchitecture that is an independent predictor of fracture risk. TBS does not appear to be clinically useful to monitor the skeletal effects of bisphosphonates and denosumab, but is potentially useful as a component of monitoring the skeletal effects of teriparatide and abaloparatide. The least significant change (LSC) for TBS can be conservatively estimated to be about 5.8% (the largest LSC in published data) or calculated by a dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry facility using the same methodology that is used for bone mineral density (BMD) precision assessment to calculate BMD LSC. A review of the best available evidence at the 2019 ISCD Position Development Conference concluded that the role of TBS in monitoring antiresorptive therapy is unclear and that TBS is potentially useful for monitoring anabolic therapy. For patients treated with teriparatide or abaloparatide, a statistically significant increase in TBS may represent a clinically meaningful improvement in trabecular structure. A significant decrease of TBS may represent a worsening of trabecular structure, suggesting the need for further clinical assessment and possible change in treatment strategies. Since BMD measures bone quantity and TBS measures bone quality, these tests can be considered complementary in assessing fracture risk and response to therapy in appropriate patients.

12 Review Reactive Oxygen Species in Osteoclast Differentiation and Possible Pharmaceutical Targets of ROS-Mediated Osteoclast Diseases. 2019

Agidigbi, Taiwo Samuel / Kim, Chaekyun. ·Laboratory of Leukocyte Signaling Research, Department of Pharmacology, Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon 22212, Korea. · Laboratory of Leukocyte Signaling Research, Department of Pharmacology, Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon 22212, Korea. chaekyun@inha.ac.kr. ·Int J Mol Sci · Pubmed #31336616.

ABSTRACT: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and free radicals are essential for transmission of cell signals and other physiological functions. However, excessive amounts of ROS can cause cellular imbalance in reduction-oxidation reactions and disrupt normal biological functions, leading to oxidative stress, a condition known to be responsible for the development of several diseases. The biphasic role of ROS in cellular functions has been a target of pharmacological research. Osteoclasts are derived from hematopoietic progenitors in the bone and are essential for skeletal growth and remodeling, for the maintenance of bone architecture throughout lifespan, and for calcium metabolism during bone homeostasis. ROS, including superoxide ion (O

13 Review Assessment of finite element models for prediction of osteoporotic fracture. 2019

Lee, Yeokyeong / Ogihara, Naomichi / Lee, Taeyong. ·Department of Architectural Engineering, Ewha Womans University, Republic of Korea. · Department of Mechanical Engineering, Keio University, Japan. · Division of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, Ewha Womans University, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: tlee@ewha.ac.kr. ·J Mech Behav Biomed Mater · Pubmed #31151004.

ABSTRACT: With increasing life expectancy and mortality rates, the burden of osteoporotic hip fractures is continually on an upward trend. In terms of prevention, there are several osteoporosis treatment strategies such as anti-resorptive drug treatments, which attempt to retard the rate of bone resorption, while promoting the rate of formation. With respect to prediction, several studies have provided insights into obtaining bone strength by non-invasive means through the application of FE analysis. However, what valuable information can we obtain from FE studies that have focused on osteoporosis research, with respect to the prediction of osteoporotic fractures? This paper aims to fine studies that have used FE analysis to predict fractures in the proximal femur through a systematic search of literature using PUBMED, with the main objective of supporting the diagnosis of osteoporosis. The focus of these FE studies is first discussed, and the methodological aspects are summarized, by mainly comparing and contrasting their meshing properties, material properties, and boundary conditions. The implications of these methodological differences in FE modelling processes and propositions with the aim of consolidating or minimalizing these differences are further discussed. We proved that studies need to start converging in terms of their input parameters to make the FE method applicable to clinical settings. This, in turn, will decrease the time needed for in vitro tests. Current advancements in FE analysis need to be consolidated before any further steps can be taken to implement engineering analysis into the clinical scenario.

14 Review Direct conversion of fibroblasts to osteoblasts as a novel strategy for bone regeneration in elderly individuals. 2019

Chang, Yujung / Cho, Byounggook / Kim, Siyoung / Kim, Jongpil. ·Department of Biomedical Engineering, Dongguk University, Pildong-ro 1-gil 30, Jung-gu, Seoul, 04620, Republic of Korea. · Department of Biomedical Engineering, Dongguk University, Pildong-ro 1-gil 30, Jung-gu, Seoul, 04620, Republic of Korea. jk2316@gmail.com. · Department of Chemistry, Dongguk University, 30, Pildong-ro 1-gil 30, Jung-gu, Seoul, 04620, Republic of Korea. jk2316@gmail.com. ·Exp Mol Med · Pubmed #31073120.

ABSTRACT: Mortality caused by age-related bone fractures or osteoporosis is steadily increasing worldwide as the population ages. The pace of the development of bone regeneration engineering to treat bone fractures has consequently increased in recent years. A range of techniques for bone regeneration, such as immunotherapy, allografts, and hydrogel therapy, have been devised. Cell-based therapies using bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells derived from somatic cells are considered to be suitable approaches for bone repair. However, these cell-based therapies suffer from a number of limitations in terms of efficiency and safety. Somatic cells can also be directly differentiated into osteoblasts by several transcription factors. As osteoblasts play a central role in the process of bone formation, the direct reprogramming of fibroblasts into osteoblasts may hence be a new way to treat bone fractures in elderly individuals. Here, we review recent developments regarding the therapeutic potential of the direct reprogramming of cells for bone regeneration.

15 Review Clinical Application of Bone Turnover Markers in Osteoporosis in Korea. 2019

Park, So Young / Ahn, Seong Hee / Yoo, Jun-Il / Chung, Youn-Jee / Jeon, Yun Kyung / Yoon, Byung-Ho / Kim, Ha Young / Lee, Seung Hun / Lee, Jehoon / Hong, Seongbin. ·Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul, Korea. · Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Inha University Hospital, Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon, Korea. · Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Jinju, Korea. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea. · Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan, Korea. · Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul Paik Hospital, Seoul, Korea. · Division of Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Wonkwang University Sanbon Hospital, Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Gunpo, Korea. · Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea. ·J Bone Metab · Pubmed #30899720.

ABSTRACT: Bone turnover markers (BTMs) have important role in the management of osteoporosis. Recently the clinical application of BTMs has achieved significant progress and measurement of BTMs give us better understanding of pathogenesis of osteoporosis. However, the use of BTMs is still insufficient in Korea. We summarized the available methods and standard interval of the BTMs in Korea. Also we reviewed published literatures on pre-analytical variability in the measurement of BTMs and provided recommendations for standardized sample handling and patient preparation for reducing those pre-analytical variabilities. The clinical application of BTMs in patients with chronic kidney disease who have a higher fracture risk than the general population is summarized.

16 Review Coupling factors involved in preserving bone balance. 2019

Kim, Beom-Jun / Koh, Jung-Min. ·Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 88 Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 05505, South Korea. · Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 88 Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 05505, South Korea. jmkoh@amc.seoul.kr. ·Cell Mol Life Sci · Pubmed #30515522.

ABSTRACT: Coupling during bone remodeling refers to the spatial and temporal coordination of bone resorption with bone formation. Studies have assessed the subtle interactions between osteoclasts and osteoblasts to preserve bone balance. Traditionally, coupling research related to osteoclast function has focused on bone resorption activity causing the release of growth factors embedded in the bone matrix. However, considerable evidence from in vitro, animal, and human studies indicates the importance of the osteoclasts themselves in coupling phenomena, and many osteoclast-derived coupling factors have been identified. These include sphingosine-1-phosphate, vesicular-receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB, collagen triple helix repeat containing 1, and cardiotrophin-1. Interestingly, neuronal guidance molecules, such as slit guidance ligand 3, semaphorin (SEMA) 3A, SEMA4D, and netrin-1, originally identified as instructive cues allowing the navigation of growing axons to their targets, have been shown to be involved in the intercellular cross-talk among bone cells. This review discusses osteoclast-osteoblast coupling signals, including recent advances and the potential roles of these signals as therapeutic targets for osteoporosis and as biomarkers predicting human bone health.

17 Review Air Pollution and Noncommunicable Diseases: A Review by the Forum of International Respiratory Societies' Environmental Committee, Part 2: Air Pollution and Organ Systems. 2019

Schraufnagel, Dean E / Balmes, John R / Cowl, Clayton T / De Matteis, Sara / Jung, Soon-Hee / Mortimer, Kevin / Perez-Padilla, Rogelio / Rice, Mary B / Riojas-Rodriguez, Horacio / Sood, Akshay / Thurston, George D / To, Teresa / Vanker, Anessa / Wuebbles, Donald J. ·Pulmonary, Critical Care, Sleep and Allergy, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL. Electronic address: schrauf@uic.edu. · Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, Division of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA. · Divisions of Preventive, Occupational, and Aerospace Medicine and Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. · National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Pathology, Wonju Colleage of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea. · Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · National Institute of Respiratory Diseases, Mexico City, Mexico. · Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · National Institute of Public Health, Cuernavaca Morelos, Mexico. · Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, NM. · Departments of Environmental Medicine and Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY. · The Hospital for Sick Children, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Department of Paediatrics and Child Health & MRC Unit on Child and Adolescent Health, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa. · School of Earth, Society, and Environment, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL. ·Chest · Pubmed #30419237.

ABSTRACT: Although air pollution is well known to be harmful to the lung and airways, it can also damage most other organ systems of the body. It is estimated that about 500,000 lung cancer deaths and 1.6 million COPD deaths can be attributed to air pollution, but air pollution may also account for 19% of all cardiovascular deaths and 21% of all stroke deaths. Air pollution has been linked to other malignancies, such as bladder cancer and childhood leukemia. Lung development in childhood is stymied with exposure to air pollutants, and poor lung development in children predicts lung impairment in adults. Air pollution is associated with reduced cognitive function and increased risk of dementia. Particulate matter in the air (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter < 2.5 μm) is associated with delayed psychomotor development and lower child intelligence. Studies link air pollution with diabetes mellitus prevalence, morbidity, and mortality. Pollution affects the immune system and is associated with allergic rhinitis, allergic sensitization, and autoimmunity. It is also associated with osteoporosis and bone fractures, conjunctivitis, dry eye disease, blepharitis, inflammatory bowel disease, increased intravascular coagulation, and decreased glomerular filtration rate. Atopic and urticarial skin disease, acne, and skin aging are linked to air pollution. Air pollution is controllable and, therefore, many of these adverse health effects can be prevented.

18 Review Bone mineral density assessment for research purpose using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. 2018

Kim, Ho Sung / Jeong, Eun Sun / Yang, Myung Hwa / Yang, Seoung-Oh. ·Department of Radiological Science, Shin-Han University, Uijeongbu, Korea. · Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kyung-Hee University Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Family Medicine, Gangsan Hospital, Busan, Korea. · Department of Nuclear Medicine, Dongnam Institute of Radiological & Medical Science, Busan, Korea. ·Osteoporos Sarcopenia · Pubmed #30775548.

ABSTRACT: Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) has become the most common method for measuring bone mineral density (BMD) of small animals in metabolic bone disease research, and errors should be minimized in all procedures involved in research studies in order to increase the accuracy of the study results. DXA is simpler and rapid compared to micro-computed tomography for quantitative analysis of change in trabecular bone of test subject. In human research, measuring BMD is widely used; postoperative evaluation on orthopedic surgery, evaluation of osteoporosis medication in menopause and many other areas of study. For the study, the inspector should be trained by the equipment manufacturer regarding the utilization and analysis of the equipment and regular phantom testing should be conducted to ensure the stability of the equipment, and precision tests should be conducted to analyze the positioning and data analysis. They should also be familiar with the clinical trials and conduct studies based on the approval of the Institutional Review Board. In the absolute BMD measurement of the human body, it is necessary to apply and compare the position and condition, rotation degree, region of interest, and area of the scan in the follow-up test. In the case of small animals, animal selection, measurement and equipment should be modeled to match the research. Therefore, we would like to provide information for researchers to minimize the errors, effective data management and accurate data presentation. This article reviews the process of DXA measurement for research purpose including plan for DXA examination, BMD measurement in a human body study and small animal studies.

19 Review Sharing Pathological Mechanisms of Insomnia and Osteoporosis, and a New Perspective on Safe Drug Choice. 2018

Yi, Sun Shin / Chung, Soo-Ho / Kim, Pan Soo. ·Department of Biomedical Laboratory Science, College of Medical Sciences, Soonchunhyang University, Asan, Korea. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon, Korea. · Bio-Center, Gyeonggido Business and Science Accelerator, Suwon, Korea. ·J Menopausal Med · Pubmed #30671405.

ABSTRACT: Lack of adequate sleep has become increasingly common in our 24/7 modern society. Reduced sleep has significant health consequences including metabolic and cardiovascular disorders, and mental problems including depression. In addition, although the increase in life expectancy has provided a dream of longevity to humans, the occurrence of osteoporosis is a big obstacle to this dream for both male and female. It is known that insomnia and bone health problems, which are very critical conditions in human life, interestingly, share a lot of pathogenesis in recent decades. Nevertheless, due to another side effects of the synthetic drugs being taken for the treatment of insomnia and osteoporosis, patients have substantial anxiety for the safety of drugs with therapeutic expectation. This review examines the pathogenesis shared by sleep and osteoporosis together and herbal medicine, which has recently been shown to be safe and efficacious in the treatment of both diseases other than synthetic drugs. We suggestions for how to treat osteoporosis. These efforts will be the first step toward enabling patients to have comfortable and safe prescriptions through a wide selection of therapeutic agents in the future.

20 Review Osteoporosis and Osteoporotic Fractures in Gastrointestinal Disease. 2018

Oh, Hyun Jin / Ryu, Kum Hei / Park, Bum Joon / Yoon, Byung-Ho. ·Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Center for Cancer Prevention and Detection, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Korea. · Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Seoul Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. ·J Bone Metab · Pubmed #30574465.

ABSTRACT: Patients with gastrointestinal disease (GI) are at risk for osteopenia or osteoporosis, which can lead to fractures. Although these patients may be at risk from a young age, gastroenterologists often overlook this fact in practice. There are well-known GI diseases associated with osteopenia and osteoporosis, such as the post-gastrectomy state, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and celiac disease. As there is an increase in the prevalence of IBD patients, newly diagnosed celiac disease in adulthood, and gastric cancer survivors following gastrectomy, bone disease in these patients becomes an important issue. Here, we have discussed osteoporosis and fractures in GI disease, especially in the post-gastrectomy state, IBD, and celiac disease. Although the pathogenesis of bone loss in each disease has not been fully identified, we have confirmed that the prevalence of osteoporosis and fractures in each of these diseases is high. There are scarce studies comparing the prevalence of osteoporosis or osteoporotic fractures in GI disease patients with studies in postmenopausal women, and specific guidelines for their management in each disease have not been established. Intensive surveillance and management are needed to ensure that these patients attain peak bone mass for age and sex to prevent fractures.

21 Review Korean Guideline for the Prevention and Treatment of Glucocorticoid-induced Osteoporosis. 2018

Park, So Young / Gong, Hyun Sik / Kim, Kyoung Min / Kim, Dam / Kim, Ha Young / Jeon, Chan Hong / Ju, Ji Hyeon / Lee, Shin-Seok / Park, Dong-Ah / Sung, Yoon-Kyoung / Kim, Sang Wan. ·Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam, Korea. · Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam, Korea. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Division of Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Wonkwang University Sanbon Hospital, Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Gunpo, Korea. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Bucheon, Korea. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Rheumatology, Chonnam National University Medical School and Hospital, Gwangju, Korea. · Division of Healthcare Technology Assessment Research, National Evidence-Based Healthcare Collaborating Agency, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Rheumatology, Hanyang University Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Seoul, Korea. · Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Boramae Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. ·J Bone Metab · Pubmed #30574464.

ABSTRACT: Background: To develop guidelines and recommendations to prevent and treat glucocorticoid (GC)-induced osteoporosis (GIOP) in Korea. Methods: The Korean Society for Bone and Mineral Research and the Korean College of Rheumatology have developed this guideline based on Guidance for the Development of Clinical Practice Guidelines ver. 1.0 established by the National Evidence-Based Healthcare Collaborating Agency. This guideline was developed by adapting previously published guidelines, and a systematic review and quality assessment were performed. Results: This guideline applies to adults aged ≥19 years who are using or plan to use GCs. It does not include children and adolescents. An initial assessment of fracture risk should be performed within 6 months of initial GC use. Fracture risk should be estimated using the fracture-risk assessment tool (FRAX) after adjustments for GC dose, history of osteoporotic fractures, and bone mineral density (BMD) results. All patients administered with prednisolone or an equivalent medication at a dose ≥2.5 mg/day for ≥3 months are recommended to use adequate calcium and vitamin D during treatment. Patients showing a moderate-to-high fracture risk should be treated with additional medication for osteoporosis. All patients continuing GC therapy should undergo annual BMD testing, vertebral X-ray, and fracture risk assessment using FRAX. When treatment failure is suspected, switching to another drug should be considered. Conclusions: This guideline is intended to guide clinicians in the prevention and treatment of GIOP.

22 Review Effects of Resistance Exercise on Bone Health. 2018

Hong, A Ram / Kim, Sang Wan. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Korea. · Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine and Seoul Metropolitan Government Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. swkimmd@snu.ac.kr. ·Endocrinol Metab (Seoul) · Pubmed #30513557.

ABSTRACT: The prevalence of chronic diseases including osteoporosis and sarcopenia increases as the population ages. Osteoporosis and sarcopenia are commonly associated with genetics, mechanical factors, and hormonal factors and primarily associated with aging. Many older populations, particularly those with frailty, are likely to have concurrent osteoporosis and sarcopenia, further increasing their risk of disease-related complications. Because bones and muscles are closely interconnected by anatomy, metabolic profile, and chemical components, a diagnosis should be considered for both sarcopenia and osteoporosis, which may be treated with optimal therapeutic interventions eliciting pleiotropic effects on both bones and muscles. Exercise training has been recommended as a promising therapeutic strategy to encounter the loss of bone and muscle mass due to osteosarcopenia. To stimulate the osteogenic effects for bone mass accretion, bone tissues must be exposed to mechanical load exceeding those experienced during daily living activities. Of the several exercise training programs, resistance exercise (RE) is known to be highly beneficial for the preservation of bone and muscle mass. This review summarizes the mechanisms of RE for the preservation of bone and muscle mass and supports the clinical evidences for the use of RE as a therapeutic option in osteosarcopenia.

23 Review Role of exercise in age-related sarcopenia. 2018

Yoo, Su-Zi / No, Mi-Hyun / Heo, Jun-Won / Park, Dong-Ho / Kang, Ju-Hee / Kim, So Hun / Kwak, Hyo-Bum. ·Department of Kinesiology, Inha University, Incheon, Korea. · Department of Pharmacology and Medicinal Toxicology Research Center, Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon, Korea. · Department of Internal Medicine, Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon, Korea. ·J Exerc Rehabil · Pubmed #30276173.

ABSTRACT: Sarcopenia is an age-associated decline of skeletal muscle mass and function and is known to lead to frailty, cachexia, osteoporosis, metabolic syndromes, and death. Notwithstanding the increasing incidence of sarcopenia, the molecular and cellular mechanisms driving age-related sarcopenia are not completely understood. This article reviews current definitions of sarcopenia, its potential mechanisms, and effects of exercise on sarcopenia. The pathogenesis of age-related sarcopenia is multifactorial and includes myostatin, inflammatory cytokines, and mitochondria-derived problems. Especially, age-induced mitochondrial dysfunction triggers the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by mitochondria, impedes mitochondrial dynamics, interrupts mitophagy, and leads to mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. Aerobic exercise provides at least a partial solution to sarcopenia as it ameliorates mitochondria-derived problems, and resistance exercise strengthens muscle mass and function. Furthermore, combinations of these exercise types provide the benefits of both. Collectively, this review summarizes potential mechanisms of age-related sarcopenia and emphasizes the use of exercise as a therapeutic strategy, suggesting that combined exercise provides the most beneficial means of combating age-related sarcopenia.

24 Review Inflammatory and metabolic mechanisms underlying the calcific aortic valve disease. 2018

Cho, Kyoung Im / Sakuma, Ichiro / Sohn, Il Suk / Jo, Sang-Ho / Koh, Kwang Kon. ·Department of Cardiology, Kosin University Gospel Hospital, Busan, Republic of Korea. · Cardiovascular Medicine, Hokko Memorial Clinic, Sapporo, Japan; Health Science University of Hokkaido, Tobetsu, Japan. · Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Cardiology, Hanlym University Hospital at Pyungchon, Pyungchon, Republic of Korea. · Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Heart Center, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon, Republic of Korea; Gachon Cardiovascular Research Institute, Incheon, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: kwangk@gilhospital.com. ·Atherosclerosis · Pubmed #30173080.

ABSTRACT: Although calcific aortic stenosis is a very common disease with major adverse cardiovascular events and healthcare costs, there are no effective medical interventions to delay or halt its progression. Cardiometabolic risk factors, including smoking and male sex, are linked to aortic stenosis. Emerging studies have identified important regulatory roles for immunological and inflammatory responses, including oxidized lipids, various cytokines, and biomineralization. Recent clinical and experimental studies in atherosclerosis and osteoporosis have demonstrated that oxidative stress and oxidized lipids decrease bone formation in the skeletal system while they increase bone formation in the cardiovascular system. Multidisciplinary factors contribute to vascular calcification, including inflammation and metabolic regulation of osteogenesis in the cardiovascular system via similar signaling pathways as bone formation. Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is no longer considered a simple passive process of calcium deposition that occurs with advanced age. Biomineralization in CAVD is a complex, regulated process that involves valvular, circulating, bone marrow-derived cells, macrophage heterogeneity and genetic factors along with biochemical and mechanical factors. The current review will discuss the recently discovered important role of inflammation, metabolic risk factors, and molecular and cellular mechanisms that promote CAVD, as well as the link between osteogenic signals in the skeletal and cardiovascular systems. This may inform future therapeutic strategies for CAVD progression.

25 Review Role of IL-32 Gamma on Bone Metabolism in Autoimmune Arthritis. 2018

Kwon, Oh Chan / Kim, Soohyun / Hong, Seokchan / Lee, Chang-Keun / Yoo, Bin / Chang, Eun-Ju / Kim, Yong-Gil. ·Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505, Korea. · Department of Biomedical Science and Technology, Konkuk University, Seoul 05066, Korea. · Department of Biomedical Sciences, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505, Korea. ·Immune Netw · Pubmed #29984038.

ABSTRACT: IL-32 acts as a pro-inflammatory cytokine by inducing the synthesis of inflammatory molecules as well as promoting the morphological changes involved in the transformation of monocytes into osteoclasts (OCs). Evaluation of the functions of IL-32 has mainly focused on its inflammatory properties, such as involvement in the pathogenesis of various autoimmune diseases. Recently, IL-32 was shown to be involved in bone metabolism, in which it promotes the differentiation and activation of OCs and plays a key role in bone resorption in inflammatory conditions. IL-32γ also regulates bone formation in conditions such as ankylosing spondylitis and osteoporosis. In this review, we summarize the results of recent studies on the role of IL-32γ in bone metabolism in inflammatory arthritis.

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