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Parkinson Disease: HELP
Articles by Jared J. Tanner
Based on 13 articles published since 2010
(Why 13 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Jared Tanner wrote the following 13 articles about Parkinson Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Cognitive Impairments and Self-Reported Sleep in Early-Stage Parkinson's Disease with Versus without Probable REM Sleep Behavior Disorder. 2019

Trout, Jonathan / Christiansen, Taylor / Bulkley, M Brooks / Tanner, Jared J / Sozda, Christopher N / Bowers, Dawn / Kay, Daniel B. ·Department of Psychology, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602, USA. · Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA. ·Brain Sci · Pubmed #31877713.

ABSTRACT: Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with cognitive and sleep impairments. The presence of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) symptoms may represent a worse disease prognosis for PD individuals. We investigated cognitive functioning and self-reported sleep in early-stage PD individuals with (

2 Article Structural brain correlates of fatigue in older adults with and without Parkinson's disease. 2019

Kluger, Benzi M / Zhao, Qing / Tanner, Jared J / Schwab, Nadine A / Levy, Shellie-Anne / Burke, Sarah E / Huang, Haiqing / Ding, Mingzhou / Price, Catherine. ·Neurology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA. Electronic address: benzi.kluger@ucdenver.edu. · J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. · Clinical and Health Psychology, Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration, Anesthesiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. · Clinical and Health Psychology, Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration, Anesthesiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. Electronic address: cep23@phhp.ufl.edu. ·Neuroimage Clin · Pubmed #30818269.

ABSTRACT: Fatigue is one of the most common and disabling nonmotor symptoms seen in Parkinson's disease (PD) and is also commonly seen in healthy older adults. Our understanding of the etiology of fatigue in older adults with or without PD is limited and it remains unclear whether fatigue in PD is specifically related to PD pathology. The objective of this study was thus to determine whether fatigue in PD was associated with structural changes in gray or white matter and explore whether these changes were similar in older adults without PD. Magnetic resonance imaging (T

3 Article Sleep disturbances and depression severity in patients with Parkinson's disease. 2018

Kay, Daniel B / Tanner, Jared J / Bowers, Dawn. ·Department of Psychology, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, USA. · Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. ·Brain Behav · Pubmed #30106239.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Parkinson's disease (PD) is a multisystem movement disorder associated with sleep disturbance and depression. Sleep disturbances and depression severity share a bidirectional association. This association may be greater in individuals who are more vulnerable to the deleterious consequences of sleep disturbance and depression severity. We investigated whether the association between sleep disturbances and depression severity is greater in patients with PD than in matched controls (MC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study sample (N = 98) included 50 patients with idiopathic PD and 48 age-, race-, sex-, and education-matched controls. Sleep disturbances were assessed using self-reported total sleep time (TST) on the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the sleep item on the Beck Depression Inventory, 2nd ed. (BDI-II), and the Insomnia Severity Index total score. Depression severity was assessed using the BDI-II total score, excluding the sleep item. Spearman's correlations, chi-squared tests, and multiple regression were used to assess associations between sleep disturbances and depression severity in PD and MC. Fisher's Z transformation was used to test whether the association between sleep disturbances and depression severity was stronger in patients with PD. RESULTS: Shorter TST, sleeping less than usual, and insomnia severity were associated with depression severity in the total sample, r CONCLUSION: Short TST may be an important marker, predictor, or consequence of depression severity in patients with Parkinson's disease.

4 Article Cognition and connectomes in nondementia idiopathic Parkinson's disease. 2018

Colon-Perez, Luis M / Tanner, Jared J / Couret, Michelle / Goicochea, Shelby / Mareci, Thomas H / Price, Catherine C. ·Department of Psychiatry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. · Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. · Department of Medicine, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. · Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. ·Netw Neurosci · Pubmed #29911667.

ABSTRACT: In this study, we investigate the organization of the structural connectome in cognitively well participants with Parkinson's disease (PD-Well;

5 Article Considering total intracranial volume and other nuisance variables in brain voxel based morphometry in idiopathic PD. 2018

Crowley, Samuel / Huang, Haiqing / Tanner, Jared / Zhao, Qing / Schwab, Nadine A / Hizel, Loren / Ramon, Daniel / Brumback, Babette / Ding, Mingzhou / Price, Catherine C. ·Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Florida, 1225 Center Drive, Gainesville, FL, 32611, USA. · Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, 1275 Center Drive, Gainesville, FL, 32611, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, University of Florida, 2004 Mowry Road, 5th Floor CTRB, Gainesville, FL, 32611, USA. · Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Florida, 1225 Center Drive, Gainesville, FL, 32611, USA. cep23@phhp.ufl.edu. · Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Florida, 101 S. Newell Drive, PO Box 100165, Gainesville, FL, 32610, USA. cep23@phhp.ufl.edu. ·Brain Imaging Behav · Pubmed #28070745.

ABSTRACT: Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) studies of Parkinson's disease (PD), have yielded mixed results, possibly due to several studies not accounting for common nuisance variables (age, sex, and total intracranial volume [TICV]). TICV is particularly important because there is evidence for larger TICV in PD. We explored the influence of these covariates on VBM by 1) comparing PD patients and controls before adding covariates, after adding age and sex, and after adding age, sex and TICV, and 2) by comparing controls split into large and small TICV before and after controlling for TICV, with age and sex accounted for in both analyses. Experiment 1 consisted of 40 PD participants and 40 controls. Experiment 2 consisted of 88 controls median split by TICV. All participants completed an MRI on a 3 T scanner. TICV was calculated as gray + white + CSF from Freesurfer. VBM was performed on T1 images using an optimized VBM protocol. Volume differences were assessed using a voxel-wise GLM analysis. Clusters were considered significant at >10 voxels and p < .05 corrected for familywise error. Before controlling for covariates, PD showed reduced GM in temporal, occipital, and cerebellar regions. Controlling for age and sex did not affect the pattern of significance. Controlling for TICV reduced the size of the significant region although it still contained portions of bilateral temporal lobes, occipital lobes and cerebellum. The large TICV group showed reduced volume in temporal, parietal, and cerebellar areas. None of these differences survived controlling for TICV. This demonstrates that TICV influences VBM results independently from other factors. Controlling for TICV in VBM studies is recommended.

6 Article Striatal and Hippocampal Atrophy in Idiopathic Parkinson's Disease Patients without Dementia: A Morphometric Analysis. 2017

Tanner, Jared J / McFarland, Nikolaus R / Price, Catherine C. ·Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. · Neurology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. · Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. ·Front Neurol · Pubmed #28450849.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Analyses of subcortical gray structure volumes in non-demented idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) often, but not always, show volume loss of the putamen, caudate nucleus, nucleus accumbens, and hippocampus. There is building evidence that structure morphometry might be more sensitive to disease-related processes than volume. OBJECTIVE: To assess morphometric differences of subcortical structures (putamen, caudate nucleus, thalamus, globus pallidus, nucleus accumbens, and amygdala) as well as the hippocampus in non-demented individuals with PD relative to age and education matched non-PD peers. METHODS: Prospective recruitment of idiopathic no-dementia PD and non-PD peers as part of a federally funded investigation. T1-weighted isovoxel metrics acquired RESULTS: Group volume differences were observed only for putamen and hippocampi (PD < non-PD) with hippocampal volume significantly associating with disease duration. Group shape differences were observed for bilateral putamen, caudate nucleus, and hippocampus with greater striatal atrophy contralateral to side of motor symptom onset. Hippocampal shape differences disappeared when removing the effects of volume. CONCLUSION: The putamen was the primary structure to show both volume and shape differences in PD, indicating that the putamen is the predominant site of basal ganglia atrophy in early- to mid-stage PD. Side of PD symptom onset associates with contralateral striatal atrophy. Left-onset PD might experience more extensive striatal atrophy than right-onset PD. Hippocampus morphometric results suggest possible primary atrophy of CA3/4 and dentate gyrus.

7 Article Are Parkinson's Patients More Vulnerable to the Effects of Cardiovascular Risk: A Neuroimaging and Neuropsychological Study. 2017

Jones, Jacob D / Tanner, Jared J / Okun, Michael / Price, Catherine C / Bowers, Dawn. ·1Department of Clinical and Health Psychology,McKnight Brain Institute,University of Florida,Gainesville,Florida. · 2Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration,McKnight Brain Institute,University of Florida,Gainesville,Florida. ·J Int Neuropsychol Soc · Pubmed #28162137.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: This study examined whether individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) are at increased vulnerability for vascular-related cognitive impairment relative to controls. The underlying assumption behind this hypothesis relates to brain reserve and that both PD and vascular risk factors impair similar fronto-executive cognitive systems. METHODS: The sample included 67 PD patients and 61 older controls (total N=128). Participants completed neuropsychological measures of executive functioning, processing speed, verbal delayed recall/memory, language, and auditory attention. Cardiovascular risk was assessed with the Framingham Cardiovascular Risk index. Participants underwent brain imaging (T1 and T2 FLAIR). Trained raters measured total and regional leukoaraiosis (periventricular, deep subcortical, and infracortical). RESULTS: Hierarchical regressions revealed that more severe cardiovascular risk was related to worse executive functioning, processing speed, and delayed verbal recall in both Parkinson patients and controls. More severe cardiovascular risk was related to worse language functioning in the PD group, but not controls. In contrast, leukoaraiosis related to both cardiovascular risk and executive functioning for controls, but not the PD group. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, results revealed that PD and cardiovascular risk factors are independent risk factors for cognitive impairment. Generally, the influence of cardiovascular risk factors on cognition is similar in PD patients and controls. (JINS, 2017, 23, 322-331).

8 Article Marked brain asymmetry with intact cognitive functioning in idiopathic Parkinson's disease: a longitudinal analysis. 2017

Tanner, Jared J / Levy, Shellie-Anne / Schwab, Nadine A / Hizel, Loren P / Nguyen, Peter T / Okun, Michael S / Price, Catherine C. ·a Department of Clinical and Health Psychology , University of Florida , Gainesville , FL , USA. · b Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration , University of Florida , Gainesville , FL , USA. ·Clin Neuropsychol · Pubmed #27813459.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: A 71-year-old (MN) with an 11-year history of left onset tremor diagnosed as Parkinson's disease (PD) completed longitudinal brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neuropsychological testing. MRI scans showed an asymmetric caudate nucleus (right < left volume). We describe this asymmetry at baseline and the progression over time relative to other subcortical gray, frontal white matter, and cortical gray matter regions of interest. Isolated structural changes are compared to MN's cognitive profiles. METHOD: MN completed yearly MRIs and neuropsychological assessments. For comparison, left onset PD (n = 15) and non-PD (n = 43) peers completed the same baseline protocol. All MRI scans were processed with FreeSurfer and the FMRIB Software Library to analyze gray matter structures and frontal fractional anisotropy (FA) metrics. Processing speed, working memory, language, verbal memory, abstract reasoning, visuospatial, and motor functions were examined using reliable change methods. RESULTS: At baseline, MN had striatal volume and frontal lobe thickness asymmetry relative to peers with mild prefrontal white matter FA asymmetry. Over time only MN's right caudate nucleus showed accelerated atrophy. Cognitively, MN had slowed psychomotor speed and visuospatial-linked deficits with mild visuospatial working memory declines longitudinally. CONCLUSIONS: This is a unique report using normative neuroimaging and neuropsychology to describe an individual diagnosed with PD who had striking striatal asymmetry followed secondarily by cortical thickness asymmetry and possible frontal white matter asymmetry. His decline and variability in visual working memory could be linked to ongoing atrophy of his right caudate nucleus.

9 Article Gray and White Matter Contributions to Cognitive Frontostriatal Deficits in Non-Demented Parkinson's Disease. 2016

Price, Catherine C / Tanner, Jared / Nguyen, Peter T / Schwab, Nadine A / Mitchell, Sandra / Slonena, Elizabeth / Brumback, Babette / Okun, Michael S / Mareci, Thomas H / Bowers, Dawn. ·Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America. · University of Florida Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America. · Department of Biostatistics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America. · Department of Neurology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America. · Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #26784744.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This prospective investigation examined: 1) processing speed and working memory relative to other cognitive domains in non-demented medically managed idiopathic Parkinson's disease, and 2) the predictive role of cortical/subcortical gray thickness/volume and white matter fractional anisotropy on processing speed and working memory. METHODS: Participants completed a neuropsychological protocol, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, brain MRI, and fasting blood draw to rule out vascular contributors. Within group a priori anatomical contributors included bilateral frontal thickness, caudate nuclei volume, and prefrontal white matter fractional anisotropy. RESULTS: Idiopathic Parkinson's disease (n = 40; Hoehn & Yahr stages 1-3) and non-Parkinson's disease 'control' peers (n = 40) matched on demographics, general cognition, comorbidity, and imaging/blood vascular metrics. Cognitively, individuals with Parkinson's disease were significantly more impaired than controls on tests of processing speed, secondary deficits on working memory, with subtle impairments in memory, abstract reasoning, and visuoperceptual/spatial abilities. Anatomically, Parkinson's disease individuals were not statistically different in cortical gray thickness or subcortical gray volumes with the exception of the putamen. Tract Based Spatial Statistics showed reduced prefrontal fractional anisotropy for Parkinson's disease relative to controls. Within Parkinson's disease, prefrontal fractional anisotropy and caudate nucleus volume partially explained processing speed. For controls, only prefrontal white matter was a significant contributor to processing speed. There were no significant anatomical predictors of working memory for either group. CONCLUSIONS: Caudate nuclei volume and prefrontal fractional anisotropy, not frontal gray matter thickness, showed unique and combined significance for processing speed in Parkinson's disease. Findings underscore the relevance for examining gray-white matter interactions and also highlight clinical processing speed metrics as potential indicators of early cognitive impairment in PD.

10 Article Orthopedic Surgery and Post-Operative Cognitive Decline in Idiopathic Parkinson's Disease: Considerations from a Pilot Study. 2015

Price, Catherine C / Levy, Shellie-Anne / Tanner, Jared / Garvan, Cyndi / Ward, Jade / Akbar, Farheen / Bowers, Dawn / Rice, Mark / Okun, Michael. ·Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Florida, FL, USA. · Anesthesiology, University of Florida, FL, USA. · Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration, University of Florida, FL, USA. · College of Nursing, University of Florida, FL, USA. · Neurology, University of Florida, FL, USA. · Anesthesiology, Vanderbilt University, TN, USA. ·J Parkinsons Dis · Pubmed #26683785.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Post-operative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) demarks cognitive decline after major surgery but has been studied to date in "healthy" adults. Although individuals with neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD) commonly undergo elective surgery, these individuals have yet to be prospectively followed despite hypotheses of increased POCD risk. OBJECTIVE: To conduct a pilot study examining cognitive change pre-post elective orthopedic surgery for PD relative to surgery and non-surgery peers. METHODS: A prospective one-year longitudinal design. No-dementia idiopathic PD individuals were actively recruited along with non-PD "healthy" controls (HC) undergoing knee replacement surgery. Non-surgical PD and HC controls were also recruited. Attention/processing speed, inhibitory function, memory recall, animal (semantic) fluency, and motor speed were assessed at baseline (pre-surgery), 3 weeks, 3 months, and 1 year post- orthopedic surgery. Reliable change methods examined individual changes for PD individuals relative to control surgery and control non-surgery peers. RESULTS: Over two years we screened 152 older adult surgery or non-surgery candidates with 19 of these individuals having a diagnosis of PD. Final participants included 8 PD (5 surgery, 3 non-surgery), 47 Control Surgery, and 21 Control Non-Surgery. Eighty percent (4 of the 5) PD surgery declined greater than 1.645 standard deviations from their baseline performance on measures assessing processing speed and inhibitory function. This was not observed for the non-surgery PD individuals. CONCLUSION: This prospective pilot study demonstrated rationale and feasibility for examining cognitive decline in at-risk neurodegenerative populations. We discuss recruitment and design challenges for examining post-operative cognitive decline in neurodegenerative samples.

11 Article Temporal Lobe and Frontal-Subcortical Dissociations in Non-Demented Parkinson's Disease with Verbal Memory Impairment. 2015

Tanner, Jared J / Mareci, Thomas H / Okun, Michael S / Bowers, Dawn / Libon, David J / Price, Catherine C. ·Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America. · Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America. · Department of Neurology, UF Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America. · Drexel Neuroscience Institute, Drexel University, College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States of America. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #26208170.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The current investigation examined verbal memory in idiopathic non-dementia Parkinson's disease and the significance of the left entorhinal cortex and left entorhinal-retrosplenial region connections (via temporal cingulum) on memory impairment in Parkinson's disease. METHODS: Forty non-demented Parkinson's disease patients and forty non-Parkinson's disease controls completed two verbal memory tests--a wordlist measure (Philadelphia repeatable Verbal Memory Test) and a story measure (Logical Memory). All participants received T1-weighted and diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (3T; Siemens) sequences. Left entorhinal volume and left entorhinal-retrosplenial connectivity (temporal cingulum edge weight) were the primary imaging variables of interest with frontal lobe thickness and subcortical structure volumes as dissociating variables. RESULTS: Individuals with Parkinson's disease showed worse verbal memory, smaller entorhinal volumes, but did not differ in entorhinal-retrosplenial connectivity. For Parkinson's disease entorhinal-retrosplenial edge weight had the strongest associations with verbal memory. A subset of Parkinson's disease patients (23%) had deficits (z-scores < -1.5) across both memory measures. Relative to non-impaired Parkinson's peers, this memory-impaired group had smaller entorhinal volumes. DISCUSSION: Although entorhinal cortex volume was significantly reduced in Parkinson's disease patients relative to non-Parkinson's peers, only white matter connections associated with the entorhinal cortex were significantly associated with verbal memory performance in our sample. There was also no suggestion of contribution from frontal-subcortical gray or frontal white matter regions. These findings argue for additional investigation into medial temporal lobe gray and white matter connectivity for understanding memory in Parkinson's disease.

12 Article Proof of principle: Transformation approach alters caudate nucleus volume and structure-function associations. 2015

Schwab, Nadine A / Tanner, Jared J / Nguyen, Peter T / Schmalfuss, Ilona M / Bowers, Dawn / Okun, Michael / Price, Catherine C. ·Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Florida, 1225 Center Drive, Gainesville, FL, 32611, USA. · Department of Radiology, North Florida/South Georgia Veteran Administration, University of Florida, 1601 SW Archer Rd., Gainesville, FL, 32608, USA. · Department of Neurology, Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration, University of Florida, 3450 Hull Rd., Gainesville, FL, 32607, USA. · Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Florida, 1225 Center Drive, Gainesville, FL, 32611, USA. cep23@phhp.ufl.edu. · Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Florida, 101 S. Newell Drive, PO Box 100165, Gainesville, FL, 32610, USA. cep23@phhp.ufl.edu. ·Brain Imaging Behav · Pubmed #25413122.

ABSTRACT: Brain magnetic resonance image (MRI) registration alters structure orientation, size, and/or shape. To determine whether linear registration methods (image transformation to 6, 9, and 12° of freedom) alter structural volume and cognitive associations, we examined transformation alterations to the caudate nucleus within individuals diagnosed with Parkinson's disease (PD) and demographically matched non-PD peers. Volumes from native and six were expected be significantly different from 9 and 12° of freedom methods. Caudate nucleus volumes were expected to be associated with measures of processing speed and mental flexibility, but the strength of the association based on transformation approach was unknown. MRI brain scans from individuals with Parkinson's disease (n = 40) and age-matched controls (n = 40) were transformed using 6, 9, and 12° of freedom to an average brain template. Correlations controlling for total intracranial volume assessed expected structural-behavioral associations. Volumetric: Raw 9 and 12° transformed volumes were significantly larger than native and 6° volumes. Only 9 and 12° volumes revealed group differences with PD less than controls. Intracranial volume considerations were essential for native and 6° between group comparisons. Structural-Behavioral: The 9 and 12° caudate nucleus volume transformations revealed the expected brain-behavioral associations. Linear registration techniques alter volumetric and cognitive-structure associations. The study highlights the need to communicate transformation approach and group intracranial volume considerations.

13 Article Lateral ventricle volume is poor predictor of post unilateral DBS motor change for Parkinson's disease. 2011

Price, Catherine C / Favilla, Christopher / Tanner, Jared J / Towler, Stephen / Jacobson, Charles E / Hass, Chris J / Foote, Kelly D / Okun, Michael S. ·Department of Clinical & Health Psychology, University of Florida, 101 S. Newell Drive, PO Box 100165, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA. cep23@phhp.ufl.edu ·Parkinsonism Relat Disord · Pubmed #21345713.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) surgery can effectively treat many debilitating motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), but axial symptom improvement is variable. Predictors for post-DBS axial symptom performance have yet to be identified. Pre-surgery ventricle volume may be one predictor, for increasing ventricular size has been associated with worsening gait disturbance. In PD, ventricle size may also increase with the advancement of motor symptoms. OBJECTIVE: To examine the hypotheses that 1) lateral ventricular volumes would predict motor and axial motor symptom change from pre to four months post unilateral DBS, and 2) PD patients have larger ventricle volumes contralateral to side of symptom onset. METHODS: Idiopathic PD patients (n = 37) completed pre-surgery volumetric brain scans and UPDRS motor testing (off-medication), unilateral DBS (Globus Pallidus interna, n = 11; subthalamic nucleus, n = 26), and 4-month follow-up motor assessments (on-stimulation). Ventricle volumes were normalized using total intracranial volume. RESULTS: Total ventricular volume as well as measurements of contralateral/ipsilateral volumes to side of symptom onset or DBS lead placement did not predict outcome motor measures or correlate to axial motor change. Patients improving at least 2 standard errors of measurement (n = 6) did not have smaller ventricles relative to those without significant change. Post-operative hemorrhage (n = 1) had ventricle volumes similar to the group average. There was no asymmetry in ventricular volume by side of onset or side of lead placement. CONCLUSION: Ventricular volume was a poor predictor of acute motor change following DBS. Asymmetrical ventricles may not be a consistent imaging marker for PD motor dysfunction.