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Parkinson Disease: HELP
Articles by Daniel Weintraub
Based on 143 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, D. Weintraub wrote the following 143 articles about Parkinson Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6
1 Editorial Neuropsychiatric symptoms in Parkinson disease and dementia with Lewy bodies: what geriatric psychiatry can learn. 2013

Weintraub, Daniel. ·Departments of Psychiatry and Neurology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and Parkinson's Disease Research, Education and Clinical Center, Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Electronic address: Daniel.Weintraub@uphs.upenn.edu. ·Am J Geriatr Psychiatry · Pubmed #23668226.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Editorial Glad about SAD (PD). 2012

Friedman, Joseph H / Weintraub, Daniel. · ·Neurology · Pubmed #22496197.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Editorial A failure to communicate: preliminary evidence for cortico-striatal dysconnection with pathological gambling in Parkinson's disease. 2011

Weintraub, Daniel. · ·Mov Disord · Pubmed #21412827.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Review Global scales for cognitive screening in Parkinson's disease: Critique and recommendations. 2018

Skorvanek, Matej / Goldman, Jennifer G / Jahanshahi, Marjan / Marras, Connie / Rektorova, Irena / Schmand, Ben / van Duijn, Erik / Goetz, Christopher G / Weintraub, Daniel / Stebbins, Glenn T / Martinez-Martin, Pablo / Anonymous2421195. ·Department of Neurology, Safarik University, Kosice, Slovakia. · Department of Neurology, University Hospital of L. Pasteur, Kosice, Slovakia. · Rush University Medical Center, Department of Neurological Sciences, Section of Parkinson Disease and Movement Disorders, Chicago, Illinois, USA. · Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience & Movement Disorders and the National Hospital for Neurology & Neurosurgery, London, UK. · Morton and Gloria Shulman Movement Disorders Centre and the Edmond J. Safra Program in Parkinson's Disease, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Applied Neuroscience Research Group, Central European Institute of Technology, CEITEC, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic. · Department of Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Psychiatry, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, and Centre of Mental Health Care Delfland, Delft, Netherlands. · Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Parkinson's Disease and Mental Health Research, Education and Clinical Centers (PADRECC and MIRECC), Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. · National Centre of Epidemiology and CIBERNED, Carlos III Institute of Health, Madrid, Spain. ·Mov Disord · Pubmed #29168899.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Cognitive impairment is a common nonmotor manifestation of Parkinson's disease, with deficits ranging from mild cognitive difficulties in 1 or more of the cognitive domains to severe dementia. The International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society commissioned the assessment of the clinimetric properties of cognitive rating scales measuring global cognitive performance in PD to make recommendations regarding their use. METHODS: A systematic literature search was conducted to identify the scales used to assess global cognitive performance in PD, and the identified scales were reviewed and rated as "recommended," "recommended with caveats," "suggested," or "listed" by the panel using previously established criteria. RESULTS: A total of 12 cognitive scales were included in this review. Three scales, the Montreal Cognitive Assessment, the Mattis Dementia Rating Scale Second Edition, and the Parkinson's Disease-Cognitive Rating Scale, were classified as "recommended." Two scales were classified as "recommended with caveats": the Mini-Mental Parkinson, because of limited coverage of executive abilities, and the Scales for Outcomes in Parkinson's Disease-Cognition, which has limited data on sensitivity to change. Six other scales were classified as "suggested" and 1 scale as "listed." CONCLUSIONS: Because of the existence of "recommended" scales for assessment of global cognitive performance in PD, this task force suggests that the development of a new scale for this purpose is not needed at this time. However, global cognitive scales are not a substitute for comprehensive neuropsychological testing. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

5 Review Past, present, and future of Parkinson's disease: A special essay on the 200th Anniversary of the Shaking Palsy. 2017

Obeso, J A / Stamelou, M / Goetz, C G / Poewe, W / Lang, A E / Weintraub, D / Burn, D / Halliday, G M / Bezard, E / Przedborski, S / Lehericy, S / Brooks, D J / Rothwell, J C / Hallett, M / DeLong, M R / Marras, C / Tanner, C M / Ross, G W / Langston, J W / Klein, C / Bonifati, V / Jankovic, J / Lozano, A M / Deuschl, G / Bergman, H / Tolosa, E / Rodriguez-Violante, M / Fahn, S / Postuma, R B / Berg, D / Marek, K / Standaert, D G / Surmeier, D J / Olanow, C W / Kordower, J H / Calabresi, P / Schapira, A H V / Stoessl, A J. ·HM CINAC, Hospital Universitario HM Puerta del Sur, Mostoles, Madrid, Spain. · Universidad CEU San Pablo, Madrid, Spain. · CIBERNED, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Neurology, Philipps University, Marburg, Germany. · Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Department, HYGEIA Hospital and Attikon Hospital, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Neurological Sciences, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA. · Department of Neurology, Medical University Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria. · Morton and Gloria Shulman Movement Disorders Clinic and the Edmond J Safra Program in Parkinson's Disease, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Canada. · Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. · Parkinson's Disease and Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Centers (PADRECC and MIRECC), Corporal Michael J. Crescenz Veteran's Affairs Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. · Medical Sciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle, UK. · Brain and Mind Centre, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. · School of Medical Sciences, University of New South Wales and Neuroscience Research Australia, Sydney, Australia. · Université de Bordeaux, Institut des Maladies Neurodégénératives, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique Unité Mixte de Recherche 5293, Institut des Maladies Neurodégénératives, Bordeaux, France. · China Academy of Medical Sciences, Institute of Lab Animal Sciences, Beijing, China. · Departments of Neurology, Pathology, and Cell Biology, the Center for Motor Neuron Biology and Disease, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA. · Columbia Translational Neuroscience Initiative, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA. · Institut du Cerveau et de la Moelle épinière - ICM, Centre de NeuroImagerie de Recherche - CENIR, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Inserm U1127, CNRS UMR 7225, Paris, France. · Groupe Hospitalier Pitié-Salpêtrière, Paris, France. · Clinical Sciences Department, Newcastle University, Newcastle, UK. · Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. · Human Neurophysiology, Sobell Department, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK. · Human Motor Control Section, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Neurology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. · Morton and Gloria Shulman Movement Disorders Centre and the Edmond J Safra Program in Parkinson's disease, Toronto Western Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · Movement Disorders and Neuromodulation Center, Department of Neurology, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA. · Parkinson's Disease Research, Education and Clinical Center, San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, California, USA. · Veterans Affairs Pacific Islands Health Care System, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. · Parkinson's Institute, Sunnyvale, California, USA. · Institute of Neurogenetics, University of Luebeck, Luebeck, Germany. · Department of Clinical Genetics, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Parkinson's Disease Center and Movement Disorders Clinic, Department of Neurology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA. · Department of Neurosurgery, Toronto Western Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · Department of Neurology, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Christian Albrechts University Kiel, Kiel, Germany. · Department of Medical Neurobiology, Institute of Medical Research Israel-Canada, Jerusalem, Israel. · Edmond and Lily Safra Center for Brain Sciences, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel. · Department of Neurosurgery, Hadassah University Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel. · Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Unit, Neurology Service, Institut Clínic de Neurociències, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Medicine, Universitat de Barcelona, IDIBAPS, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED) Barcelona, Spain. · Movement Disorders Clinic, Clinical Neurodegenerative Research Unit, Mexico City, Mexico. · Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía, Mexico City, Mexico. · Department of Neurology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Neurology, McGill University, Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Klinik für Neurologie, UKSH, Campus Kiel, Christian-Albrechts-Universität, Kiel, Germany. · Institute for Neurodegenerative Disorders, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. · Department of Neurology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, USA. · Department of Physiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA. · Departments of Neurology and Neuroscience, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. · Research Center for Brain Repair, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA. · Neuroscience Graduate Program, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA. · Neurological Clinic, Department of Medicine, Hospital Santa Maria della Misericordia, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy. · Laboratory of Neurophysiology, Santa Lucia Foundation, IRCCS, Rome, Italy. · University Department of Clinical Neurosciences, UCL Institute of Neurology, University College London, London, UK. · Pacific Parkinson's Research Centre, Division of Neurology & Djavadf Mowafaghian Centre for Brain Health, University of British Columbia, British Columbia, Canada. · Vancouver Coastal Health, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ·Mov Disord · Pubmed #28887905.

ABSTRACT: This article reviews and summarizes 200 years of Parkinson's disease. It comprises a relevant history of Dr. James Parkinson's himself and what he described accurately and what he missed from today's perspective. Parkinson's disease today is understood as a multietiological condition with uncertain etiopathogenesis. Many advances have occurred regarding pathophysiology and symptomatic treatments, but critically important issues are still pending resolution. Among the latter, the need to modify disease progression is undoubtedly a priority. In sum, this multiple-author article, prepared to commemorate the bicentenary of the shaking palsy, provides a historical state-of-the-art account of what has been achieved, the current situation, and how to progress toward resolving Parkinson's disease. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

6 Review Impulse Control and Related Disorders in Parkinson's Disease. 2017

Weintraub, Daniel / Claassen, Daniel O. ·Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States; Parkinson's Disease and Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Centers, Corporal Michael J. Crescenz Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA, United States. Electronic address: daniel.weintraub@uphs.upenn.edu. · Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, United States. ·Int Rev Neurobiol · Pubmed #28802938.

ABSTRACT: Impulse control disorders (ICDs), such as compulsive gambling, buying, sexual, and eating behaviors, are a serious and increasingly recognized complication in Parkinson's disease (PD), occurring in up to 20% of PD patients over the course of their illness. Related behaviors include punding (stereotyped, repetitive, purposeless behaviors), dopamine dysregulation syndrome (DDS) (compulsive medication overuse), and hobbyism (e.g., compulsive internet use, artistic endeavors, and writing). These disorders have a significant impact on quality of life and function, strain interpersonal relationships, and worsen caregiver burden, and are associated with significant psychiatric comorbidity. ICDs have been most closely related to the use of dopamine agonists (DAs), while DDS is primarily associated with shorter acting, higher potency dopamine replacement therapy (DRT), such as levodopa. However, in preliminary research ICDs have also been reported to occur with monoamine oxidase inhibitor-B and amantadine treatment, and after deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery. Other risk factors for ICDs may include sex (e.g., male sex for compulsive sexual behavior, and female sex for compulsive buying behavior); younger age overall at PD onset; a pre-PD history of an ICD; personal or family history of substance abuse, bipolar disorder, or gambling problems; and impulsive personality traits. Dysregulation of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system is thought to be the major neurobiological substrate for ICDs in PD, but there is preliminary evidence for alterations in opiate and serotonin systems too. The primary treatment of ICDs in PD is discontinuation of the offending treatment, but not all patients can tolerate this due to worsening motor symptoms or DA withdrawal syndrome. While psychiatric medications and psychosocial treatments are frequently used to treat ICDs in the general population, there is limited empirical evidence for their use in PD, so it is critical for patients to be monitored closely for ICDs from disease onset and routine throughout its course. In the future, it may be possible to use a precision medicine approach to decrease the incidence of ICDs in PD by avoiding DA use in patients determined to be at highest risk based on their clinical and neurobiological (e.g., motor presentation, behavioral measures of medication response, genetics, dopamine transporter neuroimaging) profile. Additionally, as empirically validated treatments for ICDs and similar disorders (e.g., substance use disorders) emerge, it will also be important to examine their efficacy and tolerability in individuals with comorbid PD.

7 Review Impulse Control Disorders and Related Complications of Parkinson's Disease Therapy. 2017

Lopez, Alexander M / Weintraub, Daniel / Claassen, Daniel O. ·Department of Medicine, Meharry Medical College, Nashville, Tennessee. · Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee. ·Semin Neurol · Pubmed #28511259.

ABSTRACT: Impulsive and compulsive behaviors in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients are most often attributed to dopamine agonist therapy; dysregulation of the mesocorticolimbic system accounts for this behavioral phenotype. The clinical presentation is commonly termed

8 Review Parkinson's disease-related fatigue: A case definition and recommendations for clinical research. 2016

Kluger, Benzi M / Herlofson, Karen / Chou, Kelvin L / Lou, Jau-Shin / Goetz, Christopher G / Lang, Anthony E / Weintraub, Daniel / Friedman, Joseph. ·Department of Neurology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado, USA. · Department of Neurology, Sorlandet Hospital Arendal, Norway. · Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA. · Department of Neurology, University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Science, Department of Neurology, Sanford Health, Fargo, North Dakota, USA. · Department of Neurological Sciences, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA. · Morton and Gloria Shulman Movement Disorders Clinic and the Edmond J. Safra Program in Parkinson's Disease, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Departments of Psychiatry and Neurology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. · Parkinson's Disease and Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Centers (PADRECC and MIRECC), Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. · Department of Neurology, Butler Hospital, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA. ·Mov Disord · Pubmed #26879133.

ABSTRACT: Fatigue is one of the most common and disabling symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). Since fatigue was first described as a common feature of PD 20 years ago, little progress has been made in understanding its causes or treatment. Importantly, PD patients attending the 2013 World Parkinson Congress voted fatigue as the leading symptom in need of further research. In response, the Parkinson Disease Foundation and ProjectSpark assembled an international team of experts to create recommendations for clinical research to advance this field. The working group identified several areas in which shared standards would improve research quality and foster progress including terminology, diagnostic criteria, and measurement. Terminology needs to (1) clearly distinguish fatigue from related phenomena (eg, sleepiness, apathy, depression); (2) differentiate subjective fatigue complaints from objective performance fatigability; and (3) specify domains affected by fatigue and causal factors. We propose diagnostic criteria for PD-related fatigue to guide participant selection for clinical trials and add rigor to mechanistic studies. Recommendations are made for measurement of subjective fatigue complaints, performance fatigability, and neurophysiologic changes. We also suggest areas in which future research is needed to address methodological issues and validate or optimize current practices. Many limitations in current PD-related fatigue research may be addressed by improving methodological standards, many of which are already being successfully applied in clinical fatigue research in other medical conditions (eg, cancer, multiple sclerosis). © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

9 Review Accuracy of screening instruments for detection of neuropsychiatric syndromes in Parkinson's disease. 2016

Martinez-Martin, Pablo / Leentjens, Albert F G / de Pedro-Cuesta, Jesus / Chaudhuri, Kallol Ray / Schrag, Anette E / Weintraub, Daniel. ·National Center of Epidemiology and CIBERNED, Carlos III Institute of Health, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Psychiatry, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, The Netherlands. · National Parkinson Foundation International Centre of Excellence, King's College London, London, United Kingdom. · National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Mental Health Biomedical Research Centre and Dementia Unit at South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and King's College London, London, United Kingdom. · UCL Institute of Neurology, University College London, London, Royal Free Campus, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Psychiatry and Departments of Neurology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. · Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. ·Mov Disord · Pubmed #26695691.

ABSTRACT: Parkinson's disease includes neuropsychiatric manifestations, such as depression, anxiety, apathy, psychosis, and impulse control disorders, which often are unreported by patients and caregivers or undetected by doctors. Given their substantial impact on patients and caregivers as well as the existence of effective therapies for some of these disorders, screening for neuropsychiatric symptoms is important. Instruments for screening have a particular methodology for validation, and their performance is expressed in terms of accuracy compared with formal diagnostic criteria. The present study reviews the attributes of the screening instruments applied for detection of the aforementioned major neuropsychiatric symptoms in Parkinson's disease. A quasi-systematic review (including predefined selection criteria, but not evaluating the quality of the reviewed studies) was carried out on the basis of previous systematic reviews (commissioned by the American Academy of Neurology and the Movement Disorder Society) and made current by conducting a literature search (2005-2014). For depression, 11 scales and questionnaires were shown to be valid for Parkinson's disease screening. The recently developed Parkinson Anxiety Scale and the Geriatric Anxiety Inventory demonstrate satisfactory properties as screening instruments for anxiety, and the Lille Apathy Rating Scale for detection of apathy. No scale adequately screens for psychosis, so a specific psychosis instrument should be developed. The Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's Disease (Questionnaire and Rating Scale) are valid for comprehensive screening of impulse control disorders, and the Parkinson's Disease-Sexual Addiction Screening Test for hypersexuality specifically.

10 Review Advances in the treatment of cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease. 2015

Goldman, Jennifer G / Weintraub, Daniel. ·Rush University Medical Center, Department of Neurological Sciences, Section of Parkinson Disease and Movement Disorders, Chicago, Illinois, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. · Department of Neurology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. · Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. ·Mov Disord · Pubmed #26297863.

ABSTRACT: Cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease (PD) is a frequent complication, with significant interindividual variability in clinical symptoms, severity, timing, and neural substrates. Recent studies have focused not only on understanding PD dementia, but also mild cognitive impairment in PD, which may represent a prodromal stage for dementia. In recent years, there have been important advances regarding clinical characterizations, definitions, associated biomarkers, and risk factors for both mild cognitive impairment in PD and PD dementia. However, there is a paucity of effective therapies for cognitive impairment in PD, whether for mild symptoms or for moderate to severe dementia. At present, only rivastigmine is U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved for PD dementia, an indication received nearly a decade ago. Given the frequency of PD cognitive impairment and its substantial impact on both patients and families, the lack of available and effective treatments represents a striking gap in the field, especially when compared to the large number of available therapies for PD motor symptoms and complications. Improved symptomatic therapies, as well as potential disease-modifying agents, for PD cognitive impairment are needed. Most therapeutic trials for PD dementia and mild cognitive impairment in PD have focused on drugs developed for and tested in Alzheimer's disease, such as cholinesterase inhibitors and the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, memantine, though recent and ongoing trials examine the effects of pharmacological agents affecting other neurotransmitters, as well as nonpharmacological therapies, including mental and physical exercise and neurostimulation. This review summarizes the design and outcomes of trials for PD cognitive impairment published since 2013 and highlights future therapeutic research opportunities and challenges.

11 Review Clinical spectrum of impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease. 2015

Weintraub, Daniel / David, Anthony S / Evans, Andrew H / Grant, Jon E / Stacy, Mark. ·Departments of Psychiatry and Neurology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. ·Mov Disord · Pubmed #25370355.

ABSTRACT: Impulse control disorders (ICDs), including compulsive gambling, buying, sexual behavior, and eating, are a serious and increasingly recognized psychiatric complication in Parkinson's disease (PD). Other impulsive-compulsive behaviors (ICBs) have been described in PD, including punding (stereotyped, repetitive, purposeless behaviors) and dopamine dysregulation syndrome (DDS; compulsive PD medication overuse). ICDs have been most closely related to the use of dopamine agonists (DAs), perhaps more so at higher doses; in contrast, DDS is primarily associated with shorter-acting, higher-potency dopaminergic medications, such as apomorphine and levodopa. Possible risk factors for ICDs include male sex, younger age and younger age at PD onset, a pre-PD history of ICDs, and a personal or family history of substance abuse, bipolar disorder, or gambling problems. Given the paucity of treatment options and potentially serious consequences, it is critical for PD patients to be monitored closely for development of ICDs as part of routine clinical care.

12 Review Therapeutic development paths for cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease: report of a regulatory roundtable. 2014

Eberling, Jamie / Vincent, Lona / Goldman, Jennifer G / Weintraub, Daniel / Kulisevsky, Jaime / Marras, Connie / Stebbins, Glenn / Kieburtz, Karl. ·Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research, New York, NY, USA. · Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · Sant Pau Hospital, Barcelona, Spain. · University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA. ·J Parkinsons Dis · Pubmed #24989876.

ABSTRACT: Cognitive impairment is a common occurrence in Parkinson's disease (PD), although the severity and specific presentation varies across patients. Initial deficits, including mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI), may remain stable or in many cases, may progress over variable lengths of time to Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD). As there are currently no marketed treatments for milder forms of cognitive impairment, an opportunity exists to define the path for therapeutic development in this area. In the absence of a well-defined path for the approval of therapies that target PD-MCI, pharmaceutical companies are unlikely to pursue this indication. In order to move forward and improve the quality of life for PD patients, it is imperative for the field to have consensus on the definition of PD-MCI, the best instruments to measure cognitive decline, and a strategy for future clinical trials.

13 Review Psychiatric issues in cognitive impairment. 2014

Aarsland, Dag / Taylor, John-Paul / Weintraub, Daniel. ·Alzheimer's Disease Research Centre, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Centre for Age-Related Medicine, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway; Department of Geriatric Psychiatry, Akershus University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. ·Mov Disord · Pubmed #24757113.

ABSTRACT: Neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) such as depression, hallucinations and apathy commonly occur in Parkinson's disease (PD) and have major clinical consequences including a negative impact on quality of life. This review discusses the epidemiology, clinical features, diagnostic procedures and treatment issues of NPS in PD and related disorders in the perspective of cognitive impairment, focusing on depression, anxiety, visual hallucinations, apathy, sleep disturbances, impulse control disorder and non-motor fluctuations. The majority of NPS are more common in PD patients with dementia, possibly related to shared underlying pathologies. Recent studies also suggest that NPS are associated with mild cognitive impairment in PD, in particular with the amnestic type. Accurate diagnosis of NPS is important but can be difficult, due to overlapping symptoms and similar appearance of symptoms of motor symptoms of parkinsonism, cognitive impairment, mood disorders and apathy. There are few systematic studies focusing on the management of NPS in PD with cognitive impairment.

14 Review Should impulse control disorders and dopamine dysregulation syndrome be indications for deep brain stimulation and intestinal levodopa? 2013

Okun, Michael S / Weintraub, Daniel. ·University of Florida Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration, Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Gainesville, Florida. ·Mov Disord · Pubmed #24243803.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Review Diagnostic criteria for mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease: Movement Disorder Society Task Force guidelines. 2012

Litvan, Irene / Goldman, Jennifer G / Tröster, Alexander I / Schmand, Ben A / Weintraub, Daniel / Petersen, Ronald C / Mollenhauer, Brit / Adler, Charles H / Marder, Karen / Williams-Gray, Caroline H / Aarsland, Dag / Kulisevsky, Jaime / Rodriguez-Oroz, Maria C / Burn, David J / Barker, Roger A / Emre, Murat. ·Division of Movement Disorders, Department of Neurology, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, USA. ilitvan@ucsd.edu ·Mov Disord · Pubmed #22275317.

ABSTRACT: Mild cognitive impairment is common in nondemented Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and may be a harbinger of dementia. In view of its importance, the Movement Disorder Society commissioned a task force to delineate diagnostic criteria for mild cognitive impairment in PD. The proposed diagnostic criteria are based on a literature review and expert consensus. This article provides guidelines to characterize the clinical syndrome and methods for its diagnosis. The criteria will require validation, and possibly refinement, as additional research improves our understanding of the epidemiology, presentation, neurobiology, assessment, and long-term course of this clinical syndrome. These diagnostic criteria will support future research efforts to identify at the earliest stage those PD patients at increased risk of progressive cognitive decline and dementia who may benefit from clinical interventions at a predementia stage.

16 Review Is depression in Parkinson's disease (PD) a specific entity? 2012

Even, Christian / Weintraub, Daniel. ·Clinique des Maladies Mentales et de l'Encéphale, Centre Hospitalier Sainte-Anne, Paris, France. c.even@ch-sainte-anne.fr ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #21794923.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Clinical lore and research have suggested for a long time that depression and PD are closely related. We examined the validity of depression associated with PD (dPD) as a specific subtype of depression according to face validity, descriptive validity, construct validity and predictive validity. METHODS: The English literature was reviewed after searching the MEDLINE database up to June 2010. RESULTS: There appears to be three possible subtypes of comorbid depression: 1) patients who would have been depressed even if they had no PD (nonspecific-casual comorbid dPD), 2) patients who would have been depressed if they had had another disabling medical illness (nonspecific-reactive comorbid dPD) 3) those for which depression is directly related to the underlying pathophysiology of PD (specific comorbid dPD). These latter patients may more often present with particular clinical characteristics (descriptive validity): absence of history of depression or only within 5 years prior to onset of PD, absence of guilty thoughts and self-blame, absence of suicidal behavior, right-sided onset. However, dPD is only partly responsive to dopamine replacement and cannot be solely explained by dopamine deficiency. Other neurotransmitter systems are affected in PD and are involved in the pathophysiology of dPD. Their relative involvement however may differ from that in idiopathic depression (i.e.: lesser involvement of serotonergic systems). LIMITATIONS: Therapeutic data are limited to few controlled trials. CONCLUSIONS: Further research may allow differential diagnosis between dPD subtypes (i.e.: those who do and do not result from the underlying pathophysiological process of PD) and help inform treatment choice.

17 Review Cognitive impairment in nondemented Parkinson's disease. 2011

Barone, Paolo / Aarsland, Dag / Burn, David / Emre, Murat / Kulisevsky, Jaime / Weintraub, Daniel. ·Department of Neurological Sciences, University Federico II-ICD Hermitage, Capodimonte, Naples, Italy. barone@unina.it ·Mov Disord · Pubmed #22170275.

ABSTRACT: A substantial percentage of patients with newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease without dementia are reported to be affected by cognitive impairment (CI). In practice, however, CI is underrecognized, as the signs may not be apparent in early-stage disease and many routine assessment tools lack the sensitivity to detect subtle cognitive dysfunction. Patients with PD and mild CI (MCI) may have a higher risk of developing dementia than cognitively intact PD patients; however, it is not currently known which patients with CI are at increased risk of developing dementia. This review summarizes current knowledge about CI in nondemented PD; it discusses the structural and functional changes associated with CI and addresses areas of unmet needs. We focus on questions that should be addressed in future studies to achieve consensus on its characteristics and definition, pathophysiology, epidemiology, diagnosis and assessment, and treatment and management.

18 Review The Movement Disorder Society Evidence-Based Medicine Review Update: Treatments for the non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. 2011

Seppi, Klaus / Weintraub, Daniel / Coelho, Miguel / Perez-Lloret, Santiago / Fox, Susan H / Katzenschlager, Regina / Hametner, Eva-Maria / Poewe, Werner / Rascol, Olivier / Goetz, Christopher G / Sampaio, Cristina. ·Department of Neurology, Medical University Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria. klaus.seppi@uki.at ·Mov Disord · Pubmed #22021174.

ABSTRACT: The Movement Disorder Society (MDS) Task Force on Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) Review of Treatments for Parkinson's Disease (PD) was first published in 2002 and was updated in 2005 to cover clinical trial data up to January 2004 with the focus on motor symptoms of PD. In this revised version the MDS task force decided it was necessary to extend the review to non-motor symptoms. The objective of this work was to update previous EBM reviews on treatments for PD with a focus on non-motor symptoms. Level-I (randomized controlled trial, RCT) reports of pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions for the non-motor symptoms of PD, published as full articles in English between January 2002 and December 2010 were reviewed. Criteria for inclusion and ranking followed the original program outline and adhered to EBM methodology. For efficacy conclusions, treatments were designated: efficacious, likely efficacious, unlikely efficacious, non-efficacious, or insufficient evidence. Safety data were catalogued and reviewed. Based on the combined efficacy and safety assessment, Implications for clinical practice were determined using the following designations: clinically useful, possibly useful, investigational, unlikely useful, and not useful. Fifty-four new studies qualified for efficacy review while several other studies covered safety issues. Updated and new efficacy conclusions were made for all indications. The treatments that are efficacious for the management of the different non-motor symptoms are as follows: pramipexole for the treatment of depressive symptoms, clozapine for the treatment of psychosis, rivastigmine for the treatment of dementia, and botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) and BTX-B as well as glycopyrrolate for the treatment of sialorrhea. The practical implications for these treatments, except for glycopyrrolate, are that they are clinically useful. Since there is insufficient evidence of glycopyrrolate for the treatment of sialorrhea exceeding 1 week, the practice implication is that it is possibly useful. The treatments that are likely efficacious for the management of the different non-motor symptoms are as follows: the tricyclic antidepressants nortriptyline and desipramine for the treatment of depression or depressive symptoms and macrogol for the treatment of constipation. The practice implications for these treatments are possibly useful. For most of the other interventions there is insufficient evidence to make adequate conclusions on their efficacy. This includes the tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline, all selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) reviewed (paroxetine, citalopram, sertraline, and fluoxetine), the newer antidepressants atomoxetine and nefazodone, pergolide, Ω-3 fatty acids as well as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for the treatment of depression or depressive symptoms; methylphenidate and modafinil for the treatment of fatigue; amantadine for the treatment of pathological gambling; donepezil, galantamine, and memantine for the treatment of dementia; quetiapine for the treatment of psychosis; fludrocortisone and domperidone for the treatment of orthostatic hypotension; sildenafil for the treatment of erectile dysfunction, ipratropium bromide spray for the treatment of sialorrhea; levodopa/carbidopa controlled release (CR), pergolide, eszopiclone, melatonin 3 to 5 mg and melatonin 50 mg for the treatment of insomnia and modafinil for the treatment of excessive daytime sleepiness. Due to safety issues the practice implication is that pergolide and nefazodone are not useful for the above-mentioned indications. Due to safety issues, olanzapine remains not useful for the treatment of psychosis. As none of the studies exceeded a duration of 6 months, the recommendations given are for the short-term management of the different non-motor symptoms. There were no RCTs that met inclusion criteria for the treatment of anxiety disorders, apathy, medication-related impulse control disorders and related behaviors other than pathological gambling, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD), sweating, or urinary dysfunction. Therefore, there is insufficient evidence for the treatment of these indications. This EBM review of interventions for the non-motor symptoms of PD updates the field, but, because several RCTs are ongoing, a continual updating process is needed. Several interventions and indications still lack good quality evidence, and these gaps offer an opportunity for ongoing research. © 2011 Movement Disorder Society.

19 Review MDS Task Force on mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease: critical review of PD-MCI. 2011

Litvan, Irene / Aarsland, Dag / Adler, Charles H / Goldman, Jennifer G / Kulisevsky, Jaime / Mollenhauer, Brit / Rodriguez-Oroz, Maria C / Tröster, Alexander I / Weintraub, Daniel. ·Division of Movement Disorders, Department of Neurology, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, USA. i.litvan@louisville.edu ·Mov Disord · Pubmed #21661055.

ABSTRACT: There is controversy regarding the definition and characteristics of mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease. The Movement Disorder Society commissioned a Task Force to critically evaluate the literature and determine the frequency and characteristics of Parkinson's disease-mild cognitive impairment and its association with dementia. A comprehensive PubMed literature review was conducted using systematic inclusion and exclusion criteria. A mean of 26.7% (range, 18.9%-38.2%) of nondemented patients with Parkinson's disease have mild cognitive impairment. The frequency of Parkinson's disease-mild cognitive impairment increases with age, disease duration, and disease severity. Impairments occur in a range of cognitive domains, but single domain impairment is more common than multiple domain impairment, and within single domain impairment, nonamnestic is more common than amnestic impairment. A high proportion of patients with Parkinson's disease-mild cognitive impairment progress to dementia in a relatively short period of time. The primary conclusions of the Task Force are that: (1) Parkinson's disease-mild cognitive impairment is common, (2) there is significant heterogeneity within Parkinson's disease-mild cognitive impairment in the number and types of cognitive domain impairments, (3) Parkinson's disease-mild cognitive impairment appears to place patients at risk of progressing to dementia, and (4) formal diagnostic criteria for Parkinson's disease-mild cognitive impairment are needed.

20 Review Parkinson's disease: the quintessential neuropsychiatric disorder. 2011

Weintraub, Daniel / Burn, David J. ·Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. daniel.weintraub@uphs.upenn.edu ·Mov Disord · Pubmed #21626547.

ABSTRACT: Although diagnosed by characteristic motor features, Parkinson's disease may be preceded, and is frequently accompanied by, a wide range of cognitive and neuropsychiatric features. In addition to the most commonly studied disorders of dementia, depression, and psychosis, other relatively common and clinically significant psychiatric complications include impulse control disorders, anxiety symptoms, disorders of sleep and wakefulness, and apathy. These problems may be underrecognized and are frequently undertreated. The emergent focus on nonmotor aspects of Parkinson's disease over the past quarter of a century is highlighted by a nonlinear increase in the number of articles published devoted to this topic. Although the development of newer antidepressants, atypical antipsychotics, and cholinesterase inhibitors in recent years has had a positive benefit on the management of these troublesome and distressing symptoms, responses are frequently suboptimal, and this remains an area of major unmet therapeutic need.

21 Review Impulsive and compulsive behaviors in Parkinson's disease. 2009

Evans, Andrew H / Strafella, Antonio P / Weintraub, Daniel / Stacy, Mark. ·Department of Neurology, Royal Melbourne Hospital, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia. Andrew.Evans@mh.org.au ·Mov Disord · Pubmed #19526584.

ABSTRACT: Antiparkinson therapy can be the primary cause of a range of nonmotor symptoms that include a set of complex disinhibitory psychomotor pathologies and are linked by their repetitive, reward or incentive-based natures. These behaviors relate to aberrant or excessive dopamine receptor stimulation and encompass impulse control disorders (ICDs), punding, and the dopamine dysregulation syndrome (DDS). Common ICDs include pathological gambling, hypersexuality, compulsive eating, and compulsive buying. This review focuses on the phenomenology, epidemiology, and methods to identify and rate these disorders. The management of dopaminergic drug-related compulsive behaviors is discussed in the light of the current understanding of the neurobiological substrate of these disorders.

22 Review Treatment of early Parkinson's disease. Part 2. 2009

Simuni, Tanya / Lyons, Kelly E / Pahwa, Rajesh / Hauser, Robert A / Comella, Cynthia / Elmer, Lawrence / Weintraub, Daniel. ·Department of Neurology, Northwestern University, Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Center, Chicago, Ill, USA. tsimuni@nmff.org ·Eur Neurol · Pubmed #19176961.

ABSTRACT: The management of early Parkinson's disease (PD) involves the treatment of motor symptoms, and, increasingly, non-motor symptoms. Given the fast pace of clinical research in PD, clinicians are faced with the challenge of integrating the latest findings into the ongoing care of individual PD patients. Part 1 of this 2-part article reviews efficacy and safety data for the newest PD treatment options, as well as for established therapies. Part 2 of the article, presented here, reviews key data relevant to the assessment of potential neuroprotective therapies and the treatment of non-motor symptoms.

23 Review Treatment of early Parkinson's disease. Part 1. 2009

Simuni, Tanya / Lyons, Kelly E / Pahwa, Rajesh / Hauser, Robert A / Comella, Cynthia / Elmer, Lawrence / Weintraub, Daniel. ·Department of Neurology, Northwestern University, Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Center, Chicago, Ill 60611, USA. tsimuni@nmff.org ·Eur Neurol · Pubmed #19176960.

ABSTRACT: The management of early Parkinson's disease (PD) involves the treatment of motor symptoms and, increasingly, non-motor symptoms. Given the fast pace of clinical research in PD, clinicians are faced with the challenge of integrating the latest findings into the ongoing care of individual PD patients. Part 1 of this 2-part article reviews motor symptom efficacy data for the newest PD treatment options, as well as for established therapies. Safety and tolerability data are also reviewed. Part 2 of the article reviews key findings relevant to the assessment of potential neuroprotective therapies and the treatment of non-motor symptoms.

24 Review Diagnosis and management of Parkinson's disease dementia. 2008

Poewe, W / Gauthier, S / Aarsland, D / Leverenz, J B / Barone, P / Weintraub, D / Tolosa, E / Dubois, B. ·Department of Neurology, Medical University Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria. werner.poewe@uibk.ac.at ·Int J Clin Pract · Pubmed #18822028.

ABSTRACT: Parkinson's disease (PD) has long been considered predominantly a motor disorder. However, its frequent association with dementia, which contributes significantly to the morbidity and mortality of the condition, is gaining increasing recognition. PD dementia (PDD) has a unique clinical profile and neuropathology, distinct from Alzheimer's disease (AD). Cholinergic deficits, a feature of both AD and PDD, underlie the rationale for cholinesterase inhibitor therapy in both conditions. In clinical practice, it is important that PDD should be recognised and appropriately treated. This review aims to outline the recently proposed clinical diagnostic criteria for PDD and to summarise the guidelines/recommendations published since 2006 on the use of cholinesterase inhibitors in the management of PDD. Although the cholinesterase inhibitor rivastigmine has recently been approved for the management of PDD, there remains a need for the development of novel therapies that can affect key mechanisms of the disease or prevent/delay patients with PD and mild cognitive impairment from progressing to PDD.

25 Review Parkinson's disease--Part 3: Neuropsychiatric symptoms. 2008

Weintraub, Daniel / Comella, Cynthia L / Horn, Stacy. ·Department of Psychiatry and Neurology, University of Pennsylvania, 3615 Chestnut St, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. wintrau@upenn.edu ·Am J Manag Care · Pubmed #18402509.

ABSTRACT: The nonmotor neuropsychiatric symptoms of Parkinson's disease, particularly depression, psychosis, and cognitive impairment/dementia, are major contributors to disability and a decline in quality of life. Their effect on patients may be more disabling than motor symptoms. Increasing awareness of the importance of recognizing and treating neuropsychiatric symptoms of this disease in the medical community is a focus of specialists and organizations. This article looks at useful screening measures to help clinicians recognize neuropsychiatric symptoms and offers suggestions for their effective treatment.

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