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Parkinson Disease: HELP
Articles by Jungwoo Wren Kim
Based on 5 articles published since 2010
(Why 5 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Jungwoo Wren Kim wrote the following 5 articles about Parkinson Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review LRRK2 pathobiology in Parkinson's disease. 2014

Martin, Ian / Kim, Jungwoo Wren / Dawson, Valina L / Dawson, Ted M. ·Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. ·J Neurochem · Pubmed #25251388.

ABSTRACT: Mutations in the catalytic Roc-COR and kinase domains of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are a common cause of familial Parkinson's disease (PD). LRRK2 mutations cause PD with age-related penetrance and clinical features identical to late-onset sporadic PD. Biochemical studies support an increase in LRRK2 kinase activity and a decrease in GTPase activity for kinase domain and Roc-COR mutations, respectively. Strong evidence exists that LRRK2 toxicity is kinase dependent leading to extensive efforts to identify selective and brain-permeable LRRK2 kinase inhibitors for clinical development. Cell and animal models of PD indicate that LRRK2 mutations affect vesicular trafficking, autophagy, protein synthesis, and cytoskeletal function. Although some of these biological functions are affected consistently by most disease-linked mutations, others are not and it remains currently unclear how mutations that produce variable effects on LRRK2 biochemistry and function all commonly result in the degeneration and death of dopamine neurons. LRRK2 is typically present in Lewy bodies and its toxicity in mammalian models appears to be dependent on the presence of α-synuclein, which is elevated in human iPS-derived dopamine neurons from patients harboring LRRK2 mutations. Here, we summarize biochemical and functional studies of LRRK2 and its mutations and focus on aberrant vesicular trafficking and protein synthesis as two leading mechanisms underlying LRRK2-linked disease.

2 Article PINK1 Primes Parkin-Mediated Ubiquitination of PARIS in Dopaminergic Neuronal Survival. 2017

Lee, Yunjong / Stevens, Daniel A / Kang, Sung-Ung / Jiang, Haisong / Lee, Yun-Il / Ko, Han Seok / Scarffe, Leslie A / Umanah, George E / Kang, Hojin / Ham, Sangwoo / Kam, Tae-In / Allen, Kathleen / Brahmachari, Saurav / Kim, Jungwoo Wren / Neifert, Stewart / Yun, Seung Pil / Fiesel, Fabienne C / Springer, Wolfdieter / Dawson, Valina L / Shin, Joo-Ho / Dawson, Ted M. ·Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Physiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Division of Pharmacology, Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Suwon 440-746, South Korea. · Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. · Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Adrienne Helis Malvin Medical Research Foundation, New Orleans, LA 70130-2685, USA; Diana Helis Henry Medical Research Foundation, New Orleans, LA 70130-2685, USA. · Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. · Division of Pharmacology, Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Suwon 440-746, South Korea. · Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Adrienne Helis Malvin Medical Research Foundation, New Orleans, LA 70130-2685, USA. · Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Physiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. · Department of Neuroscience, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL 32224, USA; Mayo Graduate School, Neurobiology of Disease, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL 32224, USA. · Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Physiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Adrienne Helis Malvin Medical Research Foundation, New Orleans, LA 70130-2685, USA; Diana Helis Henry Medical Research Foundation, New Orleans, LA 70130-2685, USA. Electronic address: vdawson@jhmi.edu. · Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Division of Pharmacology, Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Suwon 440-746, South Korea. Electronic address: jshin24@skku.edu. · Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Adrienne Helis Malvin Medical Research Foundation, New Orleans, LA 70130-2685, USA; Diana Helis Henry Medical Research Foundation, New Orleans, LA 70130-2685, USA. Electronic address: tdawson@jhmi.edu. ·Cell Rep · Pubmed #28122242.

ABSTRACT: Mutations in PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) and parkin cause autosomal-recessive Parkinson's disease through a common pathway involving mitochondrial quality control. Parkin inactivation leads to accumulation of the parkin interacting substrate (PARIS, ZNF746) that plays an important role in dopamine cell loss through repression of proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1-alpha (PGC-1α) promoter activity. Here, we show that PARIS links PINK1 and parkin in a common pathway that regulates dopaminergic neuron survival. PINK1 interacts with and phosphorylates serines 322 and 613 of PARIS to control its ubiquitination and clearance by parkin. PINK1 phosphorylation of PARIS alleviates PARIS toxicity, as well as repression of PGC-1α promoter activity. Conditional knockdown of PINK1 in adult mouse brains leads to a progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra that is dependent on PARIS. Altogether, these results uncover a function of PINK1 to direct parkin-PARIS-regulated PGC-1α expression and dopaminergic neuronal survival.

3 Article LRRK2 pathobiology in Parkinson's disease - virtual inclusion. 2016

Martin, Ian / Kim, Jungwoo Wren / Dawson, Valina L / Dawson, Ted M. ·Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Physiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Adrienne Helis Malvin Medical Research Foundation, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. · Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Diana Helis Henry Medical Research Foundation, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. ·J Neurochem · Pubmed #26899799.

ABSTRACT: A common cause of Parkinson disease are missense mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) catalytic Roc-COR domain, leading to a decrease in GTPase activity; and its kinase domain, leading to an increase in kinase activity and subsequent LRRK2 toxicity. Targeting LRRK2 with selective, brain-permeable kinase inhibitors is a promising approach to reduce toxicity, and thus is a major goal of clinical development. Understanding the specific signaling cascades triggered by LRRK2 mutations will be key to this aim. This article is part of a special issue on Parkinson disease.

4 Article Abberant protein synthesis in G2019S LRRK2 Drosophila Parkinson disease-related phenotypes. 2014

Martin, Ian / Abalde-Atristain, Leire / Kim, Jungwoo Wren / Dawson, Ted M / Dawson, Valina L. ·a Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs; Institute for Cell Engineering; Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine ; Baltimore , MD USA. ·Fly (Austin) · Pubmed #25483009.

ABSTRACT: LRRK2 mutations are a frequent cause of familial Parkinson disease (PD) and are also found in a number of sporadic PD cases. PD-linked G2019S and I2020T mutations in the kinase domain of LRRK2 result in elevated kinase activity, which is required for the toxicity of these pathogenic variants in cell and animal models of PD. We recently reported that LRRK2 interacts with and phosphorylates a number of mammalian ribosomal proteins, several of which exhibit increased phosphorylation via both G2019S and I2020T LRRK2. Blocking the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein s15 through expression of phospho-deficient T136A s15 prevents age-associated locomotor deficits and dopamine neuron loss caused by G2019S LRRK2 expression in Drosophila indicating that s15 is a pathogenic LRRK2 substrate. We previously described that G2019S LRRK2 causes an induction of bulk mRNA translation that is blocked by T136A s15 or the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin. Here, we report the protective effects of the eIF4E/eIF4G interaction inhibitor 4EGI-1, in preventing neurodegenerative phenotypes in G2019S LRRK2 flies, and discuss how our findings and those of other groups provide a framework to begin investigating the mechanistic impact of LRRK2 on translation.

5 Article Ribosomal protein s15 phosphorylation mediates LRRK2 neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease. 2014

Martin, Ian / Kim, Jungwoo Wren / Lee, Byoung Dae / Kang, Ho Chul / Xu, Jin-Chong / Jia, Hao / Stankowski, Jeannette / Kim, Min-Sik / Zhong, Jun / Kumar, Manoj / Andrabi, Shaida A / Xiong, Yulan / Dickson, Dennis W / Wszolek, Zbigniew K / Pandey, Akhilesh / Dawson, Ted M / Dawson, Valina L. ·Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Adrienne Helis Malvin Medical Research Foundation, New Orleans, LA 70130, USA. · Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Physiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Adrienne Helis Malvin Medical Research Foundation, New Orleans, LA 70130, USA. · Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Age-Related and Brain Disease Research Center, Department of Neuroscience, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701, South Korea. · Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Physiology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon 443-749, South Korea. · Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. · Department of Biological Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; McKusick Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. · McKusick Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. · Department of Neuroscience, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL 32224, USA. · Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL 32224, USA. · Department of Biological Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; McKusick Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Adrienne Helis Malvin Medical Research Foundation, New Orleans, LA 70130, USA; Diana Helis Henry Medical Research Foundation, New Orleans, LA 70130, USA. · Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Adrienne Helis Malvin Medical Research Foundation, New Orleans, LA 70130, USA. Electronic address: tdawson@jhmi.edu. · Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Physiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Adrienne Helis Malvin Medical Research Foundation, New Orleans, LA 70130, USA. Electronic address: vdawson@jhmi.edu. ·Cell · Pubmed #24725412.

ABSTRACT: Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are a common cause of familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). Elevated LRRK2 kinase activity and neurodegeneration are linked, but the phosphosubstrate that connects LRRK2 kinase activity to neurodegeneration is not known. Here, we show that ribosomal protein s15 is a key pathogenic LRRK2 substrate in Drosophila and human neuron PD models. Phosphodeficient s15 carrying a threonine 136 to alanine substitution rescues dopamine neuron degeneration and age-related locomotor deficits in G2019S LRRK2 transgenic Drosophila and substantially reduces G2019S LRRK2-mediated neurite loss and cell death in human dopamine and cortical neurons. Remarkably, pathogenic LRRK2 stimulates both cap-dependent and cap-independent mRNA translation and induces a bulk increase in protein synthesis in Drosophila, which can be prevented by phosphodeficient T136A s15. These results reveal a novel mechanism of PD pathogenesis linked to elevated LRRK2 kinase activity and aberrant protein synthesis in vivo.