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Pancreatic Diseases HELP
Based on 56,674 articles published since 2010
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These are the 56674 published articles about Pancreatic Diseases that originated from Worldwide during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline ACG Clinical Guideline: Chronic Pancreatitis. 2020

Gardner, Timothy B / Adler, Douglas G / Forsmark, Chris E / Sauer, Bryan G / Taylor, Jason R / Whitcomb, David C. ·Section of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire, USA. · Section of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Utah Medical Center, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA. · Section of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Saint Louis University, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Departments of Medicine, Cell Biology and Molecular Physiology, and Human Genetics, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. ·Am J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #32022720.

ABSTRACT: Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is historically defined as an irreversible inflammatory condition of the pancreas leading to varying degrees of exocrine and endocrine dysfunction. Recently however, the paradigm for the diagnosis has changed in that it breaks with the traditional clinicopathologic-based definition of disease, focusing instead on diagnosing the underlying pathologic process early in the disease course and managing the syndrome more holistically to change the natural course of disease and minimize adverse disease effects. Currently, the most accepted mechanistically derived definition of CP is a pathologic fibroinflammatory syndrome of the pancreas in individuals with genetic, environmental, and/or other risk factors who develop persistent pathologic responses to parenchymal injury or stress. The most common symptom of CP is abdominal pain, with other symptoms such as exocrine pancreatic insufficiency and diabetes developing at highly variable rates. CP is most commonly caused by toxins such as alcohol or tobacco use, genetic polymorphisms, and recurrent attacks of acute pancreatitis, although no history of acute pancreatitis is seen in many patients. Diagnosis is made usually on cross-sectional imaging, with modalities such as endoscopic ultrasonography and pancreatic function tests playing a secondary role. Total pancreatectomy represents the only known cure for CP, although difficulty in patient selection and the complications inherent to this intervention make it usually an unattractive option. This guideline will provide an evidence-based practical approach to the diagnosis and management of CP for the general gastroenterologist.

2 Guideline Screening for Pancreatic Cancer: US Preventive Services Task Force Reaffirmation Recommendation Statement. 2019

Anonymous3391081 / Owens, Douglas K / Davidson, Karina W / Krist, Alex H / Barry, Michael J / Cabana, Michael / Caughey, Aaron B / Curry, Susan J / Doubeni, Chyke A / Epling, John W / Kubik, Martha / Landefeld, C Seth / Mangione, Carol M / Pbert, Lori / Silverstein, Michael / Simon, Melissa A / Tseng, Chien-Wen / Wong, John B. ·Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California. · Stanford University, Stanford, California. · Feinstein Institute for Medical Research at Northwell Health, Manhasset, New York. · Fairfax Family Practice Residency, Fairfax, Virginia. · Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · University of California, San Francisco. · Oregon Health & Science University, Portland. · University of Iowa, Iowa City. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, New York. · Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, Roanoke. · Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · University of Alabama at Birmingham. · University of California, Los Angeles. · University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester. · Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts. · Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois. · University of Hawaii, Honolulu. · Pacific Health Research and Education Institute, Honolulu, Hawaii. · Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts. ·JAMA · Pubmed #31386141.

ABSTRACT: Importance: Pancreatic cancer is an uncommon cancer with an age-adjusted annual incidence of 12.9 cases per 100 000 person-years. However, the death rate is 11.0 deaths per 100 000 person-years because the prognosis of pancreatic cancer is poor. Although its incidence is low, pancreatic cancer is the third most common cause of cancer death in the United States. Because of the increasing incidence of pancreatic cancer, along with improvements in early detection and treatment of other types of cancer, it is estimated that pancreatic cancer may soon become the second-leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Objective: To update the 2004 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for pancreatic cancer. Evidence Review: The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the benefits and harms of screening for pancreatic cancer, the diagnostic accuracy of screening tests for pancreatic cancer, and the benefits and harms of treatment of screen-detected or asymptomatic pancreatic cancer. Findings: The USPSTF found no evidence that screening for pancreatic cancer or treatment of screen-detected pancreatic cancer improves disease-specific morbidity or mortality, or all-cause mortality. The USPSTF found adequate evidence that the magnitude of the benefits of screening for pancreatic cancer in asymptomatic adults can be bounded as no greater than small. The USPSTF found adequate evidence that the magnitude of the harms of screening for pancreatic cancer and treatment of screen-detected pancreatic cancer can be bounded as at least moderate. The USPSTF reaffirms its previous conclusion that the potential benefits of screening for pancreatic cancer in asymptomatic adults do not outweigh the potential harms. Conclusions and Recommendation: The USPSTF recommends against screening for pancreatic cancer in asymptomatic adults. (D recommendation).

3 Guideline Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of chronic pancreatitis in China (2018 edition). 2019

Zou, Wen-Bin / Ru, Nan / Wu, Hao / Hu, Liang-Hao / Ren, Xu / Jin, Gang / Wang, Zheng / Du, Yi-Qi / Cao, Ya-Nan / Zhang, Lei / Chang, Xiao-Yan / Zhang, Rong-Chun / Li, Xiao-Bin / Shen, Yan / Li, Peng / Li, Zhao-Shen / Liao, Zhuan / Anonymous3901017. ·Department of Gastroenterology, Digestive Endoscopy Center, Changhai Hospital, Naval Medical University, Shanghai 200433, China; Shanghai Institute of Pancreatic Diseases, Shanghai 200433, China. · Department of Gastroenterology, Digestive Endoscopy Center, Changhai Hospital, Naval Medical University, Shanghai 200433, China. · Department of Gastroenterology, Heilongjiang Provincial Hospital, Harbin 150030, China. · Department of Hepatobiliary Pancreatic Surgery, Changhai Hospital, Naval Medical University, Shanghai 200433, China. · Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710061, China. · Shanghai Clinical Center for Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Ruijin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200025, China. · Department of Radiology, Shanghai First People's Hospital, Shanghai 200080, China. · Department of Pathology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing 100730, China. · Department of Gastroenterology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032, China. · Department of General Surgery, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing 100730, China. · Department of Hepatobiliary Pancreatic Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou 310003, China. · Department of Digestive Endoscopy, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100050, China. · Department of Gastroenterology, Digestive Endoscopy Center, Changhai Hospital, Naval Medical University, Shanghai 200433, China; Shanghai Institute of Pancreatic Diseases, Shanghai 200433, China. Electronic address: zhaoshenli@smmu.edu.cn. · Department of Gastroenterology, Digestive Endoscopy Center, Changhai Hospital, Naval Medical University, Shanghai 200433, China; Shanghai Institute of Pancreatic Diseases, Shanghai 200433, China. Electronic address: liaozhuan@smmu.edu.cn. ·Hepatobiliary Pancreat Dis Int · Pubmed #30922816.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Guideline The consensus of integrative diagnosis and treatment of acute pancreatitis-2017. 2019

Li, Junxiang / Chen, Jing / Tang, Wenfu. ·Digestive Disease Committee, Chinese Association of Integrative Medicine. ·J Evid Based Med · Pubmed #30806495.

ABSTRACT: Acute pancreatitis (AP) is one of the most common acute abdominal diseases. The digestive disease committee, Chinese Association of Integrative Medicine, released Integrated traditional Chinese and Western medicine for diagnosis and treatment of acute pancreatitis in 2010.

5 Guideline Endoscopic treatment of chronic pancreatitis: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Guideline - Updated August 2018. 2019

Dumonceau, Jean-Marc / Delhaye, Myriam / Tringali, Andrea / Arvanitakis, Marianna / Sanchez-Yague, Andres / Vaysse, Thierry / Aithal, Guruprasad P / Anderloni, Andrea / Bruno, Marco / Cantú, Paolo / Devière, Jacques / Domínguez-Muñoz, Juan Enrique / Lekkerkerker, Selma / Poley, Jan-Werner / Ramchandani, Mohan / Reddy, Nageshwar / van Hooft, Jeanin E. ·Gedyt Endoscopy Center, Buenos Aires, Argentina. · Department of Gastroenterology Hepatopancreatology, and Digestive Oncology, Erasme University Hospital, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium. · Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli, IRCCS, Rome, Italy. · Centre for Endoscopic Research, Therapeutics and Training (CERTT), Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Hospital Costa del Sol, Marbella, Spain. · Service de Gastroentérologie, University Hospital of Bicêtre, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Université Paris Sud, Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France. · Nottingham Digestive Diseases Centre, NIHR Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust and University of Nottingham, UK. · Endoscopy Unit, IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Rozzano, Milan, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy. · Gastroenterology Department, University Hospital of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Asian Institute of Gastroenterology, Hyderabad, India. ·Endoscopy · Pubmed #30654394.

ABSTRACT: ESGE suggests endoscopic therapy and/or extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) as the first-line therapy for painful uncomplicated chronic pancreatitis (CP) with an obstructed main pancreatic duct (MPD) in the head/body of the pancreas. The clinical response should be evaluated at 6 - 8 weeks; if it appears unsatisfactory, the patient's case should be discussed again in a multidisciplinary team and surgical options should be considered.Weak recommendation, low quality evidence.ESGE suggests, for the selection of patients for initial or continued endoscopic therapy and/or ESWL, taking into consideration predictive factors associated with a good long-term outcome. These include, at initial work-up, absence of MPD stricture, a short disease duration, non-severe pain, absence or cessation of cigarette smoking and of alcohol intake, and, after initial treatment, complete removal of obstructive pancreatic stones and resolution of pancreatic duct stricture with stenting.Weak recommendation, low quality evidence.ESGE recommends ESWL for the clearance of radiopaque obstructive MPD stones larger than 5 mm located in the head/body of the pancreas and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for MPD stones that are radiolucent or smaller than 5 mm. Strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence.ESGE suggests restricting the use of endoscopic therapy after ESWL to patients with no spontaneous clearance of pancreatic stones after adequate fragmentation by ESWL.Weak recommendation, moderate quality evidence.ESGE suggests treating painful dominant MPD strictures with a single 10-Fr plastic stent for one uninterrupted year if symptoms improve after initial successful MPD drainage. The stent should be exchanged if necessary, based on symptoms or signs of stent dysfunction at regular pancreas imaging at least every 6 months. ESGE suggests consideration of surgery or multiple side-by-side plastic stents for symptomatic MPD strictures persisting beyond 1 year after the initial single plastic stenting, following multidisciplinary discussion. Weak recommendation, low quality evidence.ESGE recommends endoscopic drainage over percutaneous or surgical treatment for uncomplicated chronic pancreatitis (CP)-related pseudocysts that are within endoscopic reach.Strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence.ESGE recommends retrieval of transmural plastic stents at least 6 weeks after pancreatic pseudocyst regression if MPD disruption has been excluded, and long-term indwelling of transmural double-pigtail plastic stents in patients with disconnected pancreatic duct syndrome.Strong recommendation, low quality evidence.ESGE suggests the temporary insertion of multiple side-by-side plastic stents or of a fully covered self-expandable metal stent (FCSEMS) for treating CP-related benign biliary strictures.Weak recommendation, moderate quality evidence.ESGE recommends maintaining a registry of patients with biliary stents and recalling them for stent removal or exchange.Strong recommendation, low quality evidence.

6 Guideline Evaluating Susceptibility to Pancreatic Cancer: ASCO Provisional Clinical Opinion. 2019

Stoffel, Elena M / McKernin, Shannon E / Brand, Randall / Canto, Marcia / Goggins, Michael / Moravek, Cassadie / Nagarajan, Arun / Petersen, Gloria M / Simeone, Diane M / Yurgelun, Matthew / Khorana, Alok A. ·1 University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. · 2 American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA. · 3 University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA. · 4 Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD. · 5 Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, Los Angeles, CA. · 6 Taussig Cancer Institute and Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH. · 7 Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. · 8 New York University Langone Health, New York, NY. · 9 Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #30457921.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: An ASCO provisional clinical opinion (PCO) offers timely clinical direction to ASCO's membership and other health care providers. This PCO addresses identification and management of patients and family members with possible predisposition to pancreatic adenocarcinoma. METHODS: ASCO convened an Expert Panel and conducted a systematic review of the literature published from January 1998 to June 2018. Results of the databases searched were supplemented with hand searching of the bibliographies of systematic reviews and selected seminal articles and contributions from Expert Panel members' curated files. PROVISIONAL CLINICAL OPINION: All patients diagnosed with pancreatic adenocarcinoma should undergo assessment of risk for hereditary syndromes known to be associated with an increased risk for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Assessment of risk should include a comprehensive review of family history of cancer. Individuals with a family history of pancreatic cancer affecting two first-degree relatives meet criteria for familial pancreatic cancer (FPC). Individuals (cancer affected or unaffected) with a family history of pancreatic cancer meeting criteria for FPC, those with three or more diagnoses of pancreatic cancer in same side of the family, and individuals meeting criteria for other genetic syndromes associated with increased risk for pancreatic cancer have an increased risk for pancreatic cancer and are candidates for genetic testing. Germline genetic testing for cancer susceptibility may be discussed with individuals diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, even if family history is unremarkable. Benefits and limitations of pancreatic cancer screening should be discussed with individuals whose family history meets criteria for FPC and/or genetic susceptibility to pancreatic cancer. Additional information is available at www.asco.org/gastrointestinal-cancer-guidelines .

7 Guideline Screening and surveillance in hereditary gastrointestinal cancers: Recommendations from the European Society of Digestive Oncology (ESDO) expert discussion at the 20th European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO)/World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer, Barcelona, June 2018. 2018

Vangala, Deepak B / Cauchin, Estelle / Balmaña, Judith / Wyrwicz, Lucian / van Cutsem, Eric / Güller, Ulrich / Castells, Antoni / Carneiro, Fatima / Hammel, Pascal / Ducreux, Michel / van Laethem, Jean-Luc / Matysiak-Budnik, Tamara / Schmiegel, Wolff. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Knappschaftskrankenhaus, Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany. Electronic address: meduni-kkh@rub.de. · Institut des Maladies de L'Appareil Digestif, Hepato-Gastroenterology and Digestive Oncology, Nantes University Hospital, Nantes, France. · Vall D'Hebron University Hospital and Institute of Oncology, Barcelona, Spain. · Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Centre and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw, Poland. · Digestive Oncology, University Hospitals and KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Division of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Kantonsspital St Gallen, Switzerland. · Gastroenterology Department, Hospital Clínic, University of Barcelona, IDIBAPS, CIBEREHD, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. · Faculty of Medicine of the University of Porto (FMUP), Centro Hospitalar de Sao Joao (CHSJ) and Ipatimup/i3S, Porto, Portugal. · Department of Digestive Oncology, Hôpital Beaujon, Clichy, University Paris VII Denis Diderot, France. · Department of Medical Oncology, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif and Université Paris-Saclay, Saint Aubain, France. · Department of Gastroenterology and Digestive Oncology, Hopital Erasme, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium. · Department of Internal Medicine, Knappschaftskrankenhaus, Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany. ·Eur J Cancer · Pubmed #30342310.

ABSTRACT: Patients with hereditary gastrointestinal (GI) cancers represent a substantial fraction of the overall affected population. Although awareness for hereditary GI cancer syndromes is on the rise, identification of patients and measures of surveillance are often unclear in everyday clinical routine. Therefore, the European Society of Digestive Oncology expert discussion 2018 at the World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer focussed on screening and surveillance of hereditary colorectal, gastric and pancreatic cancers. An international panel of experts and opinion leaders developed the here presented recommendations based on published evidence and on profound clinical expertise to facilitate clinical routine in identification and caretaking of patients with familial GI cancers.

8 Guideline Performance measures for ERCP and endoscopic ultrasound: a European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Quality Improvement Initiative. 2018

Domagk, Dirk / Oppong, Kofi W / Aabakken, Lars / Czakó, Laszlo / Gyökeres, Tibor / Manes, Gianpiero / Meier, Peter / Poley, Jan-Werner / Ponchon, Thierry / Tringali, Andrea / Bellisario, Cristina / Minozzi, Silvia / Senore, Carlo / Bennett, Cathy / Bretthauer, Michael / Hassan, Cesare / Kaminski, Michal F / Dinis-Ribeiro, Mario / Rees, Colin J / Spada, Cristiano / Valori, Roland / Bisschops, Raf / Rutter, Matthew D. ·Department of Medicine I, Josephs Hospital Warendorf, Academic Teaching Hospital, University of Muenster, Warendorf, Germany. · HPB Unit, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom. · Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, Newcastle, United Kingdom. · Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Transplantation Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo Norway. · First Department of Medicine, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary. · Department of Gastroenterology, Medical Center Hungarian Defence Forces, Budapest, Hungary. · Department of Gastroenterology, ASST Rhodense, Rho, and Garbagnate Milanese Hospitals, Milan, Italy. · Med. Klinik II, DIAKOVERE Henriettenstift, Klinik für Enterologie, Hannover, Germany. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Endoscopy and Gastroenterology, Edouard Herriot Hospital, Lyon, France. · Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli - IRCCS, Catholic University, Rome, Italy. · CERTT, Center for Endoscopic Research, Therapeutics and Training - Catholic University, Rome, Italy. · CPO Piemonte, AOU Città della Salute e della Scienza, Turin, Italy. · Office of Research and Innovation, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland Coláiste Ríoga na Máinleá in Éirinn, Dublin, Ireland. · Clinical Effectiveness Research Group, University of Oslo and Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Endoscopy Unit, Nuovo Regina Margherita Hospital, Rome, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Oncology, Medical Center for Postgraduate Education, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Gastroenterological Oncology and Department of Cancer Prevention, The Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Health Management and Health Economics, University of Oslo, Norway. · Servicio de Gastroenterologia, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil, Porto, Portugal. · Northern Institute for Cancer Research, Newcastle University, Newcastle, United Kingdom. · Digestive Endoscopy and Gastroenterology Unit, Poliambulanza Foundation, Brescia, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Gloucestershire, United Kingdom. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology. University Hospital Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital of North Tees, Stockton-on-Tees, Cleveland, UK. ·Endoscopy · Pubmed #30340220.

ABSTRACT: The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy and United European Gastroenterology present a short list of key performance measures for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). We recommend that endoscopy services across Europe adopt the following seven key and one minor performance measures for EUS and ERCP, for measurement and evaluation in daily practice at center and endoscopist level: 1: Adequate antibiotic prophylaxis before ERCP (key performance measure, at least 90 %); 2: Antibiotic prophylaxis before EUS-guided puncture of cystic lesions (key performance measure, at least 95 %); 3: Bile duct cannulation rate (key performance measure, at least 90 %); 4: Tissue sampling during EUS (key performance measure, at least 85 %); 5: Appropriate stent placement in patients with biliary obstruction below the hilum (key performance measure, at least 95 %); 6: Bile duct stone extraction (key performance measure, at least 90 %); 7: Post-ERCP pancreatitis (key performance measure, less than 10 %). 8: Adequate documentation of EUS landmarks (minor performance measure, at least 90 %).This present list of quality performance measures for ERCP and EUS recommended by ESGE should not be considered to be exhaustive: it might be extended in future to address further clinical and scientific issues.

9 Guideline ISPAD Clinical Practice Consensus Guidelines 2018: Management of cystic fibrosis-related diabetes in children and adolescents. 2018

Moran, Antoinette / Pillay, Kubendran / Becker, Dorothy / Granados, Andrea / Hameed, Shihab / Acerini, Carlo L. ·Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota. · Westville Hospital, Durban, South Africa. · Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Department of Pediatrics, Washington University in St Louis School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri. · Department of Endocrinology, Sydney Children's Hospital, Randwick, NSW, Australia. · School of Women's and Children's Health, University of New South Wales, Kensington, NSW, Australia. · Department of Paediatrics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. ·Pediatr Diabetes · Pubmed #30094886.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Guideline Identification and diagnosis of patients with familial chylomicronaemia syndrome (FCS): Expert panel recommendations and proposal of an "FCS score". 2018

Moulin, Philippe / Dufour, Robert / Averna, Maurizio / Arca, Marcello / Cefalù, Angelo B / Noto, Davide / D'Erasmo, Laura / Di Costanzo, Alessia / Marçais, Christophe / Alvarez-Sala Walther, Luis Antonio / Banach, Maciej / Borén, Jan / Cramb, Robert / Gouni-Berthold, Ioanna / Hughes, Elizabeth / Johnson, Colin / Pintó, Xavier / Reiner, Željko / van Lennep, Jeanine Roeters / Soran, Handrean / Stefanutti, Claudia / Stroes, Erik / Bruckert, Eric. ·Hôpital Cardiovasculaire Louis Pradel, Hospices Civils de Lyon, INSERM UMR 1060 Carmen, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Lyon, France. · Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montréal, Montréal, Canada. · Dipartimento Biomedico di Medicina Interna e Specialistica (Di.Bi.M.I.S.), University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy. · Department of Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, IiSGM, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, Spain. · Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. · University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK. · Polyclinic for Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Preventive Medicine, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany. · Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust, Birmingham, UK. · University Hospital, Southampton, UK. · Bellvitge University Hospital, Barcelona, Spain. · University Hospital Center Zagreb, School of Medicine, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia. · Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam, the Netherlands. · Central Manchester University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK. · Department of Molecular Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Hôpital Pitié Salpêtrière, Paris, France. Electronic address: eric.bruckert@aphp.fr. ·Atherosclerosis · Pubmed #29980054.

ABSTRACT: Familial chylomicronaemia syndrome (FCS) is a rare, inherited disorder characterised by impaired clearance of triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoproteins from plasma, leading to severe hypertriglyceridaemia (HTG) and a markedly increased risk of acute pancreatitis. It is due to the lack of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) function, resulting from recessive loss of function mutations in the genes coding LPL or its modulators. A large overlap in the phenotype between FCS and multifactorial chylomicronaemia syndrome (MCS) contributes to the inconsistency in how patients are diagnosed and managed worldwide, whereas the incidence of acute hypertriglyceridaemic pancreatitis is more frequent in FCS. A panel of European experts provided guidance on the diagnostic strategy surrounding FCS and proposed an algorithm-based diagnosis tool for identification of these patients, which can be readily translated into practice. Features included in this FCS score comprise: severe elevation of plasma TGs (fasting TG levels >10 mmol/L [885 mg/dL] on multiple occasions), refractory to standard TG-lowering therapies, a young age at onset, the lack of secondary factors (except for pregnancy and oral oestrogens) and a history of episodes of acute pancreatitis. Considering 53 FCS patients from three cohorts and 52 MCS patients from three cohorts, the overall sensitivity of the FCS score (≥10) was 88% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.76, 0.97) with an overall specificity of 85% (95% CI: 0.75, 0.94). Receiver operating characteristic curve area was 0.91. Pragmatic clinical scoring, by standardising diagnosis, may help differentiate FCS from MCS, may alleviate the need for systematic genotyping in patients with severe HTG and may help identify high-priority candidates for genotyping.

11 Guideline German National Guideline for Treating Chronic Respiratory Failure with Invasive and Non-Invasive Ventilation - Revised Edition 2017: Part 2. 2018

Windisch, Wolfram / Geiseler, Jens / Simon, Karsten / Walterspacher, Stephan / Dreher, Michael / Anonymous290953. ·Department of Pneumology, Cologne Merheim Hospital, Kliniken der Stadt Köln gGmbH, Cologne, Germany. · Faculty of Health/School of Medicine, Witten/Herdecke University, Witten, Germany. · Medical Clinic IV, Pneumology, Sleep medicine and Mechanical Ventilation, Paracelsus-Klinik Marl, Marl, Germany. · Fachkrankenhaus Kloster Grafschaft GmbH, Center for Pneumology and Allergology, Schmallenberg, Germany. · Medical Clinic II, Department of Pneumology, Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Klinikum Konstanz, Konstanz, Germany. · Division of Pneumology, University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Aachen, Germany. ·Respiration · Pubmed #29945156.

ABSTRACT: Today, invasive and non-invasive home mechanical ventilation have become a well-established treatment option. Consequently, in 2010, the German Respiratory Society (DGP) has leadingly published the guidelines on "Non-Invasive and Invasive Mechanical Ventilation for Treatment of Chronic Respiratory Failure." However, continuing technical evolutions, new scientific insights, and health care developments require an extensive revision of the guidelines. For this reason, the updated guidelines are now published. Thereby, the existing chapters, namely technical issues, organizational structures in Germany, qualification criteria, disease-specific recommendations including special features in pediatrics as well as ethical aspects and palliative care, have been updated according to the current literature and the health care developments in Germany. New chapters added to the guidelines include the topics of home mechanical ventilation in paraplegic patients and in those with failure of prolonged weaning. In the current guidelines, different societies as well as professional and expert associations have been involved when compared to the 2010 guidelines. Importantly, disease-specific aspects are now covered by the German Interdisciplinary Society of Home Mechanical Ventilation (DIGAB). In addition, societies and associations directly involved in the care of patients receiving home mechanical ventilation have been included in the current process. Importantly, associations responsible for decisions on costs in the health care system and patient organizations have now been involved.

12 Guideline Nutritional Considerations in Pediatric Pancreatitis: A Position Paper from the NASPGHAN Pancreas Committee and ESPGHAN Cystic Fibrosis/Pancreas Working Group. 2018

Abu-El-Haija, Maisam / Uc, Aliye / Werlin, Steven L / Freeman, Alvin Jay / Georgieva, Miglena / Jojkić-Pavkov, Danijela / Kalnins, Daina / Kochavi, Brigitte / Koot, Bart G P / Van Biervliet, Stephanie / Walkowiak, Jaroslaw / Wilschanski, Michael / Morinville, Veronique D. ·Division of Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH. · Stead Family Children's Hospital, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA. · Department of Pediatrics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI. · Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA. · Second Pediatric Clinic, University Hospital St Marina, Varna, Bulgaria. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Institute for Child and Youth Health Care of Vojvodina, Medical Faculty, University of Novi Sad, Novi Sad, Serbia. · Department of Clinical Dietetics, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Pediatric Gastroenterology Unit, The Edmond and Lily Safra Children's Hospital, The Haim Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan, Israel. · Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. · Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology & Metabolic Diseases, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland. · Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hadassah Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel. · Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Montreal Children's Hospital, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ·J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr · Pubmed #29927872.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Wide variations exist in how physicians manage the nutritional aspects of children affected by acute pancreatitis (AP), acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP), and chronic (CP) pancreatitis. Better consensus for optimal management is needed. METHODS: This consensus statement on nutrition in pediatric pancreatic diseases was developed through a joint ESPGHAN-NASPGHAN working group that performed an evidence-based search of the literature on nutrition in AP, ARP, and CP with a focus on pediatrics. The literature was summarized, quality of evidence reviewed, and expert recommendations developed. The authorship met to discuss the evidence and statements. Voting on recommendations occurred over 2 rounds based on feedback. A consensus of at least 75% was required to approve a recommendation. Areas requiring further research were identified. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: The literature on nutrition in pediatric pancreatitis is limited. Children with mild AP benefit from starting an early nutritional regimen in the course of the attack. Early nutrition should be attempted in severe AP when possible; enteral nutrition is preferred over parenteral nutrition. Children with ARP are likely to tolerate and benefit from a regular diet. Children with CP need ongoing assessment for growth and nutritional deficiencies, exocrine and endocrine insufficiencies. CONCLUSIONS: This document presents the first authoritative recommendations on nutritional considerations in pediatric pancreatitis. Future research should address the gaps in knowledge particularly relating to optimal nutrition for AP in children, role of diet or dietary supplements on recurrent attacks of pancreatitis and pain episodes, monitoring practices to detect early growth and nutritional deficiencies in CP and identifying risk factors that predispose children to these deficiencies.

13 Guideline Consensus document on the progression and treatment response criteria in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. 2018

Merino-Casabiel, X / Aller, J / Arbizu, J / García-Figueiras, R / González, C / Grande, E / Jiménez-Fonseca, P / Sevilla, M I / Capdevila, J. ·Radiology Department, Hospital Universitario Vall d'Hebron, Barcelona, Spain. · Endocrinology Department, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro de Majadahonda, Madrid, Spain. · Nuclear Medicine Department, Clínica Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona, Spain. · Radiology Department, Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, A Coruña, Spain. · Radiology Department, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro de Majadahonda, Madrid, Spain. · Medical Oncology Department, Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, Spain. · Medical Oncology Department, Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias, Oviedo, Spain. · Medical Oncology Department, Investigación Clínica y Traslacional en Cáncer, Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas de Málaga (IBIMA), Hospital Universitario Regional y Virgen de la Victoria de Málaga, Malaga, Spain. · Medical Oncology Department and Gastrointestinal and Endocrine Tumor Unit, Hospital Universitario Vall d'Hebron, Vall d'Hebron Institute of Oncology (VHIO), Pg Vall d'Hebron, 119-129, 08035, Barcelona, Spain. jacapdevila@vhebron.net. ·Clin Transl Oncol · Pubmed #29766455.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors are a heterogeneous group of low incidence neoplasms characterized by a low proliferative activity and slow growth. Their response to targeted therapies is heterogeneous and often does not lead to tumor shrinkage. Thus, evaluation of the therapeutic response should differ from other kind of tumors. METHODS: To answer relevant questions about which techniques are best in the assessment of progression or treatment response a RAND/UCLA-based consensus process was implemented. Relevant clinical questions were listed followed by a systematic search of the literature. The expert panel answered all questions with recommendations, combining available evidence and expert opinion. Recommendations were validated through a questionnaire and a participatory meeting. RESULTS: Expert recommendations regarding imaging tools for tumor assessment and evaluation of progression were agreed upon. Available imaging techniques were reviewed and recommendations for best patient monitoring practice and the best way to evaluate treatment response were formulated.

14 Guideline Recommendations for Diagnosis and Management of Autoimmune Pancreatitis in Childhood: Consensus From INSPPIRE. 2018

Scheers, Isabelle / Palermo, Joseph J / Freedman, Steven / Wilschanski, Michael / Shah, Uzma / Abu-El-Haija, Maisam / Barth, Bradley / Fishman, Douglas S / Gariepy, Cheryl / Giefer, Matthew J / Heyman, Melvin B / Himes, Ryan W / Husain, Sohail Z / Lin, Tom K / Liu, Quin / Lowe, Mark / Mascarenhas, Maria / Morinville, Veronique / Ooi, Chee Y / Perito, Emily R / Piccoli, David A / Pohl, John F / Schwarzenberg, Sarah J / Troendle, David / Werlin, Steven / Zimmerman, Bridget / Uc, Aliye / Gonska, Tanja. ·Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Cliniques Universitaires St Luc, Brussels, Belgium. · Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH. · Harvard Medical School, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA. · Hadassah Hebrew University Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel. · Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, Boston, MA. · University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas. · Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX. · Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH. · Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, WA. · University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA. · Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Pittsburgh, PA. · Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA. · Washington University School of Medicine, St-Louis, MO. · The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA. · Montreal Children's Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada. · Discipline of Paediatrics, School of Women's and Children's Health Medicine, University of New South Wales and Sydney Children's Hospital Randwick, Sydney, Australia. · University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT. · University of Minnesota, Masonic Children's Hospital, Minneapolis, MN. · Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI. · University of Iowa, Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA. ·J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr · Pubmed #29746340.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) represents a complex immune-mediated pancreas disorder. Pediatric AIP (P-AIP) is rare. We have recently summarized the characteristic features of P-AIP. We now aim to develop recommendation statements to standardize the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to P-AIP and facilitate future research in the field. METHODS: A panel of pediatric gastroenterologists participating in the International Study Group of Pediatric Pancreatitis: In search for a cuRE was formed to discuss and then vote on 15 recommendation statements. A consensus of at least 80% was obtained following 3 voting rounds and revision of the statements. RESULTS: We have now generated 15 statements to help standardize the approach to diagnosis and management of P-AIP. CONCLUSIONS: The first P-AIP recommendation statements developed by the International Study Group of Pediatric Pancreatitis: In search for a cuRE group are intended to bring standardization to the diagnosis and treatment of this rare childhood disorder. These statements may help guide a uniform approach to patient care and facilitate future research studies.

15 Guideline Recommended parameters for pathology reporting of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (GEP-NETs). 2018

Anonymous1370945. · ·Malays J Pathol · Pubmed #29704389.

ABSTRACT: No abstract available.

16 Guideline Endoscopic management of acute necrotizing pancreatitis: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) evidence-based multidisciplinary guidelines. 2018

Arvanitakis, Marianna / Dumonceau, Jean-Marc / Albert, Jörg / Badaoui, Abdenor / Bali, Maria Antonietta / Barthet, Marc / Besselink, Marc / Deviere, Jacques / Oliveira Ferreira, Alexandre / Gyökeres, Tibor / Hritz, Istvan / Hucl, Tomas / Milashka, Marianna / Papanikolaou, Ioannis S / Poley, Jan-Werner / Seewald, Stefan / Vanbiervliet, Geoffroy / van Lienden, Krijn / van Santvoort, Hjalmar / Voermans, Rogier / Delhaye, Myriam / van Hooft, Jeanin. ·Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Digestive Oncology, Erasme University Hospital Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium. · Gedyt Endoscopy Center, Buenos Aires, Argentina. · Robert-Bosch-Krankenhaus, Abteilung für Gastroenterologie, Hepatologie und Endokrinologie, Stuttgart, Germany. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Université catholique de Louvain, CHU UCL Namur, Yvoir, Belgium. · Service d'Hépato-gastroentérologie, Hôpital Nord, Marseille, France. · Department of Surgery, Amsterdam Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Academic Medical Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Gastroenterology Unit, Department of Surgery, Hospital Beatriz Ângelo, Loures, Portugal. · Dept. of Gastroenterology, Medical Centre Hungarian Defense Forces, Budapest, Hungary. · Semmelweis University, 1st Department of Surgery, Endoscopy Unit, Budapest, Hungary. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Institute of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. · Service de Gastroentérologie et Hépatologie, Hôpital Desgenettes, Lyon, France. · Hepatogastroenterology Unit, Second Department of Internal Medicine, Propaedeutic, Research Institute and Diabetes Center, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University, Attikon University General Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Gastroenterologie, Klinik Hirslanden, Zurich, Switzerland. · Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nice, Pole D.A.R.E, Endoscopie Digestive, Nice, France. · Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, St. Antonius Hospital Nieuwegein, The Netherlands and Department of Surgical Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht Cancer Center, The Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Endoscopy · Pubmed #29631305.

ABSTRACT: 1:  ESGE suggests using contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) as the first-line imaging modality on admission when indicated and up to the 4th week from onset in the absence of contraindications. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be used instead of CT in patients with contraindications to contrast-enhanced CT, and after the 4th week from onset when invasive intervention is considered because the contents (liquid vs. solid) of pancreatic collections are better characterized by MRI and evaluation of pancreatic duct integrity is possible. Weak recommendation, low quality evidence. 2:  ESGE recommends against routine percutaneous fine needle aspiration (FNA) of (peri)pancreatic collections. Strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence. FNA should be performed only if there is suspicion of infection and clinical/imaging signs are unclear. Weak recommendation, low quality evidence. 3:  ESGE recommends initial goal-directed intravenous fluid therapy with Ringer's lactate (e. g. 5 - 10 mL/kg/h) at onset. Fluid requirements should be patient-tailored and reassessed at frequent intervals. Strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence. 4:  ESGE recommends against antibiotic or probiotic prophylaxis of infectious complications in acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Strong recommendation, high quality evidence. 5:  ESGE recommends invasive intervention for patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis and clinically suspected or proven infected necrosis. Strong recommendation, low quality evidence.ESGE suggests that the first intervention for infected necrosis should be delayed for 4 weeks if tolerated by the patient. Weak recommendation, low quality evidence. 6:  ESGE recommends performing endoscopic or percutaneous drainage of (suspected) infected walled-off necrosis as the first interventional method, taking into account the location of the walled-off necrosis and local expertise. Strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence. 7:  ESGE suggests that, in the absence of improvement following endoscopic transmural drainage of walled-off necrosis, endoscopic necrosectomy or minimally invasive surgery (if percutaneous drainage has already been performed) is to be preferred over open surgery as the next therapeutic step, taking into account the location of the walled-off necrosis and local expertise. Weak recommendation, low quality evidence. 8:  ESGE recommends long-term indwelling of transluminal plastic stents in patients with disconnected pancreatic duct syndrome. Strong recommendation, low quality evidence. Lumen-apposing metal stents should be retrieved within 4 weeks to avoid stent-related adverse effects.Strong recommendation, low quality evidence.

17 Guideline European evidence-based guidelines on pancreatic cystic neoplasms. 2018

Anonymous2761112. · ·Gut · Pubmed #29574408.

ABSTRACT: Evidence-based guidelines on the management of pancreatic cystic neoplasms (PCN) are lacking. This guideline is a joint initiative of the European Study Group on Cystic Tumours of the Pancreas, United European Gastroenterology, European Pancreatic Club, European-African Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association, European Digestive Surgery, and the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. It replaces the 2013 European consensus statement guidelines on PCN. European and non-European experts performed systematic reviews and used GRADE methodology to answer relevant clinical questions on nine topics (biomarkers, radiology, endoscopy, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN), serous cystic neoplasm, rare cysts, (neo)adjuvant treatment, and pathology). Recommendations include conservative management, relative and absolute indications for surgery. A conservative approach is recommended for asymptomatic MCN and IPMN measuring <40 mm without an enhancing nodule. Relative indications for surgery in IPMN include a main pancreatic duct (MPD) diameter between 5 and 9.9 mm or a cyst diameter ≥40 mm. Absolute indications for surgery in IPMN, due to the high-risk of malignant transformation, include jaundice, an enhancing mural nodule >5 mm, and MPD diameter >10 mm. Lifelong follow-up of IPMN is recommended in patients who are fit for surgery. The European evidence-based guidelines on PCN aim to improve the diagnosis and management of PCN.

18 Guideline Consensus statement on mandatory measurements in pancreatic cancer trials (COMM-PACT) for systemic treatment of unresectable disease. 2018

Ter Veer, Emil / van Rijssen, L Bengt / Besselink, Marc G / Mali, Rosa M A / Berlin, Jordan D / Boeck, Stefan / Bonnetain, Franck / Chau, Ian / Conroy, Thierry / Van Cutsem, Eric / Deplanque, Gael / Friess, Helmut / Glimelius, Bengt / Goldstein, David / Herrmann, Richard / Labianca, Roberto / Van Laethem, Jean-Luc / Macarulla, Teresa / van der Meer, Jonathan H M / Neoptolemos, John P / Okusaka, Takuji / O'Reilly, Eileen M / Pelzer, Uwe / Philip, Philip A / van der Poel, Marcel J / Reni, Michele / Scheithauer, Werner / Siveke, Jens T / Verslype, Chris / Busch, Olivier R / Wilmink, Johanna W / van Oijen, Martijn G H / van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M. ·Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Center Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Cancer Center Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA. · Department of Internal Medicine III, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Klinikum Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Munich, Germany. · Methodology and Quality of Life in Oncology Unit, University Hospital of Besançon, Besançon, France. · Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London and Surrey, UK. · Department of Medical Oncology, Institut de Cancérologie de Lorraine and Lorraine University, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, France. · Department of Gastroenterology and Digestive Oncology, University Hospitals Gasthuisberg Leuven and KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Oncology, Hôpital Riviera-Chablais, Vevey, Switzerland. · Department of Surgery, Technical University of Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich, Germany. · Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. · Nelune Cancer Centre, Prince of Wales Hospital, Prince of Wales Clinical School University of New South Wales, Randwick, NSW, Australia. · Department of Medical Oncology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland. · Cancer Center, ASST Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Gastrointestinal Cancer Unit, Erasme University Hospital, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium. · Vall d'Hebron University Hospital (HUVH), Vall d'Hebron Institute of Oncology (VHIO), Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. · Gastrointestinal Oncology Service, Division of Solid Tumor Oncology, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Hematology, Oncology and Tumor Immunology, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany; Freie Universität Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Berlin, Germany; Berlin Institute of Health, Berlin, Germany. · Department of Oncology, Karmanos Cancer Center, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Department of Internal Medicine I, Medical University Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Division of Solid Tumor Translational Oncology, West German Cancer Cancer, University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany; German Cancer Consortium (DKTK, partner site Essen) and German Cancer Research Center, DKFZ, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Digestive Oncology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Center Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands. Electronic address: h.vanlaarhoven@amc.uva.nl. ·Lancet Oncol · Pubmed #29508762.

ABSTRACT: Variations in the reporting of potentially confounding variables in studies investigating systemic treatments for unresectable pancreatic cancer pose challenges in drawing accurate comparisons between findings. In this Review, we establish the first international consensus on mandatory baseline and prognostic characteristics in future trials for the treatment of unresectable pancreatic cancer. We did a systematic literature search to find phase 3 trials investigating first-line systemic treatment for locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer to identify baseline characteristics and prognostic variables. We created a structured overview showing the reporting frequencies of baseline characteristics and the prognostic relevance of identified variables. We used a modified Delphi panel of two rounds involving an international panel of 23 leading medical oncologists in the field of pancreatic cancer to develop a consensus on the various variables identified. In total, 39 randomised controlled trials that had data on 15 863 patients were included, of which 32 baseline characteristics and 26 prognostic characteristics were identified. After two consensus rounds, 23 baseline characteristics and 12 prognostic characteristics were designated as mandatory for future pancreatic cancer trials. The COnsensus statement on Mandatory Measurements in unresectable PAncreatic Cancer Trials (COMM-PACT) identifies a mandatory set of baseline and prognostic characteristics to allow adequate comparison of outcomes between pancreatic cancer studies.

19 Guideline Acute Pancreatitis Guideline. 2018

Crockett, Seth / Falck-Ytter, Yngve / Wani, Sachin / Gardner, Timothy B. ·University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC. · Louis Stokes VA Medical Center and Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado. · Section of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #29501369.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Guideline ACG Clinical Guideline: Diagnosis and Management of Pancreatic Cysts. 2018

Elta, Grace H / Enestvedt, Brintha K / Sauer, Bryan G / Lennon, Anne Marie. ·Division of Gastroenterology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology, Oregon Health and Sciences University, Portland, Oregon, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology, The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. ·Am J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #29485131.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cysts are very common with the majority incidentally identified. There are several types of pancreatic cysts; some types can contain cancer or have malignant potential, whereas others are benign. However, even the types of cysts with malignant potential rarely progress to cancer. At the present time, the only viable treatment for pancreatic cysts is surgical excision, which is associated with a high morbidity and occasional mortality. The small risk of malignant transformation, the high risks of surgical treatment, and the lack of high-quality prospective studies have led to contradictory recommendations for their immediate management and for their surveillance. This guideline will provide a practical approach to pancreatic cyst management and recommendations for cyst surveillance for the general gastroenterologist.

21 Guideline Consensus guidelines on the optimal management in interventional EUS procedures: results from the Asian EUS group RAND/UCLA expert panel. 2018

Teoh, Anthony Y B / Dhir, Vinay / Kida, Mitsuhiro / Yasuda, Ichiro / Jin, Zhen Dong / Seo, Dong Wan / Almadi, Majid / Ang, Tiing Leong / Hara, Kazuo / Hilmi, Ida / Itoi, Takao / Lakhtakia, Sundeep / Matsuda, Koji / Pausawasdi, Nonthalee / Puri, Rajesh / Tang, Raymond S / Wang, Hsiu-Po / Yang, Ai Ming / Hawes, Robert / Varadarajulu, Shyam / Yasuda, Kenjiro / Ho, Lawrence Khek Yu. ·Department of Surgery, Prince of Wales Hospital, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong. · Baldota Institute of Digestive Sciences, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India. · Department of Gastroenterology, Kitasato University Hospital, Sagamihara City, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology, Teikyo University Mizonokuchi Hospital, Kawasaki, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China. · Department of Gastroenterology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Gastroenterology, King Khalid University Hospital, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Changi General Hospital, Singapore. · Department of Gastroenterology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Department of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Department of Gastroenterology, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology, Asian Institute of Gastroenterology, Hyderabad, Telangana, India. · St Marianna University School of Medicine, Yokohama City Seibu Hospital, Kawasaki, Japan. · Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand. · Department of Gastroenterology, Institute of Digestive and Hepatobiliary Sciences Medanta, The Medicity, Gurgaon, India. · Institute of Digestive Disease, Prince of Wales Hospital, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong. · Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University College of Medicine and Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. · Department of Gastroenterology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Dongcheng-qu, Beijing, China. · Center for Interventional Endoscopy, Florida Hospital, Orlando, Florida, USA. · Department of Gastroenterology, Kyoto Second Red Cross Hospital, Kyoto, Japan. · Department of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore. ·Gut · Pubmed #29463614.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Interventional endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) procedures are gaining popularity and the most commonly performed procedures include EUS-guided drainage of pancreatic pseudocyst, EUS-guided biliary drainage, EUS-guided pancreatic duct drainage and EUS-guided celiac plexus ablation. The aim of this paper is to formulate a set of practice guidelines addressing various aspects of the above procedures. METHODS: Formulation of the guidelines was based on the best scientific evidence available. The RAND/UCLA appropriateness methodology (RAM) was used. Panellists recruited comprised experts in surgery, interventional EUS, interventional radiology and oncology from 11 countries. Between June 2014 and October 2016, the panellists met in meetings to discuss and vote on the clinical scenarios for each of the interventional EUS procedures in question. RESULTS: A total of 15 statements on EUS-guided drainage of pancreatic pseudocyst, 15 statements on EUS-guided biliary drainage, 12 statements on EUS-guided pancreatic duct drainage and 14 statements on EUS-guided celiac plexus ablation were formulated. The statements addressed the indications for the procedures, technical aspects, pre- and post-procedural management, management of complications, and competency and training in the procedures. All statements except one were found to be appropriate. Randomised studies to address clinical questions in a number of aspects of the procedures are urgently required. CONCLUSIONS: The current guidelines on interventional EUS procedures are the first published by an endoscopic society. These guidelines provide an in-depth review of the current evidence and standardise the management of the procedures.

22 Guideline Comparison of Practice Guidelines, BRCAPRO, and Genetic Counselor Estimates to Identify Germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations in Pancreatic Cancer. 2018

Grant, Robert C / Holter, Spring / Borgida, Ayelet / Dhani, Neesha C / Hedley, David W / Knox, Jennifer J / Akbari, Mohammad R / Zogopoulos, George / Gallinger, Steven. ·Division of Medical Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. robert.grant@utoronto.ca. · Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, Canada. robert.grant@utoronto.ca. · Princess Margaret Cancer Centre-Ontario Power Generation, 700 University Avenue, Work Station 7W460, Toronto, ON, M5G 1Z5, Canada. robert.grant@utoronto.ca. · Ontario Pancreas Cancer Study, Toronto, Canada. · Division of Medical Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · Wallace McCain Centre for Pancreatic Cancer, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · Women's College Research Institute, Toronto, Canada. · Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Canada. · Goodman Cancer Research Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. · Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, Canada. · Princess Margaret Cancer Centre-Ontario Power Generation, 700 University Avenue, Work Station 7W460, Toronto, ON, M5G 1Z5, Canada. · Division of General Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. ·J Genet Couns · Pubmed #29441441.

ABSTRACT: Germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA) mutation carriers with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) may benefit from precision therapies and their relatives should undergo tailored cancer prevention. In this study, we compared strategies to identify BRCA carriers with PDAC. Incident cases of PDAC were prospectively recruited for BRCA sequencing. Probands were evaluated using the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) and the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care (MOHLTC) guidelines. The probability of each proband carrying a mutation was estimated by surveying genetic counselors and using BRCAPRO. BRCA mutations were detected in 22/484 (4.5%) probands. 152/484 (31.2%) and 16/484 (3.3%) probands met the NCCN and MOHLTC guidelines, respectively. The NCCN guidelines had higher sensitivity than the MOHLTC guidelines (0.864 versus 0.227, P < 0.001) but lower specificity (0.712 versus 0.976, P < 0.001). One hundred and nineteen genetic counselors completed the survey. Discrimination was similar between genetic counselors and BRCAPRO (area-under-the-curve: 0.755 and 0.775, respectively, P = 0.702). Genetic counselors generally overestimated (P = 0.008), whereas BRCAPRO severely underestimated (P < 0.001), the probability that each proband carried a mutation. Our results indicate that the NCCN guidelines and genetic counselors accurately identify BRCA mutations in PDAC, while the MOHLTC guidelines and BRCAPRO should be updated to account for the association between BRCA and PDAC.

23 Guideline Management of airway mucus hypersecretion in chronic airway inflammatory disease: Chinese expert consensus (English edition). 2018

Shen, Yongchun / Huang, Shaoguang / Kang, Jian / Lin, Jiangtao / Lai, Kefang / Sun, Yongchang / Xiao, Wei / Yang, Lan / Yao, Wanzhen / Cai, Shaoxi / Huang, Kewu / Wen, Fuqiang. ·Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, West China Hospital of Sichuan University and Division of Pulmonary Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy of China, Chengdu. · Department of Pulmonary Disease, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai. · Department of Respiratory Medicine, Institute of Respiratory Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang. · Department of Respiratory Diseases, China-Japan Friendship Hospital, Beijing. · State Key Laboratory of Respiratory Disease, National Clinical Research Center for Respiratory Disease, Guangzhou Institute of Respiratory Diseases, First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou. · Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing. · Department of Respiratory Medicine, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan. · Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an. · Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou. · Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Beijing Chao-Yang Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People's Republic of China. ·Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis · Pubmed #29430174.

ABSTRACT: Airway mucus hypersecretion is one of the most important characteristics of chronic airway inflammatory diseases. Evaluating and managing airway mucus hypersecretion is of great importance for patients with chronic airway inflammatory diseases. This consensus statement describes the pathogenesis, clinical features, and the management of airway mucus hypersecretion in patients with chronic airway inflammatory diseases in the People's Republic of China. The statement has been written particularly for respiratory researchers, pulmonary physicians, and patients.

24 Guideline American Gastroenterological Association Institute Guideline on Initial Management of Acute Pancreatitis. 2018

Crockett, Seth D / Wani, Sachin / Gardner, Timothy B / Falck-Ytter, Yngve / Barkun, Alan N / Anonymous5100935. ·Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Electronic address: sethc@med.unc.edu. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado. · Section of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire. · Division of Gastroenterology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio; Louis Stokes VA Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Division of Gastroenterology, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #29409760.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

25 Guideline Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Pulmonary Guidelines. Use of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Modulator Therapy in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis. 2018

Ren, Clement L / Morgan, Rebecca L / Oermann, Christopher / Resnick, Helaine E / Brady, Cynthia / Campbell, Annette / DeNagel, Richard / Guill, Margaret / Hoag, Jeffrey / Lipton, Andrew / Newton, Thomas / Peters, Stacy / Willey-Courand, Donna Beth / Naureckas, Edward T. ·1 Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana. · 2 McMaster University Faculty of Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · 3 Children's Mercy-Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri. · 4 Resnick, Chodorow, and Associates, Silver Spring, Maryland. · 5 Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, Saint Paul, Minnesota. · 6 Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences, Kansas City, Missouri. · 7 Patient Community Advisor, New York, New York. · 8 Dartmouth College Geisel School of Medicine, Hanover, New Hampshire. · 9 Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · 10 Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland. · 11 Miller Children's and Women's Hospital Long Beach, Long Beach, California. · 12 South Dakota State University, College of Pharmacy, Brookings, South Dakota. · 13 University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas; and. · 14 University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. ·Ann Am Thorac Soc · Pubmed #29342367.

ABSTRACT: RATIONALE: Cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) modulators are a new class of medications targeting the underlying defect in CF. Ivacaftor (IVA) and IVA combined with lumacaftor (LUM; IVA/LUM) have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in patients with CF. However, the FDA label for these medications encompasses patient groups that were not studied as part of the drug approval process. CF clinicians, patients, and their families have recognized a need for recommendations to guide the use of these medications. OBJECTIVE: Develop evidence-based guidelines for CFTR modulator therapy in patients with CF. METHODS: A multidisciplinary committee of CF caregivers and patient representatives was assembled. A methodologist, an epidemiologist, a medical librarian, and a biostatistician were recruited to assist with the literature search, evidence grading, and generation of recommendations. The committee developed clinical questions using the Patient-Intervention-Comparison-Outcome format. A systematic review was conducted to find relevant publications. The evidence was then evaluated using the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) approach, and recommendations were made based on this analysis. RESULTS: For adults and children aged 6 years and older with CF due to gating mutations other than G551D or R117H, the guideline panel made a conditional recommendation for treatment with IVA. For those with the R117H mutation, the guideline panel made a conditional recommendation for treatment with IVA for 1) adults aged 18 years or older, and 2) children aged 6-17 years with a forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV CONCLUSIONS: Using the GRADE approach, we have made recommendations for the use of CFTR modulators in patients with CF. These recommendations will be of help to CF clinicians, patients, and their families in guiding decisions regarding use of these medications.

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