Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Parkinson Disease: HELP
Articles by John L. Goudreau
Based on 6 articles published since 2009
(Why 6 articles?)
||||

Between 2009 and 2019, John Goudreau wrote the following 6 articles about Parkinson Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Clinical Trial Choice of dopaminergic therapy among early, mild Parkinson disease subjects in North America. 2016

Goudreau, John L / Pérez, Adriana / Aminoff, Michael J / Boyd, James T / Burau, Keith D / Christine, Chadwick W / Leehey, Maureen / Morgan, John C / Anonymous1440871. ·Department of Neurology, Michigan State University, 804 Service Rd Room A217, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA. Electronic address: john.goudreau@hc.msu.edu. · Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, UTHealth, USA. Electronic address: adriana.perez@uth.tmc.edu. · Department of Neurology, University of California San Francisco, 505 Parnassus Ave, Moffitt, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA. Electronic address: Michael.Aminoff@ucsf.edu. · Department of Neurological Sciences, University of Vermont, College of Medicine, 1 So. Prospect Street, UHC - Arnold 2, Burlington, VT 05401, USA. Electronic address: James.Boyd@uvm.edu. · Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, UTHealth, USA. Electronic address: kb_athome@yahoo.com. · Department of Neurology, University of California San Francisco, 505 Parnassus Ave, Moffitt, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA. Electronic address: chad.christine@ucsf.edu. · Department of Neurology, University of Colorado, School of Medicine, Academic Office 1, Mail Stop B-185, 12631 East 17th Avenue, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. Electronic address: maureen.leehey@ucdenver.edu. · Department of Neurology, Georgia Regent's University, 1120 15th St, Augusta, GA 30912, USA. Electronic address: jmorgan@gru.edu. ·J Neurol Sci · Pubmed #27288780.

ABSTRACT: The choice of dopaminergic therapy in early Parkinson disease (PD) is an important clinical decision, yet factors influencing this decision have not been extensively studied. We sought to investigate the factors that may be associated with the choice of dopaminergic therapy at the NINDS Exploratory Trials in PD (NET-PD) Long-Term Study-1 (LS1). NET-PD LS1 was a clinical trial of creatine versus placebo in participants with early, mild PD on stable doses of dopaminergic therapy. Baseline data from 1616 out of the 1741 participants were evaluated using univariable and multivariable logistic or generalized logit regression analyses for available factors associated with the choice of dopaminergic therapy. The dopaminergic therapy choice was determined as: (i) therapy that subjects recalled taking 180days before the study; (ii) therapy at baseline; and (iii) the longest duration of therapy reported by participants. Younger age, higher education level, longer length of time since PD diagnosis and use of an adjunctive, non-dopaminergic or monoamine oxidase inhibitor medication were associated with more frequent use of dopamine agonist compared to levodopa or combination therapy.

2 Article Autonomic and electrocardiographic findings in Parkinson's disease. 2017

Gibbons, Christopher H / Simon, David K / Huang, Meilin / Tilley, Barbara / Aminoff, Michael J / Bainbridge, Jacquelyn L / Brodsky, Matthew / Freeman, Roy / Goudreau, John / Hamill, Robert W / Luo, Sheng T / Singer, Carlos / Videnovic, Aleksandar / Bodis-Wollner, Ivan / Wong, Pei S / Anonymous4410906. ·Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215, USA. Electronic address: cgibbons@bidmc.harvard.edu. · Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas Health Science Center School of Public Health at Houston, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, USA. · Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Neurology, University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Aurora, CO, USA. · Department of Neurology, Oregon Health & Science University, USA. · Department of Neurology, Michigan State University, USA. · Department of Neurological Sciences, University of Vermont College of Medicine, USA. · Department of Neurology, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA. · Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Neurology and Ophthalmology, State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center, USA. · Department of Pharmacy, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore. ·Auton Neurosci · Pubmed #28506500.

ABSTRACT: Parkinson disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by motor and non-motor symptoms and signs. Many reports suggest that diminished heart rate variability occurs early, even prior to the cardinal signs of PD. In a longitudinal study of PD, we evaluated whether heart rate variability (HRV) obtained using a 10-second ECG tracing, and the electrocardiographic QT-interval would be associated with PD severity and progression. Subjects were derived from a longitudinal study of 1741 individuals with early, stable PD. The severity of PD was measured using the global statistical test (GST). In a subset, the heart rate corrected QT-interval (QTcB) was calculated for each electrocardiogram (ECG). The HRV was measured for each ECG and then transformed to fit a normal distribution. The baseline analysis included 653 subjects, with 256 completing the 5-year follow up study. There was an association (P<0.05) between QTcB and PD severity in individuals that were taking QT-interval affecting drugs. A longer QT-interval at baseline was associated with more advanced PD at 5years (P<0.05), and greater disease progression over 5years (P<0.05). There was an association between diminished HRV and an orthostatic decrease in standing blood pressure at baseline in individuals with PD (P<0.05). HRV was not associated with PD severity or progression. In conclusion, we were able to detect measurable associations between the QTcB interval and PD severity, PD severity 5years later, and the change in disease over time. However, routine ECG tracings appear inadequate for the evaluation of autonomic function in PD.

3 Article Longer Duration of MAO-B Inhibitor Exposure is Associated with Less Clinical Decline in Parkinson's Disease: An Analysis of NET-PD LS1. 2017

Hauser, Robert A / Li, Ruosha / Pérez, Adriana / Ren, Xuehan / Weintraub, Dan / Elm, Jordan / Goudreau, John L / Morgan, John C / Fang, John Y / Aminoff, Michael J / Christine, Chadwick W / Dhall, Rohit / Umeh, Chizoba C / Boyd, James T / Stover, Natividad / Leehey, Maureen / Zweig, Richard M / Nicholas, Anthony P / Bodis-Wollner, Ivan / Willis, Allison / Kieburtz, Karl / Tilley, Barbara C / Anonymous4700889. ·Departments of Neurology, Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology, University of South Florida, Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Center, National Parkinson Foundation Center of Excellence, Tampa FL, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health, Houston, TX, USA. · Departments of Psychiatry and Neurology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Public Health Sciences, Charleston, SC, USA. · Department of Neurology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA. · National Parkinson Foundation Center of Excellence, Movement Disorders Program, Department of Neurology, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta University, Augusta, GA, USA. · Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA. · University of California, San Francisco, Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA. · The Parkinson's Institute and Clinical Center, Sunnyvale, CA, USA. · Division of Movement Disorders, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Neurological Sciences, University of Vermont, College of Medicine, Burlington, VT, USA. · Department of Neurology, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA. · Department of Neurology, University of Colorado, School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA. · Department of Neurology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in Shreveport, Shreveport, LA, USA. · Department of Neurology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA. · Departments of Neurology and Ophthalmology, Parkinson's Disease and Related Disorders Clinic, Center of Excellence, State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY, USA. · Department of Neurology, The University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · University of Rochester, Center for Human Experimental Therapeutics, Rochester, NY, USA. ·J Parkinsons Dis · Pubmed #27911341.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B) inhibitors exhibit neuroprotective effects in preclinical models of PD but clinical trials have failed to convincingly demonstrate disease modifying benefits in PD patients. OBJECTIVE: To perform a secondary analysis of NET-PD LS1 to determine if longer duration of MAO-B inhibitor exposure was associated with less clinical decline. METHODS: The primary outcome measure was the Global Outcome (GO), comprised of 5 measures: change from baseline in the Schwab and England (ADL) scale, the 39-item Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39), the UPDRS Ambulatory Capacity Scale, the Symbol Digit Modalities Test, and the most recent Modified Rankin Scale. A linear mixed model was used to explore the association between the cumulative duration of MAO-B inhibitor exposure and the GO, adjusting for necessary factors and confounders. Associations between MAO-B inhibitor exposure and each of the five GO components were then studied individually. RESULTS: 1616 participants comprised the analytic sample. Mean observation was 4.1 (SD = 1.4) years, and 784 (48.5%) participants received an MAO-B inhibitor. The regression coefficient of cumulative duration of MAO-B inhibitor exposure (in years) on the GO was - 0.0064 (SE = 0.002, p = 0.001). Significant associations between duration of MAO-B inhibitor exposure and less progression were observed for ADL (p < 0.001), Ambulatory Capacity (p < 0.001), and the Rankin (p = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis identified a significant association between longer duration of MAO-B inhibitor exposure and less clinical decline. These findings support the possibility that MAO-B inhibitors slow clinical disease progression and suggest that a definitive prospective trial should be considered.

4 Article Parkinson's disease severity and use of dopaminergic medications. 2015

Fang, John Y / Pérez, Adriana / Christine, Chadwick W / Leehey, Maureen / Aminoff, Michael J / Boyd, James T / Morgan, John C / Dhall, Rohit / Nicholas, Anthony P / Bodis-Wollner, Ivan / Zweig, Richard M / Goudreau, John L / Anonymous2560816. ·Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University, 1161 21st Ave South, A-0118, Nashville, TN 37232, USA. Electronic address: john.y.fang@vanderbilt.edu. · UTHealth, The University of Texas School of Public Health, Austin Regional Campus, University of Texas Administration Building (UTA), 1616 Guadalupe Street, Suite 6.300, Austin, TX 78701, USA. · Department of Neurology, University of California at San Francisco, 400 Parnassus Ave, Box 0348, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA. · Department of Neurology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Academic Office 1, Mail Stop B-185, 12631 East 17th Avenue, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. · Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, University of California at San Francisco, 505 Parnassus Ave, Box 0114, San Francisco, CA 94143-0114, USA. · Department of Neurological Sciences, University of Vermont College of Medicine, 1 South Prospect Street, Burlington, VT 05401, USA. · Movement and Cognitive Disorders Center, Department of Neurology, Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Regents University, 1429 Harper Street, HF-1154, Augusta, GA 30912, USA. · Barrow Neurological Institute, 240 W Thomas Road, Suite 301, Phoenix, AZ 85013, USA. · Department of Neurology, University of Alabama at Birmingham and The Birmingham VA Medical Center, 1720 2nd Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA. · Department of Neurology, State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center, 450 Clarkson Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11203, USA; Department of Ophthalmology, State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center, 450 Clarkson Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11203, USA. · Department of Neurology, LSU Health Sciences Center in Shreveport, 1501 King's Highway, Shreveport, LA 71130, USA. · Department of Neurology, Michigan State University, 804 Service Rd, Room A217, USA. ·Parkinsonism Relat Disord · Pubmed #25541182.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The effects of dopaminergic therapy in parkinson's disease (PD) can vary depending on the class of medication selected. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this post hoc study was to determine if the class of dopaminergic therapy correlated with disease severity in persons with early, treated PD. METHODS: A non-parametric global statistical test (GST) was used to assess the status of participants treated with dopamine agonist (DA) monotherapy, levodopa (LD) monotherapy or combined LD and DA therapy on multiple PD outcomes encompassing motor, cognitive, psychiatric and autonomic function, as well as disability and quality of life. RESULTS: The outcomes measured at the beginning of the study showed lower disease burden for participants on initial DA monotherapy compared to those taking combined LD and DA therapy after controlling for age, education, taking cog-meds and amantadine. CONCLUSION: This observation suggests that clinicians treating early PD patients favor combined LD and DA therapy in patients with more disabling features over DA monotherapy. As such, studies of PD progression in treated PD patients may be affected by the class of symptomatic dopaminergic therapy.

5 Article Inosine to increase serum and cerebrospinal fluid urate in Parkinson disease: a randomized clinical trial. 2014

Anonymous5780779 / Schwarzschild, Michael A / Ascherio, Alberto / Beal, M Flint / Cudkowicz, Merit E / Curhan, Gary C / Hare, Joshua M / Hooper, D Craig / Kieburtz, Karl D / Macklin, Eric A / Oakes, David / Rudolph, Alice / Shoulson, Ira / Tennis, Marsha K / Espay, Alberto J / Gartner, Maureen / Hung, Albert / Bwala, Grace / Lenehan, Richard / Encarnacion, Elmyra / Ainslie, Melissa / Castillo, Richard / Togasaki, Daniel / Barles, Gina / Friedman, Joseph H / Niles, Lisa / Carter, Julie H / Murray, Megan / Goetz, Christopher G / Jaglin, Jeana / Ahmed, Anwar / Russell, David S / Cotto, Candace / Goudreau, John L / Russell, Doozie / Parashos, Sotirios Andreas / Ede, Patricia / Saint-Hilaire, Marie H / Thomas, Cathi-Ann / James, Raymond / Stacy, Mark A / Johnson, Julia / Gauger, Lisa / Antonelle de Marcaida, J / Thurlow, Sheila / Isaacson, Stuart H / Carvajal, Lisbeth / Rao, Jayaraman / Cook, Maureen / Hope-Porche, Charlise / McClurg, Lauren / Grasso, Daniela L / Logan, Robert / Orme, Constance / Ross, Tori / Brocht, Alicia F D / Constantinescu, Radu / Sharma, Saloni / Venuto, Charles / Weber, Joseph / Eaton, Ken. ·Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. · Cornell University, New York, New York. · Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · University of Miami, Miami, Florida. · Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · University of Rochester, Rochester, New York. · Georgetown University, Washington, DC. · Peterborough, New Hampshire. · University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio. · Scott & White Memorial Hospital/Texas A&M University, Temple. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles. · Butler Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island. · Oregon Health & Science University, Portland. · Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois. · Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. · Institute of Neurodegenerative Disorders, New Haven, Connecticut. · Michigan State University, East Lansing. · Struthers Parkinson's Center, Golden Valley, Minnesota. · Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts. · Duke University, Durham, North Carolina. · Eastern Connecticut Neurology Specialists, Manchester. · Parkinson's Disease & Movement Disorder Center of Boca Raton, Boca Raton, Florida. · Ochsner Clinic Foundation, New Orleans, Louisiana. · Administrative Coordination Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. · Clinical Coordination Center, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York. ·JAMA Neurol · Pubmed #24366103.

ABSTRACT: IMPORTANCE: Convergent biological, epidemiological, and clinical data identified urate elevation as a candidate strategy for slowing disability progression in Parkinson disease (PD). OBJECTIVE: To determine the safety, tolerability, and urate-elevating capability of the urate precursor inosine in early PD and to assess its suitability and potential design features for a disease-modification trial. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: The Safety of Urate Elevation in PD (SURE-PD) study, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging trial of inosine, enrolled participants from 2009 to 2011 and followed them for up to 25 months at outpatient visits to 17 credentialed clinical study sites of the Parkinson Study Group across the United States. Seventy-five consenting adults (mean age, 62 years; 55% women) with early PD not yet requiring symptomatic treatment and a serum urate concentration less than 6 mg/dL (the approximate population median) were enrolled. INTERVENTIONS: Participants were randomized to 1 of 3 treatment arms: placebo or inosine titrated to produce mild (6.1-7.0 mg/dL) or moderate (7.1-8.0 mg/dL) serum urate elevation using 500-mg capsules taken orally up to 2 capsules 3 times per day. They were followed for up to 24 months (median, 18 months) while receiving the study drug plus 1 washout month. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: The prespecified primary outcomes were absence of unacceptable serious adverse events (safety), continued treatment without adverse event requiring dose reduction (tolerability), and elevation of urate assessed serially in serum and once (at 3 months) in cerebrospinal fluid. RESULTS Serious adverse events (17), including infrequent cardiovascular events, occurred at the same or lower rates in the inosine groups relative to placebo. No participant developed gout and 3 receiving inosine developed symptomatic urolithiasis. Treatment was tolerated by 95% of participants at 6 months, and no participant withdrew because of an adverse event. Serum urate rose by 2.3 and 3.0 mg/dL in the 2 inosine groups (P < .001 for each) vs placebo, and cerebrospinal fluid urate level was greater in both inosine groups (P = .006 and <.001, respectively). Secondary analyses demonstrated nonfutility of inosine treatment for slowing disability. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Inosine was generally safe, tolerable, and effective in raising serum and cerebrospinal fluid urate levels in early PD. The findings support advancing to more definitive development of inosine as a potential disease-modifying therapy for PD. TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00833690.

6 Article Executive function in Parkinson's disease: contributions of the dorsal frontostriatal pathways to action and motivation. 2012

Ravizza, Susan M / Goudreau, John / Delgado, Mauricio R / Ruiz, Sandra. ·Department of Psychology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA. ravizzas@msu.edu ·Cogn Affect Behav Neurosci · Pubmed #22006555.

ABSTRACT: Disruption of the dorsal frontostriatal pathways in Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with impairments in motivation, as well as in executive function. The goal of this study was to investigate whether these impairments are related and, if so, whether the disruption of frontostriatal pathways compromises the ability to process the motivational aspects of feedback in such tasks. In Experiment 1, informative feedback improved the performance of young, healthy participants in a task-switching paradigm. This task-switching paradigm was then used in Experiment 2 to test whether feedback would improve the performance of 17 PD patients and age-matched controls. The PD group benefitted from feedback to the same degree as control participants; however, depression scores on the Beck Depression Inventory were significantly related to feedback usage, especially when response selection demands were high. Regardless of feedback, PD patients were more impaired when response demands were high than in an equally difficult condition with low action demands. These results suggest that response selection is a core impairment of insufficient dopamine to the dorsal frontal striatal pathways.