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Parkinson Disease: HELP
Articles by Jason L. Aldred
Based on 4 articles published since 2009
(Why 4 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Jason Aldred wrote the following 4 articles about Parkinson Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review The past, present, and future of telemedicine for Parkinson's disease. 2014

Achey, Meredith / Aldred, Jason L / Aljehani, Noha / Bloem, Bastiaan R / Biglan, Kevin M / Chan, Piu / Cubo, Esther / Dorsey, E Ray / Goetz, Christopher G / Guttman, Mark / Hassan, Anhar / Khandhar, Suketu M / Mari, Zoltan / Spindler, Meredith / Tanner, Caroline M / van den Haak, Pieter / Walker, Richard / Wilkinson, Jayne R / Anonymous4170794. ·Center for Human Experimental Therapeutics, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York, USA. ·Mov Disord · Pubmed #24838316.

ABSTRACT: Travel distance, growing disability, and uneven distribution of doctors limit access to care for most Parkinson's disease (PD) patients worldwide. Telemedicine, the use of telecommunications technology to deliver care at a distance, can help overcome these barriers. In this report, we describe the past, present, and likely future applications of telemedicine to PD. Historically, telemedicine has relied on expensive equipment to connect single patients to a specialist in pilot programs in wealthy nations. As the cost of video conferencing has plummeted, these efforts have expanded in scale and scope, now reaching larger parts of the world and extending the focus from care to training of remote providers. Policy, especially limited reimbursement, currently hinders the growth and adoption of these new care models. As these policies change and technology advances and spreads, the following will likely develop: integrated care networks that connect patients to a wide range of providers; education programs that support patients and health care providers; and new research applications that include remote monitoring and remote visits. Together, these developments will enable more individuals with PD to connect to care, increase access to expertise for patients and providers, and allow more-extensive, less-expensive participation in research.

2 Article National randomized controlled trial of virtual house calls for Parkinson disease. 2017

Beck, Christopher A / Beran, Denise B / Biglan, Kevin M / Boyd, Cynthia M / Dorsey, E Ray / Schmidt, Peter N / Simone, Richard / Willis, Allison W / Galifianakis, Nicholas B / Katz, Maya / Tanner, Caroline M / Dodenhoff, Kristen / Aldred, Jason / Carter, Julie / Fraser, Andrew / Jimenez-Shahed, Joohi / Hunter, Christine / Spindler, Meredith / Reichwein, Suzanne / Mari, Zoltan / Dunlop, Becky / Morgan, John C / McLane, Dedi / Hickey, Patrick / Gauger, Lisa / Richard, Irene Hegeman / Mejia, Nicte I / Bwala, Grace / Nance, Martha / Shih, Ludy C / Singer, Carlos / Vargas-Parra, Silvia / Zadikoff, Cindy / Okon, Natalia / Feigin, Andrew / Ayan, Jean / Vaughan, Christina / Pahwa, Rajesh / Dhall, Rohit / Hassan, Anhar / DeMello, Steven / Riggare, Sara S / Wicks, Paul / Achey, Meredith A / Elson, Molly J / Goldenthal, Steven / Keenan, H Tait / Korn, Ryan / Schwarz, Heidi / Sharma, Saloni / Stevenson, E Anna / Zhu, William / Anonymous471268. ·From the Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology (C.A.B.), University of Rochester, NY · National Parkinson Foundation (D.B.B., P.N.S.), Miami, FL · Department of Neurology (K.M.B., E.R.D., I.H.R., H.S.) and The Center for Human Experimental Therapeutics (E.R.D., M.A.A., M.J.E., S.G., H.T.K., R.K., S.S., E.A.S., W.Z.), University of Rochester Medical Center, NY · Division of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology, Department of Medicine (C.M.B., Z.M., B.D.), Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD · Simone Consulting (R.S.), Sunnyvale, CA · Departments of Neurology and Biostatistics and Epidemiology (A.W.W., M.S., S.R.), University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia · University of California San Francisco (N.B.G., M.K., C.M.T., K.D.) · Northwest Neurological, PLLC (J. Aldred), Spokane, WA · Oregon Health and Science University (J.C., A. Fraser), Portland · Baylor College of Medicine (J.J.-S., C.H.), Houston, TX · Augusta University (J.C.M., D.M.), GA · Duke Medical Center (P.H., L.G.), Durham, NC · Massachusetts General Hospital (N.I.M., G.B.), Boston · Struthers Parkinson's Center (M.N.), Minneapolis, MN · Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (L.C.S.), Boston, MA · University of Miami (C.S., S.V.-P.), FL · Northwestern University (C.Z., N.O.), Evanston, IL · The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research (A. Feigin, J. Ayan), Northwell Health, Manhasset, NY · Medical University of South Carolina (C.V.), Charleston · University of Kansas Medical Center (R.P.), Kansas City · Parkinson's Institute (R.D.), Sunnyvale, CA · Mayo Clinic (A.H.), Rochester, MN · Center for Information Technology Research in the Interest of Society (CITRIS) (S.D.), University of California, Berkeley · Health Informatics Centre (S.S.R.), Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden · and PatientsLikeMe (P.W.), Derby, UK. ·Neurology · Pubmed #28814455.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To determine whether providing remote neurologic care into the homes of people with Parkinson disease (PD) is feasible, beneficial, and valuable. METHODS: In a 1-year randomized controlled trial, we compared usual care to usual care supplemented by 4 virtual visits via video conferencing from a remote specialist into patients' homes. Primary outcome measures were feasibility, as measured by the proportion who completed at least one virtual visit and the proportion of virtual visits completed on time; and efficacy, as measured by the change in the Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-39, a quality of life scale. Secondary outcomes included quality of care, caregiver burden, and time and travel savings. RESULTS: A total of 927 individuals indicated interest, 210 were enrolled, and 195 were randomized. Participants had recently seen a specialist (73%) and were largely college-educated (73%) and white (96%). Ninety-five (98% of the intervention group) completed at least one virtual visit, and 91% of 388 virtual visits were completed. Quality of life did not improve in those receiving virtual house calls (0.3 points worse on a 100-point scale; 95% confidence interval [CI] -2.0 to 2.7 points; CONCLUSIONS: Providing remote neurologic care directly into the homes of people with PD was feasible and was neither more nor less efficacious than usual in-person care. Virtual house calls generated great interest and provided substantial convenience. CLINICALTRIALSGOV IDENTIFIER: NCT02038959. CLASSIFICATION OF EVIDENCE: This study provides Class III evidence that for patients with PD, virtual house calls from a neurologist are feasible and do not significantly change quality of life compared to in-person visits. The study is rated Class III because it was not possible to mask patients to visit type.

3 Article National Randomized Controlled Trial of Virtual House Calls for People with Parkinson's Disease: Interest and Barriers. 2016

Dorsey, E Ray / Achey, Meredith A / Beck, Christopher A / Beran, Denise B / Biglan, Kevin M / Boyd, Cynthia M / Schmidt, Peter N / Simone, Richard / Willis, Allison W / Galifianakis, Nicholas B / Katz, Maya / Tanner, Caroline M / Dodenhoff, Kristen / Ziman, Nathan / Aldred, Jason / Carter, Julie / Jimenez-Shahed, Joohi / Hunter, Christine / Spindler, Meredith / Mari, Zoltan / Morgan, John C / McLane, Dedi / Hickey, Patrick / Gauger, Lisa / Richard, Irene Hegeman / Bull, Michael T / Mejia, Nicte I / Bwala, Grace / Nance, Martha / Shih, Ludy / Anderson, Lauren / Singer, Carlos / Zadikoff, Cindy / Okon, Natalia / Feigin, Andrew / Ayan, Jean / Vaughan, Christina / Pahwa, Rajesh / Cooper, Jessica / Webb, Sydney / Dhall, Rohit / Hassan, Anhar / Weis, Delana / DeMello, Steven / Riggare, Sara S / Wicks, Paul / Smith, Joseph / Keenan, H Tait / Korn, Ryan / Schwarz, Heidi / Sharma, Saloni / Stevenson, E Anna / Zhu, William. ·1 Department of Neurology, Rochester, New York. · 2 CHET, University of Rochester Medical Center , Rochester, New York. · 3 Duke University School of Medicine , Durham, North Carolina. · 4 Department of Biostatistics, University of Rochester , Rochester, New York. · 5 National Parkinson Foundation , Miami, Florida. · 6 Division of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine , Baltimore, Maryland. · 7 Simone Consulting , Sunnyvale, California. · 8 Department of Neurology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · 9 Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania , Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · 10 Department of Neurology, University of California San Francisco , San Francisco, California. · 11 Northwest Neurological, PLLC , Spokane, Washington. · 12 Parkinson Center and Movement Disorders Program, Oregon Health and Science University , Portland, Oregon. · 13 Department of Neurology, Baylor College of Medicine , Houston, Texas. · 14 Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins University , Baltimore, Maryland. · 15 Department of Neurology, Georgia Regents University , Augusta, Georgia . · 16 Department of Neurology, Duke Medical Center , Durham, North Carolina. · 17 Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital , Boston, Massachusetts. · 18 Struthers Parkinson's Center , Golden Valley, Minnesota. · 19 Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center , Boston, Massachusetts. · 20 Department of Neurology, University of Miami , Miami, Florida. · 21 Department of Neurology, Northwestern University , Evanston, Illinois. · 22 The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, North Shore-LIJ Health System , Manhasset, New York. · 23 Department of Neurology, Medical University of South Carolina , Charleston, South Carolina. · 24 Department of Neurology, University of Kansas Medical Center , Kansas City, Kansas. · 25 Parkinson's Institute , Sunnyvale, California. · 26 Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic , Rochester, Minnesota. · 27 Center for Information Technology Research in the Interest of Society, University of California , Berkeley, California. · 28 Health Informatics Centre, Karolinska Institute , Stockholm, Sweden . · 29 PatientsLikeMe, Cambridge, Massachusetts . · 30 West Health Institute , La Jolla, California. ·Telemed J E Health · Pubmed #26886406.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Delivering specialty care remotely directly into people's homes can enhance access for and improve the healthcare of individuals with chronic conditions. However, evidence supporting this approach is limited. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Connect.Parkinson is a randomized comparative effectiveness study that compares usual care of individuals with Parkinson's disease in the community with usual care augmented by virtual house calls with a Parkinson's disease specialist from 1 of 18 centers nationally. Individuals in the intervention arm receive four virtual visits from a Parkinson's disease specialist over 1 year via secure, Web-based videoconferencing directly into their homes. All study activities, including recruitment, enrollment, and assessments, are conducted remotely. Here we report on interest, feasibility, and barriers to enrollment in this ongoing study. RESULTS: During recruitment, 11,734 individuals visited the study's Web site, and 927 unique individuals submitted electronic interest forms. Two hundred ten individuals from 18 states enrolled in the study from March 2014 to June 2015, and 195 were randomized. Most participants were white (96%) and college educated (73%). Of the randomized participants, 73% had seen a Parkinson's disease specialist within the previous year. CONCLUSIONS: Among individuals with Parkinson's disease, national interest in receiving remote specialty care directly into the home is high. Remote enrollment in this care model is feasible but is likely affected by differential access to the Internet.

4 Article Are high doses of carbidopa a concern? A randomized, clinical trial in Parkinson's disease. 2012

Brod, Lissa S / Aldred, Jason L / Nutt, John G. ·Portland VA Medical Center Parkinson Disease Research, Education and Clinical Center, Portland, Oregon, USA. ·Mov Disord · Pubmed #22508376.

ABSTRACT: Recommended doses of carbidopa are 75-200 mg/day. Higher doses could inhibit brain aromatic amino-acid decarboxylase and reduce clinical effects. We compared 4-week outpatient treatments with carbidopa (75 and 450 mg/day) administered with L-dopa on the subjects' normal schedule. After each treatment phase, subjects had two 2-hour L-dopa infusions. The first infusion examined the effects of carbidopa doses administered the preceding 4 weeks, and the second infusion determined the acute effects of the two dosages of carbidopa. The antiparkinsonian effects and L-dopa and carbidopa plasma concentrations were monitored during the infusions. Twelve subjects completed the study. Carbidopa concentrations were eight times higher after the high-carbidopa phase. Area under the curve (AUC) for clinical ratings did not differ for the four L-dopa infusions, although AUC for plasma L-dopa was modestly increased with 450 mg of carbidopa. Nine subjects reported that the high-carbidopa outpatient phase was associated with greater response to L-dopa. Doses of 450 mg/day of carbidopa did not reduce the responses to L-dopa infusion, extending the safe range of carbidopa to 450 mg/day.