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Parkinson Disease: HELP
Articles by Michael D. Fox
Based on 4 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, M. Fox wrote the following 4 articles about Parkinson Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review The impact of Tai Chi and Qigong mind-body exercises on motor and non-motor function and quality of life in Parkinson's disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis. 2017

Song, R / Grabowska, W / Park, M / Osypiuk, K / Vergara-Diaz, G P / Bonato, P / Hausdorff, J M / Fox, M / Sudarsky, L R / Macklin, E / Wayne, P M. ·College of Nursing, Chungnam National University, South Korea. Electronic address: songry@cnu.ac.kr. · Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital, USA. Electronic address: wgrabowska@coa.edu. · Department of Nursing, Woosong College, South Korea. Electronic address: mkpark@wsi.ac.kr. · Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital, USA. Electronic address: kosypiuk@partners.org. · Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Harvard Medical School, USA. Electronic address: gvergaradiaz@partners.org. · Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Harvard Medical School, USA. Electronic address: pbonato@partners.org. · Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Center for the Study of Movement, Cognition, and Mobility at Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv-Yafo, Israel. Electronic address: Jeff.hausdorff@gmail.com. · Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, USA. Electronic address: Mfox3@bidmc.harvard.edu. · Department of Neurology, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital, USA. Electronic address: lsudarsky@partners.org. · Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, USA. Electronic address: emacklin@mgh.harvard.org. · Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital, USA. Electronic address: pwayne@partners.org. ·Parkinsonism Relat Disord · Pubmed #28602515.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To systematically evaluate and quantify the effects of Tai Chi/Qigong (TCQ) on motor (UPDRS III, balance, falls, Timed-Up-and-Go, and 6-Minute Walk) and non-motor (depression and cognition) function, and quality of life (QOL) in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). METHODS: A systematic search in 7 electronic databases targeted clinical studies evaluating TCQ for individuals with PD published through August 2016. Meta-analysis was used to estimate effect sizes (Hedges's g) and publication bias for randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Methodological bias in RCTs was assessed by two raters. RESULTS: Our search identified 21 studies, 15 of which were RCTs with a total of 735 subjects. For RCTs, comparison groups included no treatment (n = 7, 47%) and active interventions (n = 8, 53%). Duration of TCQ ranged from 2 to 6 months. Methodological bias was low in 6 studies, moderate in 7, and high in 2. Fixed-effect models showed that TCQ was associated with significant improvement on most motor outcomes (UPDRS III [ES = -0.444, p < 0.001], balance [ES = 0.544, p < 0.001], Timed-Up-and-Go [ES = -0.341, p = 0.005], 6 MW [ES = -0.293, p = 0.06], falls [ES = -0.403, p = 0.004], as well as depression [ES = -0.457, p = 0.008] and QOL [ES = -0.393, p < 0.001], but not cognition [ES = -0.225, p = 0.477]). I CONCLUSION: Evidence to date supports a potential benefit of TCQ for improving motor function, depression and QOL for individuals with PD, and validates the need for additional large-scale trials.

2 Article Characterisation of meta-analytical functional connectivity in progressive supranuclear palsy. 2018

Yu, F / Barron, D S / Tantiwongkosi, B / Fox, M / Fox, P. ·Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit St, Boston, MA 02114, USA. Electronic address: frankfy21@gmail.com. · Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, 333 Cedar St., New Haven, CT 06510, USA. · Department of Radiology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7703 Floyd Curl Dr, MC 7800, San Antonio, TX 78229, USA. · Research Imaging Institute, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 8403 Floyd Curl Dr, San Antonio, TX 78229, USA. ·Clin Radiol · Pubmed #29269038.

ABSTRACT: AIM: To characterise the meta-analytical functional connectivity patterns in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and compare them to idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD). MATERIALS AND METHODS: It was previously reported that PSP and IPD showed distinct regions of brain atrophy based on voxel-based morphometry (VBM) meta-analysis. Using these regions as seeds, healthy control data were referenced to create and statistically compare meta-analytical functional connectivity maps of PSP and IPD. RESULTS: Some overlap was noted between the two diseases, including within the thalamus, striatum, and prefrontal cortex; however, the PSP seeds demonstrated more extensive functional co-activity throughout the brain, particularly within the midbrain, precentral gyrus, parietal cortex, basal ganglia, and cerebellum. CONCLUSION: These findings may help guide future longitudinal studies in the development of new functional imaging biomarkers for diagnosis and assessing treatment response.

3 Article Connectivity Predicts deep brain stimulation outcome in Parkinson disease. 2017

Horn, Andreas / Reich, Martin / Vorwerk, Johannes / Li, Ningfei / Wenzel, Gregor / Fang, Qianqian / Schmitz-Hübsch, Tanja / Nickl, Robert / Kupsch, Andreas / Volkmann, Jens / Kühn, Andrea A / Fox, Michael D. ·Berenson-Allen Center for Noninvasive Brain Stimulation and Division of Cognitive Neurology, Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Department of Neurology, Movement Disorder and Neuromodulation Unit, Charité-Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany. · Department of Neurology, Würzburg University Hospital, Würzburg, Germany. · Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah. · Institute of Software Engineering and Theoretical Computer Science, Neural Information Processing Group, Berlin Technical University, Berlin, Germany. · Department of Bioengineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA. · NeuroCure Clinical Research Center, Charité-Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany. · Department of Neurosurgery, Würzburg University Hospital, Würzburg, Germany. · Clinic of Neurology and Stereotactic Neurosurgery, Otto von Guericke University, Magdeburg, Germany. · Neurology Moves, Berlin, Germany. · Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Charlestown, MA. ·Ann Neurol · Pubmed #28586141.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The benefit of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson disease (PD) may depend on connectivity between the stimulation site and other brain regions, but which regions and whether connectivity can predict outcome in patients remain unknown. Here, we identify the structural and functional connectivity profile of effective DBS to the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and test its ability to predict outcome in an independent cohort. METHODS: A training dataset of 51 PD patients with STN DBS was combined with publicly available human connectome data (diffusion tractography and resting state functional connectivity) to identify connections reliably associated with clinical improvement (motor score of the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale [UPDRS]). This connectivity profile was then used to predict outcome in an independent cohort of 44 patients from a different center. RESULTS: In the training dataset, connectivity between the DBS electrode and a distributed network of brain regions correlated with clinical response including structural connectivity to supplementary motor area and functional anticorrelation to primary motor cortex (p < 0.001). This same connectivity profile predicted response in an independent patient cohort (p < 0.01). Structural and functional connectivity were independent predictors of clinical improvement (p < 0.001) and estimated response in individual patients with an average error of 15% UPDRS improvement. Results were similar using connectome data from normal subjects or a connectome age, sex, and disease matched to our DBS patients. INTERPRETATION: Effective STN DBS for PD is associated with a specific connectivity profile that can predict clinical outcome across independent cohorts. This prediction does not require specialized imaging in PD patients themselves. Ann Neurol 2017;82:67-78.

4 Article Multifocal repetitive TMS for motor and mood symptoms of Parkinson disease: A randomized trial. 2016

Brys, Miroslaw / Fox, Michael D / Agarwal, Shashank / Biagioni, Milton / Dacpano, Geraldine / Kumar, Pawan / Pirraglia, Elizabeth / Chen, Robert / Wu, Allan / Fernandez, Hubert / Wagle Shukla, Aparna / Lou, Jau-Shin / Gray, Zachary / Simon, David K / Di Rocco, Alessandro / Pascual-Leone, Alvaro. ·From the New York University School of Medicine (M.B., S.A., M.B., G.D., P.K., A.D.R.), Marlene and Paolo Fresco Institute for Parkinson's and Movement Disorders, Department of Neurology, New York · Berenson-Allen Center for Noninvasive Brain Stimulation (M.D.F., Z.G., A.P.-L.), Division of Cognitive Neurology, and Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Center (D.K.S., A.P.-L.), Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA · Department of Neurology (A.W.) and Ahmanson-Lovelace Brain Mapping Center (A.W.), University of California School of Medicine, Los Angeles · Cleveland Clinic (H.F.), Department of Neurology, OH · Toronto Western Research Institute (R.C.), University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada · University of Florida (A.W.S.), Department of Neurology, Gainesville · University of North Dakota School of Medicine (J.-S.L.), Department of Neurology, Grand Forks · and Center for Brain Health (E.P.), NYU School of Medicine, New York, NY. ·Neurology · Pubmed #27708129.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To assess whether multifocal, high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of motor and prefrontal cortex benefits motor and mood symptoms in patients with Parkinson disease (PD). METHODS: Patients with PD and depression were enrolled in this multicenter, double-blind, sham-controlled, parallel-group study of real or realistic (electric) sham rTMS. Patients were randomized to 1 of 4 groups: bilateral M1 ( + sham dorsolateral prefrontal cortex [DLPFC]), DLPFC ( + sham M1), M1 + DLPFC, or double sham. The TMS course consisted of 10 daily sessions of 2,000 stimuli for the left DLPFC and 1,000 stimuli for each M1 (50 × 4-second trains of 40 stimuli at 10 Hz). Patients were evaluated at baseline, at 1 week, and at 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment. Primary endpoints were changes in motor function assessed with the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-III and in mood with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale at 1 month. RESULTS: Of the 160 patients planned for recruitment, 85 were screened, 61 were randomized, and 50 completed all study visits. Real M1 rTMS resulted in greater improvement in motor function than sham at the primary endpoint (p < 0.05). There was no improvement in mood in the DLPFC group compared to the double-sham group, as well as no benefit to combining M1 and DLPFC stimulation for either motor or mood symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with PD with depression, M1 rTMS is an effective treatment of motor symptoms, while mood benefit after 2 weeks of DLPFC rTMS is not better than sham. Targeting both M1 and DLPFC in each rTMS session showed no evidence of synergistic effects. CLINICALTRIALSGOV IDENTIFIER: NCT01080794. CLASSIFICATION OF EVIDENCE: This study provides Class I evidence that in patients with PD with depression, M1 rTMS leads to improvement in motor function while DLPFC rTMS does not lead to improvement in depression compared to sham rTMS.