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Parkinson Disease: HELP
Articles by Jacob D. Jones
Based on 12 articles published since 2010
(Why 12 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, J. D. Jones wrote the following 12 articles about Parkinson Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Clinical Trial The cognition and emotional well-being indices of the Parkinson's disease questionnaire-39: what do they really measure? 2014

Jones, Jacob D / Hass, Chris / Mangal, Paul / Lafo, Jacob / Okun, Michael S / Bowers, Dawn. ·Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration, McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. · Department of Applied Physiology and Kinesiology, McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration, McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. · Department of Neurology, McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration, McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. · Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; Department of Neurology, McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration, McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. Electronic address: dawnbowers@phhp.ufl.edu. ·Parkinsonism Relat Disord · Pubmed #25260967.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The Parkinson's disease questionnaire-39 (PDQ-39) is a common measure of health related quality of life (HRQoL) that is widely used with Parkinson disease (PD) patients. Previous evidence suggests that the PDQ-39 reflects at least 8 dimensions (i.e., Emotion, Cognitions, Mobility, etc). To date, little research has examined the external/convergent validity of the Cognitions and Emotional Well-being domains of the PDQ-39. METHODS: A convenience sample of 303 PD patients underwent a comprehensive multi-domain neuropsychological evaluation, including tests of execution function, episodic verbal memory, processing speed, language and working memory, as well as completing measures of depression, apathy, state and trait anxiety and HRQoL (PDQ-39). Hierarchical regressions were conducted in order to examine the relationship between scores on neuropsychological tests and the Cognitions index, as well as mood measures and the Emotional Well-being index of the PDQ-39. RESULTS: Neuropsychological test performance did not account for a significant amount of variance in the PDQ-39 Cognitions index scores. Instead, it was depression that significantly contributed to the Cognitions index, above and beyond neuropsychological performance. The PDQ-39 Emotional Well-being index was also related to mood measures, primarily depression and trait anxiety. CONCLUSIONS: The PDQ-39 Cognition index may be more related to mood functioning, as opposed to cognitive functioning, and should not be considered a "proxy" for cognitive functioning. Future studies are needed to better explain the construct of this index.

2 Clinical Trial Selection of deep brain stimulation candidates in private neurology practices: referral may be simpler than a computerized triage system. 2012

Oyama, Genko / Rodriguez, Ramon L / Jones, Jacob D / Swartz, Camille / Merritt, Stacy / Unger, Richard / Hubmann, Monica / Delgado, Alain / Simon, Ely / Doniger, Glen M / Bowers, Dawn / Foote, Kelly D / Fernandez, Hubert H / Okun, Michael S. ·Department of Neurology, University of Florida, Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration, McKnight Brain Institute, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA. ·Neuromodulation · Pubmed #22376158.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to compare a computerized deep brain stimulation (DBS) screening module (Comparing Private Practice vs. Academic Centers in Selection of DBS Candidates [COMPRESS], NeuroTrax Corp., Bellaire, TX, USA) with traditional triage by a movement disorders specialized neurologist as the gold standard. METHODS: The COMPRESS consists of a combination of the Florida Surgical Questionnaire for Parkinson disease (FLASQ-PD), a cognitive assessment battery provided by MindStreams® (NeuroTrax Corp.), and the Geriatric Depression Scale and the Zung Anxiety Self-Assessment Scale. COMPRESS resulted in the classification of patients into three categories: "optimal candidate,""probable candidate," and "not a good candidate." Similar categorical ratings made by a referring private practice neurologist and by a trained movement disorders specialist were compared with the ratings generated by COMPRESS. RESULTS: A total of 19 subjects with Parkinson's disease were enrolled from five private neurological practices. The clinical impressions of the private practice neurologist vs. those of the movement disorders specialist were in agreement approximately half the time (10/19 cases). The movement disorders specialist and COMPRESS agreed on 15/19 cases. A further comparison between outcomes from the entire COMPRESS module and the FLASQ-PD questionnaire by itself resulted in high agreement (18/19 cases in agreement). CONCLUSIONS: The COMPRESS agreed with an in-person evaluation by a movement disorders neurologist approximately 80% of the time. The computerized COMPRESS did not provide any screening advantage over the short FLASQ-PD paper questionnaire. Larger studies will be needed to assess the utility and cost effectiveness of this computerized triage method for DBS.

3 Article Reverters from PD-MCI to cognitively intact are at risk for future cognitive impairment: Analysis of the PPMI cohort. 2018

Jones, Jacob D / Kuhn, Taylor P / Szymkowicz, Sarah M. ·Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA. Electronic address: jacobjones@mednet.ucla.edu. · Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Department of Clinical & Health Psychology, College of Public Health & Health Professions, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. ·Parkinsonism Relat Disord · Pubmed #29233608.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Past studies have shown that a large portion of individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) will revert to a cognitively intact (CI) status in the future. Aging studies have shown that individuals who revert from MCI to CI are at increased risk for reconverting to MCI or dementia in the future. The current study examined if individuals who revert from PD-mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI) to CI will be at increased risk for future PD-MCI and Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD). METHOD: The study utilized data from the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI). The sample included 364 newly diagnosed PD participants who were followed annually for up to 4 years. Based on the first and second assessments, we identified individuals who were CI at each assessment (CI-Stable) and individuals who were PD-MCI at baseline but then reverted to CI (Reversion). Analyses examined if participants in the Reversion group were at greater risk, relative to the CI-Stable group, for cognitive impairment at future assessments. RESULTS: Participants in the Reversion group were at greater risk for future cognitive impairment (PD-MCI or PDD) at the 2nd, 3rd and 4th annual follow-up, relative to the CI-Stable group. The Reversion group continued to be at increased risk for future cognitive impairment when adjusting for age, gender, education, depressive symptoms, and motor severity. CONCLUSION: A large proportion of individuals with PD-MCI will not show evidence of cognitive impairment within a year. However, these "reverters" continue to be at risk for future development of cognitive impairment.

4 Article Are Parkinson's Patients More Vulnerable to the Effects of Cardiovascular Risk: A Neuroimaging and Neuropsychological Study. 2017

Jones, Jacob D / Tanner, Jared J / Okun, Michael / Price, Catherine C / Bowers, Dawn. ·1Department of Clinical and Health Psychology,McKnight Brain Institute,University of Florida,Gainesville,Florida. · 2Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration,McKnight Brain Institute,University of Florida,Gainesville,Florida. ·J Int Neuropsychol Soc · Pubmed #28162137.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: This study examined whether individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) are at increased vulnerability for vascular-related cognitive impairment relative to controls. The underlying assumption behind this hypothesis relates to brain reserve and that both PD and vascular risk factors impair similar fronto-executive cognitive systems. METHODS: The sample included 67 PD patients and 61 older controls (total N=128). Participants completed neuropsychological measures of executive functioning, processing speed, verbal delayed recall/memory, language, and auditory attention. Cardiovascular risk was assessed with the Framingham Cardiovascular Risk index. Participants underwent brain imaging (T1 and T2 FLAIR). Trained raters measured total and regional leukoaraiosis (periventricular, deep subcortical, and infracortical). RESULTS: Hierarchical regressions revealed that more severe cardiovascular risk was related to worse executive functioning, processing speed, and delayed verbal recall in both Parkinson patients and controls. More severe cardiovascular risk was related to worse language functioning in the PD group, but not controls. In contrast, leukoaraiosis related to both cardiovascular risk and executive functioning for controls, but not the PD group. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, results revealed that PD and cardiovascular risk factors are independent risk factors for cognitive impairment. Generally, the influence of cardiovascular risk factors on cognition is similar in PD patients and controls. (JINS, 2017, 23, 322-331).

5 Article Mood Differences Among Parkinson's Disease Patients With Mild Cognitive Impairment. 2016

Jones, Jacob D / Mangal, Paul / Lafo, Jacob / Okun, Michael S / Bowers, Dawn. ·From the Depts. of Clinical and Health Psychology (JDJ, PM, JL, DB) and Neurology (MSO, DB), Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration, McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville. ·J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci · Pubmed #26792098.

ABSTRACT: Studies with healthy elderly adults suggest that apathy, depression, and anxiety are more common among individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). This study examined differences in mood/amotivational symptoms among patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) with and without MCI. Patients with PD (N=214) underwent neurocognitive evaluations including assessment of apathy (Apathy Scale), depression (Beck Depression Inventory-II), and trait anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory trait scale). Trait anxiety and depression were more severe in patients with PD with MCI. Delineation of MCI into amnestic and nonamnestic subtypes revealed greater depression, apathy, and anxiety among patients with PD with amnestic MCI relative to cognitively intact patients with PD. Patients with PD and MCI report greater mood symptoms compared to patients with PD who are cognitively intact.

6 Article Memory Similarities Between Essential Tremor and Parkinson's Disease: A Final Common Pathway? 2015

Lafo, Jacob A / Jones, Jacob D / Okun, Michael S / Bauer, Russell M / Price, Catherine C / Bowers, Dawn. ·a Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, College of Public Health & Health Professions , University of Florida , Gainesville , FL , USA. · c Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration , University of Florida College of Medicine, University of Florida , Gainesville , FL , USA. · b Department of Neurology , University of Florida College of Medicine, University of Florida , Gainesville , FL , USA. ·Clin Neuropsychol · Pubmed #26689342.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: A growing body of literature supports the view that essential tremor (ET) involves alteration of cerebellar-thalamo-cortical networks which can result in working memory and executive deficits. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that individuals with ET would exhibit worse performance on memory tasks requiring more intrinsic organization and structuring (i.e., word lists) relative to those with fewer 'executive' demands (i.e., stories), similar to that previously observed in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). METHOD: Participants included a convenience sample of 68 ET patients and 68 idiopathic PD patients, retrospectively matched based on age, education, and sex. All patients underwent routine neuropsychological evaluation assessing recent memory, auditory attention/working memory, language, and executive function. Memory measures included the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-R and WMS-III Logical Memory. RESULTS: Both ET and PD patients performed significantly worse on word list than story memory recall tasks. The magnitude of the difference between these two memory tasks was similar for ET and PD patients. In both patient groups, performance on measures of executive function and auditory attention/working memory was not distinctly correlated with word list vs. story recall. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that frontal-executive dysfunction in both ET and PD may negatively influence performance on memory tests that are not inherently organized. Although the pathophysiology of these two 'movement disorders' are quite distinct, both have downstream effects on thalamo-frontal circuitry which may provide a common pathway for a similar memory phenotype. Findings are discussed in terms of neuroimaging evidence, conceptual models, and best practice.

7 Article Latent growth-curve analysis reveals that worsening Parkinson's disease quality of life is driven by depression. 2015

Jones, Jacob D / Marsiske, Michael / Okun, Michael S / Bowers, Dawn. ·Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida. · Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Florida. · Department of Neurology, McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida. ·Neuropsychology · Pubmed #25365564.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder resulting in a wide variety of symptoms. The current study examined the influence of apathy, depression and motor symptoms on quality of life (QoL) in PD patients. Information was drawn from an 18-month period. METHOD: Participants (N = 397) were assessed for apathy (Apathy Scale; Starkstein et al., 1992), depression (Beck Depression Inventory-II; Beck, Steer, Ball & Ranieri, 1996), motor severity (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, Part III; UPDRS; Fahn, Elton & Committee, 1987), and QoL (Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-39; Jenkinson, Fitzpatrick, Peto, Greenhall, & Hyman,1997) at 3 time points: an initial clinical evaluation (baseline), a 6-month follow-up, and an 18-month follow-up. Latent growth-curve models were used to determine the influence of apathy, depression, and motor symptoms on QoL trajectories. RESULTS: Greater difficulties with QoL at baseline showed the strongest relationship to more severe depression symptoms, followed by more severe motor symptoms, younger age, and less education (all p values < .001). Worsening of QoL over the 18-month period was only predicted by a worsening of depression (p = .003). The relationship between QoL and depression symptoms remained significant in a subsample of nondepressed PD patients. CONCLUSION: Overall, findings from the current study suggest that self-reported QoL among PD patients is primarily related to depression. Future efforts to improving clinical care of PD patients may benefit by focusing on improving psychosocial adjustment or treatments targeting depression.

8 Article Anxiety and Depression Are Better Correlates of Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Than Apathy. 2015

Jones, Jacob D / Butterfield, London C / Song, Woojin / Lafo, Jacob / Mangal, Paul / Okun, Michael S / Bowers, Dawn. ·From the Dept. of Clinical and Health Psychology (JDJ, LCB, JL, PM, DB), Dept. of Neurology (MSO, DB), and Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration, McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL · and Dept. of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (WS). ·J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci · Pubmed #25162776.

ABSTRACT: Due to controversy regarding the influence of apathy on quality of life (QoL), the authors examined the independent influence of apathy, depression, and trait anxiety in a nondemented sample of patients with Parkinson disease (PD). Participants (N=107) completed standard self-report measures of QoL and mood/motivation. Analyses investigated the contribution of these measures and empirically derived factor scores on QoL. QoL was predicted by trait anxiety, dysphoria, and decreased interest, with no independent contribution of apathy. Different patterns emerged with respect to domain-specific QoL, with trait anxiety being the strongest predictor across most domains. Anxiety was most widely related to QoL in PD, with minimal contribution of apathy. Future studies should examine different roles of PD mood/motivation symptoms on caregiver QoL.

9 Article Coordinate-based lead location does not predict Parkinson's disease deep brain stimulation outcome. 2014

Nestor, Kelsey A / Jones, Jacob D / Butson, Christopher R / Morishita, Takashi / Jacobson, Charles E / Peace, David A / Chen, Dennis / Foote, Kelly D / Okun, Michael S. ·Department of Neurology, University of Florida, Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration, McKnight Brain Institute, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America; Department of Neurosurgery, University of Florida, Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration, McKnight Brain Institute, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America. · Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America. · Department of Neurology, Biotechnology and Bioengineering Center, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States of America. · Department of Neurosurgery, University of Florida, Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration, McKnight Brain Institute, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America. · Department of Neurology, University of Florida, Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration, McKnight Brain Institute, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #24691109.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Effective target regions for deep brain stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD) have been well characterized. We sought to study whether the measured Cartesian coordinates of an implanted DBS lead are predictive of motor outcome(s). We tested the hypothesis that the position and trajectory of the DBS lead relative to the mid-commissural point (MCP) are significant predictors of clinical outcomes. We expected that due to neuroanatomical variation among individuals, a simple measure of the position of the DBS lead relative to MCP (commonly used in clinical practice) may not be a reliable predictor of clinical outcomes when utilized alone. METHODS: 55 PD subjects implanted with subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS and 41 subjects implanted with globus pallidus internus (GPi) DBS were included. Lead locations in AC-PC space (x, y, z coordinates of the active contact and sagittal and coronal entry angles) measured on high-resolution CT-MRI fused images, and motor outcomes (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale) were analyzed to confirm or refute a correlation between coordinate-based lead locations and DBS motor outcomes. RESULTS: Coordinate-based lead locations were not a significant predictor of change in UPDRS III motor scores when comparing pre- versus post-operative values. The only potentially significant individual predictor of change in UPDRS motor scores was the antero-posterior coordinate of the GPi lead (more anterior lead locations resulted in a worse outcome), but this was only a statistical trend (p<.082). CONCLUSION: The results of the study showed that a simple measure of the position of the DBS lead relative to the MCP is not significantly correlated with PD motor outcomes, presumably because this method fails to account for individual neuroanatomical variability. However, there is broad agreement that motor outcomes depend strongly on lead location. The results suggest the need for more detailed identification of stimulation location relative to anatomical targets.

10 Article Health comorbidities and cognition in 1948 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease. 2012

Jones, J D / Malaty, I / Price, C C / Okun, M S / Bowers, D. ·Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. ·Parkinsonism Relat Disord · Pubmed #22776043.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Health comorbidities, particularly cardiovascular factors, are well known to pose risks for cognitive decline in older adults. This study examined the prevalence and contribution of comorbidities on cognitive performance in a large cohort of Parkinson patients. METHODS: Data on 1948 PD patients were obtained from the National Parkinson Foundation Quality Improvement Initiative (NPF-QII) registry, a multi-site initiative from NPF Centers of Excellence. Available comorbidity data included six common conditions (heart/circulation problems, diabetes, arthritis, cancer, respiratory disease, and other neurologic disease) that were clinician-rated for presence and severity. Available cognitive measures included semantic fluency and a 5-word recall memory task. The unique effects of comorbidities on cognition were analyzed (multiple hierarchical regression) controlling for demographic, PD disease severity (duration, Hoehn-Yahr), and medication status. RESULTS: The two most reported comorbidities were arthritis (46.6%) and heart/circulation problems (36.3%), with diabetes affecting 9% of the sample. Severity of heart/circulation problems independently contributed to worse delayed recall performance (p = 0.03). A trend emerged for more severe diabetes as contributing to worse semantic fluency scores (p = 0.06). CONCLUSIONS: This study with a large cohort of PD patients provides evidence for a small detrimental influence of specific health comorbidities, particularly heart/circulatory and diabetes, on general measures of cognition. This effect is present, above and beyond the influences of basic demographic information (age), duration and staging of PD, and medication status. Future studies involving more refined cognitive indices and direct assessment of comorbidities are warranted.

11 Minor Reply: The 'cognitions' index of the Parkinson's disease questionnaire-39 relates to sleep disturbances and hallucinations. 2015

Jones, Jacob D / Hass, Chris / Okun, Michael S / Bowers, Dawn. ·Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration, McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. · Department of Applied Physiology and Kinesiology, McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration, McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. · Department of Neurology, McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration, McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. · Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; Department of Neurology, McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration, McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. Electronic address: dawnbowers@phhp.ufl.edu. ·Parkinsonism Relat Disord · Pubmed #25616693.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Minor Cognitive declines after deep brain stimulation are likely to be attributable to more than caudate penetration and lead location. 2014

Morishita, Takashi / Okun, Michael S / Jones, Jacob D / Foote, Kelly D / Bowers, Dawn. ·1 Department of Neurosurgery, University of Florida College of Medicine, Centre for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration, Gainesville, FL, USA. ·Brain · Pubmed #24519976.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --