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Parkinson Disease: HELP
Articles by Yun Jung Bae
Based on 4 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Yun Jung Bae wrote the following 4 articles about Parkinson Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Psychiatric Manifestation in Patients with Parkinson's Disease. 2018

Han, Ji Won / Ahn, Yebin D / Kim, Won-Seok / Shin, Cheol Min / Jeong, Seong Jin / Song, Yoo Sung / Bae, Yun Jung / Kim, Jong-Min. ·Department of Neuropsychiatry, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Korea. · Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Korea. · Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Korea. · Department of Urology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Korea. · Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Korea. · Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Korea. ·J Korean Med Sci · Pubmed #30450025.

ABSTRACT: Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. Although its major manifestation is motor symptoms, resulting from the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, psychiatric symptoms, such as depression, anxiety, hallucination, delusion, apathy and anhedonia, impulsive and compulsive behaviors, and cognitive dysfunction, may also manifest in most patients with PD. Given that the quality of life - and the need for institutionalization - is so highly dependent on the psychiatric well-being of patients with PD, psychiatric symptoms are of high clinical significance. We reviewed the prevalence, risk factors, pathophysiology, and treatment of psychiatric symptoms to get a better understanding of PD for improved management.

2 Review Loss of Nigral Hyperintensity on 3 Tesla MRI of Parkinsonism: Comparison With (123) I-FP-CIT SPECT. 2016

Bae, Yun Jung / Kim, Jong-Min / Kim, Eunhee / Lee, Kyung Mi / Kang, Seo Young / Park, Hyun Soo / Kim, Kyeong Joon / Kim, Young Eun / Oh, Eung Seok / Yun, Ji Young / Kim, Ji Seon / Jeong, Hye-Jin / Jeon, Beomseok / Kim, Sang Eun. ·Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam, Korea. · Department of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Chungbuk National University Hospital, Cheongju, Korea. · Neuroscience Research Institute, Gachon University of Medicine and Science, Incheon, Korea. · Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea. ·Mov Disord · Pubmed #26990970.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate whether 3 Tesla susceptibility-weighted imaging can detect the alteration of substantia nigra hyperintensity in Parkinson's disease (PD), multiple system atrophy (MSA), and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and to assess the concordance between the loss of nigral hyperintensity on 3 Tesla susceptibility-weighted imaging and the nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration indicated by (123) I-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl)-N-(3-fluoropropyl)-nortropane single photon emission computerized tomography. METHODS: Consecutive subjects with suspected parkinsonism were included, and clinical diagnosis was solidified during clinical follow-up. Two blinded neuroradiologists interpreted the nigral hyperintensity on susceptibility-weighted imaging. The performance of susceptibility-weighted imaging for detection of nigral hyperintensity loss was estimated on the basis of the clinical diagnosis and compared with single photon emission computerized tomography results. RESULTS: The study included 210 subjects (126 PD, 11 MSA, 11 PSP patients, 26 healthy controls, 36 disease controls). The presence or absence of nigral hyperintensity was accurately visualized in 112 PD, 7 MSA, and 11 PSP patients and 53 controls. We identified 16 false-negative cases and 11 false-positive cases. The sensitivity and specificity of susceptibility-weighted imaging were 88.8% and 83.6%, respectively. The concordance rate between susceptibility-weighted imaging and single photon emission computerized tomography was 86.2%. CONCLUSIONS: The loss of nigral hyperintensity on susceptibility-weighted imaging suggested nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration in a large portion of patients with parkinsonism, which was indicated by (123) I-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl)-N-(3-fluoropropyl)-nortropane single photon emission computerized tomography. In consideration of false-negative and -positive cases, well-designed imaging protocols should be introduced to improve the performance of nigral hyperintensity imaging. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

3 Article The Prevalence of Cerebral Microbleeds in Non-Demented Parkinson's Disease Patients. 2018

Kim, Kyeong Joon / Bae, Yun Jung / Kim, Jong-Min / Kim, Beom Joon / Oh, Eung Seok / Yun, Ji Young / Kim, Ji Seon / Kim, Han-Joon. ·Department of Neurology, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Goyang, Korea. · Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Chungnam National University Hospital, Chungnam National University College of Medicine, Daejeon, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital, Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Chungbuk National University Hospital, Chungbuk National University College of Medicine, Cheongju, Korea. ·J Korean Med Sci · Pubmed #30416409.

ABSTRACT: Background: Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) are associated with cerebrovascular risk factors and cognitive dysfunction among patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, whether CMBs themselves are associated with PD is to be elucidated. Methods: We analyzed the presence of CMBs using 3-Tesla brain magnetic resonance imaging in non-demented patients with PD and in age-, sex-, and hypertension-matched control subjects. PD patients were classified according to their motor subtypes: tremor-dominant, intermediate, and postural instability-gait disturbance (PIGD). Other cerebrovascular risk factors and small vessel disease (SVD) burdens were also evaluated. Results: Two-hundred and five patients with PD and 205 control subjects were included. The prevalence of CMBs was higher in PD patients than in controls (16.1% vs. 8.8%; odds ratio [OR], 2.126; Conclusion: We found that CMBs are more frequent in PD patients than in controls, especially in those with the PIGD subtype and CMBs on the lobar area. Further study investigating the pathogenetic significance of CMBs is required.

4 Article Loss of substantia nigra hyperintensity on 7 Tesla MRI of Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy, and progressive supranuclear palsy. 2016

Kim, Jong-Min / Jeong, Hye-Jin / Bae, Yun Jung / Park, Sung-Yeon / Kim, Eunhee / Kang, Seo Young / Oh, Eung Seok / Kim, Kyeong Joon / Jeon, Beomseok / Kim, Sang Eun / Cho, Zang-Hee / Kim, Young-Bo. ·Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam, South Korea. · Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Neuroscience Research Institute, Gachon University of Medicine and Science, Incheon, South Korea. · Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam, South Korea. · Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam, South Korea. · Department of Neurology, Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon, South Korea. · Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam, South Korea; Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea. · Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Neuroscience Research Institute, Gachon University of Medicine and Science, Incheon, South Korea. Electronic address: neurokim@gachon.ac.kr. ·Parkinsonism Relat Disord · Pubmed #26951846.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Seven Tesla (7T) MRI can visualize anatomical alterations occurring in a hyperintense structure of the substantia nigra in Parkinson's disease (PD). OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether 7T MRI can detect the loss of substantia nigra hyperintensity in patients with PD, multiple system atrophy (MSA), and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). METHODS: Using 7T MRI, we evaluated 26 healthy subjects, 30 patients with PD, 7 patients with MSA, and 3 patients with PSP. Two blinded readers independently assessed the images. We carried out a comparative analysis of five patients with hemiparkinsonism via (123)I-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl)-N-(3-fluoropropyl)-nortropane ((123)I-FP-CIT) SPECT. RESULTS: 7T MRI revealed a definitive shape of nigral hyperintensity in healthy subjects, nearly identical to neuropathological characterization of nigrosome 1, and enabled instantaneous determination of its presence or absence in all subjects. Nigral hyperintensity was lost in all patients with PD, MSA with predominant parkinsonism, and PSP. One of five patients with MSA with predominant cerebellar ataxia showed an intact nigral hyperintensity. The side effects were mild and tolerable, and imaging was successful in patients with dyskinesia. Motion artifact incidence was higher in elderly subjects. In hemiparkinsonism cases, we observed partial loss of nigral hyperintensity on the side of less reduced (123)I-FP-CIT binding, suggesting an ongoing iron deposition on the unaffected side in hemiparkinsonism. CONCLUSIONS: The present findings suggest that 7T MRI represents an excellent tool for evaluating nigral hyperintensity in PD, MSA, and PSP, with tolerable side effects and limited motion artifacts. Thus, imaging of parkinsonism may benefit from using 7T MRI.