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Parkinson Disease: HELP
Articles by Peter C. Warnke
Based on 10 articles published since 2010
(Why 10 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Peter Warnke wrote the following 10 articles about Parkinson Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Editorial Deep brain stimulation: awake or asleep: it comes with a price either way. 2018

Warnke, Peter. · ·J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry · Pubmed #29550787.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Editorial Deep brain stimulation surgery under general anaesthesia with microelectrode recording: the best of both worlds or a little bit of everything? 2014

Warnke, Peter C. · ·J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry · Pubmed #24591455.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Editorial Deep brain stimulation for movement disorders: what counts in the end is the end result. 2014

Warnke, Peter. · ·J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry · Pubmed #24108058.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Review Effect of low versus high frequency stimulation on freezing of gait and other axial symptoms in Parkinson patients with bilateral STN DBS: a mini-review. 2017

Xie, Tao / Padmanaban, Mahesh / Bloom, Lisa / MacCracken, Ellen / Bertacchi, Breanna / Dachman, Abraham / Warnke, Peter. ·Department of Neurology, University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago, IL USA. · 0000 0004 1936 7822 · grid.170205.1 · Speech and Swallowing Section, Department of Surgery, University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago, IL USA. · Department of Radiology, University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago, IL USA. · Department of Neurosurgery, University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago, IL USA. ·Transl Neurodegener · Pubmed #28529730.

ABSTRACT: Some studies have shown that low frequency stimulation (LFS, most commonly 60 Hz), compared to high frequency stimulation (HFS, most commonly 130 Hz), has beneficial effects, short-term or even long-term, on improving freezing of gait (FOG) and other axial symptoms, including speech and swallowing function, in Parkinson disease (PD) patients with bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS). However, other studies failed to confirm this. It seems not clear what determines the difference in response to LFS. Differences in study design, such as presence or absence of FOG, exact LFS used (60 Hz versus 80 Hz), study size, open label versus randomized double blind assessment, retrospective versus prospective evaluation, medication On or Off state, total electric energy delivered maintained or not with the change in frequency, and the location of active contacts could all potentially affect the results. This mini-review goes over the literature with the aforementioned factors in mind, focusing on the effect of LFS versus HFS on FOG and other axial symptoms in PD with bilateral STN DBS, in an effort to extract the essential data to guide our clinical management of axial symptoms and explore the potential underlying mechanisms as well. Overall, LFS of 60 Hz seems to be consistently effective in patients with FOG at the usual HFS in regards to improving FOG, speech, swallowing function and other axial symptoms, though LFS could reduce tremor control in some patients. Whether LFS simply addresses the axial symptoms in the context of HFS or has other beneficial effects requires further studies, along with the mechanism.

5 Article Long-term effect of low frequency stimulation of STN on dysphagia, freezing of gait and other motor symptoms in PD. 2018

Xie, Tao / Bloom, Lisa / Padmanaban, Mahesh / Bertacchi, Breanna / Kang, Wenjun / MacCracken, Ellen / Dachman, Abraham / Vigil, Julie / Satzer, David / Zadikoff, Cindy / Markopoulou, Katerina / Warnke, Peter / Kang, Un Jung. ·Department of Neurology, University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA. · Speech and Swallowing Section, Department of Surgery, University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA. · Center for Research Informatics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA. · Department of Radiology, University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA. · Department of Neurosurgery, University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA. · Department of Neurology, Northwestern University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA. · Department of Neurology, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Glenview, Illinois, USA. · Department of Neurology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York City, New York, USA. ·J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry · Pubmed #29654112.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the long-term effect of 60 Hz stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) on dysphagia, freezing of gait (FOG) and other motor symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) who have FOG at the usual 130 Hz stimulation. METHODS: This is a prospective, sequence randomised, crossover, double-blind study. PD patients with medication refractory FOG at 130 Hz stimulation of the STN were randomised to the sequences of 130 Hz, 60 Hz or deep brain stimulation off to assess swallowing function (videofluoroscopic evaluation and swallowing questionnaire), FOG severity (stand-walk-sit test and FOG questionnaire) and motor function (Unified PD Rating Scale, Part III motor examination (UPDRS-III)) at initial visit (V1) and follow-up visit (V2, after being on 60 Hz stimulation for an average of 14.5 months), in their usual medications on state. The frequency of aspiration events, perceived swallowing difficulty and FOG severity at 60 Hz compared with 130 Hz stimulation at V2, and their corresponding changes at V2 compared with V1 at 60 Hz were set as primary outcomes, with similar comparisons in UPDRS-III and its subscores as secondary outcomes. RESULTS: All 11 enrolled participants completed V1 and 10 completed V2. We found the benefits of 60 Hz stimulation compared with 130 Hz in reducing aspiration frequency, perceived swallowing difficulty, FOG severity, bradykinesia and overall axial and motor symptoms at V1 and persistent benefits on all of them except dysphagia at V2, with overall decreasing efficacy when comparing V2 to V1. CONCLUSIONS: The 60 Hz stimulation, when compared with 130 Hz, has long-term benefits on reducing FOG, bradykinesia and overall axial and motor symptoms except dysphagia, although the overall benefits decrease with long-term use. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT02549859; Pre-results.

6 Article Respiratory dyskinesia in a patient with Parkinson disease successfully treated with STN DBS. 2015

Xie, Tao / Guan, Rui / Staisch, Julia / Towle, Vernon L / Warnke, Peter. ·From the Department of Neurology (T.X., R.G., J.S., V.L.T.) and Division of Neurosurgery (P.W.), University of Chicago, Chicago, IL. txie@neurology.bsd.uchicago.edu. · From the Department of Neurology (T.X., R.G., J.S., V.L.T.) and Division of Neurosurgery (P.W.), University of Chicago, Chicago, IL. ·Neurology · Pubmed #26138944.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Article Low-frequency stimulation of STN-DBS reduces aspiration and freezing of gait in patients with PD. 2015

Xie, Tao / Vigil, Julie / MacCracken, Ellen / Gasparaitis, Arunas / Young, Joan / Kang, Wenjun / Bernard, Jacqueline / Warnke, Peter / Kang, Un J. ·From the Departments of Neurology (T.X., J.Y., J.B.), Radiology (A.G.), and Neurosurgery (P.W.), and Speech and Swallowing Section, Department of Surgery (J.V., E.M.), University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago · Center for Research Informatics (W.K.), University of Chicago, Chicago, IL · and Department of Neurology (U.J.K.), Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY. ·Neurology · Pubmed #25540305.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To study whether 60-Hz stimulation, compared with routine 130 Hz, improves swallowing function and freezing of gait (FOG) in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) who undergo bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS). METHODS: We studied 7 patients with PD who experienced FOG that persisted despite routine 130-Hz stimulation and dopaminergic medication. Each patient received 3 modified barium swallow (MBS) studies in a single day under 3 DBS conditions in the medication-on state: 130 Hz, 60 Hz, or DBS off, in a randomized double-blind manner. The laryngeal penetration and aspiration events were cautiously assessed, and a swallowing questionnaire was completed. The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, Part III motor score, axial subscore, tremor subscore, and FOG by a questionnaire and stand-walk-sit test were also assessed. The best DBS condition (60 Hz here) producing the least FOG was maintained for 3 to 8 weeks, and patients were assessed again. Changes in measurements between the 60 Hz and 130 Hz were analyzed using paired t test, with swallowing function as primary and the remainder as secondary outcomes. Changes between other DBS conditions were further explored with Bonferroni correction. RESULTS: Compared with the routine 130 Hz, 60-Hz stimulation significantly reduced aspiration frequency by 57% on MBS study and perceived swallowing difficulty by 80% on questionnaire. It also significantly reduced FOG, and axial and parkinsonian symptoms. The benefits at 60-Hz stimulation persisted over the average 6-week assessment. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with the routine 130 Hz, the 60-Hz stimulation significantly improved swallowing function, FOG, and axial and parkinsonian symptoms in patients with PD treated with bilateral STN-DBS, which persisted over the 6-week study period. CLASSIFICATION OF EVIDENCE: This study provides Class IV evidence that for patients with PD who experience FOG, STN-DBS at 60 Hz decreases aspiration events observed during MBS compared with DBS at 130 Hz.

8 Article Effect of stimulation frequency on immediate freezing of gait in newly activated STN DBS in Parkinson's disease. 2012

Xie, Tao / Kang, Un Jung / Warnke, Peter. ·Department of Neurology, University of Chicago Medical Center, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, MC 2030, Chicago, IL 60637, USA. txie@bsd.uchicago.edu ·J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry · Pubmed #22696586.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) may develop freezing of gait (FOG) with chronic deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) at the commonly used frequency of 130 Hz and FOG can be ameliorated by 60 Hz stimulation in some patients. It is not clear whether the development of FOG is due to the disease progression or the chronic stimulation at this 130 Hz frequency. AIMS: To investigate the effect of stimulation frequency on immediate FOG in newly activated STN DBS patient with PD and determine if stimulation frequency alone could affect the FOG. METHODS: Two cases of PD who developed FOG immediately upon activation of the newly placed STN DBS were studied for the effect of stimulation frequency on FOG in both `off' and `on' medication status. RESULTS: Both patients developed severe FOG with the commonly used 130 Hz stimulation. Switching the frequency to 60 Hz immediately alleviated the FOG, without change in contacts, voltages and pulse widths. This frequency effect on FOG was present in both `off' and `on' statuses and remained effective during the 10-month follow-up period. CONCLUSION: These two cases demonstrate that lower frequency stimulation of 60 Hz could improve FOG, while the commonly used 130 Hz stimulation could cause FOG or make it worse. In addition, the beneficial effect of low frequency DBS was additive to dopaminergic medication effect and included other axial symptoms.

9 Minor Author Response. 2015

Xie, Tao / Vigil, Julie / MacCracken, Ellen / Warnke, Peter / Kang, Un J. · ·Neurology · Pubmed #26484368.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Minor Role of DaTSCAN and clinical diagnosis in Parkinson disease. 2012

Xie, Tao / Warnke, Peter / Kang, Un Jung / de la Fuente-Fernandez, Raul. · ·Neurology · Pubmed #23071169.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --