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Parkinson Disease: HELP
Articles by Onanong Jitkritsadakul
Based on 17 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Onanong Jitkritsadakul wrote the following 17 articles about Parkinson Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Non-Motor Symptoms Assessed by Non-Motor Symptoms Questionnaire and Non-Motor Symptoms Scale in Parkinson's Disease in Selected Asian Populations. 2017

Sauerbier, Anna / Jitkritsadakul, Onanong / Titova, Nataliya / Klingelhoefer, Lisa / Tsuboi, Yoshio / Carr, Harry / Kumar, Hrishikesh / Banerjee, Rebecca / Erro, Roberto / Bhidayasiri, Roongroj / Schrag, Anette / Zis, Panagiotis / Lim, Shen-Yang / Al-Hashel, J Y / Kamel, Walaa A / Martinez-Martin, Pablo / Ray Chaudhuri, K. ·Neurology, King's College Hospital, London, UK. ·Neuroepidemiology · Pubmed #28803229.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Ethnic variations have been described in medical conditions, such as hypertension, diabetes, and multiple sclerosis. Whether ethnicity plays a role in Parkinson's disease (PD), particularly with regard to non-motor symptoms (NMS), remains unclear. Existing literature is diverse, controversial, and inadequately documented. This review aims to analyse and report the currently available literature on NMS, specifically in Asian PD patients. SUMMARY: We conducted a literature review using PubMed, searching for articles and currently available publications that reference and assess NMS in PD patients living in Asia using the validated NMS Questionnaire (NMS Quest) and NMS Scale (NMSS). In total, 24 articles were included: 12 using the NMS Quest and 12 using the NMSS. Symptoms of constipation, memory impairment, and nocturia were the most frequently self-reported symptoms (NMS Quest) in selected Asian populations, while symptoms within the domains sleep/fatigue, attention/memory, and mood/apathy were most prevalent when applying the health-professional completed NMSS. Key Messages: NMS are generally prevalent and highly burdensome within selected Asian PD populations living in countries included in this review. Our review suggests that NMS-driven phenotypic heterogeneity is present in Asian patients, and compared to Western PD populations there might be variations in assessed NMS.

2 Review Objective Measurement and Monitoring of Nonmotor Symptoms in Parkinson's Disease. 2017

Klingelhoefer, Lisa / Jitkritsadakul, Onanong / Bhidayasiri, Roongroj. ·Technical University Dresden, Dresden, Germany. · Chulalongkorn Center of Excellence for Parkinson's Disease & Related Disorders, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University and King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok, Thailand. · Chulalongkorn Center of Excellence for Parkinson's Disease & Related Disorders, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University and King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok, Thailand; Juntendo University, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: rbh@chulapd.org. ·Int Rev Neurobiol · Pubmed #28802925.

ABSTRACT: The comprehensive evaluation of nonmotor symptoms (NMS) in Parkinson's disease (PD) starts with the awareness of physicians, patients, and caregivers on their nature, clinical presentation, and effect on patient's daily activities and quality of life. This awareness can be better achieved if the symptoms can be visualized, measured, and monitored. As NMS are largely subjective in nature, a majority of them cannot be visualized (unlike tremor, which is easily seen), making their identification and quantification difficult. While symptoms are nonmotor, it does not mean that they are not measurable, as many NMS are integral to motor symptoms of Parkinson's, yet often neglected. In this review, we attempt to provide the most up-to-date and comprehensive literature review on the objective measurement and monitoring of NMS in PD. The aim is to make it clinically relevant by approaching NMS by domains as identified in the NMS Questionnaire. A section on the assessment of nonmotor fluctuations is also included, providing prospects for future objective monitoring. With the advances of technology, it is likely that many NMS will have objective outcomes, thus making these symptoms easily measurable and hopefully lead to future clinical trials that incorporate nonmotor outcomes. Nevertheless, it still requires a physician's judgment to determine which method, scales, objective measures, or monitoring devices or a combination of these is most appropriate to the individual patient in order to answer a particular clinical question.

3 Review Systematic review of hardware-related complications of Deep Brain Stimulation: Do new indications pose an increased risk? 2017

Jitkritsadakul, Onanong / Bhidayasiri, Roongroj / Kalia, Suneil K / Hodaie, Mojgan / Lozano, Andres M / Fasano, Alfonso. ·Morton and Gloria Shulman Movement Disorders Centre and the Edmond J. Safra Program in Parkinson's Disease, Toronto Western Hospital, UHN, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Chulalongkorn Center of Excellence for Parkinson's Disease & Related Disorders, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University and King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok, Thailand. · Chulalongkorn Center of Excellence for Parkinson's Disease & Related Disorders, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University and King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok, Thailand; Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Juntendo University, Tokyo, Japan. · Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Toronto Western Hospital, University of Toronto, Canada; Krembil Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Morton and Gloria Shulman Movement Disorders Centre and the Edmond J. Safra Program in Parkinson's Disease, Toronto Western Hospital, UHN, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Krembil Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Division of Neurology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: alfonso.fasano@uhn.ca. ·Brain Stimul · Pubmed #28739219.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is an effective treatment extended broadly to many neurological and psychiatric disorders. Nevertheless, complications may arise during DBS procedures or following implantation due to implanted hardware. This may result in both minor and major adverse events that may necessitate hardware removal and/or compromise maximal therapeutic benefit for the patient. OBJECTIVES AND METHODS: To identify relevant literature on hardware-related complications from DBS procedures by performing a systematic review, and propose how to identify at-risk group and possible preventive approaches. RESULTS: Of 4592 abstract screened, 96 articles fulfilled the selection criteria and were reviewed. Overall, the most common hardware-related complications were infections (5.12% of patients), followed by lead migration (1.60%), fracture or failure of the lead or other parts of the implant (1.46% and 0.73%, respectively), IPG malfunctions (1.06% of patients), and skin erosions without infections (0.48% of patients). New indications for DBS, including Tourette's syndrome, cluster headache, and refractory partial epilepsy, were found to bear a higher incidence of hardware-related infections than established indications such as Parkinson's disease. The highest rate of lead fracture or failure was found in dystonia patients (4.22%). Ultimately, the highest rate of pain at the implantation sites was found in refractory partial epilepsy patients (16.55%). CONCLUSION: Our analysis identified a variety of potential hardware-related complications among patients who underwent DBS procedures. Patients who were at risk of complications, such as patients with dystonia and off-label indications (e.g. Tourette's syndrome) should be informed prior to surgery and closely followed thereafter.

4 Review Understanding the role of the Parkinson's disease nurse specialist in the delivery of apomorphine therpy. 2016

Bhidayasiri, Roongroj / Boonpang, Kamolwan / Jitkritsadakul, Onanong / Calne, Susan M / Henriksen, Tove / Trump, Sally / Chaiwong, Suchapit / Susang, Phenprapa / Boonrod, Nonglak / Sringean, Jirada / van Laar, Teus / Drent, Martje / Chaudhuri, K Ray. ·Chulalongkorn Center of Excellence for Parkinson's Disease & Related Disorders, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University and King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok, 10330, Thailand; Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Juntendo University, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: rbh@chulapd.org. · Chulalongkorn Center of Excellence for Parkinson's Disease & Related Disorders, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University and King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok, 10330, Thailand. · Pacific Parkinson's Research Center, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, (1982-2007), Canada. · Movement Disorder Clinic, University Hospital of Bispebjerg, Copenhagen, Denmark. · National Parkinson Foundation Centre of Excellence, King's College Hospital, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Neurology, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. ·Parkinsonism Relat Disord · Pubmed #27939324.

ABSTRACT: Optimal care of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients should involve a multidisciplinary team (MDT) of which a PD nurse specialist (PDNS) is a key member. The role of a PDNS is particularly prominent in the care of advanced PD patients suitable for apomorphine because, in addition to nursing skills, apomorphine treatment requires liaison, training, interaction and coordination with patients, caregivers and other members of the MDT as well as the interface with primary care physicians. The therapeutic success of apomorphine therapy depends not only upon the pharmacologic drug response, but also on how well the patient understands his/her disease and how to handle the therapy. In this respect, a PDNS is a vital member of the MDT who provides education and training, support, and is available for consultation when problems arise. In this article, we review the literature on the contribution of PDNSs in both continuous subcutaneous apomorphine infusion and intermittent subcutaneous apomorphine injection and highlight the various beneficial aspects of PDNS care, supported by scientific evidence when available. Despite a low level of published evidence, there is strong clinical evidence that the impact of PDNSs on the management of apomorphine therapy is vital and indispensable for the success of this treatment.

5 Review What is the evidence to support home environmental adaptation in Parkinson's disease? A call for multidisciplinary interventions. 2015

Bhidayasiri, Roongroj / Jitkritsadakul, Onanong / Boonrod, Nonglak / Sringean, Jirada / Calne, Susan M / Hattori, Nobutaka / Hayashi, Akito. ·Chulalongkorn Center of Excellence for Parkinson Disease & Related Disorders, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University and King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok, 10330, Thailand; Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Juntendo University, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: rbh@chulapd.org. · Chulalongkorn Center of Excellence for Parkinson Disease & Related Disorders, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University and King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok, 10330, Thailand. · Pacific Parkinson's Research Center, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. · Department of Neurology, Juntendo University, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Juntendo University, Tokyo, Japan. ·Parkinsonism Relat Disord · Pubmed #26365779.

ABSTRACT: "Home" is where one has a sense of belonging and feels secure, but it can also be a risky place for people with Parkinson's disease (PD). PD patients need assistance making adjustments to their physical environment to maintain appropriate care and provide a safe environment. This relationship is called the "person-environmental fit" (P-E fit). While most PD patients remain in their own homes, little is known about the specific challenges that PD patients and their caregivers encounter in the routine activities of daily living. The aim of our study was to identify the existing evidence on the issue of housing environmental adaptation in PD by performing a systematic review with a proposal of development strategies to integrate a multidisciplinary team into a home environmental research. MEDLINE, and life science journals were searched by querying appropriate key words, but revealed very few publications in this area. However, early evidence suggested that PD patients do not enjoy an adequate P-E fit in their own homes and face more functional limitations compared to matched controls. We concluded that we need to develop research-based evaluation strategies that can provide us with a theoretical and conceptual basis as well as tools for analysis of the P-E fit for PD patients and caregivers. We recommend that individual members of the multidisciplinary team including patients, caregivers, physicians, rehabilitation specialists, and social workers use a team approach to identify the key indicators and solutions for the development of PD-specific solutions for improving the P-E fit.

6 Clinical Trial Compassionate trial of levodopa carbidopa intestinal gel infusion in two patients with progressive supranuclear palsy. 2014

Bhidayasiri, Roongroj / Jitkritsadakul, Onanong / Boonrod, Nonglak / Rerknimitr, Rungsun. ·Chulalongkorn Center of Excellence on Parkinson's Disease and Related Disorders, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University and King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok 10330, Thailand; Department of Neurology, Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles 90095, USA. Electronic address: rbh1@ucla.edu. · Chulalongkorn Center of Excellence on Parkinson's Disease and Related Disorders, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University and King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok 10330, Thailand. · Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University and King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok 10330, Thailand. ·Clin Neurol Neurosurg · Pubmed #24388506.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Article Tremor's glove-an innovative electrical muscle stimulation therapy for intractable tremor in Parkinson's disease: A randomized sham-controlled trial. 2017

Jitkritsadakul, Onanong / Thanawattano, Chusak / Anan, Chanawat / Bhidayasiri, Roongroj. ·Chulalongkorn Center of Excellence for Parkinson's Disease & Related Disorders, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok 10330, Thailand. · National Electronics and Computer Technology Center (NECTEC), Pathumthani, Thailand. · Chulalongkorn Center of Excellence for Parkinson's Disease & Related Disorders, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok 10330, Thailand; Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Juntendo University, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: rbh@chulapd.org. ·J Neurol Sci · Pubmed #28991711.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Medically refractory resting tremor is a debilitating symptom of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. In our pilot study, modulation of peripheral reflex mechanism by electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) temporarily suppressed tremor. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the efficacy of EMS, delivered using Tremor's glove, as a treatment of resting hand tremor. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Thirty PD patients with medically refractory resting tremor were randomly allocated to a Tremor's glove group (n=15) or a sham glove group (n=15). Gloves were placed on the most tremulous hand for 30min per testing session. Demographics, clinical rating scales, and tremor parameters (RMS of angular velocity and angular displacement, peak magnitude, and frequency) were assessed before and during stimulation. Correlations with validated clinical rating scales were performed. RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences between groups in demographics, rating scales, or tremor parameters. During stimulation, significant reduction in RMS angular velocity (as percentage) in every axis and peak magnitude in axis (x-, y-) and UPDRS tremor score, were found with Tremor's glove compared to the sham groups (p<0.05, each). Significant moderate correlations were observed between a percentage reduction of RMS angular velocity in every axis and UPDRS tremor scores. Mean duration of tremor reduction after stimulation was 107.78±104.15s. No serious adverse events were observed. CONCLUSION: In this study, EMS-based Tremor's glove was effective in suppressing resting hand tremor in PD patients. Tremor's glove is light-weight with a good safety profile, making it a future potential therapeutic option for PD patients with medically refractory tremor.

8 Article Knowledge, attitudes and perceptions of Parkinson's disease: A cross-sectional survey of Asian patients. 2017

Jitkritsadakul, Onanong / Boonrod, Nonglak / Bhidayasiri, Roongroj. ·Chulalongkorn Center of Excellence for Parkinson's Disease & Related Disorders, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University and King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok 10330, Thailand. · Chulalongkorn Center of Excellence for Parkinson's Disease & Related Disorders, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University and King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok 10330, Thailand; Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Juntendo University, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: rbh@chulapd.org. ·J Neurol Sci · Pubmed #28104234.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: A knowledge gap about Parkinson's disease (PD) often exists amongst PD patients, the level and accuracy of which can influence their attitude and perceptions about the disease. Increased awareness of this information deficit can help physicians identify interventions that will improve patient's knowledge and perceptions about PD. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate general understanding of PD and identify knowledge gaps amongst PD patients using a validated PD knowledge questionnaire. METHODS: A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study was conducted in 108 PD patients (34 working; 74 retired). The questionnaire covers three domains of PD, including diagnosis, therapeutic options, and disease course with a total knowledge score ranging from 0 to 26. Subjects with dementia were excluded. RESULTS: Patient misconceptions were reflected in the mean (SD) total, diagnosis, therapeutic options, and disease course scores: 14.64 (3.32), 7.76 (1.93), 3.85 (1.28), and 3.03 (1.41) respectively. The working age subgroup had significantly higher knowledge scores than the retired age group for the whole questionnaire (p=0.004), as well as the diagnosis (p=0.001) and therapeutic sections (p=0.023). Three dependent variables, including younger age at recruitment (<60years old), female gender, and higher disease duration (≥4years), were identified as predictors of a higher level of PD knowledge amongst PD patients. CONCLUSION: Significant knowledge gaps were identified amongst PD patients in all three aspects of the questionnaire. Timely identification of patients with inaccurate or insufficient disease-related knowledge could help healthcare professionals choose more suitable multimodal educational interventions.

9 Article What daily activities increase the risk of falling in Parkinson patients? An analysis of the utility of the ABC-16 scale. 2016

Foongsathaporn, Chayanin / Panyakaew, Pattamon / Jitkritsadakul, Onanong / Bhidayasiri, Roongroj. ·Chulalongkorn Center of Excellence for Parkinson Disease & Related Disorders, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok, 10330, Thailand. · Chulalongkorn Center of Excellence for Parkinson Disease & Related Disorders, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok, 10330, Thailand; Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Juntendo University, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: rbh@chulapd.org. ·J Neurol Sci · Pubmed #27084242.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Although the strongest predictor of falling in Parkinson's disease is the number of falls in the preceding year, little information is available on what types of daily activities (ADLs) that are associated with a significant fall risk in this population. OBJECTIVES: To determine balance confidence (FOF) in PD patients by utilizing the 16-item Activities-Specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABC-16), and identifying specific activities from this scale that are predictors of future falls. METHODS: 160 patients with PD, and 52 age-matched healthy controls completed the Thai-validated version of the ABC-16. The number of falls during the past month was obtained from both groups. RESULTS: PD patients reported lower confidence in their ability to maintain balance during ADLs compared to controls (p<0.001) with the lowest confidence score being item 16 (walking on slippery sidewalks). A significant negative correlation was observed between the number of falls in the previous month, and a mean ABC-16 score (r=-0.387, p<0.001). Logistic regression analysis identified the strongest predictor of fall in PD patients was item 9 (getting in/out of car; OR=4.8), followed by item 6 (standing on chair to reach; OR=3.4), and item 3 (picking up slippers from floor; OR=2.6). All of these high-risk activities involve movement in the vertical orientation. CONCLUSION: FOF was more common in PD patients than controls. In patients with postural instability and visual impairment, high-risk activities should be minimized, avoided, or performed only under supervision. It is recommended that fall prevention strategies include physical therapy interventions that are targeted at these activities.

10 Article Exploring the effect of electrical muscle stimulation as a novel treatment of intractable tremor in Parkinson's disease. 2015

Jitkritsadakul, Onanong / Thanawattano, Chusak / Anan, Chanawat / Bhidayasiri, Roongroj. ·Chulalongkorn Center of Excellence for Parkinson Disease & Related Disorders, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University and King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok 10330, Thailand. · Biomedical Signal Processing Laboratory, National Electronics and Computer Technology Center (NECTEC), and National Science and Technology Development Agency (NSTDA), Pathumthani, Thailand. · Chulalongkorn Center of Excellence for Parkinson Disease & Related Disorders, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University and King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok 10330, Thailand; Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Juntendo University, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: rbh@chulapd.org. ·J Neurol Sci · Pubmed #26342942.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: As the pathophysiology of tremor in Parkinson disease (PD) involves a complex interaction between central and peripheral mechanisms, we propose that modulation of peripheral reflex mechanism by electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) may improve tremor temporarily. OBJECTIVES: To determine the efficacy of EMS as a treatment for drug resistant tremor in PD patients. METHODS: This study was a single-blinded, quasi-experimental study involving 34 PD patients with classic resting tremor as confirmed by tremor analysis. The EMS was given at 50Hz over the abductor pollicis brevis and interrosseus muscles for 10s with identified tremor parameters before and during stimulation as primary outcomes. RESULTS: Compared to before stimulation, we observed a significant reduction in the root mean square (RMS) of the angular velocity (p<0.001) and peak magnitude (p<0.001) of resting tremor while tremor frequency (p=0.126) and dispersion (p=0.284) remained unchanged during stimulation. The UPDRS tremor score decreased from 10.59 (SD=1.74) before stimulation to 8.85 (SD=2.19) during stimulation (p<0.001). The average percentage of improvement of the peak magnitude and RMS angular velocity was 49.57% (SD=38.89) and 43.81% (SD=33.15) respectively. 70.6% and 61.8% of patients experienced at least 30% tremor attenuation as calculated from the peak magnitude and RMS angular velocity respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrated the efficacy of EMS in temporarily improving resting tremor in medically intractable PD patients. Although tremor severity decreased, they were not completely eliminated and continued with a similar frequency, thus demonstrating the role of peripheral reflex mechanism in the modulation of tremor, but not as a generator. EMS should be further explored as a possible therapeutic intervention for tremor in PD.

11 Article Postural instability, the absence of sexual intercourse in the past month, and loss of libido are predictors of sexual dysfunction in Parkinson's disease. 2015

Jitkritsadakul, Onanong / Jagota, Priya / Bhidayasiri, Roongroj. ·Chulalongkorn Center of Excellence on Parkinson Disease & Related Disorders, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University and King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok 10330, Thailand. · Chulalongkorn Center of Excellence on Parkinson Disease & Related Disorders, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University and King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok 10330, Thailand; Department of Neurology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles 90095, USA. Electronic address: rbh1@ucla.edu. ·Parkinsonism Relat Disord · Pubmed #25466402.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence and predictors of sexual dysfunction (SD) in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. BACKGROUND: Assessments of SD in the professional literature is limited. Understanding the predictors of SD can help physicians focus on this problem in vulnerable patients. METHOD: A total of 60 PD patients and 60 controls answered the Arizona Sexual Experiences Scale-Thai Version (ASEX-Thai) and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) questionnaires, and were asked on 3 additional sets of questions about premature ejaculation (PE), dyspareunia, and hypersexual disorders. RESULT: The prevalence of SD in PD patients and controls was 81.6% and 48.3% respectively (p < 0.05). PD patients had lower BMI, lower uric acid level, higher HAMD score and had sexual intercourse (SI) less frequently. SD correlated with greater disease severity and depression. The most distressing problem in male patients was PE (51.4%) and orgasmic dissatisfaction (76%) for female patients. Logistic regression analysis found 3 factors were related to SD: no SI in the past month (p < 0.001), postural instability (PI) (p = 0.028), and HAMD item 14 (p = 0.021), predicting SD with the OR of 12.2, 5.5, and 5.0 respectively. CONCLUSIONS: SD in PD is common and usually occurs with depression. Absence of SI in the past month, PI, and loss of libido are predictors of SD in PD. A simple and quick screening of SD can be routinely performed by inquiring patients about the frequency of SI and the examination of the pull test. Detailed assessment of sexual functioning and depression may guide physicians in proper management.

12 Article Identifying gaps in knowledge about Parkinson disease among medical professionals in Thailand. 2014

Bhidayasiri, Roongroj / Brenden, Neil / Viwattanakulvanid, Pramon / Jitkritsadakul, Onanong / Tabucanon, Ray / Jagota, Priya / Hojer, Henning. ·From the Department of Medicine (R.B., N.B., P.V., O.J., R.T., P.J.), Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn Center of Excellence on Parkinson's Disease and Related Disorders, Chulalongkorn University and King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok, Thailand · the Department of Neurology (R.B.), Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA · and the County Board of Sörmland (H.H.), Nyköping, Sweden. ·Neurology · Pubmed #24960833.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Article The impact of the nocturnal disabilities of Parkinson's disease on caregivers' burden: implications for interventions. 2014

Viwattanakulvanid, Pramon / Kaewwilai, Lalita / Jitkritsadakul, Onanong / Brenden, Neil R / Setthawatcharawanich, Suwanna / Boonrod, Nonglak / Mekawichai, Pawut / Bhidayasiri, Roongroj. ·Chulalongkorn Center of Excellence on Parkinson's Disease and Related Disorders, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University and King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thai Red Cross Society, 1873 Rama 4 Road, Bangkok, 10330, Thailand. ·J Neural Transm (Vienna) · Pubmed #24682360.

ABSTRACT: Parkinson's disease (PD) imposes a burden on those who care for the person afflicted. The objective of this study was to assess and analyze the main determinants of caregivers' burden, especially the nocturnal manifestations of PD. This multi-center, national, cross-sectional study included 89 patient-caregiver pairs. Caregiver self-assessments were performed with Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Zarit Caregiver Burden Interview (ZCBI). Patient self-assessments were performed with Modified Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale (MPDSS), Nocturnal Akinesia Dystonia and Cramp Score (NADCS), HADS and Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire (PDQ-8). Most of the caregivers were employed women, and the majority had been permanently taking care of the patient for 6.8 ± 5.4 years. The study found that the ZCBI mean score of the caregivers significantly worsened as patients became more dependent (HY: 4-5, p = 0.036), and the mean ZCBI score of spousal caregivers (19.4; SD 15.5) was significantly higher than that of the offspring group (11.7; SD 7.9) (p = 0.008). Disease duration (r = 0.22), NADCS (r = 0.38), MPDSS (r = -0.36), PDQ-8 SI (r = 0.39) and HADS (total, anxiety and depression) scores (r = 0.46-0.49), and HADS (total, anxiety and depression scores (r = 0.37-0.52), had significant negative effect on caregivers' burden. Moderate association was found on MPDSS item 14 (r = 0.38) and NADCS akinesia score (r = 0.37). Patients' anxiety, nocturnal akinesia and the feeling of tiredness and sleepiness upon awakening in the morning were independent predictors of caregivers' burden (adjusted R2 = 0.46). Based on these findings, treatment of early mood symptoms of the patients and caregivers at risk may be helpful for the effective management of PD and it is also important to have well-designed psycho-educational and multicomponent interventions in the community for caregivers of persons with PD.

14 Article Nocturnal journey of body and mind in Parkinson's disease: the manifestations, risk factors and their relationship to daytime symptoms. Evidence from the NIGHT-PD study. 2014

Bhidayasiri, Roongroj / Mekawichai, Pawut / Jitkritsadakul, Onanong / Panyakaew, Pattamon / Kaewwilai, Lalita / Boonrod, Nonglak / Petchrutchatachart, Sitthi / Jagota, Priya / Boonpeng, Kamolwan / Singmaneesakulchai, Surat / Setthawatcharawanich, Suwanna. ·Chulalongkorn Center of Excellence on Parkinson's Disease and Related Disorders, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University and King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok, 10330, Thailand, rbh1@ucla.edu. ·J Neural Transm (Vienna) · Pubmed #24682359.

ABSTRACT: Nocturnal manifestations of Parkinson's disease (PD) are myriad, have diverse etiologies and include motor, sleep, urinary, and neuropsychiatric symptoms which are often associated with daytime somnolence. While most patients perceive these symptoms as troublesome, the recognition of nocturnal problems related to PD is still low in clinical practice. We conducted a survey using semi-structured interviews and self-rated questionnaires of 215 consecutive patients with PD enrolled in three centers in Thailand to determine the prevalence and risk factors of nocturnal disabilities and their relationship to daytime symptoms. We found that 96.6% of patients reported the presence of nocturnal symptoms as determined by the modified version of Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale (MPDSS). Our survey indicated that the most frequent and distressing symptom was the interruption of sleep to pass urine (56.7%, 4.4 ± 3.9). The severity of symptoms revealed in the MPDSS increased along with the disease duration (p < 0.05) and Hoehn and Yahr stages (p = 0.01). There were similar to findings of the Nocturnal Akinesia Dystonia and Cramp Score (NADCS) where patients with advanced disease had significantly higher NADCS scores than early/moderate disease (p < 0.001). There was a significant correlation of total MPDSS scores with the total scores of the 9-item Wearing-Off Questionnaire (WOQ-9); (r = -0.43, p < 0.05) [motor (r = -0.35, p < 0.05) and nonmotor subscores (r = -0.43, p < 0.05)]; total nonmotor symptoms (NMS) scores (r = -0.55, p < 0.05); Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-8 Summary Index (PDQ-8 SI) (r = -0.52, p < 0.05); and the total NADCS (r = -0.35, p < 0.05). Multiple regression analysis identified PDQ-8 SI (β = -0.27, p = 0.005) as the most significant predictor of nocturnal manifestations of PD, followed by the nonmotor subscore of WOQ (β = -0.24, p = 0.006), and the NMS item 20 (feeling light-headed, dizzy, or weak when standing from sitting or lying) (β = -0.22, p = 0.003). Our study found that nocturnal symptoms of PD are very common and we suggest that good clinical practice should include a comprehensive review of nighttime manifestations, particularly for those patients who already experience "wearing-off" symptoms.

15 Article Nocturnal manifestations of atypical and vascular parkinsonism: how do they differ from Parkinson's disease? 2014

Bhidayasiri, Roongroj / Jitkritsadakul, Onanong / Petchrutchatachart, Sitthi / Kaewwilai, Lalita / Panyakaew, Pattamon / Boonrod, Nonglak / Colosimo, Carlo. ·Chulalongkorn Center of Excellence on Parkinson's Disease and Related Disorders, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University Hospital and King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thai Red Cross Society, 1873 Rama 4 Road, Bangkok, 10330, Thailand, rbh1@ucla.edu. ·J Neural Transm (Vienna) · Pubmed #24668247.

ABSTRACT: While nocturnal disturbances of Parkinson's disease (PD) are increasingly recognized as being part of a continuum that includes daytime manifestations, there is still little analysis in the medical literature that assesses these complex phenomena in patients with atypical (AP) and vascular parkinsonisms (VP). The objective of our study was to determine the prevalence of these disturbances in patients with AP and VP and to determine the range of nighttime symptoms that occur compared with those in patients with PD. This comparison was done using a semi-structured interview and self-rated questionnaires in 63 AP and VP patients (PSP 24, MSA 24, CBD 5, and VP 10), and 208 PD patients. 61 AP and VP patients (96.8%) and 201 PD patients (96.6%) reported at least one nocturnal symptom with a score of less than 6 on the Modified Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale (MPDSS). Nocturnal akinesia, as measured on the Nocturnal Akinesia, Dystonia, and Cramp Score, was found to be significantly greater in patients with PSP (p = 0.006), MSA (p = 0.002), and CBD (p = 0.012) than PD patients, but not VP patients (p = 0.428). Like those with PD, patients with AP and VP identified the problem of getting up at night to urinate (MPDSS item 8) as being the most frequent and troublesome nocturnal symptom. MSA and PSP patients reported more frequent (p = 0.001) and troublesome (p < 0.001) urinary incontinence (MPDSS item 9) than PD patients and MSA patients had more severe problems with unexpectedly falling asleep during the day (MPDSS item 15) than PD patients (p = 0.003). In summary, our study determined that nocturnal manifestations are commonly experienced by patients with AP and VP and highlighted specific nocturnal symptoms, which are more prevalent and troublesome in certain AP syndromes. The concept of 24-h control of symptoms should not be limited to only PD and we recommend that all who are involved in the care of AP and VP patients should realize that many nocturnal symptoms are experienced by these patients and a multidisciplinary approach should be utilized to address these problems.

16 Article The Arizona Sexual Experiences Scale: a validity and reliability assessment of the Thai translation (ASEX-Thai) in Parkinson's disease. 2014

Jitkritsadakul, Onanong / Jagota, Priya / Bhidayasiri, Roongroj. ·Chulalongkorn Center of Excellence on Parkinson Disease & Related Disorders, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University and King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok, Thailand. · Chulalongkorn Center of Excellence on Parkinson Disease & Related Disorders, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University and King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok, Thailand Department of Neurology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA. ·J Parkinsons Dis · Pubmed #24322061.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Cultural sensitivities tend to limit assessments of sexual dysfunction (SD) in Parkinson's disease (PD). OBJECTIVE: To assess the validity and reliability of the Thai translation (ASEX-Thai) of the Arizona Sexual Experiences Scale (ASEX). METHOD: The validity and reliability of ASEX-Thai were assessed with a random sample of 40 PD patients. Back translation and cross-cultural modifications assured content validity. Criterion validity used DSM-IV-TR criteria and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis was calculated for cutoff points plus sensitivity and specificity. Internal consistency was assessed with Cronbach's alpha coefficient. Test-retest reliability was assessed by Pearson's correlation at baseline and at a 2-month follow-up. RESULT: Criterion validity was conducted with a positive correlation between the clinical diagnosis of SD and DSM-IV-TR (r = 0.601; p < 0.001). The ROC analysis differentiated between SD and non-SD patients (p < 0.001). The cutoff point of ASEX-Thai at ≥16 points effectively screened for SD (sensitivity 96.2%, specificity 92.9%). Reliability was documented with the Cronbach's alpha of all items at baseline and at a 2-month follow-up with values of 0.948 and 0.962 respectively. The Pearson's correlation also showed highly significant test-retest reliability [Item 1 (r = 0.959, p < 0.001), Item 2 (r = 0.914, p < 0.001), Item 3 (r = 0.944, p < 0.001), Item 4 (r = 0.992, p < 0.001), Item 5 (r = 0.930, p < 0.001), and total ASEX-Thai score (r = 0.883, p < 0.001)]. CONCLUSION: ASEX-Thai is a valid and reliable instrument for the assessment of sexual dysfunction in Thai PD patients.

17 Minor Recurrent pancreatitis as a rare complication of duodenal levodopa infusion treatment. 2013

Jitkritsadakul, Onanong / Jagota, Priya / Petchrutchatachart, Sitthi / Sansopha, Lalana / Rerknimitr, Rungsun / Bhidayasiri, Roongroj. · ·Mov Disord · Pubmed #23389834.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --