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Parkinson Disease: HELP
Articles by Carme Uribe
Based on 11 articles published since 2010
(Why 11 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, C. Uribe wrote the following 11 articles about Parkinson Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Disruption of posterior brain functional connectivity and its relation to cognitive impairment in idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder. 2020

Campabadal, A / Abos, A / Segura, B / Serradell, M / Uribe, C / Baggio, H C / Gaig, C / Santamaria, J / Compta, Y / Bargallo, N / Junque, C / Iranzo, A. ·Medical Psychology Unit, Department of Medicine. Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona. Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. · Medical Psychology Unit, Department of Medicine. Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona. Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED:CB06/05/0018-ISCIII) Barcelona, Spain; Institute of Biomedical Research August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS). Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. · Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED:CB06/05/0018-ISCIII) Barcelona, Spain; Institute of Biomedical Research August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS). Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.; Multidisciplinary Sleep Unit, Neurology Service, Hospital Clínic, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. · Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED:CB06/05/0018-ISCIII) Barcelona, Spain; Institute of Biomedical Research August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS). Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.; Parkinson's disease & Movement Disorders Unit, Neurology Service, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona. Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. · Centre de Diagnòstic per la Imatge, Hospital Clínic, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. · Medical Psychology Unit, Department of Medicine. Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona. Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED:CB06/05/0018-ISCIII) Barcelona, Spain; Institute of Biomedical Research August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS). Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.. Electronic address: cjunque@ub.edu. ·Neuroimage Clin · Pubmed #31911344.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Resting-state functional MRI has been proposed as a new biomarker of prodromal neurodegenerative disorders, but it has been poorly investigated in the idiopathic form of rapid-eye-movement sleep behavior disorder (IRBD), a clinical harbinger of subsequent synucleinopathy. Particularly, a complex-network approach has not been tested to study brain functional connectivity in IRBD patients. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the current work is to characterize resting-state functional connectivity in IRBD patients using a complex-network approach and to determine its possible relation to cognitive impairment. METHOD: Twenty patients with IRBD and 27 matched healthy controls (HC) underwent resting-state functional MRI with a 3T scanner and a comprehensive neuropsychological battery. The functional connectome was studied using threshold-free network-based statistics. Global and local network parameters were calculated based on graph theory and compared between groups. Head motion, age and sex were introduced as covariates in all analyses. RESULTS: IRBD patients showed reduced cortico-cortical functional connectivity strength in comparison with HC in edges located in posterior regions (p <0.05, FWE corrected). This regional pattern was also shown in an independent analysis comprising posterior areas where a decreased connectivity in 51 edges was found, whereas no significant results were detected when an anterior network was considered (p <0.05, FWE corrected). In the posterior network, the left superior parietal lobule had reduced centrality in IRBD. Functional connectivity strength between left inferior temporal lobe and right superior parietal lobule positively correlated with mental processing speed in IRBD (r = .633; p = .003). No significant correlations were found in the HC group. CONCLUSION: Our findings support the presence of disrupted posterior functional brain connectivity of IRBD patients similar to that found in synucleinopathies. Moreover, connectivity reductions in IRBD were associated with lower performance in mental processing speed domain.

2 Article Progression of Parkinson's disease patients' subtypes based on cortical thinning: 4-year follow-up. 2019

Uribe, Carme / Segura, Barbara / Baggio, Hugo Cesar / Abos, Alexandra / Garcia-Diaz, Anna Isabel / Campabadal, Anna / Marti, Maria Jose / Valldeoriola, Francesc / Compta, Yaroslau / Bargallo, Nuria / Junque, Carme. ·Medical Psychology Unit, Department of Medicine. Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: carme.uribe@ub.edu. · Medical Psychology Unit, Department of Medicine. Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red Sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: bsegura@ub.edu. · Medical Psychology Unit, Department of Medicine. Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: hbaggio@ub.edu. · Medical Psychology Unit, Department of Medicine. Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: alexandraabos@ub.edu. · Medical Psychology Unit, Department of Medicine. Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: ai.garciadiaz@ub.edu. · Medical Psychology Unit, Department of Medicine. Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: anna.campabadal@ub.edu. · Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red Sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Movement Disorders Unit, Neurology Service, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona. Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Institute of Biomedical Research August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: mjmarti@clinic.cat. · Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red Sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Movement Disorders Unit, Neurology Service, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona. Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Institute of Biomedical Research August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: fvallde@clinic.cat. · Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red Sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Movement Disorders Unit, Neurology Service, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona. Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Institute of Biomedical Research August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: ycompta@clinic.cat. · Institute of Biomedical Research August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Centre de Diagnòstic per la Imatge, Hospital Clínic, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: bargallo@clinic.cat. · Medical Psychology Unit, Department of Medicine. Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red Sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Institute of Biomedical Research August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: cjunque@ub.edu. ·Parkinsonism Relat Disord · Pubmed #31103485.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Three cortical atrophy patterns were previously identified in non-demented Parkinson's disease patients using a data-driven approach based on cortical thickness data: i) parieto-temporal pattern of atrophy with worse cognitive performance (pattern 1), ii) occipital and frontal cortical atrophy with younger disease onset (pattern 2), and iii) non-detectable cortical atrophy (pattern 3). We aimed to investigate the evolution of these three patterns over time. METHODS: Magnetic resonance imaging and neuropsychological assessment were obtained at baseline and follow-up (3.8 ± 0.4 year apart) in a group of 45 Parkinson's disease patients and 22 healthy controls. FreeSurfer was used for cortical thickness analysis and global atrophy measures. RESULTS: Temporo-parietal cortical thinning occurred in pattern 2, 3 and controls groups, and patients showed decline in processing speed (as measured by the Stroop Word-Color test, the Symbol Digits Modalities test and the Trail Making Test Part B) and in semantic fluency (animals). Pattern 3 patients showed more progressive cortical thinning in the left prefrontal cortex than controls and more right occipital thinning than pattern 2 patients over time. Pattern 1 patients had greater compromise in activities of the daily living and suffered higher attrition rate. CONCLUSION: The Parkinson's disease phenotypes identified using cluster analysis of cortical thickness data showed different progression over time. The presence of prefrontal thinning and younger disease onset at baseline was associated to less cortical degeneration, while non-atrophic patients progressed showing a temporo-parietal cortical thinning.

3 Article Cerebellar resting-state functional connectivity in Parkinson's disease and multiple system atrophy: Characterization of abnormalities and potential for differential diagnosis at the single-patient level. 2019

Baggio, Hugo C / Abos, Alexandra / Segura, Barbara / Campabadal, Anna / Uribe, Carme / Giraldo, Darly M / Perez-Soriano, Alexandra / Muñoz, Esteban / Compta, Yaroslau / Junque, Carme / Marti, Maria Jose. ·Medical Psychology Unit, Department of Medicine, Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: hbaggio@ub.edu. · Medical Psychology Unit, Department of Medicine, Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: alexandraabos@ub.edu. · Medical Psychology Unit, Department of Medicine, Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: bsegura@ub.edu. · Medical Psychology Unit, Department of Medicine, Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: anna.campabadal@ub.edu. · Medical Psychology Unit, Department of Medicine, Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: carme.uribe@ub.edu. · Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Movement Disorders Unit, Neurology Service, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. · Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Movement Disorders Unit, Neurology Service, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: APEREZ3@clinic.cat. · Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Movement Disorders Unit, Neurology Service, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: JEMUNOZ@clinic.cat. · Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Movement Disorders Unit, Neurology Service, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Institute of Biomedical Research August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: YCOMPTA@clinic.cat. · Medical Psychology Unit, Department of Medicine, Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Institute of Biomedical Research August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: cjunque@ub.edu. · Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Movement Disorders Unit, Neurology Service, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Institute of Biomedical Research August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: mjmarti@clinic.cat. ·Neuroimage Clin · Pubmed #30785051.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Recent studies using resting-state functional connectivity and machine-learning to distinguish patients with neurodegenerative diseases from other groups of subjects show promising results. This approach has not been tested to discriminate between Parkinson's disease (PD) and multiple system atrophy (MSA) patients. OBJECTIVES: Our first aim is to characterize possible abnormalities in resting-state functional connectivity between the cerebellum and a set of intrinsic-connectivity brain networks and between the cerebellum and different regions of the striatum in PD and MSA. The second objective of this study is to assess the potential of cerebellar connectivity measures to distinguish between PD and MSA patients at the single-patient level. METHODS: Fifty-nine healthy controls, 62 PD patients, and 30 MSA patients underwent resting-state functional MRI with a 3T scanner. Independent component analysis and dual regression were used to define seven resting-state networks of interest. To assess striatal connectivity, a seed-to-voxel approach was used after dividing the striatum into six regions bilaterally. Measures of cerebellar-brain network and cerebellar-striatal connectivity were then used as features in a support vector machine to discriminate between PD and MSA patients. RESULTS: MSA patients displayed reduced cerebellar connectivity with different brain networks and with the striatum compared with PD patients and with controls. The classification procedure achieved an overall accuracy of 77.17% with 83.33% of the MSA subjects and 74.19% of the PD patients correctly classified. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that measures of cerebellar functional connectivity have the potential to distinguish between PD and MSA patients.

4 Article Diagnostic Accuracy, Item Analysis and Age Effects of the UPSIT Spanish Version in Parkinson's Disease. 2019

Campabadal, A / Segura, B / Baggio, H C / Abos, A / Uribe, C / Garcia-Diaz, A I / Marti, M J / Valldeoriola, F / Compta, Y / Bargallo, N / Junque, C. ·Medical Psychology Unit, Department of Medicine, Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. · Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Movement Disorders Unit, Neurology Service, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. · Centre de Diagnòstic per la Imatge, Hospital Clínic, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. · Institute of Biomedical Research August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. ·Arch Clin Neuropsychol · Pubmed #30007334.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) is the most commonly used test to detect olfactory impairment in Parkinson's disease (PD), but the cut-off score for clinical purposes is often difficult to establish because of age and sex effects. The current work aims to study the sensitivity and specificity of the UPSIT Spanish version and its accuracy in discriminating PD patients at different age groups from healthy controls (HC), and to perform an item analysis. METHOD: Ninety-seven non-demented PD patients and 65 HC were assessed with the UPSIT Spanish version. Sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy for PD were calculated. Multiple regression analysis was used to define predictors of UPSIT scores. RESULTS: Using the normative cut-off score for anosmia (≤18), the UPSIT showed a sensitivity of 54.6% with a specificity of 100.0% for PD. We found that, using the UPSIT cut-off score of ≤25, sensitivity was 81.4% and specificity 84.6% (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve = 0.908). Diagnosis and age were good predictors of UPSIT scores (B = -10.948; p < .001; B = -0.203; p < .001). When optimal cut-off scores were considered according to age ranges (≤60, 61-70, and ≥71), sensitivity and specificity values were >80.0% for all age groups. CONCLUSIONS: In the Spanish UPSIT version, sensitivity and specificity are improved when specific cut-off scores for different age groups are computed.

5 Article Differential Progression of Regional Hippocampal Atrophy in Aging and Parkinson's Disease. 2018

Uribe, Carme / Segura, Barbara / Baggio, Hugo C / Campabadal, Anna / Abos, Alexandra / Compta, Yaroslau / Marti, Maria Jose / Valldeoriola, Francesc / Bargallo, Nuria / Junque, Carme. ·Medical Psychology Unit, Department of Medicine, Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red Sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Institute of Biomedical Research August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Spain. · Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Unit, Neurology Service, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Centre de Diagnòstic per la Imatge, Hospital Clínic, Barcelona, Spain. ·Front Aging Neurosci · Pubmed #30364338.

ABSTRACT: Hippocampal subfields have different vulnerability to the degenerative processes related to aging, amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD), but the temporal evolution in Parkinson's disease (PD) is unknown. The purposes of the current work are to describe regional hippocampal changes over time in a sample of PD patients classified according to their baseline cognitive status and to relate these changes to verbal memory loss. T1-weighted images and verbal memory assessment were obtained at two separate time points (3.8 ± 0.4 years apart) from 28 PD with normal cognition (PD-NC), 16 PD with MCI (PD-MCI) and 21 healthy controls (HCs). FreeSurfer 6.0 automated pipeline was used to segment the hippocampus into 12 bilateral subregions. Memory functions were measured with Rey's Auditory Verbal learning test (RAVLT). We found significant reductions in cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) over time in controls as well as in PD subgroups. Right whole-hippocampal volumes showed time effects in both PD groups but not in controls. PD-NC patients also displayed time effects in the left hippocampal tail and right parasubiculum. Regression analyses showed that specific hippocampal subfield volumes at time 1 predicted almost 60% of the variability in RAVLT delayed-recall score decline. Changes in several hippocampal subregions also showed predictive value for memory loss. In conclusion, CA1 changes in PD were similar to those that occur in normal aging, but PD patients also had more decline in both anterior and posterior hippocampal segments with a more pronounced atrophy of the right hemisphere. Hippocampal segments are better predictors of changes in memory performance than whole-hippocampal volumes.

6 Article Gray/White Matter Contrast in Parkinson's Disease. 2018

Uribe, Carme / Segura, Barbara / Baggio, Hugo C / Abos, Alexandra / Garcia-Diaz, Anna I / Campabadal, Anna / Marti, Maria J / Valldeoriola, Francesc / Compta, Yaroslau / Bargallo, Nuria / Junque, Carme. ·Medical Psychology Unit, Department of Medicine, Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Institute of Biomedical Research August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Hospital Clinic, Barcelona, Spain. · Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red Sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Unit, Neurology Service, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Centre de Diagnòstic per la Imatge, Hospital Clínic, Barcelona, Spain. ·Front Aging Neurosci · Pubmed #29636679.

ABSTRACT: Gray/white matter contrast (GWC) decreases with aging and has been found to be a useful MRI biomarker in Alzheimer's disease (AD), but its utility in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients has not been investigated. The aims of the study were to test whether GWC is sensitive to aging changes in PD patients, if PD patients differ from healthy controls (HCs) in GWC, and whether the use of GWC data would improve the sensitivity of cortical thickness analyses to differentiate PD patients from controls. Using T1-weighted structural images, we obtained individual cortical thickness and GWC values from a sample of 90 PD patients and 27 controls. Images were processed with the automated FreeSurfer stream. GWC was computed by dividing the white matter (WM) by the gray matter (GM) values and projecting the ratios onto a common surface. The sample characteristics were: 52 patients and 14 controls were males; mean age of 64.4 ± 10.6 years in PD and 64.7 ± 8.6 years in controls; 8.0 ± 5.6 years of disease evolution; 15.6 ± 9.8 UPDRS; and a range of 1.5-3 in Hoehn and Yahr (H&Y) stage. In both PD and controls we observed significant correlations between GWC and age involving almost the entire cortex. When applying a stringent cluster-forming threshold of

7 Article Cortical atrophy patterns in early Parkinson's disease patients using hierarchical cluster analysis. 2018

Uribe, Carme / Segura, Barbara / Baggio, Hugo Cesar / Abos, Alexandra / Garcia-Diaz, Anna Isabel / Campabadal, Anna / Marti, Maria Jose / Valldeoriola, Francesc / Compta, Yaroslau / Tolosa, Eduard / Junque, Carme. ·Medical Psychology Unit, Department of Medicine, Institute of Neurosciences, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: carme.uribe@ub.edu. · Medical Psychology Unit, Department of Medicine, Institute of Neurosciences, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: bsegura@ub.edu. · Medical Psychology Unit, Department of Medicine, Institute of Neurosciences, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: hbaggio@ub.edu. · Medical Psychology Unit, Department of Medicine, Institute of Neurosciences, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: alexandraabos@ub.edu. · Medical Psychology Unit, Department of Medicine, Institute of Neurosciences, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: ai.garciadiaz@ub.edu. · Medical Psychology Unit, Department of Medicine, Institute of Neurosciences, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Institute of Biomedical Research August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: anna.campabadal@ub.edu. · Institute of Biomedical Research August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Spain; Movement Disorders Unit, Neurology Service, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Institute of Neurosciences, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: mjmarti@clinic.cat. · Institute of Biomedical Research August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Spain; Movement Disorders Unit, Neurology Service, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Institute of Neurosciences, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: fvallde@clinic.cat. · Institute of Biomedical Research August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Spain; Movement Disorders Unit, Neurology Service, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Institute of Neurosciences, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: ycompta@clinic.cat. · Institute of Biomedical Research August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Spain; Movement Disorders Unit, Neurology Service, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Institute of Neurosciences, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: etolosa@clinic.cat. · Medical Psychology Unit, Department of Medicine, Institute of Neurosciences, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Institute of Biomedical Research August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Spain. Electronic address: cjunque@ub.edu. ·Parkinsonism Relat Disord · Pubmed #29449187.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Cortical brain atrophy detectable with MRI in non-demented advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) is well characterized, but its presence in early disease stages is still under debate. We aimed to investigate cortical atrophy patterns in a large sample of early untreated PD patients using a hypothesis-free data-driven approach. METHODS: Seventy-seven de novo PD patients and 50 controls from the Parkinson's Progression Marker Initiative database with T1-weighted images in a 3-tesla Siemens scanner were included in this study. Mean cortical thickness was extracted from 360 cortical areas defined by the Human Connectome Project Multi-Modal Parcellation version 1.0, and a hierarchical cluster analysis was performed using Ward's linkage method. A general linear model with cortical thickness data was then used to compare clustering groups using FreeSurfer software. RESULTS: We identified two patterns of cortical atrophy. Compared with controls, patients grouped in pattern 1 (n = 33) were characterized by cortical thinning in bilateral orbitofrontal, anterior cingulate, and lateral and medial anterior temporal gyri. Patients in pattern 2 (n = 44) showed cortical thinning in bilateral occipital gyrus, cuneus, superior parietal gyrus, and left postcentral gyrus, and they showed neuropsychological impairment in memory and other cognitive domains. CONCLUSIONS: Even in the early stages of PD, there is evidence of cortical brain atrophy. Neuroimaging clustering analysis is able to detect two subgroups of cortical thinning, one with mainly anterior atrophy, and the other with posterior predominance and worse cognitive performance.

8 Article Cortical thinning correlates of changes in visuospatial and visuoperceptual performance in Parkinson's disease: A 4-year follow-up. 2018

Garcia-Diaz, A I / Segura, B / Baggio, H C / Uribe, C / Campabadal, A / Abos, A / Marti, M J / Valldeoriola, F / Compta, Y / Bargallo, N / Junque, C. ·Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Institute of Neurosciences, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. · Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Institute of Neurosciences, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Institut D'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi I Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. · Institut D'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi I Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red Sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Hospital Clinic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Movement Disorders Unit, Neurology Service, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. · Institute of Neurosciences, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Institut D'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi I Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red Sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Hospital Clinic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Movement Disorders Unit, Neurology Service, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. · Institute of Neurosciences, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Institut D'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi I Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Centre de Diagnostic per La Imatge, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. · Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Institute of Neurosciences, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Institut D'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi I Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red Sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Hospital Clinic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Movement Disorders Unit, Neurology Service, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: cjunque@ub.edu. ·Parkinsonism Relat Disord · Pubmed #29132765.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Growing evidence highlights the relevance of posterior cortically-based cognitive deficits in Parkinson's disease (PD) as possible biomarkers of the evolution to dementia. Cross-sectional correlational studies have established a relationship between the degree of atrophy in posterior brain regions and visuospatial and visuoperceptual (VS/VP) impairment. The aim of this study is to address the progressive cortical thinning correlates of VS/VP performance in PD. METHODS: Forty-four PD patients and 20 matched healthy subjects were included in this study and followed for 4 years. Tests used to assess VS/VP functions included were: Benton's Judgement of Line Orientation (JLOT), Facial Recognition (FRT), and Visual Form Discrimination (VFDT) Tests; Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT); and the Pentagon Copying Test (PCT). Structural magnetic resonance imaging data and FreeSurfer were used to evaluate cortical thinning evolution. RESULTS: PD patients with normal cognition (PD-NC) and PD patients with mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI) differed significantly in the progression of cortical thinning in posterior regions. In PD-MCI patients, the change in VS/VP functions assessed by PCT, JLOT, FRT, and SMDT correlated with the symmetrized percent change of cortical thinning of occipital, parietal, and temporal regions. In PD-NC patients, we also observed a correlation between changes in FRT and thinning in parieto-occipital regions. CONCLUSION: In this study, we establish the neuroanatomical substrate of progressive changes in VS/VP performance in PD patients with and without MCI. In agreement with cross-sectional data, VS/VP changes over time are related to cortical thinning in posterior regions.

9 Article Structural Brain Correlations of Visuospatial and Visuoperceptual Tests in Parkinson's Disease. 2018

Garcia-Diaz, Anna Isabel / Segura, Barbara / Baggio, Hugo Cesar / Marti, Maria Jose / Valldeoriola, Francesc / Compta, Yaroslau / Bargallo, Nuria / Uribe, Carme / Campabadal, Anna / Abos, Alexandra / Junque, Carme. ·1Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Science,University of Barcelona,Barcelona,Catalonia,Spain. · 3Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS),Barcelona,Catalonia,Spain. · 2Neuroscience Institute,University of Barcelona,Barcelona,Catalonia,Spain. ·J Int Neuropsychol Soc · Pubmed #28714429.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease (PD) is relevant because it is a marker for evolution to dementia. However, the selection of suitable tests to evaluate separate cognitive domains in mild cognitive impairment related to PD remains an open question. The current work aims to investigate the neuroanatomical correlates of several visuospatial/visuoperceptual tests using the same sample and a multimodal MRI approach. METHODS: The study included 36 PD patients and 20 healthy subjects matched for age, sex, and education. The visuospatial/visuoperceptual tests selected were: Pentagon Copying Test (PCT), Judgment of Line Orientation Test (JLOT), Visual Form Discrimination Test (VFDT), Facial Recognition Test (FRT), Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SMDT), and clock copying task (CLOX2). FreeSurfer was used to assess cortical thickness, and tract-based spatial statistics was used for fractional anisotropy analysis. RESULTS: Lower performance in the PCT, JLOT, and SDMT was associated with extensive cortical thickness reductions in lateral parietal and temporal regions. VFDT and CLOX2 did not show this common pattern and correlated with more limited medial occipito-temporal and occipito-parietal regions. Performance in all visuospatial/visuoperceptual tests correlated with fractional anisotropy in the corpus callosum. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings show that JLOT, SDMT, and PCT, in addition to differentiating patients from controls, are suitable visuospatial/visuoperceptual tests to reflect cortical thinning in lateral temporo-parietal regions in PD patients. We did not observe the dissociation between dorsal and ventral streams that was expected according to the neuropsychological classification of visuospatial and visuoperceptual tests. (JINS, 2018, 24, 33-44).

10 Article Brain correlates of progressive olfactory loss in Parkinson's disease. 2017

Campabadal, Anna / Uribe, Carme / Segura, Barbara / Baggio, Hugo C / Abos, Alexandra / Garcia-Diaz, Anna Isabel / Marti, Maria Jose / Valldeoriola, Francesc / Compta, Yaroslau / Bargallo, Nuria / Junque, Carme. ·Medical Psychology Unit, Department of Medicine, Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Institute of Biomedical Research August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: anna.campabadal@ub.edu. · Medical Psychology Unit, Department of Medicine, Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: carme.uribe@ub.edu. · Medical Psychology Unit, Department of Medicine, Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: bsegura@ub.edu. · Medical Psychology Unit, Department of Medicine, Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: hbaggio@ub.edu. · Medical Psychology Unit, Department of Medicine, Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: alexandraabos@ub.edu. · Medical Psychology Unit, Department of Medicine, Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: ai.garciadiaz@ub.edu. · Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Movement Disorders Unit, Neurology Service, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: mjmarti@clinic.cat. · Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Movement Disorders Unit, Neurology Service, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: fvallde@clinic.cat. · Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Movement Disorders Unit, Neurology Service, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: YCOMPTA@clinic.cat. · Centre de Diagnòstic per la Imatge, Hospital Clínic, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: bargallo@clinic.cat. · Medical Psychology Unit, Department of Medicine, Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Institute of Biomedical Research August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: cjunque@ub.edu. ·Parkinsonism Relat Disord · Pubmed #28522171.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Olfactory dysfunction is present in a large proportion of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) upon diagnosis. However, its progression over time has been poorly investigated. The few available longitudinal studies lack control groups or MRI data. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the olfactory changes and their structural correlates in non-demented PD over a four-year follow-up. METHODS: We assessed olfactory function in a sample of 25 PD patients and 24 normal controls of similar age using the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification test (UPSIT). Structural magnetic resonance imaging data, obtained with a 3-T Siemens Trio scanner, were analyzed using FreeSurfer software. RESULTS: Analysis of variance showed significant group (F = 53.882; P < 0.001) and time (F = 6.203; P = 0.016) effects, but the group-by-time interaction was not statistically significant. UPSIT performance declined ≥1.5 standard deviations in 5 controls and 7 patients. Change in UPSIT scores of patients correlated positively with volume change in the left putamen, right thalamus, and right caudate nucleus. CONCLUSION: Olfactory loss over time in PD and controls is similar, but we have observed significant correlation between this loss and basal ganglia volumes only in patients.

11 Article Patterns of cortical thinning in nondemented Parkinson's disease patients. 2016

Uribe, Carme / Segura, Barbara / Baggio, Hugo Cesar / Abos, Alexandra / Marti, Maria Jose / Valldeoriola, Francesc / Compta, Yaroslau / Bargallo, Nuria / Junque, Carme. ·Department of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychobiology, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. · Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. · Movement Disorders Unit, Neurology Service, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. · Institute of Biomedical Research August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. · Centre de Diagnostic per la Imatge, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. ·Mov Disord · Pubmed #27094093.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Clinical variability in the Parkinson's disease phenotype suggests the existence of disease subtypes. We investigated whether distinct anatomical patterns of atrophy can be identified in Parkinson's disease using a hypothesis-free, data-driven approach based on cortical thickness data. METHODS: T1-weighted 3-tesla MRI and a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment were performed in a sample of 88 nondemented Parkinson's disease patients and 31 healthy controls. We performed a hierarchical cluster analysis of imaging data using Ward's linkage method. A general linear model with cortical thickness data was used to compare clustering groups. RESULTS: We observed 3 patterns of cortical thinning in patients when compared with healthy controls. Pattern 1 (n = 30, 34.09%) consisted of cortical atrophy in bilateral precentral gyrus, inferior and superior parietal lobules, cuneus, posterior cingulate, and parahippocampal gyrus. These patients showed worse cognitive performance when compared with controls and the other 2 patterns. Pattern 2 (n = 29, 32.95%) consisted of cortical atrophy involving occipital and frontal as well as superior parietal areas and included patients with younger age at onset. Finally, in pattern 3 (n = 29, 32.95%), there was no detectable cortical thinning. Patients in the 3 patterns did not differ in disease duration, motor severity, dopaminergic medication doses, or presence of mild cognitive impairment. CONCLUSIONS: Three cortical atrophy subtypes were identified in nondemented Parkinson's disease patients: (1) parieto-temporal pattern of atrophy with worse cognitive performance, (2) occipital and frontal cortical atrophy and younger disease onset, and (3) patients without detectable cortical atrophy. These findings may help identify prognosis markers in Parkinson's disease. © 2016 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.