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Parkinson Disease: HELP
Articles from Hebrew SeniorLife Roslindale
Based on 9 articles published since 2010
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These are the 9 published articles about Parkinson Disease that originated from Hebrew SeniorLife Roslindale during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Exercise for Individuals with Lewy Body Dementia: A Systematic Review. 2016

Inskip, Michael / Mavros, Yorgi / Sachdev, Perminder S / Fiatarone Singh, Maria A. ·Exercise, Health and Performance Faculty Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales, 2141, Australia. · CHeBA (Centre for Healthy Brain Ageing), School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, Randwick, New South Wales, 2031, Australia. · Neuropsychiatric Institute, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, New South Wales, 2031, Australia. · Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, 2006, Australia. · Hebrew SeniorLife, Roslindale, Massachusetts, 02131, United States of America. · Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts, 02155, United States of America. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #27258533.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Individuals with Lewy body Dementia (LBD), which encompasses both Parkinson disease dementia (PDD) and Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB) experience functional decline through Parkinsonism and sedentariness exacerbated by motor, psychiatric and cognitive symptoms. Exercise may improve functional outcomes in Parkinson's disease (PD), and Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the multi-domain nature of the LBD cluster of symptoms (physical, cognitive, psychiatric, autonomic) results in vulnerable individuals often being excluded from exercise studies evaluating physical function in PD or cognitive function in dementia to avoid confounding results. This review evaluated existing literature reporting the effects of exercise interventions or physical activity (PA) exposure on cluster symptoms in LBD. METHODS: A high-sensitivity search was executed across 19 databases. Full-length articles of any language and quality, published or unpublished, that analysed effects of isolated exercise/physical activity on indicative Dementia with Lewy Bodies or PD-dementia cohorts were evaluated for outcomes inclusive of physical, cognitive, psychiatric, physiological and quality of life measures. The protocol for this review (Reg. #: CRD42015019002) is accessible at http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/. RESULTS: 111,485 articles were initially retrieved; 288 full articles were reviewed and 89.6% subsequently deemed ineligible due to exclusion of participants with co-existence of dementia and Parkinsonism. Five studies (1 uncontrolled trial, 1 randomized controlled trial and 3 case reports) evaluating 16 participants were included. Interventions were diverse and outcome homogeneity was low. Habitual gait speed outcomes were measured in 13 participants and increased (0.18m/s, 95% CI -0.02, 0.38m/s), exceeding moderate important change (0.14m/s) for PD cohorts. Other outcomes appeared to improve modestly in most participants. DISCUSSION: Scarce research investigating exercise in LBD exists. This review confirms exercise studies in PD and dementia consistently exclude LBD participants. Results in this cohort must be treated with caution until robustly designed, larger studies are commissioned to explore exercise efficacy, feasibility and clinical relevance.

2 Article Advantages of timing the duration of a freezing of gait-provoking test in individuals with Parkinson's disease. 2020

Herman, Talia / Dagan, Moria / Shema-Shiratzky, Shirley / Reches, Tal / Brozgol, Marina / Giladi, Nir / Manor, Brad / Hausdorff, Jeffrey M. ·Center for the Study of Movement, Cognition and Mobility, Neurological Institute, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, 6 Weizman Street, 64239, Tel Aviv, Israel. talih@tlvmc.gov.il. · Center for the Study of Movement, Cognition and Mobility, Neurological Institute, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, 6 Weizman Street, 64239, Tel Aviv, Israel. · Sagol School of Neuroscience, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. · Department of Neurology, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. · Institute for Aging Research, Hebrew SeniorLife, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Physical Therapy, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv, Israel. · Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA. ·J Neurol · Pubmed #32383040.

ABSTRACT: Evaluating freezing of gait (FOG) and quantifying its severity in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) is challenging; objective assessment is not sufficiently established. We aimed to improve the ability to objectively evaluate FOG severity by investigating the value of measuring the duration of the test and its components. Seventy-one patients with PD and FOG completed a previously validated FOG-provoking test. The test was performed under three conditions: (1) usual, single task; (2) dual task (walking while carrying a tray); and (3) triple task (walking while holding a tray and subtracting 7 s). FOG and festination were scored using standard procedures. We evaluated effect sizes based on both the original scoring and the test duration for the motor-cognitive cost and before and after anti-Parkinsonian medication intake. Additionally, video recording of the test and total time frozen were measured. As expected, the original test score and the test duration increased across the three conditions of the task and were higher in OFF than in the ON-medication state (p < 0.036). For motor-cognitive cost, higher effect sizes were observed for the test duration of each condition, compared to the original scoring in OFF state (0.85 vs. 0.68, respectively). Change in effect size category was more pronounced in the ON state vs. OFF (0.87 vs. 0.55, respectively). Test duration was the only independent predictor for the self-report of FOG severity and the total time frozen during the test. These findings suggest that quantifying the duration of each condition of the FOG-provoking test improves its sensitivity to medications and task complexity. Timing can be used to provide immediate, objective feedback of freezing severity, and a clear interpretation of a patient's performance.

3 Article Measurement of Step Angle for Quantifying the Gait Impairment of Parkinson's Disease by Wearable Sensors: Controlled Study. 2020

Wang, Jingying / Gong, Dawei / Luo, Huichun / Zhang, Wenbin / Zhang, Lei / Zhang, Han / Zhou, Junhong / Wang, Shouyan. ·Institute of Science and Technology for Brain-Inspired Intelligence, Fudan University, Shanghai, China. · Key Laboratory of Computational Neuroscience and Brain-Inspired Intelligence (Fudan University), Ministry of Education, Shanghai, China. · Department of Neurosurgery, The Second Hospital of Nanjing, Nanjing, China. · Department of Neurosurgery, Nanjing Brain Hospital, Nanjing, China. · Department of Computer Science, Virginia Tech, Falls Church, VA, United States. · Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research, Hebrew SeniorLife, Harvard Medical School, Roslindale, MA, United States. ·JMIR Mhealth Uhealth · Pubmed #32196458.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Gait impairments including shuffling gait and hesitation are common in people with Parkinson's disease (PD), and have been linked to increased fall risk and freezing of gait. Nowadays the gait metrics mostly focus on the spatiotemporal characteristics of gait, but less is known of the angular characteristics of the gait, which may provide helpful information pertaining to the functional status and effects of the treatment in PD. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to quantify the angles of steps during walking, and explore if this novel step angle metric is associated with the severity of PD and the effects of the treatment including the acute levodopa challenge test (ALCT) and deep brain stimulation (DBS). METHODS: A total of 18 participants with PD completed the walking test before and after the ALCT, and 25 participants with PD completed the test with the DBS on and off. The walking test was implemented under two conditions: walking normally at a preferred speed (single task) and walking while performing a cognitive serial subtraction task (dual task). A total of 17 age-matched participants without PD also completed this walking test. The angular velocity was measured using wearable sensors on each ankle, and three gait angular metrics were obtained, that is mean step angle, initial step angle, and last step angle. The conventional gait metrics (ie, step time and step number) were also calculated. RESULTS: The results showed that compared to the control, the following three step angle metrics were significantly smaller in those with PD: mean step angle (F CONCLUSIONS: This pilot study demonstrated that the gait angular characteristics, as quantified by the step angles, were sensitive to the disease severity of PD and, more importantly, can capture the effects of treatments on the gait, while the traditional metrics cannot. This indicates that these metrics may serve as novel markers to help the assessment of gait in those with PD as well as the rehabilitation of this vulnerable cohort.

4 Article Choroid plexus volume is associated with levels of CSF proteins: relevance for Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. 2020

Tadayon, Ehsan / Pascual-Leone, Alvaro / Press, Daniel / Santarnecchi, Emiliano / Anonymous1811146. ·Berenson-Allen Center for Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation and Division for Cognitive Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: stadayon@bidmc.harvard.edu. · Berenson-Allen Center for Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation and Division for Cognitive Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research and Center for Memory Health, Hebrew SeniorLife, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Neurology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Guttmann Brain Health Institut, Guttmann Institut, Universitat Autonoma, Barcelona, Spain. · Berenson-Allen Center for Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation and Division for Cognitive Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Neurology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Berenson-Allen Center for Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation and Division for Cognitive Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Neurology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: esantarn@bidmc.harvard.edu. ·Neurobiol Aging · Pubmed #32107064.

ABSTRACT: The choroid plexus (ChP) is a major source of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) production, with a direct and indirect role in protein clearance, and pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we tested the link between the ChP volume and levels of CSF proteins in 2 data sets of (i) healthy controls, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and AD patients from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) (N = 509), and (ii) healthy controls and Parkinson's disease (PD) patients from the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (N = 302). All patients had baseline CSF proteins (amyloid-β, total and phosphorylated-tau and α-synuclein (only in Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative)). ChP was automatically segmented on 3T structural T1-weighted MRIs. We found negative associations between ChP volume and CSF proteins, which were stronger in healthy controls, early-MCI patients, and PD patients compared with late-MCI and AD patients. Further grouping of patients of ADNI dataset into amyloid-positive and amyloid-negative based on their florbetapir (AV45) PET imaging showed that the association between ChP volume and CSF proteins (t/p-tau) was lower in amyloid-positive group. Our findings support the possible role of ChP in the clearance of CSF proteins, provide evidence for ChP dysfunction in AD, and suggest the need to account for the ChP volume in future studies of CSF-based biomarkers.

5 Article Frequency-dependent effects of subthalamic deep brain stimulation on motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease: a meta-analysis of controlled trials. 2018

Su, Dongning / Chen, Huimin / Hu, Wanli / Liu, Yuye / Wang, Zhan / Wang, Xuemei / Liu, Genliang / Ma, Huizi / Zhou, Junhong / Feng, Tao. ·Department of Movement Disorders, Center for Neurology, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China. · China National Clinical Research Center for Neurological Diseases, Beijing, China. · Department of Hematology and Oncology, Jingxi Campus, Beijing ChaoYang Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China. · Department of Functional Neurosurgery, Beijing Neurosurgical Institute, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China. · Hebrew Seniorlife Institution for Aging Research, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Movement Disorders, Center for Neurology, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China. happyft@sina.com. · China National Clinical Research Center for Neurological Diseases, Beijing, China. happyft@sina.com. ·Sci Rep · Pubmed #30262859.

ABSTRACT: This study aims to investigate how the frequency settings of deep brain stimulation (DBS) targeting the subthalamic nucleus (STN) influence the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). Stimulation with frequencies less than 100 Hz (mostly 60 or 80 Hz) is considered low-frequency stimulation (LFS) and with frequencies greater than 100 Hz (mostly 130 or 150 Hz) is considered high-frequency stimulation (HFS). We conducted a comprehensive literature review and meta-analysis with a random-effect model. Ten studies with 132 patients were included in our analysis. The pooled results showed no significant difference in the total Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale part III (UPDRS-III) scores (mean effect, -1.50; p = 0.19) or the rigidity subscore between HFS and LFS. Compared to LFS, HFS induced greater reduction in the tremor subscore within the medication-off condition (mean effect, 1.01; p = 0.002), while no significance was shown within the medication-on condition (mean effect, 0.01; p = 0.92). LFS induced greater reduction in akinesia subscore (mean effect, -1.68, p = 0.003), the time to complete the stand-walk-sit (SWS) test (mean effect, -4.84; p < 0.00001), and the number of freezing of gait (FOG) (mean effect, -1.71; p = 0.03). These results suggest that two types of frequency settings may have different effects, that is, HFS induces better responses for tremor and LFS induces greater response for akinesia, gait, and FOG, respectively, which are worthwhile to be confirmed in future study, and will ultimately inform the clinical practice in the management of PD using STN-DBS.

6 Article Integration of risk factors for Parkinson disease in 2 large longitudinal cohorts. 2018

Kim, Iris Y / O'Reilly, Éilis J / Hughes, Katherine C / Gao, Xiang / Schwarzschild, Michael A / Hannan, Marian T / Betensky, Rebecca A / Ascherio, Alberto. ·From the Departments of Epidemiology (I.Y.K., A.A.), Nutrition (É.J.O., K.C.H., A.A.), and Biostatistics (R.A.B.), Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA · School of Public Health (É.J.O.), University College Cork, Ireland · Channing Division of Network Medicine (A.A.), Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA · Department of Nutritional Sciences (X.G.), The Pennsylvania State University, University Park · MassGeneral Institute for Neurodegenerative Disease (M.A.S.), Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston · The Institute for Aging Research (M.T.H.), Hebrew Senior Life, Boston · and Department of Medicine (M.T.H.), Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. ·Neurology · Pubmed #29643081.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To prospectively examine how selected lifestyle factors and family history of Parkinson disease (PD) combine to determine overall PD risk. METHODS: We derived risk scores among 69,968 women in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) (1984-2012) and 45,830 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS) (1986-2012). Risk scores were computed for each individual based on the following factors previously associated with PD risk: total caffeine intake, smoking, physical activity, and family history of PD for the NHS, and additionally total flavonoid intake and dietary urate index for the HPFS. Hazard ratios were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. In addition, we performed tests of interactions on both the multiplicative and additive scale between pairs of risk factors. RESULTS: We documented 1,117 incident PD cases during follow-up. The adjusted hazard ratios comparing individuals in the highest category of the reduced risk score to those in the lowest category were 0.33 (95% confidence interval: 0.21, 0.49; CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that known protective factors for PD tend to have additive or superadditive effects, so that PD risk is very low in individuals with multiple protective risk factors.

7 Article Multitarget transcranial direct current stimulation for freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease. 2018

Dagan, Moria / Herman, Talia / Harrison, Rachel / Zhou, Junhong / Giladi, Nir / Ruffini, Giulio / Manor, Brad / Hausdorff, Jeffrey M. ·Center for the Study of Movement, Cognition and Mobility, Neurological Institute, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel. · Sagol School of Neuroscience, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. · Institute for Aging Research, Hebrew SeniorLife, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Neurology, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. · Neuroelectrics Corporation, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Physical Therapy, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv, Israel. · Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center and Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA. ·Mov Disord · Pubmed #29436740.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Recent findings suggest that transcranial direct current stimulation of the primary motor cortex may ameliorate freezing of gait. However, the effects of multitarget simultaneous stimulation of motor and cognitive networks are mostly unknown. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of multitarget transcranial direct current stimulation of the primary motor cortex and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex on freezing of gait and related outcomes. METHODS: Twenty patients with Parkinson's disease and freezing of gait received 20 minutes of transcranial direct current stimulation on 3 separate visits. Transcranial direct current stimulation targeted the primary motor cortex and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex simultaneously, primary motor cortex only, or sham stimulation (order randomized and double-blinded assessments). Participants completed a freezing of gait-provoking test, the Timed Up and Go, and the Stroop test before and after each transcranial direct current stimulation session. RESULTS: Performance on the freezing of gait-provoking test (P = 0.010), Timed Up and Go (P = 0.006), and the Stroop test (P = 0.016) improved after simultaneous stimulation of the primary motor cortex and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, but not after primary motor cortex only or sham stimulation. CONCLUSIONS: Transcranial direct current stimulation designed to simultaneously target motor and cognitive regions apparently induces immediate aftereffects in the brain that translate into reduced freezing of gait and improvements in executive function and mobility. © 2018 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

8 Article Interaction between caffeine and polymorphisms of glutamate ionotropic receptor NMDA type subunit 2A (GRIN2A) and cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2) on Parkinson's disease risk. 2018

Kim, Iris Y / O'Reilly, Éilis J / Hughes, Katherine C / Gao, Xiang / Schwarzschild, Michael A / McCullough, Marjorie L / Hannan, Marian T / Betensky, Rebecca A / Ascherio, Alberto. ·Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T. H. School Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Nutrition, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · School of Public Health, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. · Department of Nutritional Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA. · MassGeneral Institute for Neurodegenerative Disease, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. · The Institute for Aging Research, Hebrew Senior Life, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. ·Mov Disord · Pubmed #29318639.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Caffeine intake has been inversely associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) risk. This relationship may be modified by polymorphisms of glutamate ionotropic receptor NMDA type subunit 2A (GRIN2A) and cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2), but the results of previous studies have been inconsistent. METHOD: We examined the interaction of caffeine intake with GRIN2A-rs4998386 and CYP1A2-rs762551 polymorphisms in influencing PD risk among 829 incident cases of PD and 2,754 matched controls selected among participants in the following 3 large prospective ongoing cohorts: the Nurses' Health Study, the Health Professionals' Follow-up Study, and the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort. Matching factors included cohort, birth year, source of DNA, date of DNA collection, and race. Relative risks and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using conditional logistic models. Interactions were tested both on the multiplicative scale and on the additive scale. RESULTS: Overall, caffeine intake was associated with a lower PD risk (adjusted relative risk for highest versus lowest tertile = 0.70; 95% confidence interval, 0.57-0.86; p < .001). In analyses stratified by the GRIN2A-rs4998386 genotype, the multivariable-adjusted relative risk of PD comparing the highest to the lowest tertile of caffeine was 0.69 (95% confidence interval, 0.55-0.88; p < .01) among individuals homozygous for the C allele, and 0.85 (95% confidence interval, 0.55-1.32; p = .47; p CONCLUSION: Our findings do not support the hypothesis of an interaction between the GRIN2A-rs4998386 or CYP1A2-rs762551 polymorphism and caffeine intake in determining PD risk. © 2018 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

9 Article Sex Differences in Hip Fracture Surgery: Preoperative Risk Factors for Delirium and Postoperative Outcomes. 2016

Oh, Esther S / Sieber, Frederick E / Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie / Inouye, Sharon K / Lee, Hochang B. ·Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Medicine, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. · Aging Brain Center, Institute of Aging Research, Hebrew SeniorLife, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut. ·J Am Geriatr Soc · Pubmed #27384742.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To describe the differences observed in risk factors for delirium and outcomes between men and women undergoing hip fracture repair surgery. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Academic medical center. PARTICIPANTS: Individuals with acute hip fracture admitted to an academic medical center (N = 431). MEASUREMENTS: Information on preoperative demographic characteristics, medical history, laboratory results, and postoperative outcomes was obtained according to history and chart review. Delirium was assessed using the Confusion Assessment Method. RESULTS: The overall incidence of postoperative delirium was 34%, with men more likely to experience postoperative delirium (44.8%) than women (30.2%) (P = .004). Male sex was associated with postoperative delirium in individuals with hip fracture, even after adjusting for other preoperative risk factors. Other significant preoperative risk factors included age, dementia, Parkinson's disease, and American Society of Anesthesiologists classification. Men were also more likely to experience other postoperative complications and have longer hospital length of stay. CONCLUSION: Men are at higher risk of postoperative delirium after hip fracture repair than women and have more postoperative surgical complications. Their higher risk of postoperative delirium may be due to their underlying preoperative disease severity.