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Parkinson Disease: HELP
Articles from Duluth
Based on 7 articles published since 2010
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These are the 7 published articles about Parkinson Disease that originated from Duluth during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Editorial Divining progression in Parkinson disease with a blood test: NfL. 2019

Boylan, Laura S / Chiò, Adriano. ·From Bellevue Hospital (L.S.B.) · New York University School of Medicine (L.S.B.) · Albany-Stratton VA Medical Center, NY (L.S.B.) · Essentia Health, Duluth, MN (L.S.B.) · and "Rita Levi Montalcini" Department of Neuroscience (A.C.), University of Turin, Italy. ·Neurology · Pubmed #31420460.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Editorial Don't ask, don't tell: Impulse control disorders in PD. 2018

Boylan, Laura S / Kostić, Vladimir S. ·From Division of Neurology (L.S.B.), Essentia Health, Duluth, MN · Albany-Stratton VA Medical Center (L.S.B.), Albany · Bellevue Hospital/New York University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology (L.S.B.), NY · and Institute of Neurology CCS (V.S.K.), School of Medicine University of Belgrade, Serbia. ·Neurology · Pubmed #29925552.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Editorial Orthostatic hypotension, cognition, and Parkinson disease: Dumbing down by standing up. 2017

Boylan, Laura S / Messinis, Lambros. ·From the Department of Neurology (L.S.B.), New York University School of Medicine, New York · Department of Neurology (L.S.B.), Essentia Health, Duluth, MN · Department of Neurology (L.S.B.), Bellevue Hospital, New York, NY · and Neuropsychology Section, Department of Neurology (L.M.), University of Patras Medical School, Greece. ·Neurology · Pubmed #27903812.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Review Genetics of Parkinson's disease and related disorders. 2018

Zhang, Pei-Lan / Chen, Yan / Zhang, Chen-Hao / Wang, Yu-Xin / Fernandez-Funez, Pedro. ·Department of Neurology, Tianjin Huanhu Hospital, Tianjin, China. · Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Minnesota Medical School-Duluth Campus, Duluth, Minnesota, USA. ·J Med Genet · Pubmed #29151060.

ABSTRACT: Parkinson's disease (PD) is a complex and heterogeneous neurological condition characterised mainly by bradykinesia, resting tremor, rigidity and postural instability, symptoms that together comprise the parkinsonian syndrome. Non-motor symptoms preceding and following clinical onset are also helpful diagnostic markers revealing a widespread and progressive pathology. Many other neurological conditions also include parkinsonism as primary or secondary symptom, confounding their diagnosis and treatment. Although overall disease course and end-stage pathological examination single out these conditions, the significant overlaps suggest that they are part of a continuous disease spectrum. Recent genetic discoveries support this idea because mutations in a few genes (α-synuclein,

5 Review Approach to the patient with Parkinson disease. 2015

Johnson, Kevin E. ·Family Medicine Residency, Gwinnett Medical Center, 665 Duluth Hwy, Suite 501, Lawrenceville, GA 30046, USA. Electronic address: kejohnson@gwinnettmedicalcenter.org. ·Prim Care · Pubmed #25979582.

ABSTRACT: Parkinson disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with motor, nonmotor, and behavioral findings. Imaging technology advances have allowed the characterization of the underlying pathologic changes to the brain and identification of specific lesions in dopaminergic neurons. Although certain imaging techniques allow for detection up to 20 years before the onset of motor symptoms, these advances have yet to produce meaningful treatments to halt the disease or reverse its course. Current treatments are directed at optimizing symptomatic management. Referral to a movement disorder specialist familiar with PD should be considered for providers with limited familiarity in diagnosis or treatment.

6 Article Gene regulatory effects of disease-associated variation in the NRF2 network. 2016

Lacher, Sarah E / Slattery, Matthew. ·Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Minnesota Medical School, Duluth, MN, USA. · Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Minnesota Medical School, Duluth, MN, USA; Developmental Biology Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA. ·Curr Opin Toxicol · Pubmed #28203648.

ABSTRACT: Reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are both a natural byproduct of oxidative metabolism and an undesirable byproduct of many environmental stressors, can damage all classes of cellular macromolecules and promote diseases from cancer to neurodegeneration. The actions of ROS are mitigated by the transcription factor NRF2, which regulates expression of antioxidant genes via its interaction with

7 Article Mining Retrospective Data for Virtual Prospective Drug Repurposing: L-DOPA and Age-related Macular Degeneration. 2016

Brilliant, Murray H / Vaziri, Kamyar / Connor, Thomas B / Schwartz, Stephen G / Carroll, Joseph J / McCarty, Catherine A / Schrodi, Steven J / Hebbring, Scott J / Kishor, Krishna S / Flynn, Harry W / Moshfeghi, Andrew A / Moshfeghi, Darius M / Fini, M Elizabeth / McKay, Brian S. ·Center for Human Genetics, Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation, Marshfield, Wis. · Department of Ophthalmology, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. · Department of Ophthalmology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. · Department of Ophthalmology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; Department of Cell Biology, Neurobiology & Anatomy, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. · Essentia Institute of Rural Health, Duluth, Minn. · Department of Ophthalmology, USC Eye Institute, Keck School of Medicine of USC, University of Southern California, Los Angeles. · Department of Ophthalmology, Byers Eye Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, Calif. · USC Institute for Genetic Medicine, Keck School of Medicine of USC, University of Southern California, Los Angeles; Department of Cell & Neurobiology, Keck School of Medicine of USC, University of Southern California, Los Angeles; Department of Ophthalmology, Keck School of Medicine of USC, University of Southern California, Los Angeles. · Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Science, University of Arizona, Tucson; Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson. Electronic address: bsmckay@eyes.arizona.edu. ·Am J Med · Pubmed #26524704.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of visual loss among the elderly. A key cell type involved in AMD, the retinal pigment epithelium, expresses a G protein-coupled receptor that, in response to its ligand, L-DOPA, up-regulates pigment epithelia-derived factor, while down-regulating vascular endothelial growth factor. In this study we investigated the potential relationship between L-DOPA and AMD. METHODS: We used retrospective analysis to compare the incidence of AMD between patients taking vs not taking L-DOPA. We analyzed 2 separate cohorts of patients with extensive medical records from the Marshfield Clinic (approximately 17,000 and approximately 20,000) and the Truven MarketScan outpatient and databases (approximately 87 million) patients. We used International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision codes to identify AMD diagnoses and L-DOPA prescriptions to determine the relative risk of developing AMD and age of onset with or without an L-DOPA prescription. RESULTS: In the retrospective analysis of patients without an L-DOPA prescription, AMD age of onset was 71.2, 71.3, and 71.3 in 3 independent retrospective cohorts. Age-related macular degeneration occurred significantly later in patients with an L-DOPA prescription, 79.4 in all cohorts. The odds ratio of developing AMD was also significantly negatively correlated by L-DOPA (odds ratio 0.78; confidence interval, 0.76-0.80; P <.001). Similar results were observed for neovascular AMD (P <.001). CONCLUSIONS: Exogenous L-DOPA was protective against AMD. L-DOPA is normally produced in pigmented tissues, such as the retinal pigment epithelium, as a byproduct of melanin synthesis by tyrosinase. GPR143 is the only known L-DOPA receptor; it is therefore plausible that GPR143 may be a fruitful target to combat this devastating disease.