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Pancreatic Neoplasms HELP
Based on 24,614 articles since 2006
|||| 14 

These are the 24614 published articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms that originated from Worldwide during 2006-2015.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline American gastroenterological association institute guideline on the diagnosis and management of asymptomatic neoplastic pancreatic cysts. 2015

Vege, Santhi Swaroop / Ziring, Barry / Jain, Rajeev / Moayyedi, Paul / Anonymous4270806 / Anonymous4280806. ·Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Division of Internal Medicine, Sidney Kimmel College of Medicine, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Texas Digestive Disease Consultants, Dallas, Texas. · Division of Gastroenterology, Hamilton Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #25805375.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Guideline Appropriateness of systemic treatments in unresectable metastatic well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. 2015

Strosberg, Jonathan R / Fisher, George A / Benson, Al B / Anthony, Lowell B / Arslan, Bulent / Gibbs, John F / Greeno, Edward / Iyer, Renuka V / Kim, Michelle K / Maples, William J / Philip, Philip A / Wolin, Edward M / Cherepanov, Dasha / Broder, Michael S. ·Jonathan R Strosberg, Department of Gastrointestinal Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL 33612, United States. ·World J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #25741154.

ABSTRACT: AIM: To evaluate systemic treatment choices in unresectable metastatic well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) and provide consensus treatment recommendations. METHODS: Systemic treatment options for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors have expanded in recent years to include somatostatin analogs, angiogenesis inhibitors, inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin and cytotoxic agents. At this time, there is little data to guide treatment selection and sequence. We therefore assembled a panel of expert physicians to evaluate systemic treatment choices and provide consensus treatment recommendations. Treatment appropriateness ratings were collected using the RAND/UCLA modified Delphi process. After studying the literature, a multidisciplinary panel of 10 physicians assessed the appropriateness of various medical treatment scenarios on a 1-9 scale. Ratings were done both before and after an extended discussion of the evidence. Quantitative measurements of agreement were made and consensus statements developed from the second round ratings. RESULTS: Specialties represented were medical and surgical oncology, interventional radiology, and gastroenterology. Panelists had practiced for a mean of 15.5 years (range: 6-33). Among 202 rated scenarios, disagreement decreased from 13.2% (26 scenarios) before the face-to-face discussion of evidence to 1% (2) after. In the final ratings, 46.5% (94 scenarios) were rated inappropriate, 21.8% (44) were uncertain, and 30.7% (62) were appropriate. Consensus statements from the scenarios included: (1) it is appropriate to use somatostatin analogs as first line therapy in patients with hormonally functional tumors and may be appropriate in patients who are asymptomatic; (2) it is appropriate to use everolimus, sunitinib, or cytotoxic chemotherapy therapy as first line therapy in patients with symptomatic or progressive tumors; and (3) beyond first line, these same agents can be used. In patients with uncontrolled secretory symptoms, octreotide LAR doses can be titrated up to 60 mg every 4 wk or up to 40 mg every 3 or 4 wk. CONCLUSION: Using the Delphi process allowed physician experts to systematically obtain a consensus on the appropriateness of a variety of medical therapies in patients with PNETs.

3 Guideline [Pancreatic cancer. Evidence based management guidelines of the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group]. 2015

Szmola, Richárd / Farkas, Gyula / Hegyi, Péter / Czakó, László / Dubravcsik, Zsolt / Hritz, István / Kelemen, Dezső / Lásztity, Natália / Morvay, Zita / Oláh, Attila / Párniczky, Andrea / Rubovszky, Gábor / Sahin-Tóth, Miklós / Szentkereszti, Zsolt / Szücs, Ákos / Takács, Tamás / Tiszlavicz, László / Pap, Ákos / Anonymous1800804. ·Országos Onkológiai Intézet Intervenciós Gasztroenterológiai Részleg Budapest Semmelweis Egyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar II. Belgyógyászati Klinika Budapest. · Szegedi Tudományegyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar, Szent-Györgyi Albert Klinikai Központ Sebészeti Klinika Szeged. · Szegedi Tudományegyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar, Szent-Györgyi Albert Klinikai Központ I. Belgyógyászati Klinika Szeged MTA-SZTE Lendület Gasztroenterológiai Multidiszciplináris Kutatócsoport Szeged. · Szegedi Tudományegyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar, Szent-Györgyi Albert Klinikai Központ I. Belgyógyászati Klinika Szeged. · Bács-Kiskun Megyei Kórház Gasztroenterológia Kecskemét. · Szegedi Tudományegyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar, Szent-Györgyi Albert Klinikai Központ I. Belgyógyászati Klinika Szeged Bács-Kiskun Megyei Kórház Gasztroenterológia Kecskemét. · Pécsi Tudományegyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar Klinikai Központ, Sebészeti Klinika Pécs. · Heim Pál Gyermekkórház-Rendelőintézet Budapest. · Szegedi Tudományegyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar, Szent-Györgyi Albert Klinikai Központ Radiológiai Klinika Szeged. · Petz Aladár Megyei Oktató Kórház Sebészeti Osztály Győr. · Országos Onkológiai Intézet B Belgyógyászati-Onkológiai és Klinikai Farmakológiai Osztály Budapest. · Boston University Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine Department of Molecular and Cell Biology Boston Massachusetts USA. · Debreceni Egyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar, Orvos- és Egészségtudományi Centrum Sebészeti Klinika Debrecen. · Semmelweis Egyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar I. Sebészeti Klinika Budapest. · Szegedi Tudományegyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar, Szent-Györgyi Albert Klinikai Központ Pathologiai Intézet Szeged. · Péterfy Sándor utcai Kórház-Rendelőintézet Budapest. · ·Orv Hetil · Pubmed #25662149.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer is a disease with a poor prognosis usually diagnosed at a late stage. Therefore, screening, diagnosis, treatment and palliation of pancreatic cancer patients require up-to-date and evidence based management guidelines. The Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group proposed to prepare an evidence based guideline based on the available scientific evidence and international guidelines. The preparatory and consultation board appointed by the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group translated and complemented/modified the recent international guidelines. 37 clinical statements in 10 major topics were defined (Risk factors and genetics, Screening, Diagnosis, Staging, Surgical care, Pathology, Systemic treatment, Radiation therapy, Palliation and supportive care, Follow-up and recurrence). Evidence was graded according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) grading system. The draft of the guideline was presented and discussed at the consensus meeting in September 12, 2014. Statements were accepted with either total (more than 95% of votes, n = 15) or strong agreement (more than 70% of votes, n = 22). The present guideline is the first evidence-based pancreatic cancer guideline in Hungary that provides a solid ground for teaching purposes, offers quick reference for daily patient care and guides financing options. The authors strongly believe that these guidelines will become a standard reference for pancreatic cancer treatment in Hungary.

4 Guideline [Chronic pancreatitis. Evidence based management guidelines of the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group]. 2015

Takács, Tamás / Czakó, László / Dubravcsik, Zsolt / Farkas, Gyula / Hegyi, Péter / Hritz, István / Kelemen, Dezső / Lásztity, Natália / Morvay, Zita / Oláh, Attila / Pap, Ákos / Párniczky, Andrea / Patai, Árpád / Sahin-Tóth, Miklós / Szentkereszti, Zsolt / Szmola, Richárd / Tiszlavicz, László / Szücs, Ákos / Anonymous1770804. ·Szegedi Tudományegyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar, Szent-Györgyi Albert Klinikai Központ I. Belgyógyászati Klinika Szeged. · Bács-Kiskun Megyei Kórház Gasztroenterológia Kecskemét. · Szegedi Tudományegyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar, Szent-Györgyi Albert Klinikai Központ Sebészeti Klinika Szeged. · Szegedi Tudományegyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar, Szent-Györgyi Albert Klinikai Központ I. Belgyógyászati Klinika Szeged MTA-SZTE Lendület Gasztroenterológiai Multidiszciplináris Kutatócsoport Szeged. · Szegedi Tudományegyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar, Szent-Györgyi Albert Klinikai Központ I. Belgyógyászati Klinika Szeged Bács-Kiskun Megyei Kórház Gasztroenterológia Kecskemét. · Pécsi Tudományegyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar Klinikai Központ, Sebészeti Klinika Pécs. · Heim Pál Gyermekkórház-Rendelőintézet Budapest. · Szegedi Tudományegyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar, Szent-Györgyi Albert Klinikai Központ Radiológiai Klinika Szeged. · Petz Aladár Megyei Oktató Kórház Sebészeti Osztály Győr. · Péterfy Sándor utcai Kórház-Rendelőintézet Budapest. · Semmelweis Egyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar II. Belgyógyászati Klinika Budapest. · Boston University Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine Department of Molecular and Cell Biology Boston Massachusetts USA. · Debreceni Egyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar, Orvos- és Egészségtudományi Centrum Sebészeti Klinika Debrecen. · Országos Onkológiai Intézet Intervenciós Gasztroenterológiai Részleg Budapest. · Szegedi Tudományegyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar, Szent-Györgyi Albert Klinikai Központ Pathologiai Intézet Szeged. · Semmelweis Egyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar I. Sebészeti Klinika Budapest. · ·Orv Hetil · Pubmed #25661971.

ABSTRACT: Chronic pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease associated with structural and functional damage of the pancreas. In most cases pain, maldigestion and weight loss are the leading symptoms, which significantly worsen the quality of life. Correct diagnosis and differential diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis and treatment of these patients requires up-to-date and evidence based treatment guidelines. The Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group proposed to prepare an evidence based guideline based on the available international guidelines and evidence. The preparatory and consultation task force appointed by the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group translated and complemented and/or modified the international guidelines if it was necessary. 123 relevant clinical questions in 11 topics were defined. Evidence was classified according to the UpToDate® grading system. The draft of the guidelines were presented and discussed at the consensus meeting in September 12, 2014. All clinical questions were accepted with total or strong agreement. The present guideline is the first evidence based guideline for chronic pancreatitis in Hungary. This guideline provides very important and helpful data for tuition, everyday practice and proper financing of chronic pancreatitis. Therefore, the authors believe that these guidelines will widely become a basic reference in Hungary.

5 Guideline Saudi Oncology Society clinical management guideline series. Pancreatic cancer 2014. 2014

Rahal, Mohammed M / Bazarbashi, Shouki N / Kandil, Magdy S / Al-Shehri, Ahmed S / Alzahrani, Ali M / Aljubran, Ali H / Zekri, Jamal E / Al Olayan, Ashwaq A / Alsharm, Abdullah A / Kabbani, Monther A / Fagih, Mosa A / Anonymous3420798. ·Department of Oncology, Oncology Center, King Fahad Specialist Hospital, Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. E-mail. mohamedrahal@hotmail.com. · ·Saudi Med J · Pubmed #25491225.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Guideline [Borderline resectable pancreatic cancer: ISGPS consensus statement]. 2014

Strobel, O / Büchler, M W / Anonymous5900795. ·Klinik für Allgemein-, Viszeral- und Transplantationschirurgie, Universität Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120, Heidelberg, Deutschland, Oliver.Strobel@med.uni-heidelberg.de. · ·Chirurg · Pubmed #25385138.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Guideline American Pancreatic Association Practice Guidelines in Chronic Pancreatitis: evidence-based report on diagnostic guidelines. 2014

Conwell, Darwin L / Lee, Linda S / Yadav, Dhiraj / Longnecker, Daniel S / Miller, Frank H / Mortele, Koenraad J / Levy, Michael J / Kwon, Richard / Lieb, John G / Stevens, Tyler / Toskes, Phillip P / Gardner, Timothy B / Gelrud, Andres / Wu, Bechien U / Forsmark, Christopher E / Vege, Santhi S. ·From the *Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Department of Internal Medicine, Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH; †Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Endoscopy, Department of Internal Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA; ‡Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA; §Department of Pathology, The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH; ║Department of Radiology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL; ¶Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconness Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; #Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; **Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI; ††Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA; ‡‡Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH; §§Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL; ║║Department of Gastroenterology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL; and ¶¶Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA. · ·Pancreas · Pubmed #25333398.

ABSTRACT: The diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis remains challenging in early stages of the disease. This report defines the diagnostic criteria useful in the assessment of patients with suspected and established chronic pancreatitis. All current diagnostic procedures are reviewed, and evidence-based statements are provided about their utility and limitations. Diagnostic criteria for chronic pancreatitis are classified as definitive, probable, or insufficient evidence. A diagnostic (STEP-wise; survey, tomography, endoscopy, and pancreas function testing) algorithm is proposed that proceeds from a noninvasive to a more invasive approach. This algorithm maximizes specificity (low false-positive rate) in subjects with chronic abdominal pain and equivocal imaging changes. Furthermore, a nomenclature is suggested to further characterize patients with established chronic pancreatitis based on TIGAR-O (toxic, idiopathic, genetic, autoimmune, recurrent, and obstructive) etiology, gland morphology (Cambridge criteria), and physiologic state (exocrine, endocrine function) for uniformity across future multicenter research collaborations. This guideline will serve as a baseline manuscript that will be modified as new evidence becomes available and our knowledge of chronic pancreatitis improves.

8 Guideline Guidelines for time-to-event end-point definitions in trials for pancreatic cancer. Results of the DATECAN initiative (Definition for the Assessment of Time-to-event End-points in CANcer trials). 2014

Bonnetain, Franck / Bonsing, Bert / Conroy, Thierry / Dousseau, Adelaide / Glimelius, Bengt / Haustermans, Karin / Lacaine, François / Van Laethem, Jean Luc / Aparicio, Thomas / Aust, Daniela / Bassi, Claudio / Berger, Virginie / Chamorey, Emmanuel / Chibaudel, Benoist / Dahan, Laeticia / De Gramont, Aimery / Delpero, Jean Robert / Dervenis, Christos / Ducreux, Michel / Gal, Jocelyn / Gerber, Erich / Ghaneh, Paula / Hammel, Pascal / Hendlisz, Alain / Jooste, Valérie / Labianca, Roberto / Latouche, Aurelien / Lutz, Manfred / Macarulla, Teresa / Malka, David / Mauer, Muriel / Mitry, Emmanuel / Neoptolemos, John / Pessaux, Patrick / Sauvanet, Alain / Tabernero, Josep / Taieb, Julien / van Tienhoven, Geertjan / Gourgou-Bourgade, Sophie / Bellera, Carine / Mathoulin-Pélissier, Simone / Collette, Laurence. ·Methodology and Quality of Life Unit in Cancer, EA 3181, University Hospital of Besançon and CTD-INCa Gercor, UNICNCER GERICO, Besançon, France. Electronic address: franck.bonnetain@univ-fcomte.fr. · Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands. · Department of Medical Oncology, Institut de Cancérologie de Lorraine, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy, France. · Bordeaux Segalen University & CHRU, Bordeaux, France. · Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven, Belgium. · Digestive Surgical Department, Tenon hospital, Paris, France. · Gastro Intestinal Cancer Unit Erasme Hospital Brussels, Belgium. · Gastroenterology Department, Avicenne Hospital, Paris 13, Bobigny, France. · Institute for Pathology, University Hospital Carl-Gustav-Carus, Dresden, Germany. · Surgical and Gastroenterological Department, Endocrine and Pancreatic Unit, Hospital of 'G.B.Rossi', University of Verona, Italy. · Institut de Cancérologie de l'Ouest - Centre Paul Papin Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer (CLCC), Angers, France. · Biostatistics Unit, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice, France. · Oncology Department, Hôpital Saint-Antoine & CTD-INCa GERCOR, Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris, UPMC Paris VI, Paris, France. · Gastroenterology Department, Hopital la Timone, Assitance publique des Hopitaux de Marseille, Marseille, France. · Department of Surgery, Institut Paoli Calmettes, Marseille, France. · Department of Surgery, Agia Olga Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Department of Gastroenterology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France. · Biostatistician, Biostatistics Unit, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice, France. · Department of Radiotherapy, Institut fuer Radioonkologie, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Surgical Oncology, Royal Liverpool Hospital, United Kingdom. · Department of Gastroenterology, Beaujon Hospital, Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France. · Digestive Oncology and Gastro-enterology Department, Jules Bordet Institute, Brussels, Belgium. · Digestive Cancer Registry, INSERM U866, Dijon, France. · Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedali Riuniti di Bergamo, Bergame, Italy. · Inserm, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, U1018, Biostatistics Team, Villejuif, France. · Gastroenterology Department, Caritas Hospital, Saarbrücken, Germany. · Department of the Gastrointestinal Tumors and Phase I Unit, Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, Barcelona, Spain. · Statistics Department, EORTC, Brussels, Belgium. · Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Curie, Hôpital René Huguenin, Saint-Cloud, France. · Division of Surgery and Oncology at the University of Liverpool and Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Department of Digestive Surgery, Universitu Hospital Strasbourg, France. · Department of Hepato-pancreatic and Biliary Surgery, Beaujon Hospital, Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France. · Department of Hepato-gastroenterology and Digestive Oncology, Georges Pompidou European hospital, Paris, France. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Academisch Medisch Centrum, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Institut Du Cancer de Montpellier, Comprehensive Cancer Centre, and Data Center for Cancer Clinical Trials, CTD-INCa, Montpellier, France. · Clinical and Epidemiological Research Unit, Institut Bergonie, Comprehensive Cancer Centre, Bordeaux, France; Data Center for Cancer Clinical Trials, CTD-INCa, Bordeaux, France; INSERM, Centre d'Investigation Clinique - Épidémiologie Clinique CIC-EC 7, F-33000 Bordeaux, France. ·Eur J Cancer · Pubmed #25256896.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Using potential surrogate end-points for overall survival (OS) such as Disease-Free- (DFS) or Progression-Free Survival (PFS) is increasingly common in randomised controlled trials (RCTs). However, end-points are too often imprecisely defined which largely contributes to a lack of homogeneity across trials, hampering comparison between them. The aim of the DATECAN (Definition for the Assessment of Time-to-event End-points in CANcer trials)-Pancreas project is to provide guidelines for standardised definition of time-to-event end-points in RCTs for pancreatic cancer. METHODS: Time-to-event end-points currently used were identified from a literature review of pancreatic RCT trials (2006-2009). Academic research groups were contacted for participation in order to select clinicians and methodologists to participate in the pilot and scoring groups (>30 experts). A consensus was built after 2 rounds of the modified Delphi formal consensus approach with the Rand scoring methodology (range: 1-9). RESULTS: For pancreatic cancer, 14 time to event end-points and 25 distinct event types applied to two settings (detectable disease and/or no detectable disease) were considered relevant and included in the questionnaire sent to 52 selected experts. Thirty experts answered both scoring rounds. A total of 204 events distributed over the 14 end-points were scored. After the first round, consensus was reached for 25 items; after the second consensus was reached for 156 items; and after the face-to-face meeting for 203 items. CONCLUSION: The formal consensus approach reached the elaboration of guidelines for standardised definitions of time-to-event end-points allowing cross-comparison of RCTs in pancreatic cancer.

9 Guideline EBM-based Clinical Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer (2013) issued by the Japan Pancreas Society: a synopsis. 2014

Yamaguchi, Koji / Okusaka, Takuji / Shimizu, Kyoko / Furuse, Junji / Ito, Yoshinori / Hanada, Keiji / Shimosegawa, Tooru / Anonymous3420797. ·Department of Advanced Treatment of Pancreatic Diseases, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu yamaguch@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp. · Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Oncology Division, National Cancer Center, Tokyo. · Department of Gastroenterology, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Tokyo. · Department of Internal Medicine, Medical Oncology, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Tokyo. · Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center, Tokyo. · Department of Gastroenterology, JA Onomichi General Hospital, Onomichi. · Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan. · ·Jpn J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #25205672.

ABSTRACT: Clinical practice guidelines for pancreatic cancer based on evidence-based medicine (2006) were published by the Japan Pancreas Society (Committee for revision of clinical guidelines for pancreatic cancer) in March 2009 in Japanese, revised to Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer based on evidence-based medicine (2009) in July 2009 in Japanese and further revised to Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer (2013) in October 2013 in Japanese. These guidelines were established according to evidence-based medicine. A total of 629 papers were collected from among 4612 reports concerning pancreatic cancer listed in PubMed and Igakuchuo Zasshi between May 2007 and January 2011. This new set of guidelines was written by members of the Committee for the Revision of Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer in the Japan Pancreas Society. The guidelines provide an algorithm for the diagnosis (Fig. 1) and treatment (Fig. 2) of pancreatic cancer and address six subjects (Diagnosis, Surgery, Adjuvant therapy, Radiation therapy, Chemotherapy and stent therapy), with 35 clinical questions and 57 recommendations.

10 Guideline SEOM clinical guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (GEP-NENs) 2014. 2014

Garcia-Carbonero, R / JImenez-Fonseca, P / Teulé, A / Barriuso, J / Sevilla, I / Anonymous3870796. ·Medical Oncology Department, Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio, Instituto de Biomedicina de Sevilla (IBIS) (Universidad de Sevilla, CSIC, HUVR), Center affiliated to the Red Temática de Investigación Cooperativa en Cancer (RTICC), Instituto Carlos III, Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation, Av. Manuel Siurot, s/n, 41013, Seville, Spain, rgcarbonero@gmail.com. · ·Clin Transl Oncol · Pubmed #25183048.

ABSTRACT: GEP-NENs are a challenging family of tumors of growing incidence and varied clinical management and behavior. Diagnostic techniques have substantially improved over the past decades and significant advances have been achieved in the understanding of the molecular pathways governing tumor initiation and progression. This has already translated into relevant advances in the clinic. This guideline aims to provide practical recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of GEP-NENs. Diagnostic workup, histological and staging classifications, and the different available therapeutic approaches, including surgery, liver-directed ablative therapies, peptide receptor radionuclide therapy, and systemic hormonal, cytotoxic or targeted therapy, are briefly discussed in this manuscript. Clinical presentation (performance status, comorbidities, tumor-derived symptoms and hormone syndrome in functioning tumors), histological features [tumor differentiation, proliferation rate (Ki-67), and expression of somatostatin receptors], disease localization and extent, and resectability of primary and metastatic disease, are all key issues that shall be taken into consideration to appropriately tailor therapeutic strategies and surveillance of these patients.

11 Guideline Nordic guidelines 2014 for diagnosis and treatment of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms. 2014

Janson, Eva Tiensuu / Sorbye, Halfdan / Welin, Staffan / Federspiel, Birgitte / Grønbæk, Henning / Hellman, Per / Ladekarl, Morten / Langer, Seppo W / Mortensen, Jann / Schalin-Jäntti, Camilla / Sundin, Anders / Sundlöv, Anna / Thiis-Evensen, Espen / Knigge, Ulrich. ·Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University , Uppsala , Sweden * · ·Acta Oncol · Pubmed #25140861.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The diagnostic work-up and treatment of patients with neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) has undergone major recent advances and new methods are currently introduced into the clinic. An update of the WHO classification has resulted in a new nomenclature dividing NENs into neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) including G1 (Ki67 index ≤ 2%) and G2 (Ki67 index 3-20%) tumours and neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs) with Ki67 index > 20%, G3. Aim. These Nordic guidelines summarise the Nordic Neuroendocrine Tumour Group's current view on how to diagnose and treat NEN-patients and are meant to be useful in the daily practice for clinicians handling these patients.

12 Guideline Definition of a standard lymphadenectomy in surgery for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: a consensus statement by the International Study Group on Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS). 2014

Tol, Johanna A M G / Gouma, Dirk J / Bassi, Claudio / Dervenis, Christos / Montorsi, Marco / Adham, Mustapha / Andrén-Sandberg, Ake / Asbun, Horacio J / Bockhorn, Maximilian / Büchler, Markus W / Conlon, Kevin C / Fernández-Cruz, Laureano / Fingerhut, Abe / Friess, Helmut / Hartwig, Werner / Izbicki, Jakob R / Lillemoe, Keith D / Milicevic, Miroslav N / Neoptolemos, John P / Shrikhande, Shailesh V / Vollmer, Charles M / Yeo, Charles J / Charnley, Richard M / Anonymous4350790. ·Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: D.J.Gouma@amc.nl. · Department of Surgery and Oncology, Pancreas Institute, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of First Surgery, Agia Olga Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Department of General Surgery, Instituto Clinico Humanitas IRCCS, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. · Department of HPB Surgery, Hopital Edouard Herriot, Lyon, France. · Department of Surgery, Karolinska Institutet at Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of General Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL. · Department of General-, Visceral- and Thoracic-Surgery, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Professorial Surgical Unit, University of Dublin, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland. · Department of Surgery, Clinic Hospital of Barcelona, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · First Department of Digestive Surgery, Hippokrateon Hospital, University of Athens, Athens, Greece; Section for Surgical Research, Department of Surgery, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria. · Department of Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital and the Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · First Surgical Clinic, Clinical Center of Serbia, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia. · Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, Liverpool Cancer Research-UK Centre, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Gastrointestinal and HPB Surgical Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, India. · Department of Surgery, Penn Medicine, The University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. · Department of Surgery, Jefferson Pancreas, Biliary and Related Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA. · Department of HPB & Transplant Surgery, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · ·Surgery · Pubmed #25061003.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The lymph node (Ln) status of patients with resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is an important predictor of survival. The survival benefit of extended lymphadenectomy during pancreatectomy is, however, disputed, and there is no true definition of the optimal extent of the lymphadenectomy. The aim of this study was to formulate a definition for standard lymphadenectomy during pancreatectomy. METHODS: During a consensus meeting of the International Study Group on Pancreatic Surgery, pancreatic surgeons formulated a consensus statement based on available literature and their experience. RESULTS: The nomenclature of the Japanese Pancreas Society was accepted by all participants. Extended lymphadenectomy during pancreatoduodenectomy with resection of Ln's along the left side of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and around the celiac trunk, splenic artery, or left gastric artery showed no survival benefit compared with a standard lymphadenectomy. No level I evidence was available on prognostic impact of positive para-aortic Ln's. Consensus was reached on selectively removing suspected Ln's outside the resection area for frozen section. No consensus was reached on continuing or terminating resection in cases where these nodes were positive. CONCLUSION: Extended lymphadenectomy cannot be recommended. Standard lymphadenectomy for pancreatoduodenectomy should strive to resect Ln stations no. 5, 6, 8a, 12b1, 12b2, 12c, 13a, 13b, 14a, 14b, 17a, and 17b. For cancers of the body and tail of the pancreas, removal of stations 10, 11, and 18 is standard. Furthermore, lymphadenectomy is important for adequate nodal staging. Both pancreatic resection in relatively fit patients or nonresectional palliative treatment were accepted as acceptable treatment in cases of positive Ln's outside the resection plane. This consensus statement could serve as a guide for surgeons and researchers in future directives and new clinical studies.

13 Guideline [Update of the S3 guidelines for pancreatic cancer. What is new for pathologists?]. 2014

Munding, J / Lüttges, J / Esposito, I / Tannapfel, A. ·Institut für Pathologie, Deutsches Mesotheliomregister, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, BG-Universitätsklinikum Bergmannsheil, Bürkle-de-la-Camp Platz 1, 44789, Bochum, Deutschland. · ·Pathologe · Pubmed #24981895.

ABSTRACT: The S3 guidelines for pancreatic cancer were revised in 2013. Besides the oncological and palliative therapy modalities and surgical therapy, the guidelines for pathologists in topic 3 were updated. The modifications essentially concern the histopathological assessment of surgical specimens and in particular the circumferential resection margin and the R classification. In addition, the current recommendations were amended by recommendations concerning the pathohistological records, which should include the lymph node ratio in the future.

14 Guideline Ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma. 2014

Seufferlein, Thomas / Porzner, Marc / Heinemann, Volker / Tannapfel, Andrea / Stuschke, Martin / Uhl, Waldemar. ·Ulm University Hospital Medical Center, Department of Internal Medicine I, Medical Clinic III, Department of Hematology & Oncology, Großhadern Hospital, Ludwig-Maximilian-¬Universität, Munich, Institute of Pathology, Ruhr-University Bochum, Radiation and Tumor Clinic, University Hospital of Duisburg-Essen, Surgical Clinic at the St. Josef-Hospital, Ruhr-University Bochum. · ·Dtsch Arztebl Int · Pubmed #24980565.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas is the fourth most common cause of death from cancer in men and women in Germany: about 15 000 persons die of this disease each year. METHOD: The S3 guideline on exocrine pancreatic carcinoma was updated with the aid of systematic literature reviews on the surgical, neoadjuvant, and adjuvant treatment of ductal pancreatic carcinoma, and on treatment in the metastatic stage. These reviews covered the periods 2002 to February 2012 (for radiotherapy) and 2006 to August 2011 (for all other topics). RESULTS: The criteria for borderline resectable pancreatic tumors are the same as those of the guidelines of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Preoperative biliary drainage with a stent is recommended only if cholangitis is present or if a planned operation cannot be performed soon after the diagnosis is made. When a pancreatic carcinoma is resected, at least 10 regional lymph nodes should be excised, and the ratio of affected to excised nodes should be documented in the pathology report. Gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil are recommended for adjuvant therapy. Neither of these drugs is preferred over the other; if the one initially given is poorly tolerated, the other one should be given instead. When gemcitabine and erlotinib are given for palliative treatment, erlotinib should be given for no longer than 8 weeks if no skin rash develops. In selected patients, the folfirinox protocol yields markedly better results than gemcitabin. Moreover, the new combination of nab-paclitaxel and gemcitabine can be used as first-line treatment. In the event of disease progression under first-line treatment, second-line treatment should be initiated. CONCLUSION: In recent years, new chemotherapeutic protocols have brought about marked improvement in palliative care. Further trials are needed to determine whether the perioperative or adjuvant use of these protocols might also improve the outcome of surgical treatment with curative intent.

15 Guideline Extended pancreatectomy in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: definition and consensus of the International Study Group for Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS). 2014

Hartwig, Werner / Vollmer, Charles M / Fingerhut, Abe / Yeo, Charles J / Neoptolemos, John P / Adham, Mustapha / Andrén-Sandberg, Ake / Asbun, Horacio J / Bassi, Claudio / Bockhorn, Max / Charnley, Richard / Conlon, Kevin C / Dervenis, Christos / Fernandez-Cruz, Laureano / Friess, Helmut / Gouma, Dirk J / Imrie, Clem W / Lillemoe, Keith D / Milićević, Miroslav N / Montorsi, Marco / Shrikhande, Shailesh V / Vashist, Yogesh K / Izbicki, Jakob R / Büchler, Markus W / Anonymous940784. ·Department of Surgery, Klinikum Großhadern, University of Munich, Munich, Germany. · Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Penn Surgery, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. · Department of Digestive Surgery, Centre Hospitalier Intercommunal, Poissy, France. · Department of Surgery, Jefferson Pancreas, Biliary and Related Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA. · Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, Liverpool Cancer Research-UK Centre, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Department of HPB Surgery, Hopital Edouard Herriot, Lyon, France. · Department of Surgery, Karolinska Institutet at Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of General Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL. · Department of Surgery and Oncology, Pancreas Institute, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of General-, Visceral- and Thoracic-Surgery, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of HPB & Transplant Surgery, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Professorial Surgical Unit, University of Dublin, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland. · Department of First Surgery, Agia Olga Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Department of Surgery, Clinic Hospital of Barcelona, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Academic Unit of Surgery, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · First Surgical Clinic, Clinical Center of Serbia, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia. · Department of General Surgery, Instituto Clinico Humanitas IRCCS, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. · Department of Gastrointestinal and HPB Surgical Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, India. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: markus.buechler@med.uni-heidelberg.de. · ·Surgery · Pubmed #24856668.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Complete macroscopic tumor resection is one of the most relevant predictors of long-term survival in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Because locally advanced pancreatic tumors can involve adjacent organs, "extended" pancreatectomy that includes the resection of additional organs may be needed to achieve this goal. Our aim was to develop a common consistent terminology to be used in centers reporting results of pancreatic resections for cancer. METHODS: An international panel of pancreatic surgeons working in well-known, high-volume centers reviewed the literature on extended pancreatectomies and worked together to establish a consensus on the definition and the role of extended pancreatectomy in pancreatic cancer. RESULTS: Macroscopic (R1) and microscopic (R0) complete tumor resection can be achieved in patients with locally advanced disease by extended pancreatectomy. Operative time, blood loss, need for blood transfusions, duration of stay in the intensive care unit, and hospital morbidity, and possibly also perioperative mortality are increased with extended resections. Long-term survival is similar compared with standard resections but appears to be better compared with bypass surgery or nonsurgical palliative chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. It was not possible to identify any clear prognostic criteria based on the specific additional organ resected. CONCLUSION: Despite increased perioperative morbidity, extended pancreatectomy is warranted in locally advanced disease to achieve long-term survival in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma if macroscopic clearance can be achieved. Definitions of extended pancreatectomies for locally advanced disease (and not distant metastatic disease) are established that are crucial for comparison of results of future trials across different practices and countries, in particular for those using neoadjuvant therapy.

16 Guideline Borderline resectable pancreatic cancer: a consensus statement by the International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS). 2014

Bockhorn, Maximilian / Uzunoglu, Faik G / Adham, Mustapha / Imrie, Clem / Milicevic, Miroslav / Sandberg, Aken A / Asbun, Horacio J / Bassi, Claudio / Büchler, Markus / Charnley, Richard M / Conlon, Kevin / Cruz, Laureano Fernandez / Dervenis, Christos / Fingerhutt, Abe / Friess, Helmut / Gouma, Dirk J / Hartwig, Werner / Lillemoe, Keith D / Montorsi, Marco / Neoptolemos, John P / Shrikhande, Shailesh V / Takaori, Kyoichi / Traverso, William / Vashist, Yogesh K / Vollmer, Charles / Yeo, Charles J / Izbicki, Jakob R / Anonymous2360782. ·Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of HPB Surgery, Hôpital Edouard Herriot, Lyon, France. · Academic Unit of Surgery, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · First Surgical Clinic, Clinical Center of Serbia, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia. · Department of Surgery, Karolinska Institutet at Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of General Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL. · Department of Surgery and Oncology, Pancreas Institute, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of HPB & Transplant Surgery, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Professorial Surgical Unit, University of Dublin, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland. · Department of Surgery, Clinic Hospital of Barcelona, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · First Department of Surgery, Agia Olga Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Department of Digestive Surgery, Centre Hospitalier Intercommunal, Poissy, France. · Department of Surgery, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Department of General Surgery, Instituto Clinico Humanitas IRCCS, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. · Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, Liverpool Cancer Research-UK Centre, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Gastrointestinal and HPB Surgical Oncology, Tata Memorial Centre, Mumbai, India. · Department of Surgery, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan. · St. Luke's Clinic - Center For Pancreatic and Liver Diseases, Boise, ID. · Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Penn Surgery, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. · Department of Surgery, Jefferson Pancreas, Biliary and Related Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. Electronic address: izbicki@uke.de. · ·Surgery · Pubmed #24856119.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: This position statement was developed to expedite a consensus on definition and treatment for borderline resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (BRPC) that would have worldwide acceptability. METHODS: An international panel of pancreatic surgeons from well-established, high-volume centers collaborated on a literature review and development of consensus on issues related to borderline resectable pancreatic cancer. RESULTS: The International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS) supports the National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria for the definition of BRPC. Current evidence supports operative exploration and resection in the case of involvement of the mesentericoportal venous axis; in addition, a new classification of extrahepatic mesentericoportal venous resections is proposed by the ISGPS. Suspicion of arterial involvement should lead to exploration to confirm the imaging-based findings. Formal arterial resections are not recommended; however, in exceptional circumstances, individual therapeutic approaches may be evaluated under experimental protocols. The ISGPS endorses the recommendations for specimen examination and the definition of an R1 resection (tumor within 1 mm from the margin) used by the British Royal College of Pathologists. Standard preoperative diagnostics for BRPC may include: (1) serum levels of CA19-9, because CA19-9 levels predict survival in large retrospective series; and also (2) the modified Glasgow Prognostic Score and the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio because of the prognostic relevance of the systemic inflammatory response. Various regimens of neoadjuvant therapy are recommended only in the setting of prospective trials at high-volume centers. CONCLUSION: Current evidence justifies portomesenteric venous resection in patients with BRPC. Basic definitions were identified, that are currently lacking but that are needed to obtain further evidence and improvement for this important patient subgroup. A consensus for each topic is given.

17 Guideline Italian consensus guidelines for the diagnostic work-up and follow-up of cystic pancreatic neoplasms. 2014

Anonymous3560784 / Anonymous3570784 / Buscarini, Elisabetta / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Cannizzaro, Renato / De Angelis, Claudio / Gion, Massimo / Morana, Giovanni / Zamboni, Giuseppe / Arcidiacono, Paolo / Balzano, Gianpaolo / Barresi, Luca / Basso, Daniela / Bocus, Paolo / Calculli, Lucia / Capurso, Gabriele / Canzonieri, Vincenzo / Casadei, Riccardo / Crippa, Stefano / D'Onofrio, Mirko / Frulloni, Luca / Fusaroli, Pietro / Manfredi, Guido / Pacchioni, Donatella / Pasquali, Claudio / Rocca, Rodolfo / Ventrucci, Maurizio / Venturini, Silvia / Villanacci, Vincenzo / Zerbi, Alessandro / Falconi, Massimo / Anonymous3580784. · · Gastroenterology Unit, Maggiore Hospital, Crema, Italy. Electronic address: ebuscarini@rim.it. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Gastroenterology Unit, CRO-National Cancer Institute, Aviano, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Hepatology Department, A.O. San Giovanni Battista/Molinette, University of Turin, Turin, Italy. · Department of Clinical Pathology, AULSS 12, Venice, Italy. · Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Ospedale Cà Foncello, Treviso, Italy. · Department of Pathology, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Division of Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, Vita-Salute, Italy. · Department of Surgery, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Unit, ISMETT, Palermo, Italy. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital, Padua, Italy. · Gastroenterology Unit, Ospedale Sacro Cuore-Don Calabria, Negrar, Verona, Italy. · Department of Radiology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome at S. Andrea Hospital, Rome, Italy. · Division of Pathology, CRO-National Cancer Institute, IRCCS, Aviano, Italy. · Department of Surgery, University of Bologna, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Pancreas Unit, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy. · Department of Radiology, University Hospital G.B. Rossi, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Surgical and Gastroenterological Sciences, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. · Gastroenterology Unit, Maggiore Hospital, Crema, Italy. · Pathology Unit, A.O. San Giovanni Battista/Molinette, Turin, Italy. · Surgery Unit IV, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Gastroenterology Unit, Mauriziano Hospital, Turin, Italy. · Department of Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology, Bentivoglio Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · 2nd Pathology Section, Spedali Civili, Brescia, Brescia, Italy. · Pancreatic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Milan, Italy. ·Dig Liver Dis · Pubmed #24809235.

ABSTRACT: This report contains clinically oriented guidelines for the diagnostic work-up and follow-up of cystic pancreatic neoplasms in patients fit for treatment. The statements were elaborated by working groups of experts by searching and analysing the literature, and then underwent a consensus process using a modified Delphi procedure. The statements report recommendations regarding the most appropriate use and timing of various imaging techniques and of endoscopic ultrasound, the role of circulating and intracystic markers and the pathologic evaluation for the diagnosis and follow-up of cystic pancreatic neoplasms.

18 Guideline Postbrushing and fine-needle aspiration biopsy follow-up and treatment options for patients with pancreatobiliary lesions: the Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology guidelines. 2014

Kurtycz, Daniel / Tabatabai, Z Laura / Michaels, Claire / Young, Nancy / Schmidt, C Max / Farrell, James / Gopal, Deepak / Simeone, Diane / Merchant, Nipun B / Field, Andrew / Pitman, Martha Bishop / Anonymous1910776. ·Department of Pathology, University of Wisconsin, Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene, Madison, Wisconsin. · ·Diagn Cytopathol · Pubmed #24639399.

ABSTRACT: The papanicolaou society of cytopathology (PSC) has developed a set of guidelines for pancreatobiliary cytology including indications for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy, techniques of EUS-FNA, terminology and nomenclature for pancreatobiliary cytology, ancillary testing, and postprocedure management. All documents are based on the expertise of the authors, a review of the literature, discussions of the draft document at several national and international meetings over an 18 month period and synthesis of online comments of the draft document on the PSC web site [www.papsociety.org]. This document selectively presents the results of these discussions and focuses on the follow-up and treatment options for patients after procedures performed for obtaining cytology samples for the evaluation of biliary strictures and solid and cystic masses in the pancreas. These recommendations follow the six-tiered terminology and nomenclature scheme proposed by Committee III.

19 Guideline Utilization of ancillary studies in the cytologic diagnosis of biliary and pancreatic lesions: the Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology guidelines for pancreatobiliary cytology. 2014

Layfield, Lester J / Ehya, Hormoz / Filie, Armando C / Hruban, Ralph H / Jhala, Nirag / Joseph, Loren / Vielh, Philippe / Pitman, Martha B / Anonymous1900776. ·Department of Pathology and Anatomical Sciences, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri. · ·Diagn Cytopathol · Pubmed #24639398.

ABSTRACT: The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology has developed a set of guidelines for pancreatobiliary cytology including indications for endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration, terminology and nomenclature of pancreatobiliary disease, ancillary testing, and post-biopsy management. All documents are based on the expertise of the authors, a review of the literature, discussions of the draft document at several national and international meetings, and synthesis of selected online comments of the draft document. This document presents the results of these discussions regarding the use of ancillary testing in the cytologic diagnosis of biliary and pancreatic lesions. Currently, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) appears to be the most clinically relevant ancillary technique for cytology of bile duct strictures. The addition of FISH analysis to routine cytologic evaluation appears to yield the highest sensitivity without loss in specificity. Loss of immunohistochemical staining for the protein product of the SMAD4 gene and positive staining for mesothelin support a diagnosis of ductal adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical markers for endocrine and exocrine differentiation are sufficient for a diagnosis of endocrine and acinar tumors. Nuclear staining for beta-catenin supports a diagnosis of solid-pseudopapilary neoplasm. Cyst fluid analysis for amylase and carcinoembryonic antigen aids in the preoperative classification of pancreatic cysts. Many gene mutations (KRAS, GNAS, VHL, RNF43, and CTNNB1) may be of aid in the diagnosis of cystic neoplasms. Other ancillary techniques do not appear to improve diagnostic sensitivity sufficiently to justify their increased costs.

20 Guideline Standardized terminology and nomenclature for pancreatobiliary cytology: the Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology guidelines. 2014

Pitman, Martha B / Centeno, Barbara A / Ali, Syed Z / Genevay, Muriel / Stelow, Ed / Mino-Kenudson, Mari / Fernandez-del Castillo, Carlos / Max Schmidt, C / Brugge, William / Layfield, Lester / Anonymous1870776. ·Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · ·Diagn Cytopathol · Pubmed #24554455.

ABSTRACT: The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology has developed a set of guidelines for pancreatobiliary cytology including indications for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy, techniques of EUS-FNA, terminology and nomenclature of pancreatobiliary disease, ancillary testing, and postbiopsy treatment and management. All documents are based on the expertise of the authors, a review of the literature, discussions of the draft document at several national and international meetings over an 18-month period and synthesis of online comments of the draft document on the Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology web site (www.papsociety.org). This document selectively presents the results of these discussions and focuses on a proposed standardized terminology scheme for pancreatobiliary specimens that correlate cytological diagnosis with biological behavior and increasingly conservative patient management of surveillance only. The proposed terminology scheme recommends a six-tiered system: Nondiagnostic, Negative, Atypical, Neoplastic (benign or other), Suspicious and Positive. Unique to this scheme is the "Neoplastic" category separated into "benign" (serous cystadenoma), or "Other" (premalignant mucinous cysts, neuroendocrine tumors, and solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms). The positive or malignant category is reserved for high-grade, aggressive malignancies including ductal adenocarcinoma, acinar cell carcinoma, poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas, pancreatoblastoma, lymphoma, and metastases. Interpretation categories do not have to be used. Some pathology laboratory information systems require an interpretation category, which places the cytological diagnosis into a general category. This proposed scheme provides terminology that standardizes the category of the various diseases of the pancreas, some of which are difficult to diagnose specifically by cytology. In addition, this terminology scheme attempts to provide maximum flexibility for patient management, which has become increasingly conservative for some neoplasms.

21 Guideline Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms - management guidelines (recommended by the Polish Network of Neuroendocrine Tumours). 2013

Kos-Kudła, Beata / Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, Alicja / Kuśnierz, Katarzyna / Lampe, Paweł / Marek, Bogdan / Nasierowska-Guttmejer, Anna / Nowakowska-Duława, Ewa / Pilch-Kowalczyk, Joanna / Sowa-Staszczak, Anna / Rosiek, Violetta / Anonymous3700767 / Anonymous3710767. ·Division of Endocrinology, Department of Pathophysiology and Endocrinology, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland. endoklin@sum.edu.pl. · ·Endokrynol Pol · Pubmed #24431118.

ABSTRACT: We present revised diagnostic and therapeutic guidelines for the management of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PNENs) proposed by the Polish Network of Neuroendocrine Tumours.These guidelines refer to biochemical (determination of specific and nonspecific neuroendocrine markers) and imaging diagnostics (EUS, CT, MR, and radioisotope examination with a 68Ga or 99Tc labelled somatostatin analogue).A histopathological diagnostic, which determines the further management of patients with PNENs, must be necessarily confirmed by immunohistochemical tests. PNENs therapy requires collaboration between a multidisciplinary team of specialists experienced in the management of these neoplasms. Surgery is the basic form of treatment. Medical therapy requires a multidirectional procedure, and therefore the rules of biotherapy, peptide receptor radionuclide therapy, chemotherapy and molecular targeted therapy are discussed.

22 Guideline [S3-guideline exocrine pancreatic cancer]. 2013

Seufferlein, T / Porzner, M / Becker, T / Budach, V / Ceyhan, G / Esposito, I / Fietkau, R / Follmann, M / Friess, H / Galle, P / Geissler, M / Glanemann, M / Gress, T / Heinemann, V / Hohenberger, W / Hopt, U / Izbicki, J / Klar, E / Kleeff, J / Kopp, I / Kullmann, F / Langer, T / Langrehr, J / Lerch, M / Löhr, M / Lüttges, J / Lutz, M / Mayerle, J / Michl, P / Möller, P / Molls, M / Münter, M / Nothacker, M / Oettle, H / Post, S / Reinacher-Schick, A / Röcken, C / Roeb, E / Saeger, H / Schmid, R / Schmiegel, W / Schoenberg, M / Siveke, J / Stuschke, M / Tannapfel, A / Uhl, W / Unverzagt, S / van Oorschot, B / Vashist, Y / Werner, J / Yekebas, E / Anonymous2440766 / Anonymous2450766 / Anonymous2460766. ·Klinik für Innere Medizin I, Universitätsklinikum Ulm. · Klinik für Allgemeine Chirurgie, Viszeral-, Thorax-, Transplantations- und Kinderchirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Kiel. · Klinik für Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin. · Chirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum rechts der Isar, TU München. · Institut für Allgemeine Pathologie, Klinikum rechts der Isar, TU München. · Strahlenklinik, Universitätsklinikum Erlangen. · Leitlinienprogramm Onkologie, Deutsche Krebsgesellschaft e. V., Berlin. · I. Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, Universitätsmedizin Mainz. · Klinik für Allgemeine Innere Medizin, Onkologie/Hämatologie, Gastroenterologie und Infektiologie, Klinikum Esslingen. · Klinik für Allgemeine Chirurgie, Viszeral-, Gefäß- und Kinderchirurgie, Universitätsklinikum des Saarlandes Homburg/Saar. · Klinik für Gastroenterologie, Endokrinologie und Stoffwechsel, Universitätsklinikum Gießen und Marburg. · Medizinischen Klinik und Poliklinik III, Klinikum der Universität München LMU. · Chirurgische Klinik, Universitätsklinikum Erlangen. · Klinik für Allgemein- und Viszeralchirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Freiburg. · Klinik für Allgemein-, Viszeral- und Thoraxchirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf. · Klinik für Allgemeine Chirurgie, Thorax-, Gefäß- und Transplantationschirurgie, Universitätsmedizin Rostock. · AWMF-Institut für Medizinisches Wissensmanagement, Marburg. · Medizinische Klinik I, Klinikum Weiden. · Klinik für Allgemein-, Gefäß- und Viszeralchirurgie, Martin-Luther-Krankenhaus Berlin. · Klinik und Poliklinik für Innere Medizin A, Universitätsmedizin Greifswald. · Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm. · Institut für Pathologie, Marienkrankenhaus Hamburg. · Medizinische Klinik - Schwerpunkt Gastroenterologie, Endokrinologie, Infektiologie, Caritasklinikum Saarbrücken. · Institut für Pathologie, Universitätsklinikum Ulm. · Klinik und Poliklinik für Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie, Klinikum rechts der Isar, TU München. · Klinik für Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Klinikum Stuttgart. · AWMF-Institut für Medizinisches Wissensmanagement, Berlin. · Medizinische Klinik mit Schwerpunkt Hämatologie und Onkologie, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin. · Chirurgische Klinik, Universitätsmedizin Mannheim. · Abt. für Hämatologie und Onkologie, St. Josef-Hospital, Klinikum der Ruhr-Universität Bochum. · Institut für Pathologie, Universitätsklinikum Kiel. · Medizinische Klinik II, SP Gastroenterologie, Universitätsklinikum Gießen und Marburg. · Klinik für Viszeral-, Thorax- und Gefäßchirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Dresden. · II. Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum rechts der Isar, TU München. · Medizinische Klinik, Klinikum der Ruhr-Universität Bochum. · Klinik für Chirurgie, Rotkreuzklinikum München. · Klinik für Strahlentherapie, Universitätsklinikum Essen. · Institut für Pathologie, Ruhr-Universität Bochum. · Chirurgische Klinik, St. Josef-Hospital, Klinikum der Ruhr-Universität Bochum. · Institut für Medizinische Epidemiologie, Biometrie und Informatik, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg. · Klinik und Poliklinik für Strahlentherapie, Universitätsklinikum Würzburg. · Klinik für Allgemeine, Viszerale und Transplantationschirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Heidelberg. · Klinik für Allgemein-, Thorax- und Viszeralchirurgie, Klinikum Darmstadt. · ·Z Gastroenterol · Pubmed #24338757.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

23 Guideline Malignant insulinoma: recommendations for characterisation and treatment. 2013

Baudin, Eric / Caron, Philippe / Lombard-Bohas, Catherine / Tabarin, Antoine / Mitry, Emmanuel / Reznick, Yves / Taieb, David / Pattou, François / Goudet, Pierre / Vezzosi, Delphine / Scoazec, Jean-Yves / Cadiot, Guillaume / Borson-Chazot, Françoise / Do Cao, Christine / Anonymous5050765 / Anonymous5060765. ·Service de médecine nucléaire et d'oncologie endocrinienne, institut Gustave-Roussy, 94800 Villejuif, France. · ·Ann Endocrinol (Paris) · Pubmed #23993836.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

24 Guideline Surgical treatment. 2013

Carrère, Nicolas / Mathonnet, Muriel / Mirallié, Éric / Pattou, François / Sa-Cunha, Antonio / Anonymous150754. ·Service de chirurgie générale et digestive, pôle digestif, hôpital Purpan, CHU de Toulouse, 31059 Toulouse cedex 9, France. · ·Ann Endocrinol (Paris) · Pubmed #23806168.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

25 Guideline Topographic diagnosis: respective roles of morphological and functional imaging. 2013

Taieb, David / Legmann, Paul / Prat, Frederic / Chevallier, Patrick / Tenenbaum, Florence / Anonymous140754. ·Department of Nuclear Medicine, La Timone University Hospital, CERIMED, 264, rue Saint-Pierre, 13385 Marseille cedex 5, France. david.taieb@ap-hm.fr · ·Ann Endocrinol (Paris) · Pubmed #23796009.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

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