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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles from US Mid-Atlantic
Based on 2,217 articles published since 2008
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These are the 2217 published articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms that originated from US Mid-Atlantic during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline ACR Appropriateness Criteria 2017

Anonymous7930925 / Qayyum, Aliya / Tamm, Eric P / Kamel, Ihab R / Allen, Peter J / Arif-Tiwari, Hina / Chernyak, Victoria / Gonda, Tamas A / Grajo, Joseph R / Hindman, Nicole M / Horowitz, Jeanne M / Kaur, Harmeet / McNamara, Michelle M / Noto, Richard B / Srivastava, Pavan K / Lalani, Tasneem. ·Principal Author, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. Electronic address: aqayyum@mdanderson.org. · Research Author, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. · Panel Chair, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York; American College of Surgeons. · University of Arizona, Banner University Medical Center, Tucson, Arizona. · Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York. · Columbia University, New York, New York; American Gastroenterological Association. · University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida. · New York University Medical Center, New York, New York. · Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois. · University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. · University of Alabama Medical Center, Birmingham, Alabama. · The Warren Alpert School of Medicine at Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island. · University of Illinois College of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois; American College of Physicians. · Specialty Chair, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. ·J Am Coll Radiol · Pubmed #29101993.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is associated with poor overall prognosis. Complete surgical resection is the only possible option for cure. As such, increasingly complex surgical techniques including sophisticated vascular reconstruction are being used. Continued advances in surgical techniques, in conjunction with use of combination systemic therapies, and radiation therapy have been suggested to improve outcomes. A key aspect to surgical success is reporting of pivotal findings beyond absence of distant metastases, such as tumor size, location, and degree of tumor involvement of specific vessels associated with potential perineural tumor spread. Multiphase contrast-enhanced multidetector CT and MRI are the imaging modalities of choice for pretreatment staging and presurgical determination of resectability. Imaging modalities such as endoscopic ultrasound and fluorine-18-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose imaging with PET/CT are indicated for specific scenarios such as biopsy guidance and confirmation of distant metastases, respectively. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.

2 Guideline Potentially Curable Pancreatic Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update Summary. 2017

Khorana, Alok A / Mangu, Pamela B / Katz, Matthew H G. ·Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH; American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA; and MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. ·J Oncol Pract · Pubmed #28406730.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Guideline Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Summary. 2017

Sohal, Davendra P S / Mangu, Pamela B / Laheru, Daniel. ·Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH; American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA; Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD. ·J Oncol Pract · Pubmed #28399388.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Guideline Locally Advanced Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Summary. 2017

Balaban, Edward P / Mangu, Pamela B / Yee, Nelson S. ·Cancer Care Partnership, State College; Penn State Hershey Cancer Institute, Hershey, PA; and American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA. ·J Oncol Pract · Pubmed #28399382.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Guideline Potentially Curable Pancreatic Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update. 2017

Khorana, Alok A / Mangu, Pamela B / Berlin, Jordan / Engebretson, Anitra / Hong, Theodore S / Maitra, Anirban / Mohile, Supriya G / Mumber, Matthew / Schulick, Richard / Shapiro, Marc / Urba, Susan / Zeh, Herbert J / Katz, Matthew H G. ·Alok A. Khorana and Marc Shapiro, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH · Pamela B. Mangu, American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA · Jordan Berlin, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN · Anitra Engebretson, Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, Manhattan Beach, CA · Theodore S. Hong, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA · Anirban Maitra and Matthew H.G. Katz, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX · Supriya G. Mohile, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY · Matthew Mumber, Harbin Clinic, Rome, GA · Richard Schulick, University of Colorado at Denver, Denver, CO · Susan Urba, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI · and Herbert J. Zeh, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #28398845.

ABSTRACT: Purpose To update the Potentially Curable Pancreatic Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline published on May 31, 2016. The October 2016 update focuses solely on new evidence that pertains to clinical question 4 of the guideline: What is the appropriate adjuvant regimen for patients with pancreatic cancer who have undergone an R0 or R1 resection of their primary tumor? Methods The recently published results of a randomized phase III study prompted an update of this guideline. The high quality of the reported evidence and the potential for its clinical impact prompted the Expert Panel to revise one of the guideline recommendations. Results The ESPAC-4 study, a multicenter, international, open-label randomized controlled phase III trial of adjuvant combination chemotherapy compared gemcitabine and capecitabine with gemcitabine monotherapy in 730 evaluable patients with resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Median overall survival was improved in the doublet arm to 28.0 months (95% CI, 23.5 to 31.5 months) versus 25.5 months (95% CI, 22.7 to 27.9 months) for gemcitabine alone (hazard ratio, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.68 to 0.98; P = .032). Grade 3 and 4 adverse events were similar in both arms, although higher rates of hand-foot syndrome and diarrhea occurred in patients randomly assigned to the doublet arm. Recommendations All patients with resected pancreatic cancer who did not receive preoperative therapy should be offered 6 months of adjuvant chemotherapy in the absence of medical or surgical contraindications. The doublet regimen of gemcitabine and capecitabine is preferred in the absence of concerns for toxicity or tolerance; alternatively, monotherapy with gemcitabine or fluorouracil plus folinic acid can be offered. Adjuvant treatment should be initiated within 8 weeks of surgical resection, assuming complete recovery. The remaining recommendations from the original 2016 ASCO guideline are unchanged.

6 Guideline Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline. 2016

Sohal, Davendra P S / Mangu, Pamela B / Khorana, Alok A / Shah, Manish A / Philip, Philip A / O'Reilly, Eileen M / Uronis, Hope E / Ramanathan, Ramesh K / Crane, Christopher H / Engebretson, Anitra / Ruggiero, Joseph T / Copur, Mehmet S / Lau, Michelle / Urba, Susan / Laheru, Daniel. ·Davendra P.S. Sohal and Alok A. Khorana, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH · Pamela B. Mangu, American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA · Manish A. Shah, The Weill Cornell Medical Center · Philip A. Philip, Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit · Susan Urba, University of Michigan Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, MI · Eileen M. O'Reilly, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center · Joseph T. Ruggiero, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY · Hope E. Uronis, Duke University, Durham, NC · Ramesh K. Ramanathan, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale · Michelle Lau, Community Hospital Based Cancer Center, Tempe, AZ · Christopher H. Crane, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX · Anitra Engebretson, Patient Representative, Portland, OR · Mehmet S. Copur, St Francis Medical Center, Grand Island, NE · and Daniel Laheru, Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #27247222.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To provide evidence-based recommendations to oncologists and others for the treatment of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer. METHODS: American Society of Clinical Oncology convened an Expert Panel of medical oncology, radiation oncology, surgical oncology, gastroenterology, palliative care, and advocacy experts to conduct a systematic review of the literature from April 2004 to June 2015. Outcomes were overall survival, disease-free survival, progression-free survival, and adverse events. RESULTS: Twenty-four randomized controlled trials met the systematic review criteria. RECOMMENDATIONS: A multiphase computed tomography scan of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis should be performed. Baseline performance status and comorbidity profile should be evaluated. Goals of care, patient preferences, treatment response, psychological status, support systems, and symptom burden should guide decisions for treatments. A palliative care referral should occur at first visit. FOLFIRINOX (leucovorin, fluorouracil, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin; favorable comorbidity profile) or gemcitabine plus nanoparticle albumin-bound (NAB) -paclitaxel (adequate comorbidity profile) should be offered to patients with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (ECOG PS) 0 to 1 based on patient preference and support system available. Gemcitabine alone is recommended for patients with ECOG PS 2 or with a comorbidity profile that precludes other regimens; the addition of capecitabine or erlotinib may be offered. Patients with an ECOG PS ≥ 3 and poorly controlled comorbid conditions should be offered cancer-directed therapy only on a case-by-case basis; supportive care should be emphasized. For second-line therapy, gemcitabine plus NAB-paclitaxel should be offered to patients with first-line treatment with FOLFIRINOX, an ECOG PS 0 to 1, and a favorable comorbidity profile; fluorouracil plus oxaliplatin, irinotecan, or nanoliposomal irinotecan should be offered to patients with first-line treatment with gemcitabine plus NAB-paclitaxel, ECOG PS 0 to 1, and favorable comorbidity profile, and gemcitabine or fluorouracil should be offered to patients with either an ECOG PS 2 or a comorbidity profile that precludes other regimens. Additional information is available at www.asco.org/guidelines/MetPC and www.asco.org/guidelineswiki.

7 Guideline Pathologic Evaluation and Reporting of Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms of the Pancreas and Other Tumoral Intraepithelial Neoplasms of Pancreatobiliary Tract: Recommendations of Verona Consensus Meeting. 2016

Adsay, Volkan / Mino-Kenudson, Mari / Furukawa, Toru / Basturk, Olca / Zamboni, Giuseppe / Marchegiani, Giovanni / Bassi, Claudio / Salvia, Roberto / Malleo, Giuseppe / Paiella, Salvatore / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Matthaei, Hanno / Offerhaus, G Johan / Adham, Mustapha / Bruno, Marco J / Reid, Michelle D / Krasinskas, Alyssa / Klöppel, Günter / Ohike, Nobuyuki / Tajiri, Takuma / Jang, Kee-Taek / Roa, Juan Carlos / Allen, Peter / Fernández-del Castillo, Carlos / Jang, Jin-Young / Klimstra, David S / Hruban, Ralph H / Anonymous6200823. ·*Department of Pathology, Emory University School of Medicine and Winship Cancer Institute, Atlanta, GA †Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA ‡Department of Pathology, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Tokyo, Japan §Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY ¶Department of Pathology, University of Verona, Verona, Italy ||Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA **Department of Surgery, University of Verona, Verona, Italy ††Department of Surgery, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD ‡‡Departments of Surgery, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany §§Departments of Pathology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands ¶¶Department of Surgery, Edouard Herriot Hospital, HCL, Lyon, France ||||Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands ***Departments of Pathology, Technical University, Munich, Germany †††Department of Pathology, Showa University Fujigaoka Hospital, Yokohama, Japan ‡‡‡Department of Pathology, Tokai University Hachioji Hospital, Tokyo, Japan §§§Department of Pathology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea ¶¶¶Department of Pathology, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile ||||||Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY ****Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA ††††Department of Surgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Korea ‡‡‡‡Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. ·Ann Surg · Pubmed #25775066.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: There are no established guidelines for pathologic diagnosis/reporting of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs). DESIGN: An international multidisciplinary group, brought together by the Verona Pancreas Group in Italy-2013, was tasked to devise recommendations. RESULTS: (1) Crucial to rule out invasive carcinoma with extensive (if not complete) sampling. (2) Invasive component is to be documented in a full synoptic report including its size, type, grade, and stage. (3) The term "minimally invasive" should be avoided; instead, invasion size with stage and substaging of T1 (1a, b, c; ≤ 0.5, > 0.5-≤ 1, > 1 cm) is to be documented. (4) Largest diameter of the invasion, not the distance from the nearest duct, is to be used. (5) A category of "indeterminate/(suspicious) for invasion" is acceptable for rare cases. (6) The term "malignant" IPMN should be avoided. (7) The highest grade of dysplasia in the non-invasive component is to be documented separately. (8) Lesion size is to be correlated with imaging findings in cysts with rupture. (9) The main duct diameter and, if possible, its involvement are to be documented; however, it is not required to provide main versus branch duct classification in the resected tumor. (10) Subtyping as gastric/intestinal/pancreatobiliary/oncocytic/mixed is of value. (11) Frozen section is to be performed highly selectively, with appreciation of its shortcomings. (12) These principles also apply to other similar tumoral intraepithelial neoplasms (mucinous cystic neoplasms, intra-ampullary, and intra-biliary/cholecystic). CONCLUSIONS: These recommendations will ensure proper communication of salient tumor characteristics to the management teams, accurate comparison of data between analyses, and development of more effective management algorithms.

8 Guideline American gastroenterological association institute guideline on the diagnosis and management of asymptomatic neoplastic pancreatic cysts. 2015

Vege, Santhi Swaroop / Ziring, Barry / Jain, Rajeev / Moayyedi, Paul / Anonymous6050824 / Anonymous6060824. ·Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Division of Internal Medicine, Sidney Kimmel College of Medicine, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Texas Digestive Disease Consultants, Dallas, Texas. · Division of Gastroenterology, Hamilton Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #25805375.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Guideline American Pancreatic Association Practice Guidelines in Chronic Pancreatitis: evidence-based report on diagnostic guidelines. 2014

Conwell, Darwin L / Lee, Linda S / Yadav, Dhiraj / Longnecker, Daniel S / Miller, Frank H / Mortele, Koenraad J / Levy, Michael J / Kwon, Richard / Lieb, John G / Stevens, Tyler / Toskes, Phillip P / Gardner, Timothy B / Gelrud, Andres / Wu, Bechien U / Forsmark, Christopher E / Vege, Santhi S. ·From the *Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Department of Internal Medicine, Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH; †Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Endoscopy, Department of Internal Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA; ‡Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA; §Department of Pathology, The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH; ║Department of Radiology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL; ¶Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconness Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; #Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; **Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI; ††Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA; ‡‡Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH; §§Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL; ║║Department of Gastroenterology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL; and ¶¶Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #25333398.

ABSTRACT: The diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis remains challenging in early stages of the disease. This report defines the diagnostic criteria useful in the assessment of patients with suspected and established chronic pancreatitis. All current diagnostic procedures are reviewed, and evidence-based statements are provided about their utility and limitations. Diagnostic criteria for chronic pancreatitis are classified as definitive, probable, or insufficient evidence. A diagnostic (STEP-wise; survey, tomography, endoscopy, and pancreas function testing) algorithm is proposed that proceeds from a noninvasive to a more invasive approach. This algorithm maximizes specificity (low false-positive rate) in subjects with chronic abdominal pain and equivocal imaging changes. Furthermore, a nomenclature is suggested to further characterize patients with established chronic pancreatitis based on TIGAR-O (toxic, idiopathic, genetic, autoimmune, recurrent, and obstructive) etiology, gland morphology (Cambridge criteria), and physiologic state (exocrine, endocrine function) for uniformity across future multicenter research collaborations. This guideline will serve as a baseline manuscript that will be modified as new evidence becomes available and our knowledge of chronic pancreatitis improves.

10 Guideline Definition of a standard lymphadenectomy in surgery for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: a consensus statement by the International Study Group on Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS). 2014

Tol, Johanna A M G / Gouma, Dirk J / Bassi, Claudio / Dervenis, Christos / Montorsi, Marco / Adham, Mustapha / Andrén-Sandberg, Ake / Asbun, Horacio J / Bockhorn, Maximilian / Büchler, Markus W / Conlon, Kevin C / Fernández-Cruz, Laureano / Fingerhut, Abe / Friess, Helmut / Hartwig, Werner / Izbicki, Jakob R / Lillemoe, Keith D / Milicevic, Miroslav N / Neoptolemos, John P / Shrikhande, Shailesh V / Vollmer, Charles M / Yeo, Charles J / Charnley, Richard M / Anonymous3050801. ·Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: D.J.Gouma@amc.nl. · Department of Surgery and Oncology, Pancreas Institute, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of First Surgery, Agia Olga Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Department of General Surgery, Instituto Clinico Humanitas IRCCS, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. · Department of HPB Surgery, Hopital Edouard Herriot, Lyon, France. · Department of Surgery, Karolinska Institutet at Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of General Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL. · Department of General-, Visceral- and Thoracic-Surgery, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Professorial Surgical Unit, University of Dublin, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland. · Department of Surgery, Clinic Hospital of Barcelona, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · First Department of Digestive Surgery, Hippokrateon Hospital, University of Athens, Athens, Greece; Section for Surgical Research, Department of Surgery, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria. · Department of Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital and the Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · First Surgical Clinic, Clinical Center of Serbia, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia. · Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, Liverpool Cancer Research-UK Centre, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Gastrointestinal and HPB Surgical Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, India. · Department of Surgery, Penn Medicine, The University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. · Department of Surgery, Jefferson Pancreas, Biliary and Related Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA. · Department of HPB & Transplant Surgery, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. ·Surgery · Pubmed #25061003.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The lymph node (Ln) status of patients with resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is an important predictor of survival. The survival benefit of extended lymphadenectomy during pancreatectomy is, however, disputed, and there is no true definition of the optimal extent of the lymphadenectomy. The aim of this study was to formulate a definition for standard lymphadenectomy during pancreatectomy. METHODS: During a consensus meeting of the International Study Group on Pancreatic Surgery, pancreatic surgeons formulated a consensus statement based on available literature and their experience. RESULTS: The nomenclature of the Japanese Pancreas Society was accepted by all participants. Extended lymphadenectomy during pancreatoduodenectomy with resection of Ln's along the left side of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and around the celiac trunk, splenic artery, or left gastric artery showed no survival benefit compared with a standard lymphadenectomy. No level I evidence was available on prognostic impact of positive para-aortic Ln's. Consensus was reached on selectively removing suspected Ln's outside the resection area for frozen section. No consensus was reached on continuing or terminating resection in cases where these nodes were positive. CONCLUSION: Extended lymphadenectomy cannot be recommended. Standard lymphadenectomy for pancreatoduodenectomy should strive to resect Ln stations no. 5, 6, 8a, 12b1, 12b2, 12c, 13a, 13b, 14a, 14b, 17a, and 17b. For cancers of the body and tail of the pancreas, removal of stations 10, 11, and 18 is standard. Furthermore, lymphadenectomy is important for adequate nodal staging. Both pancreatic resection in relatively fit patients or nonresectional palliative treatment were accepted as acceptable treatment in cases of positive Ln's outside the resection plane. This consensus statement could serve as a guide for surgeons and researchers in future directives and new clinical studies.

11 Guideline Extended pancreatectomy in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: definition and consensus of the International Study Group for Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS). 2014

Hartwig, Werner / Vollmer, Charles M / Fingerhut, Abe / Yeo, Charles J / Neoptolemos, John P / Adham, Mustapha / Andrén-Sandberg, Ake / Asbun, Horacio J / Bassi, Claudio / Bockhorn, Max / Charnley, Richard / Conlon, Kevin C / Dervenis, Christos / Fernandez-Cruz, Laureano / Friess, Helmut / Gouma, Dirk J / Imrie, Clem W / Lillemoe, Keith D / Milićević, Miroslav N / Montorsi, Marco / Shrikhande, Shailesh V / Vashist, Yogesh K / Izbicki, Jakob R / Büchler, Markus W / Anonymous1520795. ·Department of Surgery, Klinikum Großhadern, University of Munich, Munich, Germany. · Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Penn Surgery, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. · Department of Digestive Surgery, Centre Hospitalier Intercommunal, Poissy, France. · Department of Surgery, Jefferson Pancreas, Biliary and Related Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA. · Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, Liverpool Cancer Research-UK Centre, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Department of HPB Surgery, Hopital Edouard Herriot, Lyon, France. · Department of Surgery, Karolinska Institutet at Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of General Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL. · Department of Surgery and Oncology, Pancreas Institute, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of General-, Visceral- and Thoracic-Surgery, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of HPB & Transplant Surgery, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Professorial Surgical Unit, University of Dublin, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland. · Department of First Surgery, Agia Olga Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Department of Surgery, Clinic Hospital of Barcelona, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Academic Unit of Surgery, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · First Surgical Clinic, Clinical Center of Serbia, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia. · Department of General Surgery, Instituto Clinico Humanitas IRCCS, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. · Department of Gastrointestinal and HPB Surgical Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, India. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: markus.buechler@med.uni-heidelberg.de. ·Surgery · Pubmed #24856668.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Complete macroscopic tumor resection is one of the most relevant predictors of long-term survival in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Because locally advanced pancreatic tumors can involve adjacent organs, "extended" pancreatectomy that includes the resection of additional organs may be needed to achieve this goal. Our aim was to develop a common consistent terminology to be used in centers reporting results of pancreatic resections for cancer. METHODS: An international panel of pancreatic surgeons working in well-known, high-volume centers reviewed the literature on extended pancreatectomies and worked together to establish a consensus on the definition and the role of extended pancreatectomy in pancreatic cancer. RESULTS: Macroscopic (R1) and microscopic (R0) complete tumor resection can be achieved in patients with locally advanced disease by extended pancreatectomy. Operative time, blood loss, need for blood transfusions, duration of stay in the intensive care unit, and hospital morbidity, and possibly also perioperative mortality are increased with extended resections. Long-term survival is similar compared with standard resections but appears to be better compared with bypass surgery or nonsurgical palliative chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. It was not possible to identify any clear prognostic criteria based on the specific additional organ resected. CONCLUSION: Despite increased perioperative morbidity, extended pancreatectomy is warranted in locally advanced disease to achieve long-term survival in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma if macroscopic clearance can be achieved. Definitions of extended pancreatectomies for locally advanced disease (and not distant metastatic disease) are established that are crucial for comparison of results of future trials across different practices and countries, in particular for those using neoadjuvant therapy.

12 Guideline Borderline resectable pancreatic cancer: a consensus statement by the International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS). 2014

Bockhorn, Maximilian / Uzunoglu, Faik G / Adham, Mustapha / Imrie, Clem / Milicevic, Miroslav / Sandberg, Aken A / Asbun, Horacio J / Bassi, Claudio / Büchler, Markus / Charnley, Richard M / Conlon, Kevin / Cruz, Laureano Fernandez / Dervenis, Christos / Fingerhutt, Abe / Friess, Helmut / Gouma, Dirk J / Hartwig, Werner / Lillemoe, Keith D / Montorsi, Marco / Neoptolemos, John P / Shrikhande, Shailesh V / Takaori, Kyoichi / Traverso, William / Vashist, Yogesh K / Vollmer, Charles / Yeo, Charles J / Izbicki, Jakob R / Anonymous1510795. ·Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of HPB Surgery, Hôpital Edouard Herriot, Lyon, France. · Academic Unit of Surgery, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · First Surgical Clinic, Clinical Center of Serbia, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia. · Department of Surgery, Karolinska Institutet at Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of General Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL. · Department of Surgery and Oncology, Pancreas Institute, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of HPB & Transplant Surgery, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Professorial Surgical Unit, University of Dublin, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland. · Department of Surgery, Clinic Hospital of Barcelona, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · First Department of Surgery, Agia Olga Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Department of Digestive Surgery, Centre Hospitalier Intercommunal, Poissy, France. · Department of Surgery, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Department of General Surgery, Instituto Clinico Humanitas IRCCS, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. · Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, Liverpool Cancer Research-UK Centre, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Gastrointestinal and HPB Surgical Oncology, Tata Memorial Centre, Mumbai, India. · Department of Surgery, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan. · St. Luke's Clinic - Center For Pancreatic and Liver Diseases, Boise, ID. · Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Penn Surgery, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. · Department of Surgery, Jefferson Pancreas, Biliary and Related Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. Electronic address: izbicki@uke.de. ·Surgery · Pubmed #24856119.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: This position statement was developed to expedite a consensus on definition and treatment for borderline resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (BRPC) that would have worldwide acceptability. METHODS: An international panel of pancreatic surgeons from well-established, high-volume centers collaborated on a literature review and development of consensus on issues related to borderline resectable pancreatic cancer. RESULTS: The International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS) supports the National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria for the definition of BRPC. Current evidence supports operative exploration and resection in the case of involvement of the mesentericoportal venous axis; in addition, a new classification of extrahepatic mesentericoportal venous resections is proposed by the ISGPS. Suspicion of arterial involvement should lead to exploration to confirm the imaging-based findings. Formal arterial resections are not recommended; however, in exceptional circumstances, individual therapeutic approaches may be evaluated under experimental protocols. The ISGPS endorses the recommendations for specimen examination and the definition of an R1 resection (tumor within 1 mm from the margin) used by the British Royal College of Pathologists. Standard preoperative diagnostics for BRPC may include: (1) serum levels of CA19-9, because CA19-9 levels predict survival in large retrospective series; and also (2) the modified Glasgow Prognostic Score and the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio because of the prognostic relevance of the systemic inflammatory response. Various regimens of neoadjuvant therapy are recommended only in the setting of prospective trials at high-volume centers. CONCLUSION: Current evidence justifies portomesenteric venous resection in patients with BRPC. Basic definitions were identified, that are currently lacking but that are needed to obtain further evidence and improvement for this important patient subgroup. A consensus for each topic is given.

13 Guideline International Cancer of the Pancreas Screening (CAPS) Consortium summit on the management of patients with increased risk for familial pancreatic cancer. 2013

Canto, Marcia Irene / Harinck, Femme / Hruban, Ralph H / Offerhaus, George Johan / Poley, Jan-Werner / Kamel, Ihab / Nio, Yung / Schulick, Richard S / Bassi, Claudio / Kluijt, Irma / Levy, Michael J / Chak, Amitabh / Fockens, Paul / Goggins, Michael / Bruno, Marco / Anonymous4730741. ·Division of Gastroenterology, Johns Hopkins University, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, 1830 E Monument Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. mcanto@jhmi.edu ·Gut · Pubmed #23135763.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Screening individuals at increased risk for pancreatic cancer (PC) detects early, potentially curable, pancreatic neoplasia. OBJECTIVE: To develop consortium statements on screening, surveillance and management of high-risk individuals with an inherited predisposition to PC. METHODS: A 49-expert multidisciplinary international consortium met to discuss pancreatic screening and vote on statements. Consensus was considered reached if ≥ 75% agreed or disagreed. RESULTS: There was excellent agreement that, to be successful, a screening programme should detect and treat T1N0M0 margin-negative PC and high-grade dysplastic precursor lesions (pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm). It was agreed that the following were candidates for screening: first-degree relatives (FDRs) of patients with PC from a familial PC kindred with at least two affected FDRs; patients with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome; and p16, BRCA2 and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) mutation carriers with ≥ 1 affected FDR. Consensus was not reached for the age to initiate screening or stop surveillance. It was agreed that initial screening should include endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) and/or MRI/magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography not CT or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. There was no consensus on the need for EUS fine-needle aspiration to evaluate cysts. There was disagreement on optimal screening modalities and intervals for follow-up imaging. When surgery is recommended it should be performed at a high-volume centre. There was great disagreement as to which screening abnormalities were of sufficient concern to for surgery to be recommended. CONCLUSIONS: Screening is recommended for high-risk individuals, but more evidence is needed, particularly for how to manage patients with detected lesions. Screening and subsequent management should take place at high-volume centres with multidisciplinary teams, preferably within research protocols.

14 Editorial Chronic pancreatitis-like changes in individuals at high risk for the development of pancreatic cancer: What is the significance? 2019

Brewer Gutierrez, Olaya I / Lennon, Anne Marie. ·Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Johns Hopkins Medical Institution, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. ·Gastrointest Endosc · Pubmed #30902206.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Editorial Improving Outcomes After Distal Pancreatectomy with Celiac Axis Resection (DP-CAR): As Always, it is All About Patient Selection. 2019

Ikoma, Naruhiko / Katz, Matthew H G. ·Department of Surgical Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, TX, USA. · Department of Surgical Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, TX, USA. mhgkatz@mdanderson.org. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #30539493.

ABSTRACT:

16 Editorial Gastroenterological Cancer and Immunotherapy. 2018

Wang, Xiaoping / Yang, Yixin Eric / Jia, Lintao / Chen, Qi. ·Department of Pathology, Shaanxi University of Chinese Medicine, Xianyang, Shaanxi, China. · School of Natural Sciences, College of Natural, Applied and Health Sciences, Kean University, Union, NJ, USA. · Department of Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, Shaanxi, China. · Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, KS, USA. ·Can J Gastroenterol Hepatol · Pubmed #30073155.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Editorial Pancreatic Cancer Chemoprevention: Challenges and Opportunities. 2018

Mohammed, Altaf / Rao, Chinthalapally V. ·Chemopreventive Agent Development Research Group (CADRG) Division of Cancer Prevention National Cancer Institute Rockville, MD 20850, United States. · Center for Cancer Prevention and Drug Development (CCPDD) Stephenson Cancer Center, Medical Oncology University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Oklahoma City, OK 73104, United States. ·Curr Med Chem · Pubmed #30014794.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Editorial Pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic cancer: perspective from the United States. 2017

Ejaz, Aslam / He, Jin. ·Department of Surgery, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Surgery, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. jhe11@jhmi.edu. ·Chin Clin Oncol · Pubmed #28249540.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Editorial PD-L1 Expression in Pancreatic Cancer. 2017

Zheng, Lei. ·Affiliations of authors: Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Graduate Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Department of Surgery, The Skip Viragh Center for Pancreatic Cancer, and The Bloomberg-Kimmel Institute of Cancer Immunotherapy, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. ·J Natl Cancer Inst · Pubmed #28131993.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Editorial What's in a Name? Steady Progress in Staging Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors. 2017

Halperin, Daniel M / Yao, James C / Dasari, Arvind. ·Daniel M. Halperin, James C. Yao, and Arvind Dasari, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #27893328.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Editorial Acinar Ductal Metaplasia: Yap Fills a Gap. 2016

Means, Anna L / Logsdon, Craig D. ·Department of Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. Electronic address: anna.means@vanderbilt.edu. · Department of Cancer Biology, University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #27456389.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Editorial Pancreatic Cancer: Current Progress and Future Challenges. 2016

Hussain, S Perwez. ·Head Pancreatic Cancer Unit, Laboratory of Human Carcinogenesis, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institutes, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. ·Int J Biol Sci · Pubmed #26929733.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most common form of pancreatic cancer, remains one of the highly lethal malignancies. The highly refractory nature of clinically advanced disease and lack of a reliable biomarker for early detection are major obstructions in improving patient outcome. The recent efforts, however, in understanding the pancreatic tumor biology have resulted in the recognition of novel addictions as well as vulnerabilities of tumor cells and are being assessed for their clinical potential. This special issue highlights some of the recent progress, complexity and challenges towards improving disease outcome in patients with this lethal malignancy.

23 Editorial The safety of incretin based drug treatments for type 2 diabetes. 2016

Bolen, Shari D / Maruthur, Nisa M. ·Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, The MetroHealth System/Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Case Western Reserve University sdb73@case.edu. · Division of General Internal Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology, and Clinical Research, Baltimore, MD, USA. ·BMJ · Pubmed #26888024.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

24 Editorial Better Biomarkers for Pancreatic Diseases. 2015

Whitcomb, David C. ·From the Departments of Medicine, Cell Biology & Molecular Physiology, and Human Genetics, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, University of Pittsburgh/UPMC, Pittsburgh, PA. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #26465944.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

25 Editorial The Safety of Prescription Drugs. 2015

Sharfstein, Joshua M / Kesselheim, Aaron S. ·Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland. · The Program on Regulation, Therapeutics, and Law (PORTAL), Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts3Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. ·JAMA · Pubmed #26197182.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

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