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Parkinson Disease: HELP
Articles by Karen E. Anderson
Based on 13 articles published since 2010
(Why 13 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, K. E. Anderson wrote the following 13 articles about Parkinson Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article The Parkinson's disease gene 2019

Furlong, Rachel M / Lindsay, Andrew / Anderson, Karen E / Hawkins, Phillip T / Sullivan, Aideen M / O'Neill, Cora. ·School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Biosciences Institute, University College Cork, Cork City T12 YT20, Ireland. · Department of Anatomy and Neuroscience, Western Gateway Building, University College Cork, Cork City T12 XF62, Ireland. · Cork NeuroScience Centre, University College Cork, Cork City T12 YT20, Ireland. · Signalling Programme, Babraham Institute, Cambridge CB22 3AT, UK. · School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Biosciences Institute, University College Cork, Cork City T12 YT20, Ireland c.oneill@ucc.ie. ·J Cell Sci · Pubmed #31540955.

ABSTRACT: Akt signalling is central to cell survival, metabolism, protein and lipid homeostasis, and is impaired in Parkinson's disease (PD). Akt activation is reduced in the brain in PD, and by many PD-causing genes, including

2 Article Does spouse participation influence quality of life reporting in patients with Parkinson's disease? 2015

Morrow, Chelsea D / Smentkowski, Katherine / Schwartz, Stacy / Armstrong, Melissa J / Gruber-Baldini, Ann L / Anderson, Karen E / Reich, Stephen G / Weiner, William J / Shulman, Lisa M. ·Department of Neurology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA, chelseadmorrow@gmail.com. ·Qual Life Res · Pubmed #24972974.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To investigate whether patient-spouse co-reporting (patient reporting with assistance from their spouse) results in the same ratings of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) as patient ratings without co-reporting, and to assess whether mutuality of the marital relationship is a determinant of co-reported ratings. Patients are the best source of HRQoL; however, co-reporting is common in clinical settings, but has not been compared to independent patient reporting of HRQoL. METHODS: Fifty-nine Parkinson's disease (PD) patient-spouse pairs completed the Short Form Health Status Survey (SF-12), measuring mental and physical HRQoL. Initially, the patient and spouse completed the SF-12 independently (about the patient). Then, patient-spouse pairs completed the SF-12 together assessing the patient's HRQoL. Patients and spouses independently completed the Mutuality Scale rating the intimacy of their relationship. RESULTS: Patients rated physical HRQoL higher (M = 46.6) than spouses alone (M = 43.4, p < 0.01) and co-reporting (M = 44.8, p < 0.05). Co-reporting rated physical HRQoL in between that of patients and spouses, (p < 0.05). Spouses who reported greater mutuality showed greater concordance with the patient regarding the patient's mental HRQoL (B = -0.43, p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Consistency of the mode of completion of HRQoL instruments is important since co-reporting may alter HRQoL ratings in PD and lead to inaccurate conclusions. Mutuality is a mediator of mental HRQoL.

3 Article Application of depression rating scales in patients with Parkinson's disease with and without co-Occurring anxiety. 2013

Calleo, Jessica / Williams, James R / Amspoker, Amber B / Swearingen, Leah / Hirsch, Elaina S / Anderson, Karen / Goldstein, Susanne R / Grill, Stephen / Lehmann, Susan / Little, John T / Margolis, Russell L / Palanci, Justin / Pontone, Gregory M / Weiss, Howard / Rabins, Peter / Marsh, Laura. ·Houston VA HSR&D Center for Innovations in Quality, Effectiveness and Safety, Houston, TX, USA Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Houston, TX, USA Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA. ·J Parkinsons Dis · Pubmed #24275604.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), depressive symptom rating scales facilitate identification of depressive disorders, which are common and disabling. Anxiety disturbances in PD, which lack valid assessment scales, frequently co-occur with PD-depression, are under-recognized, and require different interventions than depressive disorders. Whether high anxiety rates in PD confound depression scale performance or if any depression scales also predict anxiety disturbances is not known. OBJECTIVE: To test the impact of co-occurring anxiety disorders on psychometric properties of depression rating scales in depressed PD patients and compare disability between PD patients with anxiety, depression, and comorbid anxiety and depressive disorders. METHODS: PD subjects (n = 229) completed self-report and clinician-administered depression scales. Receiver operating characteristic curves were developed to estimate psychometric properties of each scale in those with depression alone, anxiety alone, and comorbid depression and anxiety. Between-group differences on all measures were examined. RESULTS: Comorbid anxiety did not affect the psychometric properties of any scale when identifying depressive disorders, but is associated with greater symptom severity and disability. Depression-scale scores were not significantly different between subjects with anxiety disorders only and those without depressive or anxiety diagnoses. CONCLUSIONS: Co-occurring anxiety disorders do not impact performance of depression rating scales in depressed PD patients. However, depression rating scales do not adequately identify anxiety disturbances alone or in patients with depression.

4 Article Pharmacologic treatment of anxiety disorders in Parkinson disease. 2013

Pontone, Gregory M / Williams, James R / Anderson, Karen E / Chase, Gary / Goldstein, Susanne R / Grill, Stephen / Hirsch, Elaina S / Lehmann, Susan / Little, John T / Margolis, Russell L / Palanci, Justin / Rabins, Peter V / Weiss, Howard D / Marsh, Laura. ·Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. Electronic address: gponton1@jhmi.edu. ·Am J Geriatr Psychiatry · Pubmed #23567419.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Neither best practices nor an evidence base for the pharmacologic treatment of anxiety in Parkinson disease (PD) has been established. This study investigated pharmacologic treatment of anxiety disorders in idiopathic PD and the associated clinical features. DESIGN: Cross-sectional. SETTING: Three community-based movement disorder neurology practices. PARTICIPANTS: 250 subjects with PD. MEASUREMENTS: Anxiety disorder diagnoses were established by consensus using a panel of six psychiatrists with expertise in geriatric psychiatry and movement disorders. Current medications were provided by the treating neurologists at the time of interview. RESULTS: Among subjects with anxiety disorders only, 53% were untreated with medications. When anxious subjects with comorbid depressive disorders were included, 70.8% were on medications effective for treatment of anxiety. Subjects with anxiety and comorbid depressive disorders were more likely to be treated for their psychiatric disturbances than subjects with anxiety disorders alone (odds ratio: 8.33), as were subjects with comorbid motor fluctuations (odds ratio: 3.65). There were no differences in the types of anti-anxiety medications used in regard to the presence of depression or motor fluctuations. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that over half of nondepressed PD patients with clinically significant anxiety are untreated with medication. A better understanding of the role of clinical features associated with anxiety in PD, such as depression and motor fluctuations, may improve the recognition and treatment of anxiety disorders in this population.

5 Article Comparison of caregiver strain in Parkinson's disease between Yamagata, Japan, and Maryland, The United States. 2013

Tanji, Haruko / Koyama, Shingo / Wada, Manabu / Kawanami, Toru / Kurita, Keiji / Tamiya, Gen / Saito, Naohiro / Suzuki, Kyoko / Kato, Takeo / Anderson, Karen E / Gruber-Baldini, Ann L / Fishman, Paul S / Reich, Stephen G / Weiner, William J / Shulman, Lisa M. ·Department of Neurology, Hematology, Metabolism, Endocrinology and Diabetology, Yamagata University School of Medicine, 2-2-2 Iida-Nishi, Yamagata, Japan. t.haruko@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp ·Parkinsonism Relat Disord · Pubmed #23514630.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Japan and the United States (US) have different cultures of caregiving including differences in family structure and social programs that may influence caregiver strain. Differences in caregiver strain between regions in Japan and in the US have not been investigated in patient-spouse dyads in PD. OBJECTIVES: To compare caregiver strain in spouses of PD patients between Yamagata, Japan and Maryland, US. Correlations between caregiver strain and patient/spousal variables are also examined. METHODS: In Yamagata and Maryland, spouses of patients with PD completed questionnaires assessing caregiver strain. Patients and spouses completed scales assessing mental health, and medical co-morbidity. PD severity and disability were assessed with the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale and the Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living Scale. Results in the two regions were compared with Chi-square and Student's t-tests. Relationships between caregiver strain and patient/spousal variables were analyzed with univariate correlations and multivariate regression. RESULTS: 178 Spouse-patient pairs were assessed. The level of caregiver strain in PD did not differ between Yamagata, Japan and Maryland, US despite differences in demographics and social support programs in the two regions. Yamagata spouses reported physical, time and financial constraints, while Maryland spouses reported more emotional distress. In both regions, spousal depression was a significant contributor to caregiver strain. CONCLUSION: Different approaches to reduce caregiver strain will likely be necessary in Yamagata and Maryland since the contributing factors to caregiver strain are influenced by differences in culture and social supports in each country.

6 Article Dual task performance in Parkinson's disease: a sensitive predictor of impairment and disability. 2013

Fuller, Rebecca L / Van Winkle, Elizabeth P / Anderson, Karen E / Gruber-Baldini, Ann L / Hill, Terra / Zampieri, Cris / Weiner, William J / Shulman, Lisa M. ·Department of Psychology, The Catholic University of America, Washington DC 20064, USA. fuller@cua.edu ·Parkinsonism Relat Disord · Pubmed #23265679.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Dual task (DT) performance assesses the ability to perform two tasks simultaneously. Difficulty with DT performance may be a sensitive indicator of early Parkinson's disease (PD) impairment. The objective of this study was to assess what elements of a DT performance (cognition or gait) are most associated with impairment and disability in PD. METHODS: Performance in single and DT conditions was examined in 154 PD patients. The single task assessments included the time required to walk 50 feet (gait speed) and the number of words generated in a verbal fluency task (word generation). The DT comprised simultaneous performance of the single tasks. Impairment and disability were measured with the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, Hoehn &Yahr, Berg Balance Scale, and Older Americans Resource and Services Scale. Age, education, and gender were control variables. Standardized residuals from regressions of DT upon single task performance were computed separately for word and gait, indicating the extent that the individual performed proportionally better/worse than predicted in DT considering their single task performance. RESULTS: Multiple regressions revealed that individuals who performed worse than expected in DT-word had greater impairment and disability. Dual task-gait was not significant in any model. Verbal fluency during DT performance is more closely associated with PD-related impairment and disability than gait speed during DT. CONCLUSION: This suggests that subjects prioritize gait performance at the expense of cognitive performance, and that DT word generation may be a sensitive indicator of early PD impairment and disability.

7 Article Randomized clinical trial of 3 types of physical exercise for patients with Parkinson disease. 2013

Shulman, Lisa M / Katzel, Leslie I / Ivey, Frederick M / Sorkin, John D / Favors, Knachelle / Anderson, Karen E / Smith, Barbara A / Reich, Stephen G / Weiner, William J / Macko, Richard F. ·University of Maryland School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Baltimore,MD21201, USA. lshulman@som.umaryland.edu ·JAMA Neurol · Pubmed #23128427.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To compare the efficacy of treadmill exercises and stretching and resistance exercises in improving gait speed, strength, and fitness for patients with Parkinson disease. DESIGN: A comparative, prospective, randomized, single-blinded clinical trial of 3 types of physical exercise. SETTING: The Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Center at the University of Maryland and the Baltimore Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center. PATIENTS: A total of 67 patients with Parkinson disease who had gait impairment were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 arms of the trial. INTERVENTIONS; (1) A higher-intensity treadmill exercise (30 minutes at 70%-80% of heart rate reserve), (2) a lower-intensity treadmill exercise (50 minutes at 40%-50% of heart rate reserve), and (3) stretching and resistance exercises (2 sets of 10 repetitions on each leg on 3 resistance machines [leg press, leg extension, and curl]). These exercises were performed 3 times a week for 3 months. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome measures were gait speed (6-minute walk), cardiovascular fitness (peak oxygen consumption per unit time [$$ VO2], and muscle strength (1-repetition maximum strength). RESULTS: All 3 types of physical exercise improved distance on the 6-minute walk: lower-intensity treadmill exercise (12% increase; P=.001), stretching and resistance exercises (9% increase; P<.02), and higher-intensity treadmill exercise (6% increase; P=.07), with no between-group differences. Both treadmill exercises improved peak $$ VO2 (7%-8% increase; P<.05) more than did the stretching and resistance exercises. Only stretching and resistance improved muscle strength (16% increase; P<.001). CONCLUSIONS: The effects of exercise were seen across all 3 exercise groups. The lower-intensity treadmill exercise resulted in the greatest improvement in gait speed. Both the higher- and lower-intensity treadmill exercises improved cardiovascular fitness. Only the stretching and resistance exercises improved muscle strength. Therefore, exercise can improve gait speed, muscle strength, and fitness for patients with Parkinson disease. The combination of treadmill and resistance exercises may result in greater benefit and requires further investigation.

8 Article The effects of gait impairment with and without freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease. 2012

Josiah, Anne F / Gruber-Baldini, Ann L / Anderson, Karen E / Fishman, Paul S / Weiner, William J / Reich, Stephen G / Shulman, Lisa M. ·University of Maryland School of Medicine, MD, USA. ·Parkinsonism Relat Disord · Pubmed #22079524.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of gait impairment without freezing of gait (FOG) versus FOG without gait impairment in Parkinson's disease (PD) on disability and quality of life. BACKGROUND: FOG is frequently characterized as the major cause of gait-related disability in PD. However, gait impairment may also result from other PD symptoms including slowing, motor asymmetry, gait variability, dystonia or stooped posture. METHODS: The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), Older Americans Resources and Services Disability Scale (OARS) and the SF-12 Health Status Survey were used to evaluate patients with PD. Responses to UPDRS Items #14 (Freezing) and # 29 (Gait) were used to create 4 subgroups: 1) No FOG or gait impairment, 2) FOG, no gait impairment, 3) Gait impairment, no FOG, and 4) Both FOG and gait impairment. Disease severity, disability, and quality of life were compared across the subgroups with ANOVAs, and between subgroups with t-tests. RESULTS: 916 PD patients were divided into 4 subgroups based on their gait and freezing score (#1: n = 213, #2: n = 41, #3: n = 323 and #4: n = 339). Total UPDRS progressively increased from Group 1 through Group 4 (1 = 25.2, 2 = 33.7, 3 = 39.2, 4 = 59.2; p < 0.001). Motor UPDRS also progressively increased (1 = 17.4, 2 = 19.7, 3 = 26.9, 4 = 36.5; p < 0.0001). Similarly, disability and health-related quality of life progressively increased from Group 1 through Group 4 (Total OARS: 1 = 15.3, 2 = 17.2, 3 = 18.9, 4 = 28.4; p < 0.001). Group 3 (Gait impairment, no FOG) showed greater disease severity than Group 2 (FOG, no gait impairment; Total and Motor UPDRS; p < 0.05), but the difference did not reach significance for disability or quality of life. CONCLUSIONS: Gait impairment without FOG was associated with greater disease severity than FOG without gait impairment. The combination of gait impairment and FOG was associated with the greatest disease severity and disability. These results show differential effects of diverse features of gait impairment in PD and demonstrate the importance of gait features unrelated to freezing.

9 Article What determines resilience in patients with Parkinson's disease? 2012

Robottom, B J / Gruber-Baldini, A L / Anderson, K E / Reich, S G / Fishman, P S / Weiner, W J / Shulman, L M. ·Raleigh Neurology Associates, Raleigh, NC, USA. ·Parkinsonism Relat Disord · Pubmed #21975263.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship of resilience to disease severity, disability, quality of life (QoL) and non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). A secondary objective was to investigate whether resilience is distinct from other personality domains in PD. BACKGROUND: Resilience is the ability to reestablish emotional equilibrium in the face of adversity. It may play a pivotal role in disability and quality of life and has not been studied in PD. METHODS: 83 PD patients (Age 66.3 ± 10.6, Total Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (T-UPDRS) 36.9 ± 17.8) completed the Resilience Scale 15 (RS-15). Scales measuring disability, mental and physical health-related QoL, non-motor symptoms (depression, anxiety, somatization, apathy, fatigue), and personality domains were completed. Pearson's correlations were analyzed between these scales and the RS-15. RESULTS: Greater resilience correlated with less disability (r = -.30, p = .01), and better physical and mental QoL (r = .31, p < .01; r = .29, p = .01), but not with PD severity (T-UPDRS, r = -.17, p > .05). Among non-motor symptoms and personality domains, resilience strongly correlated with less apathy (r = -.66), less depression (r = -.49), and more optimism (r = .54, all p < .001). Moderate correlations were seen between more resilience, reduced fatigue (r = -.40) and anxiety (r = -.34; both p < .001). CONCLUSIONS: Resilience correlated with less disability and better QoL but not with PD severity. Resilience was also highly associated with both non-motor symptoms (less apathy, depression, fatigue) and a personality domain (more optimism). The role of resilience in helping patients adapt to living with symptoms of chronic disease may explain its lack of correlation with PD severity.

10 Article Prevalence of psychotic symptoms in a community-based Parkinson disease sample. 2012

Mack, Joel / Rabins, Peter / Anderson, Karen / Goldstein, Susanne / Grill, Stephen / Hirsch, Elaina S / Lehmann, Susan / Little, John T / Margolis, Russell L / Palanci, Justin / Pontone, Gregory / Weiss, Howard / Williams, James R / Marsh, Laura. ·Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. ·Am J Geriatr Psychiatry · Pubmed #21617521.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: : To determine the prevalence of psychotic phenomena, including minor symptoms, in a Parkinson disease (PD) sample and compare the clinical correlates associated with the various psychotic phenomena. To evaluate the extent to which cases met National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke (NINDS)/National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)-proposed criteria for PD-associated psychosis. METHODS: : A total of 250 patients with idiopathic PD and Mini Mental State Exam scores greater than 23 from three community-based movement disorder clinics underwent comprehensive research diagnostic evaluations by a geriatric psychiatrist as part of a study on mood disorders in PD. Psychotic symptoms were categorized using a checklist, which included a breakdown of hallucinations, delusions, and minor symptoms. Clinical characteristics of groups with minor and other psychotic symptoms were compared. The NINDS/NIMH criteria for PD-psychosis were retrospectively applied. RESULTS: : Of the total sample, 26% of patients were found to have any current psychotic symptoms, with 47.7% of those having isolated minor symptoms, and 52.3% having hallucinations and/or delusions. Compared to those with no current psychiatric symptoms, minor symptoms were associated with more depressive symptoms and worse quality of life, and 90.8% of those with psychotic symptoms fulfilled the NINDS/NIMH proposed criteria. CONCLUSIONS: : Psychotic symptoms are common in PD patients, with minor psychotic phenomena present in nearly half of affected patients in a community-based sample. Psychotic symptoms, including minor phenomena, were clinically significant. The NINDS/NIMH PD-psychosis criteria captured the clinical characteristics of psychosis as it relates to PD. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine whether minor psychotic symptoms represent a precursor to hallucinations and delusions, and to further validate diagnostic criteria.

11 Article Anxiety and self-perceived health status in Parkinson's disease. 2011

Pontone, Gregory M / Williams, James R / Anderson, Karen E / Chase, Gary / Goldstein, Susanne R / Grill, Stephen / Hirsch, Elaina S / Lehmann, Susan / Little, John T / Margolis, Russell L / Rabins, Peter V / Weiss, Howard D / Marsh, Laura. ·Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 600 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA. gponton1@jhmi.edu ·Parkinsonism Relat Disord · Pubmed #21292531.

ABSTRACT: Both anxiety and depression are associated with lower self-perceived health status (HS) in persons with Parkinson's disease (PD). Given the high co-morbidity with depression and other non-motor symptoms, it is unclear whether anxiety disorders, in general, versus specific anxiety subtypes have an independent effect on HS in PD. To examine this question, comprehensive assessments of motor and non-motor symptoms from 249 subjects with idiopathic PD followed in three community-based movement disorders neurology practices were analyzed. HS was measured using the 8-item PD Questionnaire (PDQ-8). Psychiatric diagnoses were established by consensus using a panel of six psychiatrists with expertise in geriatric psychiatry and movement disorders. Stepwise multiple regression analyses were used, with the PDQ-8 score as the dependent variable, to identify independent predictors of HS among motor, psychiatric, and other non-motor variables. Among the anxiety disorders, only anxiety associated with motor fluctuations was an independent predictor of HS after accounting for co-morbid depression and other clinical features. In addition, depressive disorders were also an independent predictor of lower HS. Prevention or treatment of state-dependent anxiety may improve HS in persons with PD.

12 Article Metoclopramide-induced encephalopathy in Parkinson disease. 2010

Robottom, Bradley J / Shulman, Lisa M / Anderson, Karen E / Weiner, William J. ·Departments of Neurology and Psychiatry, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. BRobottom@som.umaryland.edu ·South Med J · Pubmed #20065895.

ABSTRACT: A case of prolonged encephalopathy and worsened parkinsonism in a Parkinson disease patient exposed to a short course of metoclopramide is described. Parkinson disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease in the United States. Because of the increased susceptibility to adverse drug effects, PD presents a special challenge to physicians. Anti-emetic drugs such as metoclopramide are widely used and may be particularly deleterious to PD patients due to blockade of dopamine receptors.

13 Article The clinically important difference on the unified Parkinson's disease rating scale. 2010

Shulman, Lisa M / Gruber-Baldini, Ann L / Anderson, Karen E / Fishman, Paul S / Reich, Stephen G / Weiner, William J. ·Departments of Neurology, University of Maryland Schoolof Medicine, Baltimore., MD 21201, USA. lshulman@som.umaryland.edu ·Arch Neurol · Pubmed #20065131.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To determine the estimates of minimal, moderate, and large clinically important differences (CIDs) for the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). DESIGN: Cross-sectional analysis of the CIDs for UPDRS total and motor scores was performed on patients with Parkinson disease (PD) using distribution- and anchor-based approaches based on the following 3 external standards: disability (10% on the Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living Scale), disease stage (1 stage on the Hoehn and Yahr Scale), and quality of life (1 SD on the 12-Item Short Form Health Survey). SETTING: University of Maryland Parkinson Disease and Movement Disorders Center, Patients Six hundred fifty-three patients with PD. RESULTS: A minimal CID was 2.3 to 2.7 points on the UPDRS motor score and 4.1 to 4.5 on the UPDRS total score. A moderate CID was 4.5 to 6.7 points on the UPDRS motor score and 8.5 to 10.3 on the UPDRS total score. A large CID was 10.7 to 10.8 points on the UPDRS motor score and 16.4 to 17.8 on the UPDRS total score. CONCLUSIONS: Concordance among multiple approaches of analysis based on subjective and objective data show that reasonable estimates for the CID on the UPDRS motor score are 2.5 points for minimal, 5.2 for moderate, and 10.8 for large CIDs. Estimates for the UPDRS total score are 4.3 points for minimal, 9.1 for moderate, and 17.1 for large CIDs. These estimates will assist in determining clinically meaningful changes in PD progression and response to therapeutic interventions.