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Parkinson Disease: HELP
Articles by Leslie A. Scarffe
Based on 4 articles published since 2010
(Why 4 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Leslie A. Scarffe wrote the following 4 articles about Parkinson Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Parkin and PINK1: much more than mitophagy. 2014

Scarffe, Leslie A / Stevens, Daniel A / Dawson, Valina L / Dawson, Ted M. ·Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Adrienne Helis Malvin Medical Research Foundation, New Orleans, LA 70130-2685, USA. · Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. · Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Physiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Adrienne Helis Malvin Medical Research Foundation, New Orleans, LA 70130-2685, USA. Electronic address: vdawson@jhmi.edu. · Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Adrienne Helis Malvin Medical Research Foundation, New Orleans, LA 70130-2685, USA. Electronic address: tdawson@jhmi.edu. ·Trends Neurosci · Pubmed #24735649.

ABSTRACT: Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that causes a debilitating movement disorder. Although most cases of PD appear to be sporadic, rare Mendelian forms have provided tremendous insight into disease pathogenesis. Accumulating evidence suggests that impaired mitochondria underpin PD pathology. In support of this theory, data from multiple PD models have linked Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN)-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) and parkin, two recessive PD genes, in a common pathway impacting mitochondrial health, prompting a flurry of research to identify their mitochondrial targets. Recent work has focused on the role of PINK1 and parkin in mediating mitochondrial autophagy (mitophagy); however, emerging evidence casts parkin and PINK1 as key players in multiple domains of mitochondrial health and quality control.

2 Article PINK1 Primes Parkin-Mediated Ubiquitination of PARIS in Dopaminergic Neuronal Survival. 2017

Lee, Yunjong / Stevens, Daniel A / Kang, Sung-Ung / Jiang, Haisong / Lee, Yun-Il / Ko, Han Seok / Scarffe, Leslie A / Umanah, George E / Kang, Hojin / Ham, Sangwoo / Kam, Tae-In / Allen, Kathleen / Brahmachari, Saurav / Kim, Jungwoo Wren / Neifert, Stewart / Yun, Seung Pil / Fiesel, Fabienne C / Springer, Wolfdieter / Dawson, Valina L / Shin, Joo-Ho / Dawson, Ted M. ·Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Physiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Division of Pharmacology, Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Suwon 440-746, South Korea. · Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. · Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Adrienne Helis Malvin Medical Research Foundation, New Orleans, LA 70130-2685, USA; Diana Helis Henry Medical Research Foundation, New Orleans, LA 70130-2685, USA. · Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. · Division of Pharmacology, Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Suwon 440-746, South Korea. · Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Adrienne Helis Malvin Medical Research Foundation, New Orleans, LA 70130-2685, USA. · Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Physiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. · Department of Neuroscience, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL 32224, USA; Mayo Graduate School, Neurobiology of Disease, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL 32224, USA. · Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Physiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Adrienne Helis Malvin Medical Research Foundation, New Orleans, LA 70130-2685, USA; Diana Helis Henry Medical Research Foundation, New Orleans, LA 70130-2685, USA. Electronic address: vdawson@jhmi.edu. · Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Division of Pharmacology, Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Suwon 440-746, South Korea. Electronic address: jshin24@skku.edu. · Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Adrienne Helis Malvin Medical Research Foundation, New Orleans, LA 70130-2685, USA; Diana Helis Henry Medical Research Foundation, New Orleans, LA 70130-2685, USA. Electronic address: tdawson@jhmi.edu. ·Cell Rep · Pubmed #28122242.

ABSTRACT: Mutations in PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) and parkin cause autosomal-recessive Parkinson's disease through a common pathway involving mitochondrial quality control. Parkin inactivation leads to accumulation of the parkin interacting substrate (PARIS, ZNF746) that plays an important role in dopamine cell loss through repression of proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1-alpha (PGC-1α) promoter activity. Here, we show that PARIS links PINK1 and parkin in a common pathway that regulates dopaminergic neuron survival. PINK1 interacts with and phosphorylates serines 322 and 613 of PARIS to control its ubiquitination and clearance by parkin. PINK1 phosphorylation of PARIS alleviates PARIS toxicity, as well as repression of PGC-1α promoter activity. Conditional knockdown of PINK1 in adult mouse brains leads to a progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra that is dependent on PARIS. Altogether, these results uncover a function of PINK1 to direct parkin-PARIS-regulated PGC-1α expression and dopaminergic neuronal survival.

3 Article Early-onset Parkinson's disease due to PINK1 p.Q456X mutation--clinical and functional study. 2014

Siuda, Joanna / Jasinska-Myga, Barbara / Boczarska-Jedynak, Magdalena / Opala, Grzegorz / Fiesel, Fabienne C / Moussaud-Lamodière, Elisabeth L / Scarffe, Leslie A / Dawson, Valina L / Ross, Owen A / Springer, Wolfdieter / Dawson, Ted M / Wszolek, Zbigniew K. ·Department of Neurology, Silesian Medical University, Katowice, Poland; Department of Neuroscience, Mayo Clinic Jacksonville, Florida, USA. · Department of Neurology, Silesian Medical University, Katowice, Poland. · Department of Neuroscience, Mayo Clinic Jacksonville, Florida, USA. · Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns, Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. · Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns, Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Physiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Adrienne Helis Malvin Medical Research Foundation, New Orleans, LA 70130-2685, USA. · Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns, Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Adrienne Helis Malvin Medical Research Foundation, New Orleans, LA 70130-2685, USA; Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. · Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic Jacksonville, Florida, USA. Electronic address: wszolek.zbigniew@mayo.edu. ·Parkinsonism Relat Disord · Pubmed #25226871.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Recessive mutations in the PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) gene cause early-onset Parkinson's disease (EOPD). The clinical phenotype of families that have this PINK1-associated disease may present with different symptoms, including typical PD. The loss of the PINK1 protein may lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, which causes dopaminergic neuron death. METHODS: The clinical phenotypes of a large Polish family with EOPD and an identified PINK1 homozygous nonsense mutation were assessed. Ubiquitination and degradation of mitochondrial parkin substrates as well as mitochondrial bioenergetics were investigated as direct functional readouts for PINK1's kinase activity in biopsied dermal fibroblasts. RESULTS: A four-generation family was genealogically evaluated. Genetic screening identified two affected subjects who were both homozygous carriers of the pathogenic PINK1 p.Q456X substitution. Both patients presented with dystonia and gait disorders at symptom onset. Seven heterozygous mutation carriers remained unaffected. Functional studies revealed that the PINK1 p.Q456X protein is non-functional in activating the downstream ubiquitin ligase parkin and priming the ubiquitination of its substrates, and that the RNA levels of PINK1 were significantly reduced. CONCLUSIONS: The PINK1 p.Q456X mutation leads to a decrease in mRNA and a loss of protein function. The foot dystonia and gait disorders seen at disease onset in affected members of our family, which were accompanied by parkinsonism had a similar clinical presentation to what has been described in previous reports of PINK1 mutation carriers.

4 Article Pharmacological rescue of mitochondrial deficits in iPSC-derived neural cells from patients with familial Parkinson's disease. 2012

Cooper, Oliver / Seo, Hyemyung / Andrabi, Shaida / Guardia-Laguarta, Cristina / Graziotto, John / Sundberg, Maria / McLean, Jesse R / Carrillo-Reid, Luis / Xie, Zhong / Osborn, Teresia / Hargus, Gunnar / Deleidi, Michela / Lawson, Tristan / Bogetofte, Helle / Perez-Torres, Eduardo / Clark, Lorraine / Moskowitz, Carol / Mazzulli, Joseph / Chen, Li / Volpicelli-Daley, Laura / Romero, Norma / Jiang, Houbo / Uitti, Ryan J / Huang, Zhigao / Opala, Grzegorz / Scarffe, Leslie A / Dawson, Valina L / Klein, Christine / Feng, Jian / Ross, Owen A / Trojanowski, John Q / Lee, Virginia M-Y / Marder, Karen / Surmeier, D James / Wszolek, Zbigniew K / Przedborski, Serge / Krainc, Dimitri / Dawson, Ted M / Isacson, Ole. ·Neuroregeneration Institute, McLean Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Belmont, MA 02478, USA. ·Sci Transl Med · Pubmed #22764206.

ABSTRACT: Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder caused by genetic and environmental factors that results in degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway in the brain. We analyzed neural cells generated from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from PD patients and presymptomatic individuals carrying mutations in the PINK1 (PTEN-induced putative kinase 1) and LRRK2 (leucine-rich repeat kinase 2) genes, and compared them to those of healthy control subjects. We measured several aspects of mitochondrial responses in the iPSC-derived neural cells including production of reactive oxygen species, mitochondrial respiration, proton leakage, and intraneuronal movement of mitochondria. Cellular vulnerability associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in iPSC-derived neural cells from familial PD patients and at-risk individuals could be rescued with coenzyme Q(10), rapamycin, or the LRRK2 kinase inhibitor GW5074. Analysis of mitochondrial responses in iPSC-derived neural cells from PD patients carrying different mutations provides insight into convergence of cellular disease mechanisms between different familial forms of PD and highlights the importance of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in this neurodegenerative disease.