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Parkinson Disease: HELP
Articles by Johanne Hatteland Somme
Based on 15 articles published since 2010
(Why 15 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, J. Somme wrote the following 15 articles about Parkinson Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Long-term impact of subthalamic stimulation on cognitive function in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease. 2019

Acera, M / Molano, A / Tijero, B / Bilbao, G / Lambarri, I / Villoria, R / Somme, J / Ruiz de Gopegui, E / Gabilondo, I / Gomez-Esteban, J C. ·Unidad de Trastornos del Movimiento, Departamento de Neurología, Hospital Universitario de Cruces, Servicio Vasco de Salud, Barakaldo, España; Grupo de Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria BioCruces, Barakaldo, España. · Unidad de Trastornos del Movimiento, Departamento de Neurología, Hospital Universitario de Cruces, Servicio Vasco de Salud, Barakaldo, España; Grupo de Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria BioCruces, Barakaldo, España; Departamento de Neurociencias, Universidad del País Vasco, Leioa, España. · Departamento de Neurociencias, Universidad del País Vasco, Leioa, España; Departamento de Neurocirugía, Hospital Universitario de Cruces, Barakaldo, España. · Departamento de Neurociencias, Universidad del País Vasco, Leioa, España; Departamento de Neurofisiología, Hospital Universitario de Cruces, Barakaldo, España. · Departamento de Neurociencias, Universidad del País Vasco, Leioa, España; Departamento de Neurorradiología, Hospital Universitario de Cruces, Barakaldo, España. · Departamento de Neurología, Hospital Universitario de Álava, Vitoria, España. · Departamento de Neurocirugía, Hospital Universitario de Cruces, Barakaldo, España. · Grupo de Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria BioCruces, Barakaldo, España. · Unidad de Trastornos del Movimiento, Departamento de Neurología, Hospital Universitario de Cruces, Servicio Vasco de Salud, Barakaldo, España; Grupo de Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria BioCruces, Barakaldo, España; Departamento de Neurociencias, Universidad del País Vasco, Leioa, España. Electronic address: juancarlos.gomezesteban@osakidetza.eus. ·Neurologia · Pubmed #28712841.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (DBS-SN) on cognitive function in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) 5 years after surgery. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We conducted a prospective study including 50 patients with PD who underwent DBS-SN (62.5% were men; mean age of 62.2±8.2 years; mean progression time of 14.1±6.3 years). All patients were assessed before the procedure and at one year after surgery; 40 patients were further followed up until the 5-year mark. Follow-up assessments included the following neuropsychological tests: Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Mattis Dementia Rating Scale (MDRS), letter-number sequencing of the WAIS-III (WAIS-III-LN), clock-drawing test, Rey auditory verbal learning test (RAVLT), Benton Visual Retention Test (BVRT), Judgment of Line Orientation (JLO) test, FAS Phonemic Verbal Fluency Test, Stroop test, and the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). RESULTS: Patients were found to score lower on the MMSE (-0.89%), clock-drawing test (-2.61%), MDRS (-1.72%), and especially phonemic (-13.28%) and sematic verbal fluency tests (-12.40%) at one year after surgery. Delayed recall on the RAVLT worsened one year after the procedure (-10.12%). At 5 years, impairment affected mainly verbal fluency; scores decreased an additional 16.10% and 16.60% in semantic and phonemic verbal fluency, respectively. Moderate decreases were observed in immediate recall (-16.87%), WAIS-III-LN (-16.67%), and JLO test (-11.56%). DISCUSSION: In our sample, DBS-SN did not result in global cognitive impairment 5 years after surgery. Verbal function was found to be significantly impaired one year after the procedure. Impaired learning and visuospatial function may be attributed to degeneration associated with PD.

2 Article Motor and non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease and their impact on quality of life and on different clinical subgroups. 2016

Berganzo, K / Tijero, B / González-Eizaguirre, A / Somme, J / Lezcano, E / Gabilondo, I / Fernandez, M / Zarranz, J J / Gómez-Esteban, J C. ·Grupo Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas, Unidad de trastornos del movimiento y disautonomía, BioCruces Health Research Institute, Barakaldo, Bizkaia, España. Electronic address: koldo_ber@hotmail.com. · Grupo Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas, Unidad de trastornos del movimiento y disautonomía, BioCruces Health Research Institute, Barakaldo, Bizkaia, España. · Servicio de Neurología, Hospital Universitario Álava, Vitoria-Gasteiz, España. ·Neurologia · Pubmed #25529173.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The aim of the present study is to analyse the influence that motor and non-motor symptoms have on the quality of life (QoL) of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), and to study the relationship between the two types of symptoms. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This cross-sectional study included 103 patients with PD (55 men and 48 women). Quality of life was measured on the PDQ-39 scale. The UPDRS scale (I-IV) was also used, and different items were grouped to analyse the presence of tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, and axial symptoms. The non-motor symptoms scale (NMSS) was administered to assess non-motor symptoms. We performed correlation analyses between different scales to analyse the influence of motor and non-motor symptoms on QoL. RESULTS: Correlations were observed between the PDQ-39 summary index (PDQ39_SI) and the NMSS (correlation coefficient [cc], 0.56; p<.001), UPDRS III (cc, 0.44; p< .001) and UPDRS IV (cc, 0.37; p<.001) scores. The strongest correlation was between cognitive symptoms and mood. The analysis pointed to a direct relationship between the NMSS score and axial symptoms (cc, 0.384; p<.01), bradykinesia (cc, 0.299; p<.01), and to a lesser extent, rigidity (cc, 0.194; p<.05). No relationship was observed between presence of tremor and the NMSS score. CONCLUSION: Cognitive symptoms and mood exert the most influence on QoL of patients with PD. We found at least two phenotypes; one with predominantly axial symptoms, with significant involvement of non-motor symptoms, and a tremor-associated phenotype in which these symptoms are less prevalent.

3 Article Cognitive and behavioral symptoms in Parkinson's disease patients with the G2019S and R1441G mutations of the LRRK2 gene. 2015

Somme, Johanne Hatteland / Molano Salazar, Ana / Gonzalez, Amaia / Tijero, Beatriz / Berganzo, Koldo / Lezcano, Elena / Fernandez Martinez, Manuel / Zarranz, Juan Jose / Gómez-Esteban, Juan Carlos. ·Department of Neurology, Alava University Hospital, Osakidetza, Spain. Electronic address: johannehatteland.somme@osakidetza.net. · Movement Disorders and Autonomic Unit, Department of Neurology, Cruces University Hospital, Department of Neurosciences, University of the Basque Country, Spain. ·Parkinsonism Relat Disord · Pubmed #25840672.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To compare the cognitive and psychiatric status of patients with Parkinson's disease related to the G2019S and the R1441G mutations of the LRRK2 gene (LRRK2-PD) and idiopathic Parkinson's disease (iPD) patients. METHODS: We examined cognition and psychiatric symptoms in 27 patients with LRRK2-PD (12 G2019S and 15 R1441G) and 27 iPD patients. RESULTS: The groups were similar in age, education, disease duration, levodopa equivalent daily dose, and Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) II-IV; however, the LRRK2-PD showed less impairment on UPDRS-I (2.0 ± 1.7 vs. 4.2 ± 2.8, p = 0.003). The LRRK2-PD presented less frequent subjective cognitive complaints (18.5% vs. 63.0%, p = 0.002), and mild cognitive impairment or dementia (25.9% vs. 59.2%, p = 0.027). They also showed less impairment on scales for general cognition (Mattis dementia rating scale 131.2 ± 10.9 vs. 119 ± 24.0, p = 0.022), episodic verbal memory (Rey's auditory verbal learning test, immediate recall 39.2 ± 9.5 vs. 27.6 ± 12.8 p < 0.001, delayed recall 7.2 ± 3.7 vs. 4.7 ± 4.0 p = 0.022), and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (9.7 ± 9.2 vs. 20.5 ± 14.3, p = 0.004, significant differences for apathy and hallucinations). The LRRK2-PD subjects were less frequently treated with antipsychotic medication (0% vs. 25.9%, p = 0.010). There were no significant differences between G2019S and R1441G mutation carriers. CONCLUSIONS: Mutations of the LRRK2 gene might cause PD associated with less cognitive and neuropsychiatric impairment as compared to iPD.

4 Article Autonomic dysfunction in parkinsonian LRRK2 mutation carriers. 2013

Tijero, Beatriz / Gómez Esteban, Juan Carlos / Somme, Johanne / Llorens, Verónica / Lezcano, Elena / Martinez, Ana / Rodríguez, Trinidad / Berganzo, Koldo / Zarranz, Juan José. ·Movement Disorders and Autonomic Unit, Neurology Service, Cruces University Hospital, Basque Health Service (Osakidetza), Department of Neurosciences, University of the Basque Country, Spain. beatriz_tijero@hotmail.com ·Parkinsonism Relat Disord · Pubmed #23764467.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to compare autonomic function in PD symptomatic carriers of the LRRK2 mutations and idiopathic Parkinson's disease (iPD) patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We studied 25 PD patients: 12 with the LRRK2 mutation (6 G2019S and 6 R1441G), and 13 with iPD. All patients underwent blood pressure and heart rate monitoring during head up tilt, Valsalva maneuver and deep breathing, along with recording of sympathetic skin response (SSR) and cardiac MIBG scintigraphy. RESULTS: Three of the patients with iPD and one of the LRRK2 carriers had orthostatic hypotension. Arterial pressure "overshoot" during phase IV of Valsalva maneuver was less pronounced in patients with iPD. During passive tilt, LRRK2 carries had higher increase of blood pressure than iPD patients MIBG late myocardial/mediastinal uptake ratios were higher in LRRK2 mutation carriers (1.51 ± 0.28 vs 1.32 ± 0.25; p < 0.05). DISCUSSION: Carriers of the LRRK2 mutation had less autonomic impairment than those with iPD as shown by higher cardiac MIBG uptake and a tendency to less impairment of autonomic non-invasive tests. It is important to carry out larger studies comparing the clinical, functional and pathological characteristics of these patients.

5 Article Nocturnal hypertension and dysautonomia in patients with Parkinson's disease: are they related? 2013

Berganzo, Koldo / Díez-Arrola, Begoña / Tijero, Beatriz / Somme, Johanne / Lezcano, Elena / Llorens, Verónica / Ugarriza, Iratxe / Ciordia, Roberto / Gómez-Esteban, J C / Zarranz, Juan J. ·Autonomic and Movement Disorders Unit, Neurology Service, Basque Health Service (Osakidetza), Cruces University Hospital, Plaza de Cruces s/n, Barakaldo 48903, Spain. koldo.berganzocorrales@osakidetza.net ·J Neurol · Pubmed #23412356.

ABSTRACT: Orthostatic hypotension and supine hypertension frequently coexist in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, leading to visceral damage and increased mortality rates. The aim of this paper is to analyze the frequency and association of both conditions in a sample of outpatients with PD. A total of 111 patients, diagnosed with PD, were studied. Disease duration, treatment, cardiovascular risk factors, UPDRS I-IV and Scopa Aut scale scores were reported. Subjects underwent 24-h ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring and were assessed for orthostatic hypotension. We compared our results with those published in 17,219 patients using the same protocol and the same type of device. Overall, 71.1 % had no proper circadian rhythm. This frequency was significantly higher than that of the control population (48 %). The prevalence of the nondipper or riser patterns was higher in patients with orthostatic hypotension (77.8 vs. 66.7 %). There was a correlation between nightly increases in diastolic blood pressure and changes in BP during the orthostatic test. Patients taking higher doses of treatment had less decreases in SBP (cc:-0.25; p = 0.007) and DBP (cc:-0.33; p < 0.001) at night, however there was no relation with drug type. The majority of patients with Parkinson's disease show an altered circadian rhythm of blood pressure. Patients with a non-dipper or riser pattern on 24 h ABPM exhibited a higher prevalence of autonomic disorders (orthostatic hypotension) and received higher doses of dopaminergic treatment. A day-night variation in diastolic blood pressure was the most important marker of these findings.

6 Article Cerebrospinal fluid Aβ levels correlate with structural brain changes in Parkinson's disease. 2013

Beyer, Mona K / Alves, Guido / Hwang, Kristy S / Babakchanian, Sona / Bronnick, Kolbjorn S / Chou, Yi-Yu / Dalaker, Turi O / Kurz, Martin W / Larsen, Jan P / Somme, Johanne H / Thompson, Paul M / Tysnes, Ole-Bjørn / Apostolova, Liana G. ·The Norwegian Center for Movement Disorders, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway. mona.beyer@lyse.net ·Mov Disord · Pubmed #23408705.

ABSTRACT: ParkWest is a large Norwegian multicenter study of newly diagnosed drug-naïve subjects with Parkinson's disease (PD). Cognitively normal PD subjects (PDCN) and PD subjects with mild cognitive impairment (PDMCI) from this cohort have significant hippocampal atrophy and ventricular enlargement, compared to normal controls. Here, we aimed to investigate whether the same structural changes are associated with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of amyloid beta (Aβ)38 , Aβ40 , Aβ42 , total tau (t-tau), and phosphorylated tau (p-tau). We performed three-dimensional radial distance analyses of the hippocampi and lateral ventricles using the MRI data from ParkWest subjects who provided CSF at baseline. Our sample consisted of 73 PDCN and 18 PDMCI subjects. We found significant associations between levels of all three CSF Aβ analytes and t-tau and lateral ventricular enlargement in the pooled sample. In the PDCN sample, all three amyloid analytes showed significant associations with the radial distance of the occipital and frontal horns of the lateral ventricles. CSF Aβ38 and Aβ42 showed negative associations, with enlargement in occipital and frontal horns of the lateral ventricles in the pooled sample, and a negative association with the occipital horns in PDMCI. CSF Aβ levels in early PD correlate with ventricular enlargement, previously associated with PD dementia. Therefore, CSF and MRI markers may help identify PD patients at high risk for developing cognitive decline and dementia in the course of their illness. Contrary to Alzheimer's disease, we found no associations between CSF t-tau and p-tau and hippocampal atrophy.

7 Article The applause sign and neuropsychological profile in progressive supranuclear palsy and Parkinson's disease. 2013

Somme, Johanne / Gómez-Esteban, Juan Carlos / Tijero, Beatriz / Berganzo, Koldo / Lezcano, Elena / Zarranz, Juan Jose. ·Movement Disorders Unit, Department of Neurology, Cruces University Hospital, University of the Basque Country, Baracaldo, Spain. johannehatteland.somme@osakidetza.net ·Clin Neurol Neurosurg · Pubmed #23253819.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The applause sign has been associated with various neurodegenerative diseases. We investigate its validity in the differential diagnosis of progressive supranuclear palsy and Parkinson's disease, and its relationship with neuropsychological tests. PATIENTS AND METHODS: 23 patients with progressive supranuclear palsy and 106 patients with Parkinson's disease were included and administered the following scales: progressive supranuclear palsy rating scale, unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS), mini-mental state examination (MMSE), frontal assessment battery (FAB), neuropsychiatric inventory and three-clap test. RESULTS: 73.9% with progressive supranuclear palsy and 21.7% with Parkinson's disease showed a positive applause sign. Only a positive applause sign, UPDRS II score and disease duration were found to be predictors of progressive supranuclear palsy. Both patient-groups showed statistically significant correlations between the applause sign and neuropsychological tests: in progressive supranuclear palsy patients MMSE correlation coefficient: 0.62 (p: 0.002) and FAB correlation coefficient: 0.48 (p: 0.02), and in Parkinson's disease patients MMSE correlation coefficient: 0.47 (p<0.001) and FAB correlation coefficient: 0.43 (p<0.001). Verbal fluency and inhibitory control (FAB) and writing and orientation in time (MMSE) discriminated between patients with normal and positive applause sign. CONCLUSIONS: A positive applause sign is not specific to progressive supranuclear palsy and may also be observed in Parkinson's disease patients with altered cognition, and it's related to cortical frontal abnormalities such as language disorders and inhibitory control.

8 Article Verbal memory is associated with structural hippocampal changes in newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease. 2013

Beyer, Mona K / Bronnick, Kolbjorn S / Hwang, Kristy S / Bergsland, Niels / Tysnes, Ole Bjorn / Larsen, Jan Petter / Thompson, Paul M / Somme, Johanne H / Apostolova, Liana G. ·Norwegian Centre for Movement Disorders, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway. monbey@ous-hf.no ·J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry · Pubmed #23154124.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Cognitive impairment, including impairment of episodic memory, is frequently found in newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease (PD). In this longitudinal observational study we investigated whether performance in memory encoding, retention, recognition and free recall is associated with reduced hippocampal radial distance. METHODS: We analysed baseline T1-weighted brain MRI data from 114 PD subjects without cognitive impairment, 29 PD subjects with mild cognitive impairment and 99 normal controls from the ParkWest study. Age- and education-predicted scores for the California Verbal Learning Test 2 (CVLT-2) and tests of executive function were regressed against hippocampal radial distance while adjusting for imaging centre. RESULTS: There was no association between encoding or performance on executive tests and hippocampal atrophy in the PD group. In the full PD sample we found bilaterally significant associations between lower delayed free recall scores and hippocampal atrophy in the CA1, CA3 and subiculum area (left, p=0.0013; right, p=0.0082). CVLT-2 short delay free recall scores were associated with bilateral hippocampal CA1 and subicular atrophy in the full PD sample (left, p=0.013; right, p=0.047). CVLT-2 recognition scores showed a significant association with right-sided subicular and CA1 atrophy in the full PD sample (p=0.043). CONCLUSIONS: At the time of PD diagnosis, subjects' verbal memory performance in recall and recognition are associated with atrophy of the hippocampus, while encoding is not associated with hippocampal radial distance. We postulate that impaired recall and recognition might reflect deficient memory consolidation at least partly due to structural hippocampal changes.

9 Article Cardiac sympathetic denervation in symptomatic and asymptomatic carriers of the E46K mutation in the α synuclein gene. 2013

Tijero, Beatriz / Gómez-Esteban, Juan Carlos / Lezcano, Elena / Fernández-González, Carmen / Somme, Johanne / Llorens, Verónica / Martínez, Ana / Ruiz-Martínez, Javier / Foncea, Nerea / Escalza, Inés / Berganzo, Koldo / Aniel-Quiroga, M A / Ruiz, Verónica / Terán, Nuria / Kaufmann, Horacio / Zarranz, Juan Jose. ·Movement Disorders and Autonomic Unit, Neurology Service, Cruces University Hospital, Basque Health Service, Department of Neurosciences, University of the Basque Country, Spain. beatriz_tijero@hotmail.com ·Parkinsonism Relat Disord · Pubmed #23000061.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyze autonomic function and cardiac sympathetic innervation in symptomatic and asymptomatic carriers of the E46K alpha-synuclein gene (SNCA) mutation. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Autonomic function tests were performed in six patients, four of whom were symptomatic carriers (ages: 46, 59, 52 and 28-years) and two who were asymptomatic carriers (ages: 52 and 29 years). Autopsy studies were performed on an additional two symptomatic carriers not eligible for autonomic testing. Patients completed the SCOPA autonomic questionnaire, and underwent the head-up tilt test accompanied by measurements of plasma norepinephrine. Valsalva maneuver and deep breathing tests, along with recording of sympathetic skin response (SSR) and cardiac MIBG scintigraphy were carried out. Myocardial tissue sections removed from the two autopsied cases were subjected to routine histological staining and immunohistochemical processing with monoclonal antibodies against tyrosine hydroxylase and alpha-synuclein. RESULTS: Both the four symptomatic and the older asymptomatic carriers reported abnormalities in the SCOPA questionnaire and had markedly diminished cardiac MIBG uptake. Plasma norepinephrine in the supine and tilted positions was normal in all subjects. Only one patient had significant orthostatic hypotension. There was a complete absence of tyrosine hydroxylase immunostaining in the myocardium of the two autopsied cases. INTERPRETATION: We have found imaging and histological evidence of cardiac sympathetic denervation in symptomatic and asymptomatic carriers of the E46K alpha-synuclein gene mutation. The sympathetic denervation appears to be organ-specific, with selective affectation of the heart given that plasma norepinephrine levels and blood pressure were normal.

10 Article SCOPA-AUT scale in different parkinsonisms and its correlation with (123) I-MIBG cardiac scintigraphy. 2012

Berganzo, Koldo / Tijero, Beatriz / Somme, Johanne H / Llorens, Verónica / Sánchez-Manso, Juan C / Low, David / Iodice, Valeria / Vichayanrat, Ekawat / Mathias, Christopher J / Lezcano, Elena / Zarranz, Juan J / Gómez-Esteban, Juan C. ·Service of Neurology, Hospital of Cruces, Plaza de Cruces S/N, 48903 Bilbao, Spain. Koldo_ber@hotmail.com ·Parkinsonism Relat Disord · Pubmed #21908227.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Our objective was to assess the usefulness of the Scales for Outcomes in Parkinson's disease - Autonomic (SCOPA-AUT) in the differential diagnosis of Parkinsonisms and clarify its relation with 123-I-MIBG cardiac scintigraphy. METHODS: A total of 112 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), 12 with multiple system atrophy parkinsonian variant (MSA-P) and 20 with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) participated in the study. The following variables were collected: age, sex, age at onset, length of illness, type and dose of anti-Parkinson medication, and score on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale. The Unified Multiple System Atrophy Rating Scale was administered to patients with MSA and the Progressive Supranuclear Palsy Rating Scale to those with PSP. Finally, the SCOPA-AUT was administered to all the patients. Cardiac 123I-MIBG SPECT scans were performed on a subset of patients (25 with PD and 5 with MSA-P). RESULTS: Statistically significant differences were observed (p < 0.01) in the SCOPA-AUT scores between patients with PD (14.75+/-8.09) and those with MSA (21.07+/-5.56), the latter having higher scores on the bowel function (20.07+/-13.40 vs 34.92+/-14.91) and urinary domains (30.21+/-21.55 vs 49.26+/-21.40) (p < 0.01). No correlation was found between the SCOPA-AUT score and anti-Parkinson's medication and heart:mediastinum (H/M) MIBG uptake ratio in the cardiac SPECT (at 4 h). DISCUSSION: Severity of dysautonomia as measured by the SCOPA-AUT was not correlated with clinical severity, time since onset or the H/M ratio. In the patients with PD, the only variable associated with the H/M ratio was age at onset of the disease.

11 Article Initial neuropsychological impairments in patients with the E46K mutation of the α-synuclein gene (PARK 1). 2011

Somme, Johanne H / Gomez-Esteban, Juan C / Molano, Ana / Tijero, Beatriz / Lezcano, Elena / Zarranz, Juan J. ·Department of Neurology, Hospital de Cruces, Baracaldo, Vizcaya, Spain. johanne_somme@hotmail.com ·J Neurol Sci · Pubmed #21880335.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: In 2004 we described the mutation E46K of the α-Synuclein (SNCA). These patients show Parkinson's disease with early cognitive impairment, sleep disorders and autonomic dysfunction. OBJECTIVE: The main objective is to identify early neuropsychological impairments in patients with the E46K mutation. METHODS: This is a longitudinal neuropsychological study of 4 of the 5 surviving patients with E46K mutation by semi-structured interviews and the following scales: Mattis Dementia Rating Scale (MDRS), semantic and phonemic verbal fluency tests (VFT), Benton Visual Retention Test (BVRT), Stroop Test (STROOP), Clock drawing test (CLOCK), WAIS III Letter and Number sequencing (WAIS III LN), Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT) and Benton Judgement of Line Orientation Test (BJLOT). Motor status was assessed by UPDRS III. RESULTS: Motor status: Patients 1, 2 and 3 present mild to moderate Parkinson disease of 7, 8 and 3years of evolution respectively, patient 4 is asymptomatic. Cognitive status: Patient 2 and 3 both refer cognitive decline while patient 1 presents no cognitive complaints, however they all show a progressive cognitive decline across various tasks. Tests of frontal function showed the first alterations in all patients but fluctuate. The first cognitive complaints coincide with deterioration of tasks of posterior cortical basis. Patient 4 presents a normal performance on all tests. Patient 1, 2 and 3 have all presented visual hallucinations. CONCLUSIONS: A fluctuating frontal impairment is observed at early stages. Prominent visuospatial alterations and visual hallucinations suggest that posterior cortical dysfunction might be a distinct early feature of the cognitive impairment observed in patients with this mutation.

12 Article Impact of psychiatric symptoms and sleep disorders on the quality of life of patients with Parkinson's disease. 2011

Gómez-Esteban, Juan Carlos / Tijero, Beatriz / Somme, Johanne / Ciordia, Roberto / Berganzo, Koldo / Rouco, Idoia / Bustos, Jose Luis / Valle, Maria Antonia / Lezcano, Elena / Zarranz, Juan J. ·Servicio de Neurología, Hospital de Cruces, Plz de Cruces sn, CP 48903 Baracaldo, Vizcaya, Spain. jgomeze@meditex.es ·J Neurol · Pubmed #20957384.

ABSTRACT: The objective of this study is to assess how the non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), such as depression, cognitive deterioration, neuropsychiatric and sleep disorders, affect the quality of life, and to compare them with the motor symptoms in order to determine their real impact. A cross-sectional study was designed including 99 patients (mean age 68.5 ± 9.9 years, duration of disease 8.7 ± 6.2 years). Demographic data, onset of PD, years on treatment with levodopa (LD), class of dopaminergic drug prescribed, and dosages were obtained. The following scales were used: quality of life (PDQ-39), Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS I-IV), Parkinson Disease Sleep Scale (PDSS) and daytime sleepiness (Epworth), Mini-Mental State Examination, depression (HAM-D), and the neuropsychiatric inventory (NPI-10). The PDQ-39 summary index (PDQ-39 SI) was 24.7 ± 13.2. A linear regression model including all variables showed that four independent variables accounted for 67.2% of the variance in the PDQ-39 SI (F = 33,277; p < 0.001): NPI, PDSS, UPDRS IV, and UPDRS I. When sub-items of the NPI, PDSS and UPDRS IV scales are analyzed, significant correlations (p < 0.001) are found between the PDQ-39 SI and depression, agitation, apathy, anxiety, hallucinations, delusions, incontinence of urine, morning painful posturing, restlessness in bed, morning fatigue, duration of off periods, unpredictable and predictable off periods, early morning dystonia, and sudden off periods. Neuropsychiatric symptoms, especially depression, nighttime sleep disorders such as urinary incontinence, nighttime restlessness, morning fatigue and somnolence, off-period dystonia and motor fluctuations are the variables that most affect the quality of life of patients with PD.

13 Article Factors influencing the symmetry of Parkinson's disease symptoms. 2010

Gómez-Esteban, Juan Carlos / Tijero, Beatriz / Ciordia, Roberto / Berganzo, Koldo / Somme, Johanne / Lezcano, Elena / Zarranz, Juan J. ·Movement Disorders Unit Neurology Service. Hospital de Cruces Baracaldo, Vizcaya, Spain. jgomeze@meditex.es ·Clin Neurol Neurosurg · Pubmed #20083340.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The presence of asymmetry in symptoms and clinical signs favours the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD). The aim of this study is to analyse this symptom asymmetry as a function of different variables and compare it with other parkinsonisms. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 201 Patients with PD were studied. The sample was supplemented with 29 patients diagnosed with MSA-P (according to the criteria established by the American Academy of Neurology) and 17 with PSP (according to the criteria established by the NINDS-SPSP International Workshop). The symmetry was evaluated, based on items 20-23, 25 and 26 of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, by subtracting the motor score for the left side from that for the right side. Those patients with a difference of one point or more were designated as being asymmetric. RESULTS: Around 16.4% of patients presented symmetrical clinical symptoms. There were no differences between those patients with or without family history of the disease. Those patients with symmetric symptoms were found to have longer symptomatic disease duration (10.8 vs. 7.9 years), a worse mental state (UPDRS I: 3.9 vs. 3.2), a higher incidence of complications (UPDRS IV: 4.5 vs. 3.2) and had their activities of daily living (ADL) affected to a greater degree (UPDRS II: 13.0 vs. 11.0). Around 48.3% of the MSA-P patients and 52.9% of the PSP patients showed symmetric symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: The degree of symmetry is not useful in differentiating between sporadic and familial PD. However, the observation of highly symmetrical symptoms in a patient with short evolution time indicates that an atypical parkinsonism should be suspected.

14 Minor Impulse control and repetitive behaviors in Parkinson's disease - are there differences in the relation to dopamine agonist treatment? 2014

Somme, Johanne Hatteland / Gómez-Esteban, Juan Carlos / Tijero, Beatriz / Berganzo, Koldo / Lezcano, Elena / Zarranz, Juan Jose. ·Movement Disorders Unit, Department of Neurology, Cruces University Hospital, Servicio Vasco de Salud - Osakidetza, Department of Neurosciences, University of the Basque Country, Spain; Department of Neurology, Alava University Hospital, Servicio Vasco de Salud - Osakidetza, Spain. Electronic address: johannehatteland_somme@osakidetza.net. · Movement Disorders Unit, Department of Neurology, Cruces University Hospital, Servicio Vasco de Salud - Osakidetza, Department of Neurosciences, University of the Basque Country, Spain. ·J Neurol Sci · Pubmed #25048409.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Minor Relationship between sleep and dysautonomic symptoms assessed by self-report scales. 2011

Tijero, Beatriz / Somme, Johanne / Gómez-Esteban, Juan Carlos / Berganzo, Koldo / Adhikari, Ishan / Lezcano, Elena / Bilbao, Iker / Garamendi, Iñigo / Zarranz, Juan José. · ·Mov Disord · Pubmed #21567459.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --