Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Parkinson Disease: HELP
Articles from US Federal Service
Based on 953 articles published since 2008
||||

These are the 953 published articles about Parkinson Disease that originated from US Federal Service during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Practice parameter: Assessing patients in a neurology practice for risk of falls (an evidence-based review): report of the Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology. 2008

Thurman, David J / Stevens, Judy A / Rao, Jaya K / Anonymous6930591. ·National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA. ·Neurology · Pubmed #18250292.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To develop a practice parameter for screening methods and assessments of risk for falls pertaining to patients likely to be seen in neurology practices. METHODS: Relevant literature was systematically reviewed and strength of evidence classified based on the American Academy of Neurology's criteria (Level A: established; Level B: probable; Level C: possible). RESULTS: An increased risk of falls is established among persons with diagnoses of stroke, dementia, and disorders of gait and balance (Level A) and probable among patients with Parkinson disease, peripheral neuropathy, lower extremity weakness or sensory loss, and substantial vision loss (Level B). A history of falling in the past year strongly predicts the likelihood of future falls (Level A). Screening measures have been developed to further assess risks of falls, including functional assessments that may be useful (Levels B and C). Several of these assess overlapping neurologic functions--i.e., gait, mobility, and balance--and there is insufficient evidence to assess whether they offer benefit beyond that provided by a standard neurologic examination. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with neurologic or general conditions associated with an increased risk of falling should be asked about recent falls and further examined for the presence of specific neurologic deficits that predict falls, which include gait and balance disorders; deficits of lower extremity strength, sensation, and coordination; and cognitive impairments. If substantial risks of falls are identified, appropriate interventions that are described in other evidence-based guidelines may be considered.

2 Editorial Mendel and urate: Acid test or random noise? 2018

Brown, Ethan G / Goldman, Samuel M / Tanner, Caroline M. ·Department of Neurology, University of California - San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA; Department of Neurology, Weil Institute for Neurosciences, University of California - San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Department of Neurology, University of California - San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA; Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University of California - San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA; Medical Service, San Francisco Veterans Affairs Health Care System, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Department of Neurology, University of California - San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA; Department of Neurology, Weil Institute for Neurosciences, University of California - San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA; Parkinson's Disease Research, Education and Clinical Center, San Francisco Veterans Affairs Health Care System, San Francisco, CA, USA. Electronic address: Caroline.tanner@ucsf.edu. ·Parkinsonism Relat Disord · Pubmed #30100365.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Editorial Are Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders caused by impaired signalling of insulin and other hormones? 2018

Hölscher, Christian / De Felice, Fernanda G / Greig, Nigel H / Ferreira, Sergio T. ·Biomedical and Life Sciences, Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK. Electronic address: c.holscher@lancaster.ac.uk. · Centre for Neuroscience Studies, Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. · Drug Design & Development Section, Translational Gerontology Branch, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, USA. · Institute of Biophysics Carlos Chagas Filho, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. ·Neuropharmacology · Pubmed #29782874.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial Virtually reducing fall risk in Parkinson disease. 2017

Moreau, Caroline / Barton, Brandon R / Devos, David. ·From the Service de Neurologie (C.M., D.D.) and Services de Pharmacologie and Médicale (D.D.), LICEND COEN Center, Université de Lille, CHU de Lille, INSERM UMRS_1171, France · Department of Neurological Sciences (B.R.B.), Rush University Medical Center · and Neurology Service (B.R.B.), Jesse Brown VA Medical Center, Chicago, IL. ·Neurology · Pubmed #28954881.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial What would Dr. James Parkinson think today? II. Neuroimaging in Parkinson's disease. 2017

Albin, Roger L. ·Department of Neurology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA. · Neurology Service & Geriatrics Research, Education, and Clinical Center, Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA. · University of Michigan Morris K. Udall Center of Excellence for Parkinson's Disease Research, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA. · University of Michigan Alzheimer Disease Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA. ·Mov Disord · Pubmed #28218459.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial The Clinical Profile of GBA-Related Lewy Body Disorders. 2016

Zabetian, Cyrus P. ·Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, Washington2Department of Neurology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle. ·JAMA Neurol · Pubmed #27723881.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Role of Neuroinflammation in Parkinson Disease: The Enigma Continues. 2016

Mehta, Shyamal H / Tanner, Caroline M. ·Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ. Electronic address: mehta.shyamal@mayo.edu. · San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, CA. ·Mayo Clin Proc · Pubmed #27712631.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Are We Ready for a Potential Increase in Parkinson Incidence? 2016

Chen, Honglei. ·Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. ·JAMA Neurol · Pubmed #27322659.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Identification of bona-fide LRRK2 kinase substrates. 2016

West, Andrew B / Cookson, Mark R. ·Center for Neurodegeneration and Experimental Therapeutics, Department of Neurology, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, USA. · Cell Biology and Gene Expression Section, Laboratory of Neurogenetics, National Institute on Aging, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. ·Mov Disord · Pubmed #27126091.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Serum vitamin D and risk of Parkinson's disease. 2016

Ross, G Webster / Petrovitch, Helen / Abbott, Robert D. ·Veterans Affairs Pacific Islands Health Care System, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. · Pacific Health Research and Education Institute, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. · Department of Medicine, University of Hawaii John A. Burns School of Medicine, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. · Department of Geriatric Medicine, University of Hawaii John A. Burns School of Medicine, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. · Center for Epidemiologic Research in Asia, Shiga University of Medical Science, Otsu, Shiga, Japan. ·Mov Disord · Pubmed #27091700.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Parkinson Disease Risk in Patients With Rosacea. 2016

Wingo, Thomas S. ·Department of Neurology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia2Department of Human Genetics, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia3Division of Neurology, Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Atlanta, Georgia. ·JAMA Neurol · Pubmed #26998584.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Milk consumption and the risk of nigral degeneration. 2016

Chen, Honglei / Marder, Karen. ·From the Epidemiology Branch (H.C.), National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC · and the Department of Neurology (K.M.), College of Physicians and Surgeons, Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer's Disease and the Aging Brain, Columbia University, New York, NY. ·Neurology · Pubmed #26658908.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial More than just a movement disorder: Why cognitive training is needed in Parkinson disease. 2015

Ventura, Maria I / Edwards, Jerri D / Barnes, Deborah E. ·From the Departments of Geriatrics (M.I.V.) and Psychiatry and Epidemiology & Statistics (D.E.B.), University of California, San Francisco · the School of Aging Studies (J.D.E.), University of South Florida, Tampa · and the San Francisco VA Medical Center (D.E.B.), San Francisco, CA. ·Neurology · Pubmed #26519546.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial GBA mutations and Parkinson disease: when genotype meets phenotype. 2015

Scholz, Sonja W / Jeon, Beom S. ·From the Department of Neurology (S.W.S.), Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore · Laboratory of Neurogenetics (S.W.S.), National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD · and Department of Neurology (B.S.J.), Seoul National University Hospital, Republic of Korea. ·Neurology · Pubmed #25653294.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Editorial The pharmacodynamics of placebo: expectation effects of price as a proxy for efficacy. 2015

LeWitt, Peter A / Kim, Scott. ·From the Department of Neurology (P.A.L.), Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Center, Henry Ford West Bloomfield Hospital · Department of Neurology (P.A.L.), Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI · and Department of Bioethics (S.K.), National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. ·Neurology · Pubmed #25632090.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Editorial Lardy brains make Parkinson's disease mice worse. 2014

Cookson, Mark R. ·Cell Biology and Gene Expression Section, Laboratory of Neurogenetics, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. ·J Neurochem · Pubmed #25142063.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Editorial Living and dying with Parkinson's disease. 2014

Ross, G Webster / Abbott, Robert D. ·Veterans Affairs Pacific Islands Health Care System, Honolulu, Hawaii; Pacific Health Research and Education Institute, Honolulu, Hawaii; Department of Medicine, University of Hawaii John A. Burns School of Medicine, Honolulu, Hawaii; Geriatric Medicine, University of Hawaii John A. Burns School of Medicine, Honolulu, Hawaii. ·Mov Disord · Pubmed #25044188.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Editorial Dopamine-dependent functional connectivity in Parkinson disease: a resting-state diagnosis? 2014

Bohnen, Nicolaas I / Martin, W R Wayne. ·From the Departments of Radiology and Neurology (N.I.B.), University of Michigan, and VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System, MI · and the Movement Disorders Program (W.R.W.M.), Division of Neurology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. ·Neurology · Pubmed #24920849.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Editorial Freezing of gait in PD has a REM correlate: twice cursed with a shared pathophysiology? 2013

Hershey, Linda A / Lichter, David G. ·From the Department of Neurology (L.A.H.), University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City · Department of Neurology (D.G.L.), University at Buffalo School of Medicine (SUNY), NY · and Veterans Affairs Western New York Healthcare System (D.G.L.), Buffalo. ·Neurology · Pubmed #23946300.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Editorial Neuropsychiatric symptoms in Parkinson disease and dementia with Lewy bodies: what geriatric psychiatry can learn. 2013

Weintraub, Daniel. ·Departments of Psychiatry and Neurology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and Parkinson's Disease Research, Education and Clinical Center, Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Electronic address: Daniel.Weintraub@uphs.upenn.edu. ·Am J Geriatr Psychiatry · Pubmed #23668226.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Review Immunology of West Nile Virus Infection and the Role of Alpha-Synuclein as a Viral Restriction Factor. 2019

Lesteberg, Kelsey E / Beckham, John David. ·1 Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine , Aurora, Colorado. · 2 Division of Neuroimmunology and Neurological Infections, Department of Neurology, University of Colorado School of Medicine , Aurora, Colorado. · 3 Veterans Administration, Eastern Colorado Health System , Denver, Colorado. ·Viral Immunol · Pubmed #30222521.

ABSTRACT: West Nile virus (WNV) is a single-stranded RNA flavivirus and is a major cause of viral encephalitis worldwide. Experimental models of WNV infection in mice are commonly used to define acute neuroinflammatory responses in the brain. Alpha-synuclein (Asyn) is a protein of primarily neuronal origin and is a major cause of Parkinson's disease (PD), a disorder characterized by loss of dopaminergic neurons. Both WNV and PD pathologies are largely mediated by inflammation of the central nervous system (neuroinflammation) and have overlapping inflammatory pathways. In this review, we highlight the roles of the immune system in both diseases while comparing and contrasting both protective and pathogenic roles of immune cells and their effector proteins. Additionally, we review the current literature showing that Asyn is an important mediator of the immune response with diverging roles in PD (pathogenic) and WNV disease (neuroprotective).

22 Review Molecular Imaging of the Cholinergic System in Parkinson's Disease. 2018

Bohnen, Nicolaas I / Kanel, Prabesh / Müller, Martijn L T M. ·Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, United States; Department of Neurology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, United States; Veterans Administration Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, MI, United States; Morris K. Udall Center of Excellence for Parkinson's Disease Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, United States. Electronic address: nbohnen@umich.edu. · Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, United States; Morris K. Udall Center of Excellence for Parkinson's Disease Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, United States. ·Int Rev Neurobiol · Pubmed #30314597.

ABSTRACT: One of the first identified neurotransmitters in the brain, acetylcholine, is an important modulator that drives changes in neuronal and glial activity. For more than two decades, the main focus of molecular imaging of the cholinergic system in Parkinson's disease (PD) has been on cognitive changes. Imaging studies have confirmed that degeneration of the cholinergic system is a major determinant of dementia in PD. Within the last decade, the focus is expanding to studying cholinergic correlates of mobility impairments, dyskinesias, olfaction, sleep, visual hallucinations and risk taking behavior in this disorder. These studies increasingly recognize that the regional topography of cholinergic brain areas associates with specific functions. In parallel with this trend, more recent molecular cholinergic imaging approaches are investigating cholinergic modulatory functions and contributions to large-scale brain network functions. A novel area of research is imaging cholinergic innervation functions of peripheral autonomic organs that may have the potential of future prodromal diagnosis of PD. Finally, emerging evidence of hypercholinergic activity in prodromal and symptomatic leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 PD may reflect neuronal cholinergic compensation versus a response to neuro-inflammation. Molecular imaging of the cholinergic system has led to many new insights in the etiology of dopamine non-responsive symptoms of PD (more "malignant" hypocholinergic disease phenotype) and is poised to guide and evaluate future cholinergic drug development in this disorder.

23 Review To bee or not to bee: The potential efficacy and safety of bee venom acupuncture in humans. 2018

Cherniack, E Paul / Govorushko, Sergey. ·Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami VA Medical Center, Miami, USA. Electronic address: evan.cherniack@va.gov. · Pacific Geographic Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vladivostok, Russia; Far Eastern Federal University, Vladivostok, Russia. ·Toxicon · Pubmed #30268393.

ABSTRACT: Bee venom acupuncture is a form of acupuncture in which bee venom is applied to the tips of acupuncture needles, stingers are extracted from bees, or bees are held with an instrument exposing the stinger, and applied to acupoints on the skin. Bee venom is a complex substance consisting of multiple anti-inflammatory compounds such as melittin, adolapin, apamin. Other substances such as phospholipase A2 can be anti-inflammatory in low concentrations and pro-inflammatory in others. However, bee venom also contains proinflammatory substances, melittin, mast cell degranulation peptide 401, and histamine. Nevertheless, in small studies, bee venom acupuncture has been used in man to successfully treat a number of musculoskeletal diseases such as lumbar disc disease, osteoarthritis of the knee, rheumatoid arthritis, adhesive capsulitis, and lateral epicondylitis. Bee venom acupuncture can also alleviate neurological conditions, including peripheral neuropathies, stroke and Parkinson's Disease. The treatment has even been piloted in one series to alleviate depression. An important concern is the safety of bee venom. Bee venom can cause anaphylaxis, and several deaths have been reported in patients who successfully received the therapy prior to the adverse event. While the incidence of adverse events is unknown, the number of published reports of toxicity is small. Refining bee venom to remove harmful substances may potentially limit its toxicity. New uses for bee venom acupuncture may also be considered.

24 Review Adenosine role in brain functions: Pathophysiological influence on Parkinson's disease and other brain disorders. 2018

Soliman, Amira M / Fathalla, Ahmed M / Moustafa, Ahmed A. ·Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt. Electronic address: amiram.soliman_pgs@med.suez.edu.eg. · Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt. · Department of Veterans Affairs, New Jersey Health Care System, East Orange, NJ, USA; School of Social Sciences and Psychology and Marcs Institute for Brain and Behaviour, Western Sydney University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Electronic address: a.moustafa@westernsydney.edu.au. ·Pharmacol Rep · Pubmed #29909246.

ABSTRACT: Although adenosine plays a key role in multiple motor, affective, and cognitive processes, it has received less attention in the neuroscience field compared to other neurotransmitters (e.g., dopamine). In this review, we highlight the role of adenosine in behavior as well as its interaction with other neurotransmitters, such as dopamine. We also discuss brain disorders impacted by alterations to adenosine, and how targeting adenosine can ameliorate Parkinson's disease motor symptoms. We also discuss the role of caffeine (as an adenosine antagonist) on cognition as well as a neuroprotective agent against Parkinson's disease (PD).

25 Review Genetic risk factors in Parkinson's disease. 2018

Billingsley, K J / Bandres-Ciga, S / Saez-Atienzar, S / Singleton, A B. ·Laboratory of Neurogenetics, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, 35 Convent Drive, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. · Department of Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, L69 3BX, Liverpool, UK. · Laboratory of Neurogenetics, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, 35 Convent Drive, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. singleta@mail.nih.gov. ·Cell Tissue Res · Pubmed #29536161.

ABSTRACT: Over the last two decades, we have witnessed a revolution in the field of Parkinson's disease (PD) genetics. Great advances have been made in identifying many loci that confer a risk for PD, which has subsequently led to an improved understanding of the molecular pathways involved in disease pathogenesis. Despite this success, it is predicted that only a relatively small proportion of the phenotypic variability has been explained by genetics. Therefore, it is clear that common heritable components of disease are still to be identified. Dissecting the genetic architecture of PD constitutes a critical effort in identifying therapeutic targets and although such substantial progress has helped us to better understand disease mechanism, the route to PD disease-modifying drugs is a lengthy one. In this review, we give an overview of the known genetic risk factors in PD, focusing not on individual variants but the larger networks that have been implicated following comprehensive pathway analysis. We outline the challenges faced in the translation of risk loci to pathobiological relevance and illustrate the need for integrating big-data by noting success in recent work which adopts a broad-scale screening approach. Lastly, with PD genetics now progressing from identifying risk to predicting disease, we review how these models will likely have a significant impact in the future.

Next