Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Parkinson Disease: HELP
Articles by Ji Young Yun
Based on 40 articles published since 2010
(Why 40 articles?)
||||

Between 2010 and 2020, Ji Young Yun wrote the following 40 articles about Parkinson Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2
1 Review Loss of Nigral Hyperintensity on 3 Tesla MRI of Parkinsonism: Comparison With (123) I-FP-CIT SPECT. 2016

Bae, Yun Jung / Kim, Jong-Min / Kim, Eunhee / Lee, Kyung Mi / Kang, Seo Young / Park, Hyun Soo / Kim, Kyeong Joon / Kim, Young Eun / Oh, Eung Seok / Yun, Ji Young / Kim, Ji Seon / Jeong, Hye-Jin / Jeon, Beomseok / Kim, Sang Eun. ·Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam, Korea. · Department of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Chungbuk National University Hospital, Cheongju, Korea. · Neuroscience Research Institute, Gachon University of Medicine and Science, Incheon, Korea. · Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea. ·Mov Disord · Pubmed #26990970.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate whether 3 Tesla susceptibility-weighted imaging can detect the alteration of substantia nigra hyperintensity in Parkinson's disease (PD), multiple system atrophy (MSA), and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and to assess the concordance between the loss of nigral hyperintensity on 3 Tesla susceptibility-weighted imaging and the nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration indicated by (123) I-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl)-N-(3-fluoropropyl)-nortropane single photon emission computerized tomography. METHODS: Consecutive subjects with suspected parkinsonism were included, and clinical diagnosis was solidified during clinical follow-up. Two blinded neuroradiologists interpreted the nigral hyperintensity on susceptibility-weighted imaging. The performance of susceptibility-weighted imaging for detection of nigral hyperintensity loss was estimated on the basis of the clinical diagnosis and compared with single photon emission computerized tomography results. RESULTS: The study included 210 subjects (126 PD, 11 MSA, 11 PSP patients, 26 healthy controls, 36 disease controls). The presence or absence of nigral hyperintensity was accurately visualized in 112 PD, 7 MSA, and 11 PSP patients and 53 controls. We identified 16 false-negative cases and 11 false-positive cases. The sensitivity and specificity of susceptibility-weighted imaging were 88.8% and 83.6%, respectively. The concordance rate between susceptibility-weighted imaging and single photon emission computerized tomography was 86.2%. CONCLUSIONS: The loss of nigral hyperintensity on susceptibility-weighted imaging suggested nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration in a large portion of patients with parkinsonism, which was indicated by (123) I-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl)-N-(3-fluoropropyl)-nortropane single photon emission computerized tomography. In consideration of false-negative and -positive cases, well-designed imaging protocols should be introduced to improve the performance of nigral hyperintensity imaging. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

2 Clinical Trial Comparison of once-daily versus twice-daily combination of ropinirole prolonged release in Parkinson's disease. 2013

Yun, Ji Young / Kim, Han-Joon / Lee, Jee-Young / Kim, Young Eun / Kim, Ji Seon / Kim, Jong-Min / Jeon, Beom S. ·Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea. brain@snu.ac.kr. ·BMC Neurol · Pubmed #24004540.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Ropinirole prolonged release (RPR) is a once-daily formulation. However, there may be individual pharmacokinetic differences so that multiple dosing may be preferred in some individuals. This study compares once-daily and twice-daily RPR in patients with Parkinson's disease. METHODS: This study was an open-label crossover study. We enrolled Parkinson's disease patients on dopamine agonist therapy with unsatisfactory control such as motor fluctuation, dyskinesia and sleep-related problems. Agonists were switched into equivalent dose of RPR. Subjects were consecutively enrolled into either once-daily first or twice-daily first groups, and received the same amount of RPR in a single and two divided dosing for 8 weeks respectively in a crossover manner without a washout period.The primary outcome was a questionnaire of the preference completed by patients in the last visit. The secondary outcome measures included the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part 3 (mUPDRS), Hoehn and Yahr stage (H&Y); sleep questionnaire including overall quality of sleep, nocturnal off symptoms and early morning symptoms; Epworth Sleep Scale (ESS); compliances and patient global impression (PGI). RESULTS: A total of 82 patients were enrolled and 61 completed the study. 31 patients preferred twice-daily regimen, 17 preferred the once-daily regimen, and 13 had no preference. Their mean mUPDRS, H&Y, ESS, sleep quality, compliance and adverse events were not statistically different in both regimens. PGI-improvement on wearing off defined was better in twice-daily dosing regimen. CONCLUSIONS: RPR is a once-daily formulation, but multiple dosing was preferred in many patients. Multiple dosing of RPR might be a therapeutic option if once-daily dosing is unsatisfactory.

3 Clinical Trial Effect of intravenous amantadine on dopaminergic-drug-resistant freezing of gait. 2011

Kim, Young Eun / Yun, Ji Young / Jeon, Beom S. · ·Parkinsonism Relat Disord · Pubmed #21463965.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Article Subtypes of Sleep Disturbance in Parkinson's Disease Based on the Cross-Culturally Validated Korean Version of Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale-2. 2020

Yang, Hui Jun / Kim, Han Joon / Koh, Seong Beom / Kim, Joong Seok / Ahn, Tae Beom / Cheon, Sang Myung / Cho, Jin Whan / Kim, Yoon Joong / Ma, Hyeo Il / Park, Mee Young / Baik, Jong Sam / Lee, Phil Hyu / Chung, Sun Ju / Kim, Jong Min / Song, In Uk / Kim, Ji Young / Sung, Young Hee / Kwon, Do Young / Lee, Jae Hyeok / Lee, Jee Young / Kim, Ji Seon / Yun, Ji Young / Kim, Hee Jin / Hong, Jin Yong / Kim, Mi Jung / Youn, Jinyoung / Kim, Ji Sun / Oh, Eung Seok / Yoon, Won Tae / You, Sooyeoun / Kwon, Kyum Yil / Park, Hyung Eun / Lee, Su Yun / Kim, Younsoo / Kim, Hee Tae / Kim, Sang Jin. ·Department of Neurology, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan, Korea. · Deparment of Neurology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Kyung Hee University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea. · Department of Neurology and Neuroscience Center, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Parkinson/Alzheimer Center, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Seoul Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Gachon University Gil Hospital, College of Medicine, Gachon University, Incheon, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Ansan, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Chungbuk National University School of Medicine, Chungbuk National University Hospital, Cheongju, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Ewha Womans University Seoul Hospital, Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Bobath Memorial Hospital, Seongnam, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Chungnam National University School of Medicine, Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Soonchunhyang University Seoul Hospital, Soonchunhyang University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Samsung Changwon Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Changwon, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea. · Dementia and Neurodegenerative Disease Research Center, Inje University, Busan, Korea. jsk502@hotmail.com. ·J Clin Neurol · Pubmed #31942760.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: This study aimed to determine the clinimetric properties of the Korean version of Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale-2 (K-PDSS-2) and whether distinct subtypes of sleep disturbance can be empirically identified in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) using the cross-culturally validated K-PDSS-2. METHODS: The internal consistency, test-retest reliability, scale precision, and convergent validity of K-PDSS-2 were assessed in a nationwide, multicenter study of 122 patients with PD. Latent class analysis (LCA) was used to derive subgroups of patients who experienced similar patterns of sleep-related problems and nocturnal disabilities. RESULTS: The total K-PDSS-2 score was 11.67±9.87 (mean±standard deviation) at baseline and 12.61±11.17 at the retest. Cronbach's α coefficients of the total K-PDSS-2 scores at baseline and follow-up were 0.851 and 0.880, respectively. The intraclass correlation coefficients over the 2-week study period ranged from 0.672 to 0.848. The total K-PDSS-2 score was strongly correlated with health-related quality of life measures and other corresponding nonmotor scales. LCA revealed three distinct subtypes of sleep disturbance in the study patients: "less-troubled sleepers," "PD-related nocturnal difficulties," and "disturbed sleepers." CONCLUSIONS: K-PDSS-2 showed good clinimetric attributes in accordance with previous studies that employed the original version of the PDSS-2, therefore confirming the cross-cultural usefulness of the scale. This study has further documented the first application of an LCA approach for identifying subtypes of sleep disturbance in patients with PD.

5 Article Determinants of Functional Independence or Its Loss following Subthalamic Nucleus Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease. 2019

Kim, Ryul / Yoo, Dallah / Jung, Yu Jin / Lee, Woong-Woo / Ehm, Gwanhee / Yun, Ji Young / Kim, Hee Jin / Lee, Jee-Young / Kim, Ji-Young / Kim, Han-Joon / Paek, Sun Ha / Jeon, Beomseok. ·Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Daejeon St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Nowon Eulji Medical Center, Eulji University, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, National Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Ewha Womans University Seoul Hospital, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Seoul National University - Seoul Metropolitan Government Boramae Medical Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Inje University Seoul Paik Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea, brain@snu.ac.kr. ·Stereotact Funct Neurosurg · Pubmed #31266044.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to describe the change in functional status following bilateral subthalamic nucleus stimulation (STN-DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD) and to identify predictors of postoperative functional dependence. METHODS: We included PD patients with bilateral STN-DBS who had complete Schwab & England Activities of Daily Living (S&E ADL) Scale data at baseline and 6 months after surgery from our prospective registry. Functional dependence was defined as an S&E ADL score of less than 80%. All data were collected from the on-medication state and on-stimulation state (after surgery). Logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the factors predictive of functional dependence after surgery. RESULTS: A total of 196 patients were included. At baseline, 41 patients were functionally dependent and the other 155 were functionally independent. Among the patients with preoperative dependence, 32 (78%) became functionally independent after surgery, and this conversion was associated with a lower baseline axial score (p = 0.012). Among the patients with preoperative independence, 21 (14%) developed postoperative dependence, and this conversion was associated with a higher baseline axial score (p = 0.013) and its smaller improvement (p < 0.001). Female sex (odds ratio [OR] 3.214; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.210-8.542; p = 0.019) and a higher baseline axial score (OR 1.184; 95% CI 1.056-1.327; p = 0.004) significantly predicted the risk of postoperative functional dependence. CONCLUSIONS: We found that functional status following bilateral STN-DBS is closely related to preoperative axial symptoms. When loss of independence is a potential target for STN-DBS, clinicians should take into consideration the severity of axial impairment before surgery.

6 Article Effect of unilateral subthalamic deep brain stimulation in highly asymmetrical Parkinson's disease: 7-year follow-up. 2018

Ehm, Gwanhee / Kim, Han-Joon / Kim, Ji-Young / Lee, Jee-Young / Kim, Hee Jin / Yun, Ji Young / Kim, Young Eun / Yang, Hui-Jun / Lim, Yong Hoon / Jeon, Beomseok / Paek, Sun Ha. ·1Department of Neurology, National Medical Center. · 2Department of Neurology and Movement Disorder Center, Parkinson Study Group, and Neuroscience Research Institute, College of Medicine, Seoul National University. · 3Department of Neurology, Inje University Seoul Paik Hospital. · 4Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Metropolitan Boramae Hospital. · 5Department of Neurology, Konkuk University Medical Center. · 6Department of Neurology, Ewha Women's University College of Medicine. · 7Department of Neurology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang-si; and. · 8Department of Neurology, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan, Korea. · 9Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Hospital, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul. ·J Neurosurg · Pubmed #30497175.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVEFor patients with highly asymmetrical Parkinson's disease (PD), unilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been suggested as a reasonable treatment. However, the results of a previous 2-year follow-up study involving patients with prominently asymmetrical PD who had unilateral STN DBS suggested that simultaneous bilateral surgery should be performed. In the present study, the authors analyze 7-year follow-up data from the same patient group to examine changes in motor benefit from unilateral STN DBS over time and the interval between initial unilateral surgery and a second (contralateral) STN DBS surgery.METHODSEight patients with highly asymmetrical parkinsonism who underwent unilateral STN DBS were evaluated. The factors measured were scores on the motor part of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS III), Hoehn and Yahr (HY) stage, and levodopa equivalent daily dose (LEDD). Evaluations occurred at 3, 6, and 12 months after the initial surgery and annually thereafter.RESULTSThe mean follow-up period was 91.5 months (range 36-105 months). Three years after the initial unilateral surgery, motor benefits on the contralateral side continued; however, an aggravation of the ipsilateral parkinsonism attenuated the improvement in total UPDRS III scores, which reverted to baseline. Axial motor score, LEDD, and HY stage did not differ from the baseline. Seven of 8 patients (87.5%) were considered candidates for a second surgery to offer additional motor benefits. Of the 7 candidates, 4 patients (50% of total patients) underwent the second surgery at 58.5 ± 11.6 (mean ± SD) months after the initial surgery. Three patients were not able to have the second surgery: one patient died of gastric cancer, one patient was severely immobilized by an accident, and one patient could not afford the second surgery. One patient remained content with the initial unilateral surgery throughout the follow-up period.CONCLUSIONSSeven of 8 patients with unilateral STN DBS became candidates for second surgery before battery replacement surgery of the first implanted device. Baseline asymmetry alone may not predict appropriate candidates for unilateral STN DBS. This study provides further evidence that, from a long-term perspective, initial simultaneous bilateral STN DBS should be considered for PD patients with prominently asymmetrical motor symptoms.

7 Article The Prevalence of Cerebral Microbleeds in Non-Demented Parkinson's Disease Patients. 2018

Kim, Kyeong Joon / Bae, Yun Jung / Kim, Jong-Min / Kim, Beom Joon / Oh, Eung Seok / Yun, Ji Young / Kim, Ji Seon / Kim, Han-Joon. ·Department of Neurology, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Goyang, Korea. · Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Chungnam National University Hospital, Chungnam National University College of Medicine, Daejeon, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital, Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Chungbuk National University Hospital, Chungbuk National University College of Medicine, Cheongju, Korea. ·J Korean Med Sci · Pubmed #30416409.

ABSTRACT: Background: Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) are associated with cerebrovascular risk factors and cognitive dysfunction among patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, whether CMBs themselves are associated with PD is to be elucidated. Methods: We analyzed the presence of CMBs using 3-Tesla brain magnetic resonance imaging in non-demented patients with PD and in age-, sex-, and hypertension-matched control subjects. PD patients were classified according to their motor subtypes: tremor-dominant, intermediate, and postural instability-gait disturbance (PIGD). Other cerebrovascular risk factors and small vessel disease (SVD) burdens were also evaluated. Results: Two-hundred and five patients with PD and 205 control subjects were included. The prevalence of CMBs was higher in PD patients than in controls (16.1% vs. 8.8%; odds ratio [OR], 2.126; Conclusion: We found that CMBs are more frequent in PD patients than in controls, especially in those with the PIGD subtype and CMBs on the lobar area. Further study investigating the pathogenetic significance of CMBs is required.

8 Article Musculoskeletal Problems Affect the Quality of Life of Patients with Parkinson's Disease. 2018

Kim, Young Eun / Kim, Han-Joon / Yun, Ji Young / Lee, Woong-Woo / Yang, Hui-Jun / Kim, Jong-Min / Jeon, Beomseok. ·Department of Neurology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang, Korea. · Department of Neurology and Movement Disorders Center, Parkinson Study Group, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Korea · Department of Neurology, Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital, Seoul, Korea · Department of Neurology, Eulji General Hospital, Seoul, Korea · Department of Neurology, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan, Korea · Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Sungnam, Korea ·J Mov Disord · Pubmed #30304926.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Musculoskeletal problems are more common in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) than in normal elderly, but the impact of musculoskeletal problems on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with PD is unknown. METHODS: Four hundred consecutive patients with PD were enrolled for the evaluation of musculoskeletal problems and HRQoL. HRQoL was assessed by the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, which comprised physical health and mental health. RESULTS: Of the total patients, 265 patients had musculoskeletal problems, and 135 patients did not have musculoskeletal problems. Patients with musculoskeletal problems reported lower levels of HRQoL in terms of physical health than did patients without musculoskeletal problems (p < 0.05). In women, all components of physical health were lower in patients with musculoskeletal problems than in patients without musculoskeletal problems (p < 0.05). Meanwhile, in men, only the bodily pain score of physical health was lower in patients with musculoskeletal problems than in patients without musculoskeletal problems. Mental health and physical health were negatively correlated with depression, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale I & II scores, and pain severity from musculoskeletal problems, in that order (p < 0.01 for all). CONCLUSION: These results suggest that musculoskeletal problems in patients with PD affect HRQoL significantly, mainly in terms of physical health rather than mental health and especially in women rather than men. Musculoskeletal problems should not be overlooked in the care of patients with PD.

9 Article Individual Therapeutic Singing Program for Vocal Quality and Depression in Parkinson's Disease. 2018

Han, Eun Young / Yun, Ji Young / Chong, Hyun Ju / Choi, Kyoung-Gyu. ·Department of Music Therapy, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital, Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea ·J Mov Disord · Pubmed #30086617.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) frequently experience depression associated with voice problems. Singing involves the use of similar muscles and the neural networks associated with vocal function and emotional response. The purpose of this study is to enhance vocal quality and depressive symptoms of patients with PD using individual singing program. METHODS: The Individual Therapeutic Singing Program for PD (ITSP-PD) was conducted by a certified music therapist. In total, nine PD patients with a subjective voice problem or depression participated in 6 sessions over 2 weeks. We measured the Maximum Phonation Time (MPT) via the Praat test, the Voice Handicap Index (VHI), the Voice-Related Quality of Life (V-RQOL) and the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). RESULTS: In total, 8 out of 9 patients completed all the sessions; 6 out of 8 patients participated in the follow-up test after 6 months. A statistically significant change in MPT (p = 0.011) was observed between the pre- and post-tests. The VHI (p = 0.035) and the GDS (p = 0.018) were significantly lower in the post-test. In the pre-, post-, and follow-up tests, the MPT (p = 0.030), V-RQOL (p = 0.008), and GDS (p = 0.009) were significantly changed. CONCLUSION: The ITSP-PD based on neurological singing therapy for PD showed therapeutic possibility for vocal function and depression in patients with PD. Our findings suggest the need for a randomized study to examine the continuing positive effects of the ITSP-PD over a longer period of time.

10 Article A 7-year observation of the effect of subthalamic deep brain stimulation on impulse control disorder in patients with Parkinson's disease. 2018

Kim, Aryun / Kim, Young Eun / Kim, Han-Joon / Yun, Ji Young / Yang, Hui-Jun / Lee, Woong-Woo / Shin, Chae Won / Park, Hyeyoung / Jung, Yu Jin / Kim, Ahro / Ehm, Gwanhee / Kim, Yoon / Jang, Mihee / Jeon, Beomseok. ·Department of Neurology, Movement Disorder Center, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea. · Department of Neurology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang, South Korea. · Department of Neurology, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital, Seoul, South Korea. · Department of Neurology, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan, South Korea. · Department of Neurology, Nowon Eulji Medical Center, Eulji University, Seoul, South Korea. · Department of Neurology, Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea. · Department of Neurology, Seoul Central Clinic, Seoul, South Korea. · Department of Neurology, Daejeon St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Daejeon, South Korea. · Department of Neurology, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, South Korea. · Department of Neurology, National Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea. · Department of Neurology, Jesus Hospital, Jeonju, South Korea. · Department of Neurology, Movement Disorder Center, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea. Electronic address: brain@snu.ac.kr. ·Parkinsonism Relat Disord · Pubmed #30054182.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Previous studies have reported improvement of impulse control disorders (ICDs) after subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) as well as some de novo ICDs. However, it is not clear how STN DBS changes ICDs in the long-term. METHODS MATERIALS: Eighty-nine patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) who had received a bilateral STN DBS from 2005 to 2009 and were included in our previous study were followed for 7 years with the modified Minnesota Impulsive Disorders Interview (mMIDI). Their mMIDI scores, medication, and frontal function tests measured preoperatively and at 1 and 7 years postoperatively were compared. RESULTS: A total of 61 patients were analyzed after excluding 10 and 18 patients due to death and lost to follow-up, respectively. The numbers of the patients with an ICD at each point were 8, 10, and 7, respectively. All preoperative ICDs disappeared after DBS. De novo ICDs within 1 year after DBS disappeared except for 1 patient. Six of the seven patients, who reported ICDs 7 years after the DBS developed that ICD between 1 and 7 years. Their total levodopa equivalent daily dose (LEDD) and dopamine agonist dose were not higher compared to the other 54 patients without ICDs. There was no correlation with the frontal lobe dysfunction and the electrode position in the subthalamus. CONCLUSION: STN DBS improves baseline ICDs and results in the development of "transient" de novo ICDs in the short-term. In addition, there is a unique group of the patients who develop ICDs a long time after DBS.

11 Article Amantadine and the Risk of Dyskinesia in Patients with Early Parkinson's Disease: An Open-Label, Pragmatic Trial. 2018

Kim, Aryun / Kim, Young Eun / Yun, Ji Young / Kim, Han-Joon / Yang, Hui-Jun / Lee, Woong-Woo / Shin, Chae Won / Park, Hyeyoung / Jung, Yu Jin / Kim, Ahro / Kim, Yoon / Jang, Mihee / Jeon, Beomseok. ·Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Nowon Eulji Medical Center, Eulji University, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Seoul Central Clinic, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Daejeon St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Daejeon, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Presbyterian Medical Center, Jeonju, Korea. ·J Mov Disord · Pubmed #29860788.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: We examined whether amantadine can prevent the development of dyskinesia. METHODS: Patients with drug-naïve Parkinson's disease (PD), younger than 70 years of age and in the early stage of PD (Hoehn and Yahr scale < 3), were recruited from April 2011 to December 2014. The exclusion criteria included the previous use of antiparkinsonian medication, the presence of dyskinesia, significant psychological disorders, and previous history of a hypersensitivity reaction. Patients were consecutively assigned to one of 3 treatment groups in an open label fashion: Group A-1, amantadine first and then levodopa when needed; Group A-2, amantadine first, dopamine agonist when needed, and then levodopa; and Group B, dopamine agonist first and then levodopa when needed. The primary endpoint was the development of dyskinesia, which was analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier survival rate. RESULTS: A total of 80 patients were enrolled: Group A-1 ( CONCLUSION: Amantadine as an initial treatment may decrease the incidence of dyskinesia in patients with drug-naïve PD.

12 Article Validity and Reliability Study of the Korean Tinetti Mobility Test for Parkinson's Disease. 2018

Park, Jinse / Koh, Seong-Beom / Kim, Hee Jin / Oh, Eungseok / Kim, Joong-Seok / Yun, Ji Young / Kwon, Do-Young / Kim, Younsoo / Kim, Ji Seon / Kwon, Kyum-Yil / Park, Jeong-Ho / Youn, Jinyoung / Jang, Wooyoung. ·Department of Neurology, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University, Busan, Korea. · Department of Neurology & Parkinson's Disease Centre, Guro Hospital, Korea University, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea. · Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Korea University College of Medicine, Ansan Hospital, Ansan, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Samsung Changwon Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Changwon, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Chungbuk National University College of Medicine, Cheongju, Korea. · Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, Soonchunhyang University Seoul Hospital, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Neuroscience Center, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. · Gangneung Asan Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Gangneung, Korea. ·J Mov Disord · Pubmed #29381888.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Postural instability and gait disturbance are the cardinal symptoms associated with falling among patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). The Tinetti mobility test (TMT) is a well-established measurement tool used to predict falls among elderly people. However, the TMT has not been established or widely used among PD patients in Korea. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of the Korean version of the TMT for PD patients. METHODS: Twenty-four patients diagnosed with PD were enrolled in this study. For the interrater reliability test, thirteen clinicians scored the TMT after watching a video clip. We also used the test-retest method to determine intrarater reliability. For concurrent validation, the unified Parkinson's disease rating scale, Hoehn and Yahr staging, Berg Balance Scale, Timed-Up and Go test, 10-m walk test, and gait analysis by three-dimensional motion capture were also used. We analyzed receiver operating characteristic curve to predict falling. RESULTS: The interrater reliability and intrarater reliability of the Korean Tinetti balance scale were 0.97 and 0.98, respectively. The interrater reliability and intra-rater reliability of the Korean Tinetti gait scale were 0.94 and 0.96, respectively. The Korean TMT scores were significantly correlated with the other clinical scales and three-dimensional motion capture. The cutoff values for predicting falling were 14 points (balance subscale) and 10 points (gait subscale). CONCLUSION: We found that the Korean version of the TMT showed excellent validity and reliability for gait and balance and had high sensitivity and specificity for predicting falls among patients with PD.

13 Article Validation of the Korean Version of the Scales for Outcomes in Parkinson's Disease-Sleep. 2018

Sung, Young Hee / Kim, Hee Jin / Koh, Seong Beom / Kim, Joong Seok / Kim, Sang Jin / Cheon, Sang Myung / Cho, Jin Whan / Kim, Yoon Joong / Ma, Hyeo Il / Park, Mee Young / Baik, Jong Sam / Lee, Phil Hyu / Chung, Sun Ju / Kim, Jong Min / Song, In Uk / Kim, Han Joon / Kim, Ji Young / Kwon, Do Young / Lee, Jae Hyeok / Lee, Jee Young / Kim, Ji Seon / Yun, Ji Young / Hong, Jin Yong / Kim, Mi Jung / Youn, Jinyoung / Kim, Ji Sun / Oh, Eung Seok / Yang, Hui Jun / Yoon, Won Tae / You, Sooyeoun / Kwon, Kyum Yil / Park, Hyung Eun / Lee, Su Yun / Kim, Younsoo / Kim, Hee Tae / Ahn, Tae Beom. ·Department of Neurology, Gachon University Gil Hospital, Incheon, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Inje University Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea. · Department of Neurology and Neuroscience Center, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Inje University Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Incheon St. Mary's Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Incheon, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Inje University Seoul Paik Hospital, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Ansan, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Chungbuk National University Hospital, Chungbuk National University School of Medicine, Cheongju, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine and Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Chungnam National University Hospital, Chungnam National University School of Medicine, Daejeon, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Soonchunhyang University Seoul Hospital, Soonchunhyang University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Changwon Samsung Hospital, Changwon, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Kyung Hee University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. taebeom.ahn@khu.ac.kr. ·J Korean Med Sci · Pubmed #29215823.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Sleep problems commonly occur in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), and are associated with a lower quality of life. The aim of the current study was to translate the English version of the Scales for Outcomes in Parkinson's Disease-Sleep (SCOPA-S) into the Korean version of SCOPA-S (K-SCOPA-S), and to evaluate its reliability and validity for use by Korean-speaking patients with PD. METHODS: In total, 136 patients with PD from 27 movement disorder centres of university-affiliated hospitals in Korea were enrolled in this study. They were assessed using SCOPA, Hoehn and Yahr Scale (HYS), Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale 2nd version (PDSS-2), Non-motor Symptoms Scale (NMSS), Montgomery Asberg Depression Scale (MADS), 39-item Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ39), Neurogenic Orthostatic Hypotension Questionnaire (NOHQ), and Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behaviour Disorder Questionnaire (RBDQ). The test-retest reliability was assessed over a time interval of 10-14 days. RESULTS: The internal consistency (Cronbach's α-coefficients) of K-SCOPA-S was 0.88 for nighttime sleep (NS) and 0.75 for daytime sleepiness (DS). Test-retest reliability was 0.88 and 0.85 for the NS and DS, respectively. There was a moderate correlation between the NS sub-score and PDSS-2 total score. The NS and DS sub-scores of K-SCOPA-S were correlated with motor scale such as HYS, and non-motor scales such as UPDRS I, UPDRS II, MADS, NMSS, PDQ39, and NOHQ while the DS sub-score was with RBDQ. CONCLUSION: The K-SCOPA-S exhibited good reliability and validity for the assessment of sleep problems in the Korean patients with PD.

14 Article Fundamental limit of alpha-synuclein pathology in gastrointestinal biopsy as a pathologic biomarker of Parkinson's disease: Comparison with surgical specimens. 2017

Shin, Chaewon / Park, Sung-Hye / Yun, Ji Young / Shin, Jung Hwan / Yang, Han-Kwang / Lee, Hyuk-Joon / Kong, Seong-Ho / Suh, Yun-Suhk / Shen, Guangxun / Kim, Yoon / Kim, Han-Joon / Jeon, Beomseok. ·Department of Neurology, Kyung Hee University Medical Center, 23 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, 103 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine and Ewha Medical Research Institute, 1071 Anyangcheon-ro, Yangcheon-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, Republic of Korea. · Department of Surgery, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, China-Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University, 126 Xiantai St, Erdao Qu, Changchun Shi, Jilin Sheng, China. · Department of Neurology, MRC and Movement Disorder Center, Seoul National University Hospital, Parkinson Study Group, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, MRC and Movement Disorder Center, Seoul National University Hospital, Parkinson Study Group, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: brain@snu.ac.kr. ·Parkinsonism Relat Disord · Pubmed #28923294.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Alpha-synuclein (AS) accumulation identified by immunohistochemistry (IHC) of gastrointestinal (GI) tract biopsies is considered as a potential pathologic biomarker for Parkinson's disease (PD). We compared AS IHC findings in biopsy specimens and surgically resected full-depth specimens to examine the reliability of GI tract biopsies. METHODS: We included patients with PD who had undergone operation of the GI tract for treatment of tumors. Controls were matched with age at operation, gender, and surgical resection site. We compared AS accumulation using phosphorylated AS (pAS) IHC between patients and controls, and within individuals between surgical and biopsy specimens. RESULTS: A total of 33 patients with PD were categorized into either the stomach (N = 12) or colorectal group (N = 21). The frequency of pAS positivity in gastric surgical specimens was 58.3% (7/12) and 8.3% (1/12) in the patient and control groups, respectively (p = 0.027). The frequency of pAS positivity in colorectal surgical specimens was identical in the patient and control group (23.8% [5/21] in each). Intriguingly, immunostaining results for biopsy specimens were not concordant with those for surgical specimens. There was no significant difference in the frequency of pAS positivity in biopsy specimens between patients and controls (9.1% [2/22] vs 18.2% [4/22]; p = 0.664). INTERPRETATION: Our results demonstrate that AS accumulation identified via pAS IHC of GI biopsies is unreliable due to its low positive rates and poor concordance with surgical specimens, and that future studies investigating AS accumulation in the GI tract should target the stomach, rather than the colon or rectum.

15 Article Serum Ceruloplasmin and Striatal Dopamine Transporter Density in Parkinson Disease: Comparison With 123I-FP-CIT SPECT. 2017

Song, Yoo Sung / Kim, Jong-Min / Kim, Kyeong Joon / Yun, Ji Young / Kim, Sang Eun. ·From the Departments of *Nuclear Medicine, and †Neurology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam; ‡Department of Neurology, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital, Seoul; §Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul; and ∥Center for Nanomolecular Imaging and Innovative Drug Development, Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Suwon, Republic of Korea. ·Clin Nucl Med · Pubmed #28632695.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: In patients with Parkinson disease (PD), decreased serum ceruloplasmin levels have been observed. This study investigated a correlation between serum ceruloplasmin-along with its related serum markers- and striatal presynaptic dopaminergic denervation measured with I-FP-CIT SPECT. METHODS: We analyzed a total of 141 de novo patients divided into 2 groups: the PD group (107 patients with PD) and the disease control group (34 patients with vascular pseudoparkinsonism, essential tremor, or drug-induced parkinsonism). Serum ceruloplasmin and related serum markers, such as copper, iron, total iron-binding capacity, and ferritin, were measured. Specific binding ratios of the striatum, caudate nucleus, putamen, and posterior putamen were obtained by I-FP-CIT SPECT. RESULTS: There was no difference in the serum markers, except for ceruloplasmin, between the 2 groups. Ceruloplasmin level was significantly lower in PD patients with longer symptom duration (>2 years) than in the disease control group (21.4 ± 3.4 vs 24.0 ± 3.8, P = 0.03). Serum ceruloplasmin had a significant correlation with specific binding ratios of the striatum, caudate nucleus, and putamen in a subgroup with longer symptom duration (P = 0.01, P = 0.02, P = 0.02, respectively, for the subgroup with symptom duration >1 year, and P < 0.01, P < 0.01, P = 0.04, respectively, for the subgroup with symptom duration >2 years). CONCLUSIONS: Decrease in serum ceruloplasmin had a positive correlation with a decrease in dopamine transporter density in PD patients with symptom duration of more than 1 year.

16 Article Liquid levodopa-carbidopa in advanced Parkinson's disease with motor complications. 2017

Yang, Hui-Jun / Ehm, Gwanhee / Kim, Young Eun / Yun, Ji Young / Lee, Woong-Woo / Kim, Aryun / Kim, Han-Joon / Jeon, Beomseok. ·Department of Neurology, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Myongji Hospital, Seonam University College of Medicine, Goyang, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital, Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Eulji General Hospital, Eulji University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Parkinson's Disease Study Group and Neuroscience Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Parkinson's Disease Study Group and Neuroscience Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: brain@snu.ac.kr. ·J Neurol Sci · Pubmed #28477709.

ABSTRACT: While levodopa, carbidopa, ascorbic acid solution (LCAS) therapy has been used in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) for many years, long-term follow-up data is scarce. The present study aimed to determine the long-term retention rate for LCAS therapy, and to identify the causes of LCAS therapy withdrawal. Our study included a series of 38 patients with PD (14 men and 24 women) who underwent LCAS treatment between 2011 and 2013 to alleviate motor complications that were not satisfactorily controlled by optimized conventional anti-parkinsonian treatment at the Seoul National University Hospital. All patients were admitted to educate them about and initiate LCAS treatment for 2-5days, and were then followed up as outpatients. The mean follow-up duration was 12.8months, and three main reasons for LCAS treatment discontinuation were worsening of wearing-off symptoms (8 patients), persistent dyskinesia (4 patients), and poor drug adherence (4 patients). Fourteen patients (36.8%) maintained the LCAS treatment after 12months, and were categorized as the treatment-retention group. The mean percentage of on time without dyskinesia significantly increased from 33.6±17.6% to 57.0±27.7% after LCAS initiation (p=0.016) in the treatment-retention group. Twelve patients (31.6%) were still receiving LCAS treatment after 30months. LCAS treatment can be a non-device assisted therapeutic option for patients who have no access to advanced therapies such as deep brain stimulation and infusional treatments.

17 Article Validation of the Korean Version of the Scale for Outcomes in Parkinson's Disease-Autonomic. 2017

Kim, Ji-Young / Song, In-Uk / Koh, Seong-Beom / Ahn, Tae-Beom / Kim, Sang Jin / Cheon, Sang-Myung / Cho, Jin Whan / Kim, Yun Joong / Ma, Hyeo-Il / Park, Mee-Young / Baik, Jong Sam / Lee, Phil Hyu / Chung, Sun Ju / Kim, Jong-Min / Kim, Han-Joon / Sung, Young-Hee / Kwon, Do Young / Lee, Jae-Hyeok / Lee, Jee-Young / Kim, Ji Sun / Yun, Ji Young / Kim, Hee Jin / Hong, Jin Young / Kim, Mi-Jung / Youn, Jinyoung / Kim, Ji Seon / Oh, Eung Seok / Yang, Hui-Jun / Yoon, Won Tae / You, Sooyeoun / Kwon, Kyum-Yil / Park, Hyung-Eun / Lee, Su-Yun / Kim, Younsoo / Kim, Hee-Tae / Kim, Joong-Seok. ·Department of Neurology, Seoul Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Kyung Hee University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea. · Department of Neurology and Neuroscience Center, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Parkinson/Alzheimer Center, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, Gachon University, Incheon, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Ansan, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Chungbuk National University School of Medicine, Chungbuk National University Hospital, Cheongju, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Bobath Memorial Hospital, Seongnam, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Soonchunhyang University Seoul Hospital, Soonchunhyang University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Chungnam National University School of Medicine, Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Soonchunhyang University Gumi Hospital, Soonchunhyang University School of Medicine, Gumi, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. ·J Mov Disord · Pubmed #28122431.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Autonomic symptoms are commonly observed in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and often limit the activities of daily living. The Scale for Outcomes in Parkinson's disease-Autonomic (SCOPA-AUT) was developed to evaluate and quantify autonomic symptoms in PD. The goal of this study was to translate the original SCOPA-AUT, which was written in English, into Korean and to evaluate its reliability and validity for Korean PD patients. METHODS: For the translation, the following processes were performed: forward translation, backward translation, expert review, pretest of the pre-final version and development of the final Korean version of SCOPA-AUT (K-SCOPA-AUT). In total, 127 patients with PD from 31 movement disorder clinics of university-affiliated hospitals in Korea were enrolled in this study. All patients were assessed using the K-SCOPA-AUT and other motor, non-motor, and quality of life scores. Test-retest reliability for the K-SCOPA-AUT was assessed over a time interval of 10-14 days. RESULTS: The internal consistency and reliability of the K-SCOPA-AUT was 0.727 as measured by the mean Cronbach's α-coefficient. The test-retest correlation reliability was 0.859 by the Guttman split-half coefficient. The total K-SCOPA-AUT score showed a positive correlation with other non-motor symptoms [the Korean version of non-motor symptom scale (K-NMSS)], activities of daily living (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part II) and quality of life [the Korean version of Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life 39 (K-PDQ39)]. CONCLUSION: The K-SCOPA-AUT had good reliability and validity for the assessment of autonomic dysfunction in Korean PD patients. Autonomic symptom severities were associated with many other motor and non-motor impairments and influenced quality of life.

18 Article The KMDS-NATION Study: Korean Movement Disorders Society Multicenter Assessment of Non-Motor Symptoms and Quality of Life in Parkinson's Disease NATION Study Group. 2016

Kwon, Do Young / Koh, Seong Beom / Lee, Jae Hyeok / Park, Hee Kyung / Kim, Han Joon / Shin, Hae Won / Youn, Jinyoung / Park, Kun Woo / Choi, Sun Ah / Kim, Sang Jin / Choi, Seong Min / Park, Ji Yun / Jeon, Beom S / Kim, Ji Young / Chung, Sun Ju / Lee, Chong Sik / Park, Jeong Ho / Ahn, Tae Beom / Kim, Won Chan / Kim, Hyun Sook / Cheon, Sang Myung / Kim, Hee Tae / Lee, Jee Young / Kim, Ji Sun / Kim, Eun Joo / Kim, Jong Min / Lee, Kwang Soo / Kim, Joong Seok / Kim, Min Jeong / Baik, Jong Sam / Park, Ki Jong / Kim, Hee Jin / Park, Mee Young / Kang, Ji Hoon / Song, Sook Kun / Kim, Yong Duk / Yun, Ji Young / Lee, Ho Won / Oh, Hyung Geun / Cho, Jinwhan / Song, In Uk / Sohn, Young H / Lee, Phil Hyu / Kim, Jae Woo. ·Department of Neurology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Inje University College of Medicine, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Goyang, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, National Health Insurance Corporation Ilsan Hospital, Goyang, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan Paik Hospital, Busan, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Presbyterian Medical Center, Jeonju, Korea. · Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, Inje University Seoul Paik Hospital, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Hospital, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Kyung Hee University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, CHA University College of Medicine, Seongnam, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Dong-A University Medical Centre, Busan, Korea. · Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Boramae Hospital, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, Chungbuk National University, Chungbuk National University Hospital, Daejeon, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Pusan National University School of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Busan, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Korea. · Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Kosin University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea. · Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, Inje University, Sanggye Paik Hospital, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Busan, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Daejeon, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Jeju National University Hospital, Jeju, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Konyang University Hospital, Daejeon, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National Univeristy, Daegu, Korea. · Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan, Korea. · Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Incheon, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Dong-A University Medical Centre, Busan, Korea. jwkim@dau.ac.kr. ·J Clin Neurol · Pubmed #27819413.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Nonmotor symptoms (NMS) in Parkinson's disease (PD) have multisystem origins with heterogeneous manifestations that develop throughout the course of PD. NMS are increasingly recognized as having a significant impact on the health-related quality of life (HrQoL). We aimed to determine the NMS presentation according to PD status, and the associations of NMS with other clinical variables and the HrQoL of Korean PD patients. METHODS: We surveyed patients in 37 movement-disorders clinics throughout Korea. In total, 323 PD patients were recruited for assessment of disease severity and duration, NMS, HrQoL, and other clinical variables including demographics, cognition, sleep scale, fatigability, and symptoms. RESULTS: In total, 98.1% of enrolled PD subjects suffered from various kinds of NMS. The prevalence of NMS and scores in each NMS domain were significantly higher in the PD group, and the NMS worsened as the disease progressed. Among clinical variables, disease duration and depressive mood showed significant correlations with all NMS domains (p<0.001). NMS status impacted HrQoL in PD (rS=0.329, p<0.01), and the association patterns differed with the disease stage. CONCLUSIONS: The results of our survey suggest that NMS in PD are not simply isolated symptoms of degenerative disease, but rather exert significant influences throughout the disease course. A novel clinical approach focused on NMS to develop tailored management strategies is warranted to improve the HrQoL in PD patients.

19 Article Weight Change Is a Characteristic Non-Motor Symptom in Drug-Naïve Parkinson's Disease Patients with Non-Tremor Dominant Subtype: A Nation-Wide Observational Study. 2016

Mun, Jun Kyu / Youn, Jinyoung / Cho, Jin Whan / Oh, Eung-Seok / Kim, Ji Sun / Park, Suyeon / Jang, Wooyoung / Park, Jin Se / Koh, Seong-Beom / Lee, Jae Hyeok / Park, Hee Kyung / Kim, Han-Joon / Jeon, Beom S / Shin, Hae-Won / Choi, Sun-Ah / Kim, Sang Jin / Choi, Seong-Min / Park, Ji-Yun / Kim, Ji Young / Chung, Sun Ju / Lee, Chong Sik / Ahn, Tae-Beom / Kim, Won Chan / Kim, Hyun Sook / Cheon, Sang Myung / Kim, Jae Woo / Kim, Hee-Tae / Lee, Jee-Young / Kim, Ji Sun / Kim, Eun-Joo / Kim, Jong-Min / Lee, Kwang Soo / Kim, Joong-Seok / Kim, Min-Jeong / Baik, Jong Sam / Park, Ki-Jong / Kim, Hee Jin / Park, Mee Young / Kang, Ji Hoon / Song, Sook Kun / Kim, Yong Duk / Yun, Ji Young / Lee, Ho-Won / Song, In-Uk / Sohn, Young H / Lee, Phil Hyu / Park, Jeong-Ho / Oh, Hyung Geun / Park, Kun Woo / Kwon, Do-Young. ·Department of Neurology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Neuroscience Center, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Chungnam National University Hospital, Chungnam National University School of Medicine, Daejeon, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Soonchunhyang University Seoul Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Biostatistics, Soonchunhyang University Seoul Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Gangneung Asan Hospital, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Gangneung, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, Inje University, Ilsan-Paik Hospital, Ilsan, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, National Health, Insurance Corporation Ilsan Hospital, Ilsan, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Inje University, Busan Paik Hospital, Busan, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Presbyterian Medical Center, Jeonju, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, Inje University Seoul Paik Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Kyung Hee University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, CHA University College of Medicine, Bundang, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Boramae Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, Chungbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Pusan National University School of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Busan, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Bundang, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, the Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Kosin University College of Medicine, Busan, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, Inje University, Sanggye Paik Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Jeju National University Hospital, Jeju, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Konyang University Hospital, Daejeon, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, the Catholic University of Korea, Incheon, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Soonchunhyang University Cheonan Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Korea University Anam Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Ansan, Republic of Korea. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #27622838.

ABSTRACT: Despite the clinical impact of non-motor symptoms (NMS) in Parkinson's disease (PD), the characteristic NMS in relation to the motor subtypes of PD is not well elucidated. In this study, we enrolled drug-naïve PD patients and compared NMS between PD subtypes. We enrolled 136 drug-naïve, early PD patients and 50 normal controls. All the enrolled PD patients were divided into tremor dominant (TD) and non-tremor dominant (NTD) subtypes. The Non-Motor Symptom Scale and scales for each NMS were completed. We compared NMS and the relationship of NMS with quality of life between normal controls and PD patients, and between the PD subtypes. Comparing with normal controls, PD patients complained of more NMS, especially mood/cognitive symptoms, gastrointestinal symptoms, unexplained pain, weight change, and change in taste or smell. Between the PD subtypes, the NTD subtype showed higher total NMS scale score and sub-score about weight change. Weight change was the characteristic NMS related to NTD subtype even after controlled other variables with logistic regression analysis. Even from the early stage, PD patients suffer from various NMS regardless of dopaminergic medication. Among the various NMS, weight change is the characteristic NMS associated with NTD subtype in PD patients.

20 Article Patients' reluctance to undergo deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease. 2016

Kim, Mi-Ryoung / Yun, Ji Young / Jeon, Beomseok / Lim, Yong Hoon / Kim, Kyung Ran / Yang, Hui-Jun / Paek, Sun Ha. ·Department of Neurosurgery, Movement Disorder Center and Neuroscience Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital and Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Movement Disorder Center and Neuroscience Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: brain@snu.ac.kr. · Department of Neurology, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurosurgery, Movement Disorder Center and Neuroscience Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: paeksh@snu.ac.kr. ·Parkinsonism Relat Disord · Pubmed #26686260.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Many patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) are reluctant to undergo the subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) when surgery is warranted. Reasons for this reluctance have not been examined. We undertook to establish the rate and causes of this reluctance for STN-DBS in patients with advanced PD. METHODS: A reluctant group was defined as patients who were hesitant to undergo DBS. Clinical information included age, onset age, disease duration, the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale, Hoehn and Yahr stage and levodopa equivalent dose when they were evaluated with a view to consider surgery. RESULTS: We enrolled 186 patients who underwent STN-DBS. 84 patients (45%) belonged to the reluctant group. Between the reluctant and the non-reluctant, there were no differences in preoperative characteristics. Main reasons for hesitation were fear of complications (74%) and economic burden (50%). The main reasons that they finally underwent the DBS were confidence in the doctor's decision (80%) and encouragement from their family (36%). CONCLUSIONS: Building trust between patients and physicians is an important factor in guiding patients to undergo this treatment. To reduce the reluctance to undergo DBS at the appropriate time, we need to find effective ways of reducing their psychological and economic burden.

21 Article Sudden loss of the deep brain stimulation effect with high impedance without macroscopic fracture: a case report and review of the published literature. 2015

Yang, Hui-Jun / Yun, Ji Young / Kim, Young Eun / Lim, Yong Hoon / Kim, Han-Joon / Paek, Sun Ha / Jeon, Beom S. ·Department of Neurology, Ulsan University Hospital, Ulsan, South Korea. · Department of Neurology, Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital, Seoul, South Korea. · Department of Neurology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang, South Korea. · Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, South Korea. · Department of Neurology and Movement Disorder Center, Parkinson's Disease Study Group and Neuroscience Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, South Korea. ·Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat · Pubmed #26229475.

ABSTRACT: The number of deep brain stimulation (DBS) hardware complications has increased during the past decade. In cases of abnormally high lead impedance with no evidence of a macroscopic fracture, optimal treatment options have not yet been established. Here, we present the case of a 49-year-old woman with a 12-year history of Parkinson's disease who received bilateral subthalamic nucleus DBS in March 2006. The patient showed good control of parkinsonism until December 24, 2010, when she awoke with abrupt worsening of parkinsonian symptoms. At telemetric testing, lead impedances were found at >2,000 Ω in all four leads on the left side. Fracture of a lead or an extension wire was suspected. However, radiological screening and palpation revealed no macroscopic fracture. In June 2011, the implantable pulse generator (IPG) was changed under local anesthesia without any complications. Postoperatively, her parkinsonism immediately improved to the previous level, and the lead impedance readings by telemetry were also normalized. The disconnection of the neurostimulator connector block and the hybrid circuit board of the IPG was confirmed by destructive analysis. The present report illustrates that a staged approach that starts with simple IPG replacement can be an option for some cases of acute DBS effect loss with high impedance, when radiological findings are normal, thereby sparing the intact electrodes and extension wires.

22 Article Clinicians' Tendencies to Under-Rate Parkinsonian Tremors in the Less Affected Hand. 2015

Lee, Hong Ji / Kim, Sang Kyong / Park, Hyeyoung / Kim, Han Byul / Jeon, Hyo Seon / Jung, Yu Jin / Oh, Eungseok / Kim, Hee Jin / Yun, Ji Young / Jeon, Beom S / Park, Kwang Suk. ·The Interdisciplinary Program for Bioengineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · The Department of Neurology and Movement Disorder Center, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · The Department of Neurology, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · The Department of Neurology, Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon, Republic of Korea. · The Department of Neurology, Konkuk University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · The Department of Neurology, Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · The Department of Biomedical Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #26110768.

ABSTRACT: The standard assessment method for tremor severity in Parkinson's disease is visual observation by neurologists using clinical rating scales. This is, therefore, a subjective rating that is dependent on clinical expertise. The objective of this study was to report clinicians' tendencies to under-rate Parkinsonian tremors in the less affected hand. This was observed through objective tremor measurement with accelerometers. Tremor amplitudes were measured objectively using tri-axis-accelerometers for both hands simultaneously in 53 patients with Parkinson's disease during resting and postural tremors. The videotaped tremor was rated by neurologists using clinical rating scales. The tremor measured by accelerometer was compared with clinical ratings. Neurologists tended to under-rate the less affected hand in resting tremor when the contralateral hand had severe tremor in Session I. The participating neurologists corrected this tendency in Session II after being informed of it. The under-rating tendency was then repeated by other uninformed neurologists in Session III. Kappa statistics showed high inter-rater agreements and high agreements between estimated scores derived from the accelerometer signals and the mean Clinical Tremor Rating Scale evaluated in every session. Therefore, clinicians need to be aware of this under-rating tendency in visual inspection of the less affected hand in order to make accurate tremor severity assessments.

23 Article Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder after bilateral subthalamic stimulation in Parkinson's disease. 2015

Kim, Young Eun / Jeon, Beom S / Paek, Sun-Ha / Yun, Ji Young / Yang, Hui-Jun / Kim, Han-Joon / Ehm, Gwanhee / Kim, Hee Jin / Lee, Jee-Young / Kim, Ji-Young. ·Department of Neurology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang, Republic of Korea; Parkinson's Disease Study Group, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Parkinson's Disease Study Group, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Department of Neurology and Movement Disorder Center, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: brain@snu.ac.kr. · Parkinson's Disease Study Group, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Department of Neurosurgery and Movement Disorder Center, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Parkinson's Disease Study Group, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Department of Neurology, Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital, Republic of Korea. · Parkinson's Disease Study Group, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Department of Neurology, Ulsan University Hospital, Ulsan, Republic of Korea. · Parkinson's Disease Study Group, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Department of Neurology and Movement Disorder Center, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Parkinson's Disease Study Group, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Department of Neurology, Konkuk University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Parkinson's Disease Study Group, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Department of Neurology, Seoul National University, Metropolitan Boramae Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Parkinson's Disease Study Group, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Departments of Neurology, Inje University Seoul Paik Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea. ·J Clin Neurosci · Pubmed #25439757.

ABSTRACT: The effect of subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) on rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) in Parkinson's disease (PD) is not well known. We evaluated the change in the incidence of probable RBD after bilateral STN DBS in PD patients. Ninety patients with PD treated with bilateral STN DBS underwent retrospective assessment of RBD by interview before and after DBS. Forty-seven (52.2%) of the 90 patients had RBD preoperatively. RBD was resolved only in one patient and persisted in 46 patients at 1 year after DBS. RBD developed de novo in 16 patients (de novo RBD group) within 1 year after DBS, resulting in 62 (68.9%) of the 90 patients having RBD 1 year after DBS. Patients with RBD at any time within 1 year after DBS (RBD group, n = 63) were older than the patients without RBD (non-RBD group, n = 27). The sum of the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) axial score for the "on" state was lower in the RBD group than in the non-RBD group after DBS (p = 0.029). Comparing the de novo RBD group and non-RBD group, the UPDRS Part III and total score and the levodopa equivalent daily doses for the "on" states decreased more in the de novo RBD group than in the non-RBD group (p < 0.05). The incidence of clinical RBD increased after bilateral STN DBS because de novo RBD developed and pre-existing RBD persisted after DBS.

24 Article Comparison of sleep and other non-motor symptoms between SWEDDs patients and de novo Parkinson's disease patients. 2014

Yang, Hui-Jun / Kim, Young Eun / Yun, Ji Young / Ehm, Gwanhee / Kim, Han-Joon / Jeon, Beom Seok. ·Department of Neurology, Ulsan University Hospital, Ulsan, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology and Movement Disorder Center, Parkinson's Disease Study Group and Neuroscience Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehak-Ro, Jongno-Gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology and Movement Disorder Center, Parkinson's Disease Study Group and Neuroscience Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehak-Ro, Jongno-Gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: brain@snu.ac.kr. ·Parkinsonism Relat Disord · Pubmed #25446342.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: SWEDDs (Scans Without Evidence of Dopaminergic Deficits) was defined from a series of pharmaceutical trials on Parkinson's disease (PD). Non-motor features including sleep-related problems are common even in early-stage PD patients; however, little is known about the burden of the non-motor symptoms in SWEDDs patients. METHODS: The Non-motor Symptoms Assessment Scale (NMSS), revised version of the Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale (PDSS-2), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and EuroQol 5-Dimension (EQ-5D) were applied to evaluate 17 SWEDDs patients and 28 de novo PD patients. The presence of clinically probable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (cpRBD) was assessed using the International Classification of Sleep Disorders-Revised (ICSD-R) criteria. RESULTS: The total NMSS score for the SWEDDs group was significantly lower than for the de novo PD group (p = 0.032). The most distinct difference was in taste or smell change (p < 0.000). Prevalence of cpRBD was higher in de novo PD patients than in SWEDDs patients (p = 0.030), though no significant differences in the PDSS-2 total score (p = 0.496) or the ESS score (p = 0.517) were found. The SWEDDs patients did not significantly differ from the de novo PD patients with regard to quality of life, as measured by the EQ-5D index score (p = 0.177). CONCLUSIONS: The patients with SWEDDs have less non-motor problems than newly diagnosed untreated PD patients. Given the difficulty distinguishing between SWEDDs and early PD, identifying some of non-motor symptoms, such as RBD or olfactory impairment, could aid clinicians in their work.

25 Article REM sleep behavior disorder: association with motor complications and impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease. 2014

Kim, Young Eun / Jeon, Beom S / Yang, Hui-Jun / Ehm, Gwanhee / Yun, Ji Young / Kim, Han-Joon / Kim, Jong-Min. ·Department of Neurology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang, South Korea; Parkinson's Disease Study Group, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, South Korea. · Parkinson's Disease Study Group, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, South Korea; Department of Neurology and Movement Disorder Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea. Electronic address: brain@snu.ac.kr. · Parkinson's Disease Study Group, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, South Korea; Department of Neurology, Ulsan University Hospital, Ulsan, South Korea. · Parkinson's Disease Study Group, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, South Korea; Department of Neurology and Movement Disorder Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea. · Parkinson's Disease Study Group, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, South Korea; Department of Neurology, Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital, South Korea. · Parkinson's Disease Study Group, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, South Korea; Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, South Korea. ·Parkinsonism Relat Disord · Pubmed #25085747.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Clinical phenotypes such as old age, longer disease duration, motor disability, akineto-rigid type, dementia and hallucinations are known to be associated with REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the relationship between motor fluctuations/impulse control and related behaviors (ICRB) and RBD is not clear. We designed this study to elucidate the clinical manifestations associated with RBD to determine the implications of RBD in PD. DESIGN: In a cross-sectional study, a total of 994 patients with PD were interviewed to determine the presence of RBD and their associated clinical features including motor complications and ICRB. RESULTS: Of the 944 patients, 578 (61.2%) had clinical RBD. When comparing the clinical features between patients with RBD (RBD group) and without RBD (non-RBD group), older age, longer disease duration, higher Hoehn and Yahr stage (H&Y stage), higher levodopa equivalent daily dose (LEDD), and the existence of wearing off, dyskinesia, freezing, and ICRB, especially punding, were associated with the RBD group compared to the non-RBD group (P < .05 in all). Multivariate analysis showed that motor complications including wearing off, peak dose dyskinesia, and diphasic dyskinesia were the only relevant factors for RBD after adjusting for age and disease duration. CONCLUSION: Motor complications and ICRB are more frequent in patients with RBD than in patients without RBD. In addition, motor complications are related to RBD even after adjusting for age and disease duration.

Next