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Parkinson Disease: HELP
Articles from New England
Based on 991 articles published since 2008
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These are the 991 published articles about Parkinson Disease that originated from New England during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Editorial Enabling biomarker discovery in Parkinson's disease using multiomics: challenges, promise and the future. 2019

Kiebish, Michael A / Narain, Niven R. ·BERG LLC, Precision Medicine Division, Framingham, MA 01701, USA. ·Per Med · Pubmed #30422077.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Editorial Neurotherapeutics: Recent Developments. 2018

Rizvi, Syed. ·Associate Professor of Clinical Neurosciences, Alpert Medical School of Brown University; Director, Rhode Island Hospital Multiple Sclerosis Center; Director, Neurology Outpatient Center. ·R I Med J (2013) · Pubmed #29490320.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Editorial MCI in Parkinson's disease. 2018

Friedman, Joseph H. ·Dept. of Neurology, Butler Hospital, 345 Blackstone Blvd, Providence, RI 02906, USA; Dept. of Neurology, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI 02906, USA. Electronic address: Joseph_friedman@brown.edu. ·Parkinsonism Relat Disord · Pubmed #29413123.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial Immunologic treatment of Parkinson's disease. 2018

Jankovic, Joseph. ·Distinguished Chair in Movement Disorders, Director, Parkinson's Disease Center & Movement Disorders Clinic, Department of Neurology, Baylor College of Medicine, 7200 Cambridge, Suite 9A; Houston, TX 77030-4202, USA. ·Immunotherapy · Pubmed #29260621.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial Dietary antioxidants and Parkinson's disease. 2017

Ascherio, Alberto / Schwarzschild, Michael A. ·Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. ·Mov Disord · Pubmed #28976040.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Editorial and introduction: Behavioral aspects of Parkinson's disease. 2017

Friedman, Joseph H / Bhidayasiri, Roongroj / Truong, Daniel D. ·Butler Hospital, Department of Neurology, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, RI, USA. · Chulalongkorn Center of Excellence for Parkinson's Disease & Related Disorders, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University and King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok 10330, Thailand; Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Juntendo University, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: rbh@chulapd.org. · Truong Neuroscience Institute, Parkinson's and Movement Disorders Institute, Orange Coast Memorial Medical Center, Fountain Valley, CA, USA. ·J Neurol Sci · Pubmed #28087061.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Understanding of the role of manganese in parkinsonism and Parkinson disease. 2017

Ratner, Marcia H / Fitzgerald, Edward. ·From the Laboratory of Molecular Neurobiology (M.H.R.), Department of Pharmacology & Experimental Therapeutics, Boston University School of Medicine, MA · and Department of Environmental Health Sciences (E.F.), School of Public Health, University at Albany, Rensselaer, NY. ·Neurology · Pubmed #28031391.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Thoughts on fatigue in Parkinson's disease (and other disorders). 2017

Friedman, J H. ·Butler Hospital, Providence, RI, USA. · Department of Neurology, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI, USA. ·Eur J Neurol · Pubmed #27699949.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Advances in sensor and wearable technologies for Parkinson's disease. 2016

Sánchez-Ferro, Álvaro / Maetzler, Walter. ·HM CINAC, Hospital Universitario HM Puerta del Sur, Móstoles, Madrid, Spain. · Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. · Center for Neurology and Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research, Department of Neurodegeneration, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany. walter.maetzler@uni-tuebingen.de. · German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Tübingen, Germany. walter.maetzler@uni-tuebingen.de. ·Mov Disord · Pubmed #27477675.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial 4-amino-7-chloroquinoline derivatives for treating Parkinson's disease: implications for drug discovery. 2016

Kim, Chun-Hyung / Leblanc, Pierre / Kim, Kwang-Soo. ·a Molecular Neurobiology Laboratory , McLean Hospital and Program in Neuroscience, Harvard Medical School , Belmont , MA , USA. · b Paean Biotechnology Inc. , Daejeon , Korea. ·Expert Opin Drug Discov · Pubmed #26924734.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Editorial overview: Neurobiology of disease. 2016

Selkoe, Dennis J / Weinberger, Daniel R. ·Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: dselkoe@partners.org. · Lieber Institute for Brain Development and Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. Electronic address: drweinberger@libd.org. ·Curr Opin Neurobiol · Pubmed #26797413.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Editorial on: Pagonabarraga J, Martinez-Hora S, Fernandez de Bobadilla R et al. Minor hallucinations occur in drug-naïve Parkinson's disease patients even from the premotor phase. Movement Disorders 2015; Available from: DOI: 10.1002/mds.26432. 2016

Friedman, Joseph H. ·Movement Disorders Program, Butler Hospital, Providence, RI. · Department of Neurology, Warren Alpert School of Medicine of Brown University, Providence, RI. ·Mov Disord · Pubmed #26660462.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial Hope for regenerative treatments: toward safe transplantation of human pluripotent stem-cell-based therapies. 2015

Kimbrel, Erin A / Lanza, Robert. ·Ocata Therapeutics (formerly Advanced Cell Technology), Marlborough, MA 01752, USA. ·Regen Med · Pubmed #25835474.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial Smoking and osteoarthritis: a review of the evidence and its implications. 2015

Felson, D T / Zhang, Y. ·Clinical Epidemiology Research & Training Unit, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA; NIHR Biomedical Research Unit, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. Electronic address: dfelson@bu.edu. · Clinical Epidemiology Research & Training Unit, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA. ·Osteoarthritis Cartilage · Pubmed #25454371.

ABSTRACT: A number of reports including a recent publication in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage have suggested that smokers have a lower than expected prevalence of osteoarthritis (OA) than nonsmokers. We review the evidence linking smoking with OA, suggest approaches whereby the direct and indirect effects of smoking on OA might be distinguished, highlight two diseases, ulcerative colitis and Parkinson's disease, where smoking is protective, discuss mechanisms by which nicotine might act and lastly explore the association of smoking with enhanced musculoskeletal pain.

15 Editorial Can fall of blood pressure prevent falls in Parkinson disease? 2014

Hedera, Peter / Friedman, Joseph H. ·From the Department of Neurology (P.H.), Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN · Movement Disorders Program (J.H.F.), Butler Hospital, Providence · and the Department of Neurology (J.H.F.), Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI. ·Neurology · Pubmed #24682972.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Editorial Feeling the need ... the need for speed (of processing training) in Parkinson disease. 2013

Chou, Kelvin L / Cronin-Golomb, Alice. ·From the Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery (K.L.C.), University of Michigan, Ann Arbor · and the Department of Psychology (A.C.-G.), Boston University, MA. ·Neurology · Pubmed #24014502.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Review The Alzheimer's Disease Clinical Spectrum: Diagnosis and Management. 2019

Atri, Alireza. ·Banner Sun Health Research Institute, Banner Health, 10515 W Santa Fe Drive, Sun City, AZ 85351, USA; Department of Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 60 Fenwood Road, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Harvard Medical School, 25 Shattuck Street, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address: alireza.atri@bannerhealth.com. ·Med Clin North Am · Pubmed #30704681.

ABSTRACT: Alzheimer's disease (AD) care requires timely diagnosis and multidisciplinary management. Evaluation involves structured patient and caregiver history and symptom-function reviews, examination, and testing (laboratory and neuroimaging) to delineate impairment level, determine the cognitive-behavioral syndrome, and diagnose cause. Clinical biomarkers are available to aid high confidence in etiologic diagnosis. Management uses psychoeducation, shared goal setting, and patient-caregiver dyad decision making. When combined, pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic therapies mitigate symptoms and reduce clinical progression and care burden. AD biopathologic processes develop over decades before symptoms manifest; this period is increasingly targeted in research as an opportunity to best delay or prevent AD dementia.

18 Review Immunogenetic Factors of Neurodegenerative Diseases: The Role of HLA Class II. 2018

Aliseychik, M P / Andreeva, T V / Rogaev, E I. ·Vavilov Institute of General Genetics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Department of Genomics and Human Genetics, Moscow, 119991, Russia. alisei4ikmaria@gmail.com. · Center for Genetics and Genetic Technologies, Department of Biology, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, 119192, Russia. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01655, USA. · Vavilov Institute of General Genetics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Department of Genomics and Human Genetics, Moscow, 119991, Russia. · Vavilov Institute of General Genetics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Department of Genomics and Human Genetics, Moscow, 119991, Russia. Evgeny.Rogaev@umassmed.edu. ·Biochemistry (Mosc) · Pubmed #30472949.

ABSTRACT: An increase in the life expectancy during the last decades in most world countries has resulted in the growing number of people suffering from neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, frontotemporal dementia, and others. Familial forms of neurodegenerative diseases account for 5-10% of all cases and are caused by mutations in specific genes often resulting in pathological protein deposition. The risk factors for neurodegeneration include trauma, lifestyle, and allelic variants of disease-associated genes with incomplete penetrance. Many of these gene variants are located in immunity-related loci, particularly in the human leukocyte antigen locus (HLA class II) coding for proteins of the major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII). HLA class II plays a key role in the antigen presentation and is expressed in microglial cells. Microglia is a component of innate immunity. On the one hand, microglial cells phagocytize pathological protein deposits; on the other hand, they produce proinflammatory factors accelerating neuronal death. The involvement of adaptive immunity mechanisms (antigen presentation, T cell response, antibody production) in the development of neurodegenerative diseases remains unclear and requires further research, including more detailed studies of the role of identified HLA class II genetic variants.

19 Review Perioperative implications of common and newer psychotropic medications used in clinical practice. 2018

Kaye, Alan D / Kline, Ryan J / Thompson, Elliott R / Kaye, Aaron J / Terracciano, Justin A / Siddaiah, Harish B / Urman, Richard D / Cornett, Elyse M. ·Department of Anesthesiology, LSU Health Sciences Center, Room 656, 1542 Tulane Ave., New Orleans, LA, 70112, USA. Electronic address: akaye@lsuhsc.edu. · Department of Anesthesiology, LSU Health Science Center - New Orleans, 1542 Tulane Avenue, Room 659, New Orleans, LA, 70112, USA. Electronic address: rkline@lsuhsc.edu. · Department of Anesthesiology, LSU Health Shreveport, 1501 Kings Highway, Shreveport, LA, 71103, USA. Electronic address: etho18@lsuhsc.edu. · Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, 29425, USA. Electronic address: aaronkaye44@yahoo.com. · Department of Anesthesiology, LSU Health Shreveport, 1501 Kings Highway, Shreveport, LA, 71103, USA. Electronic address: jterra@lsuhsc.edu. · Department of Anesthesiology, LSU Health Shreveport, 1501 Kings Highway, Shreveport, LA, 71103, USA. Electronic address: hbanga@lsuhsc.edu. · Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 75 Francis St., Boston, MA, 02115, USA. Electronic address: rurman@bwh.harvard.edu. · Department of Anesthesiology, LSU Health Shreveport, 1501 Kings Highway, Shreveport, LA, 71103, USA. Electronic address: ecorne@lsuhsc.edu. ·Best Pract Res Clin Anaesthesiol · Pubmed #30322459.

ABSTRACT: Psychotropic medications are widely prescribed by clinicians as both primary therapy for a variety of psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases and as adjunctive analgesics for use in the perioperative period. It is critical to understand various modes of action, drug-drug interactions, side effects, and clinical implications. Health care providers must understand how these medications interact with anesthetics, as well as other drugs used in perioperative care. We review relevant psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases, psychotropic medications used to treat them, and how these medications interact with anesthetics and drugs used in perioperative care. We will also discuss emerging psychotropic drugs and the challenges they may create during the perioperative period. Future direction of investigation into the role of these drugs during the perioperative period and implications is also discussed.

20 Review Communication impairment in Parkinson's disease: Impact of motor and cognitive symptoms on speech and language. 2018

Smith, Kara M / Caplan, David N. ·University of Massachusetts Medical School, 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester, MA 01655, USA. Electronic address: kara.smith@umassmemorial.org. · Massachusetts General Hospital, 175 Cambridge Street, Boston, MA 02114, USA. Electronic address: dcaplan@partners.org. ·Brain Lang · Pubmed #30092448.

ABSTRACT: Communication impairment is common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and may have both motor speech control and cognitive-linguistic underpinnings. The neurobiology of communication impairment in PD is poorly understood, and work is needed to disentangle the relative contributions of motor and cognitive dysfunction. In clinical practice, cognitive-linguistic impairments are often overlooked despite the large body of research on this topic in neurocognitive and linguistics literature. In this review, we will discuss the roles of motor speech changes, cognitive and linguistic impairment, and other related functions in the communication disabilities of individuals with PD. We will describe the various types of communication difficulties in PD and tools for measuring these symptoms. We will discuss specific deficits that may further understanding of the neurobiology of communication impairment in PD, including voice and speech acoustic changes, linguistic processing and production difficulties, and pausing. We will emphasize the importance of an interdisciplinary approach and the patient perspective on daily communication in guiding future research.

21 Review Targeting energy metabolism via the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier as a novel approach to attenuate neurodegeneration. 2018

Quansah, Emmanuel / Peelaerts, Wouter / Langston, J William / Simon, David K / Colca, Jerry / Brundin, Patrik. ·Center for Neurodegenerative Science, Van Andel Research Institute, Grand Rapids, 333 Bostwick Ave, Michigan, 49503, USA. · KU Leuven, Laboratory for Gene Therapy and Neurobiology, 3000, Leuven, Belgium. · Stanford Udall Center, Department of Pathology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, USA. · Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Metabolic Solutions Development Company, Kalamazoo, MI, 49007, USA. · Center for Neurodegenerative Science, Van Andel Research Institute, Grand Rapids, 333 Bostwick Ave, Michigan, 49503, USA. patrik.brundin@vai.org. ·Mol Neurodegener · Pubmed #29793507.

ABSTRACT: Several molecular pathways are currently being targeted in attempts to develop disease-modifying therapies to slow down neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease. Failure of cellular energy metabolism has long been implicated in sporadic Parkinson's disease and recent research on rare inherited forms of Parkinson's disease have added further weight to the importance of energy metabolism in the disease pathogenesis. There exists a new class of anti-diabetic insulin sensitizers in development that inhibit the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC), a protein which mediates the import of pyruvate across the inner membrane of mitochondria. Pharmacological inhibition of the MPC was recently found to be strongly neuroprotective in multiple neurotoxin-based and genetic models of neurodegeneration which are relevant to Parkinson's disease. In this review, we summarize the neuroprotective effects of MPC inhibition and discuss the potential putative underlying mechanisms. These mechanisms involve augmentation of autophagy via attenuation of the activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in neurons, as well as the inhibition of neuroinflammation, which is at least partly mediated by direct inhibition of MPC in glia cells. We conclude that MPC is a novel and potentially powerful therapeutic target that warrants further study in attempts to slow Parkinson's disease progression.

22 Review Pluripotent stem cell-based therapy for Parkinson's disease: Current status and future prospects. 2018

Sonntag, Kai-C / Song, Bin / Lee, Nayeon / Jung, Jin Hyuk / Cha, Young / Leblanc, Pierre / Neff, Carolyn / Kong, Sek Won / Carter, Bob S / Schweitzer, Jeffrey / Kim, Kwang-Soo. ·Department of Psychiatry, McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School, United States; Laboratory for Translational Research on Neurodegeneration, 115 Mill Street, Belmont, MA, 02478, United States; Program for Neuropsychiatric Research, 115 Mill Street, Belmont, MA, 02478, United States. · Department of Psychiatry, McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School, United States; Molecular Neurobiology Laboratory, Program in Neuroscience and Harvard Stem Cell Institute, McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 115 Mill Street, Belmont, MA, 02478, United States. · Kaiser Permanente Medical Group, Irvine, CA, 92618, United States. · Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 02115, United States; Computational Health Informatics Program, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, 02115, United States. · Department of Neurosurgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, 02114, United States. · Department of Neurosurgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, 02114, United States. Electronic address: jschweitzer1@mgh.harvard.edu. · Department of Psychiatry, McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School, United States; Molecular Neurobiology Laboratory, Program in Neuroscience and Harvard Stem Cell Institute, McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 115 Mill Street, Belmont, MA, 02478, United States. Electronic address: kskim@mclean.harvard.edu. ·Prog Neurobiol · Pubmed #29653250.

ABSTRACT: Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders, which affects about 0.3% of the general population. As the population in the developed world ages, this creates an escalating burden on society both in economic terms and in quality of life for these patients and for the families that support them. Although currently available pharmacological or surgical treatments may significantly improve the quality of life of many patients with PD, these are symptomatic treatments that do not slow or stop the progressive course of the disease. Because motor impairments in PD largely result from loss of midbrain dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta, PD has long been considered to be one of the most promising target diseases for cell-based therapy. Indeed, numerous clinical and preclinical studies using fetal cell transplantation have provided proof of concept that cell replacement therapy may be a viable therapeutic approach for PD. However, the use of human fetal cells as a standardized therapeutic regimen has been fraught with fundamental ethical, practical, and clinical issues, prompting scientists to explore alternative cell sources. Based on groundbreaking establishments of human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, these human pluripotent stem cells have been the subject of extensive research, leading to tremendous advancement in our understanding of these novel classes of stem cells and promising great potential for regenerative medicine. In this review, we discuss the prospects and challenges of human pluripotent stem cell-based cell therapy for PD.

23 Review Light Therapy in Parkinson's Disease: Towards Mechanism-Based Protocols. 2018

Fifel, Karim / Videnovic, Aleksandar. ·Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Neurophysiology Unit, Leiden University Medical Center, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden, The Netherlands; International Institute for Integrative Sleep Medicine (WPI-IIIS), University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8575, Japan. Electronic address: fifel-k@hotmail.com. · Movement Disorders Unit and Division of Sleep Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 165 Cambridge Street, Suite 600, Boston, MA 02446, USA. ·Trends Neurosci · Pubmed #29588060.

ABSTRACT: A growing body of work is investigating the safety and efficacy of light in Parkinson's disease (PD). Here we discuss the potential of this emerging therapy to improve both motor and non-motor symptoms of PD. We also highlight directions for future basic, translational, and clinical research that are critical for the development of mechanism-based protocols of light therapy in PD.

24 Review Pharmacological interventions for psychosis in Parkinson's disease patients. 2018

Friedman, Joseph H. ·a Movement Disorders Program , Butler Hospital , Providence , RI , USA. · b Department of Neurology , Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University , Providence , RI , USA. ·Expert Opin Pharmacother · Pubmed #29494265.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Psychosis is a common problem for people treated for Parkinson's disease. The syndrome is quite stereotypic, with hallucinations being the most common, followed by delusions. While the hallucinations are usually not very bothersome, the delusions are typically paranoid in nature. Treatment is often, but not always, required. AREAS COVERED: This article reviews the therapeutic approaches of this syndrome focusing on drug treatments used once contributory factors have been removed. This includes a review of the evidence supporting the use of clozapine and, most recently, pimavanserin, the first drug with antipsychotic efficacy that has no effect on dopamine. Treatment with second generation antipsychotic drugs and cholinesterase inhibitors are also reviewed. EXPERT OPINION: Clozapine and pimavanserin have proven efficacy for Parkinson's disease psychosis (PDP), without impairing motor function. In clozapine's favor are its antipsychotic benefits seen within 1 week and its effectiveness in improving tremor in PD. However, this is counterbalanced by the need for blood monitoring, despite the extremely low doses used, and sedation. Pimanvanserin is well tolerated, without sedation or other significant side effects. Its onset of benefit, however takes 4-6 weeks. While quetiapine is also frequently used, its efficacy is not supported by double blinded, randomized trials.

25 Review Parkinson's disease: A Quick Update. 2018

D'Abreu, Anelyssa. ·Associate Professor of Neurology, Alpert Medical School of Brown University. ·R I Med J (2013) · Pubmed #29490323.

ABSTRACT: Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by motor and non-motor symptoms. Although the diagnosis still relies on the presence of motor signs, new diagnostic criteria have been proposed to incorporate recent observations in order to improve accuracy. The cornerstone of therapy remains dopamine replacement with L-Dopa. However, new therapies, with different modes of action, or administration have become available to improve management.

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