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Pregnancy HELP
Based on 100,000 articles published since 2009
|||| 22 

These are the 100000 published articles about Pregnancy that originated from Worldwide during 2009-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Screening for Asymptomatic Bacteriuria in Adults: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. 2019

Anonymous1991522 / Owens, Douglas K / Davidson, Karina W / Krist, Alex H / Barry, Michael J / Cabana, Michael / Caughey, Aaron B / Doubeni, Chyke A / Epling, John W / Kubik, Martha / Landefeld, C Seth / Mangione, Carol M / Pbert, Lori / Silverstein, Michael / Simon, Melissa A / Tseng, Chien-Wen / Wong, John B. ·Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California. · Stanford University, Stanford, California. · Feinstein Institute for Medical Research at Northwell Health, Manhasset, New York. · Fairfax Family Practice Residency, Fairfax, Virginia. · Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · University of California, San Francisco. · Oregon Health & Science University, Portland. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, New York. · Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, Roanoke. · Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · University of Alabama at Birmingham. · University of California, Los Angeles. · University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester. · Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts. · Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois. · University of Hawaii, Honolulu. · Pacific Health Research and Education Institute, Honolulu, Hawaii. · Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts. ·JAMA · Pubmed #31550038.

ABSTRACT: Importance: Among the general adult population, women (across all ages) have the highest prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria, although rates increase with age among both men and women. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is present in an estimated 1% to 6% of premenopausal women and an estimated 2% to 10% of pregnant women and is associated with pyelonephritis, one of the most common nonobstetric reasons for hospitalization in pregnant women. Among pregnant persons, pyelonephritis is associated with perinatal complications including septicemia, respiratory distress, low birth weight, and spontaneous preterm birth. Objective: To update its 2008 recommendation, the USPSTF commissioned a review of the evidence on potential benefits and harms of screening for and treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria in adults, including pregnant persons. Population: This recommendation applies to community-dwelling adults 18 years and older and pregnant persons of any age without signs and symptoms of a urinary tract infection. Evidence Assessment: Based on a review of the evidence, the USPSTF concludes with moderate certainty that screening for and treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant persons has moderate net benefit in reducing perinatal complications. There is adequate evidence that pyelonephritis in pregnancy is associated with negative maternal outcomes and that treatment of screen-detected asymptomatic bacteriuria can reduce the incidence of pyelonephritis in pregnant persons. The USPSTF found adequate evidence of harms associated with treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria (including adverse effects of antibiotic treatment and changes in the microbiome) to be at least small in magnitude. The USPSTF concludes with moderate certainty that screening for and treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria in nonpregnant adults has no net benefit. The known harms associated with treatment include adverse effects of antibiotic use and changes to the microbiome. Based on these known harms, the USPSTF determined the overall harms to be at least small in this group. Recommendations: The USPSTF recommends screening pregnant persons for asymptomatic bacteriuria using urine culture. (B recommendation) The USPSTF recommends against screening for asymptomatic bacteriuria in nonpregnant adults. (D recommendation).

2 Guideline Care of Women Presenting with Suspected Preterm Prelabour Rupture of Membranes from 24 2019

Thomson, A J / Anonymous341378. · ·BJOG · Pubmed #31207667.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Guideline Screening for HIV Infection: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. 2019

Anonymous5161409 / Owens, Douglas K / Davidson, Karina W / Krist, Alex H / Barry, Michael J / Cabana, Michael / Caughey, Aaron B / Curry, Susan J / Doubeni, Chyke A / Epling, John W / Kubik, Martha / Landefeld, C Seth / Mangione, Carol M / Pbert, Lori / Silverstein, Michael / Simon, Melissa A / Tseng, Chien-Wen / Wong, John B. ·Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California. · Stanford University, Stanford, California. · Feinstein Institute for Medical Research at Northwell Health, Manhasset, New York. · Fairfax Family Practice Residency, Fairfax, Virginia. · Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · University of California, San Francisco. · Oregon Health & Science University, Portland. · University of Iowa, Iowa City. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, Roanoke. · Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · University of Alabama at Birmingham. · University of California, Los Angeles. · University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester. · Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts. · Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois. · University of Hawaii, Honolulu. · Pacific Health Research and Education Institute, Honolulu, Hawaii. · Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts. ·JAMA · Pubmed #31184701.

ABSTRACT: Importance: Approximately 1.1 million persons in the United States are currently living with HIV, and more than 700 000 persons have died of AIDS since the first cases were reported in 1981. There were approximately 38 300 new diagnoses of HIV infection in 2017. The estimated prevalence of HIV infection among persons 13 years and older in the United States is 0.4%, and data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show a significant increase in HIV diagnoses starting at age 15 years. An estimated 8700 women living with HIV give birth each year in the United States. HIV can be transmitted from mother to child during pregnancy, labor, delivery, and breastfeeding. The incidence of perinatal HIV infection in the United States peaked in 1992 and has declined significantly following the implementation of routine prenatal HIV screening and the use of effective therapies and precautions to prevent mother-to-child transmission. Objective: To update the 2013 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for HIV infection in adolescents, adults, and pregnant women. Evidence Review: The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the benefits and harms of screening for HIV infection in nonpregnant adolescents and adults, the yield of screening for HIV infection at different intervals, the effects of initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) at a higher vs lower CD4 cell count, and the longer-term harms associated with currently recommended ART regimens. The USPSTF also reviewed the evidence on the benefits (specifically, reduced risk of mother-to-child transmission of HIV infection) and harms of screening for HIV infection in pregnant persons, the yield of repeat screening for HIV at different intervals during pregnancy, the effectiveness of currently recommended ART regimens for reducing mother-to-child transmission of HIV infection, and the harms of ART during pregnancy to the mother and infant. Findings: The USPSTF found convincing evidence that currently recommended HIV tests are highly accurate in diagnosing HIV infection. The USPSTF found convincing evidence that identification and early treatment of HIV infection is of substantial benefit in reducing the risk of AIDS-related events or death. The USPSTF found convincing evidence that the use of ART is of substantial benefit in decreasing the risk of HIV transmission to uninfected sex partners. The USPSTF also found convincing evidence that identification and treatment of pregnant women living with HIV infection is of substantial benefit in reducing the rate of mother-to-child transmission. The USPSTF found adequate evidence that ART is associated with some harms, including neuropsychiatric, renal, and hepatic harms, and an increased risk of preterm birth in pregnant women. The USPSTF concludes with high certainty that the net benefit of screening for HIV infection in adolescents, adults, and pregnant women is substantial. Conclusions and Recommendation: The USPSTF recommends screening for HIV infection in adolescents and adults aged 15 to 65 years. Younger adolescents and older adults who are at increased risk of infection should also be screened. (A recommendation) The USPSTF recommends screening for HIV infection in all pregnant persons, including those who present in labor or at delivery whose HIV status is unknown. (A recommendation).

4 Guideline Screening for Elevated Blood Lead Levels in Children and Pregnant Women: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. 2019

Anonymous4641133 / Curry, Susan J / Krist, Alex H / Owens, Douglas K / Barry, Michael J / Cabana, Michael / Caughey, Aaron B / Doubeni, Chyke A / Epling, John W / Kemper, Alex R / Kubik, Martha / Landefeld, C Seth / Mangione, Carol M / Pbert, Lori / Silverstein, Michael / Simon, Melissa A / Tseng, Chien-Wen / Wong, John B. ·University of Iowa, Iowa City. · Fairfax Family Practice Residency, Fairfax, Virginia. · Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond. · Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California. · Stanford University, Stanford, California. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · University of California, San Francisco. · Oregon Health & Science University, Portland. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, Roanoke. · Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio. · Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · University of Alabama at Birmingham. · University of California, Los Angeles. · University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester. · Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts. · Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois. · University of Hawaii, Honolulu. · Pacific Health Research and Education Institute, Honolulu, Hawaii. · Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts. ·JAMA · Pubmed #30990556.

ABSTRACT: Importance: Elevated blood lead levels in children are associated with neurologic effects such as behavioral and learning problems, lower IQ, hyperactivity, hearing problems, and impaired growth. In pregnant women, lead exposure can impair organ systems such as the hematopoietic, hepatic, renal, and nervous systems, and increase the risk of preeclampsia and adverse perinatal outcomes. Many of the adverse health effects of lead exposure are irreversible. Objective: To update the 2006 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for elevated blood lead levels in children and pregnant women. Evidence Review: The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the benefits and harms of screening for and treatment of elevated blood lead levels. In this update, an elevated blood lead level was defined according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reference level of 5 μg/dL. Findings: The USPSTF found adequate evidence that questionnaires and other clinical prediction tools to identify asymptomatic children with elevated blood lead levels are inaccurate. The USPSTF found adequate evidence that capillary blood testing accurately identifies children with elevated blood lead levels. The USPSTF found inadequate evidence on the effectiveness of treatment of elevated blood lead levels in asymptomatic children 5 years and younger and in pregnant women. The USPSTF found inadequate evidence regarding the accuracy of questionnaires and other clinical prediction tools to identify asymptomatic pregnant women with elevated blood lead levels. The USPSTF found inadequate evidence on the harms of screening for or treatment of elevated blood lead levels in asymptomatic children and pregnant women. The USPSTF concluded that the current evidence is insufficient, and that the balance of benefits and harms of screening for elevated blood lead levels in asymptomatic children 5 years and younger and in pregnant women cannot be determined. Conclusions and Recommendation: The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for elevated blood lead levels in asymptomatic children. (I statement) The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for elevated blood lead levels in asymptomatic pregnant persons. (I statement).

5 Guideline Patient blood management in obstetrics: prevention and treatment of postpartum haemorrhage. A NATA consensus statement. 2019

Muñoz, Manuel / Stensballe, Jakob / Ducloy-Bouthors, Anne-Sophie / Bonnet, Marie-Pierre / De Robertis, Edoardo / Fornet, Ino / Goffinet, François / Hofer, Stefan / Holzgreve, Wolfgang / Manrique, Susana / Nizard, Jacky / Christory, François / Samama, Charles-Marc / Hardy, Jean-François. ·Perioperative Transfusion Medicine, Department of Surgical Specialities, Biochemistry and Inmunology, University of Málaga, Málaga, Spain. · Network for the Advancement of Patient Blood Management, Haemostasis and Thrombosis, Paris, France (NATA). · Section for Transfusion Medicine, Capital Region Blood Bank, and Department of Anaesthesiology, Centre of Head and Orthopaedics, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Lille University Hospital, Lille, France. · Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, Cochin University Hospital, Paris, France. · Department of Neurosciences, Reproductive and Odontostomatologic Sciences, University Federico II, Naples, Italy. · European Society of Anaesthesiology, Brussels, Belgium (ESA). · Deparment of Anesthesiology, University Hospital Puerta de Hierro, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Port-Royal Maternity, Groupe Hospitalier Cochin-Broca-Hôtel Dieu, Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France. · Clinic for Anesthesiology, Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine I, Westpfalz Hospital, Kaiserslautern, Germany. · Department of Obstetrics and Prenatal Medicine, University Hospital Bonn, Bonn, Germany. · International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, London, UK (FIGO). · Deparment of Anesthesiology, University Hospital Vall d'Hebron, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Groupe Hospitalier Pitié Salpêtrière, Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, Paris, France. · European Board and College of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Brussels, Belgium (EBCOG). · Department of Anaesthesiology, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada. ·Blood Transfus · Pubmed #30865585.

ABSTRACT: Patient blood management (PBM) is the timely application of evidence-informed medical and surgical concepts designed to maintain haemoglobin concentration, optimise haemostasis, and minimise blood loss in an effort to improve patient outcomes. The aim of this consensus statement is to provide recommendations on the prevention and treatment of postpartum haemorrhage as part of PBM in obstetrics. A multidisciplinary panel of physicians with expertise in obstetrics, anaesthesia, haematology, and transfusion medicine was convened by the Network for the Advancement of Patient Blood Management, Haemostasis and Thrombosis (NATA) in collaboration with the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO), the European Board and College of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (EBCOG), and the European Society of Anaesthesiology (ESA). Members of the task force assessed the quantity, quality and consistency of the published evidence, and formulated recommendations using the system developed by the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) working group. The recommendations in this consensus statement are intended for use by clinical practitioners managing perinatal care of women in all settings, and by policy-makers in charge of decision making for the update of clinical practice in health care establishments.

6 Guideline Interventions to Prevent Perinatal Depression: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. 2019

Anonymous3491079 / Curry, Susan J / Krist, Alex H / Owens, Douglas K / Barry, Michael J / Caughey, Aaron B / Davidson, Karina W / Doubeni, Chyke A / Epling, John W / Grossman, David C / Kemper, Alex R / Kubik, Martha / Landefeld, C Seth / Mangione, Carol M / Silverstein, Michael / Simon, Melissa A / Tseng, Chien-Wen / Wong, John B. ·University of Iowa, Iowa City. · Fairfax Family Practice Residency, Fairfax, Virginia. · Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond. · Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California. · Stanford University, Stanford, California. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Oregon Health & Science University, Portland. · Feinstein Institute for Medical Research at Northwell Health, Manhasset, New York. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, Roanoke. · Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, Seattle. · Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio. · Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · University of Alabama at Birmingham. · University of California, Los Angeles. · Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts. · Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois. · University of Hawaii, Honolulu. · Pacific Health Research and Education Institute, Honolulu, Hawaii. · Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts. ·JAMA · Pubmed #30747971.

ABSTRACT: Importance: Perinatal depression, which is the occurrence of a depressive disorder during pregnancy or following childbirth, affects as many as 1 in 7 women and is one of the most common complications of pregnancy and the postpartum period. It is well established that perinatal depression can result in adverse short- and long-term effects on both the woman and child. Objective: To issue a new US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on interventions to prevent perinatal depression. Evidence Review: The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the benefits and harms of preventive interventions for perinatal depression in pregnant or postpartum women or their children. The USPSTF reviewed contextual information on the accuracy of tools used to identify women at increased risk of perinatal depression and the most effective timing for preventive interventions. Interventions reviewed included counseling, health system interventions, physical activity, education, supportive interventions, and other behavioral interventions, such as infant sleep training and expressive writing. Pharmacological approaches included the use of nortriptyline, sertraline, and omega-3 fatty acids. Findings: The USPSTF found convincing evidence that counseling interventions, such as cognitive behavioral therapy and interpersonal therapy, are effective in preventing perinatal depression. Women with a history of depression, current depressive symptoms, or certain socioeconomic risk factors (eg, low income or young or single parenthood) would benefit from counseling interventions and could be considered at increased risk. The USPSTF found adequate evidence to bound the potential harms of counseling interventions as no greater than small, based on the nature of the intervention and the low likelihood of serious harms. The USPSTF found inadequate evidence to assess the benefits and harms of other noncounseling interventions. The USPSTF concludes with moderate certainty that providing or referring pregnant or postpartum women at increased risk to counseling interventions has a moderate net benefit in preventing perinatal depression. Conclusions and Recommendation: The USPSTF recommends that clinicians provide or refer pregnant and postpartum persons who are at increased risk of perinatal depression to counseling interventions. (B recommendation).

7 Guideline Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices Recommended Immunization Schedule for Adults Aged 19 Years or Older - United States, 2019. 2019

Kim, David K / Hunter, Paul. · ·MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep · Pubmed #30730868.

ABSTRACT: In October 2018, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)* voted to recommend approval of the Recommended Immunization Schedule for Adults, Aged 19 Years or Older, United States, 2019. The 2019 adult immunization schedule, available at https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules,

8 Guideline ACOG Committee Opinion No. 763: Ethical Considerations for the Care of Patients With Obesity. 2019

Anonymous741524. · ·Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #30575680.

ABSTRACT: Obesity is a medical condition that may be associated with bias among health care professionals, and this bias may result in disrespectful or inadequate care of patients with obesity. Obstetrician-gynecologists regularly care for patients with obesity and play an integral role in advocating for best practices in health care and optimizing health outcomes for patients with obesity. Obstetrician-gynecologists should be prepared to care for their patients with obesity in a nonjudgmental manner, being cognizant of the medical and societal implications of obesity. This Committee Opinion has been updated from its previous version to focus on obesity bias within the medical community and to provide practical guidance using people-first language instead of labels (ie, "patients with obesity" versus "obese patients") to help obstetrician-gynecologists deliver effective, compassionate medical care that meets the needs of patients with obesity.

9 Guideline ACOG Committee Opinion No. 762: Prepregnancy Counseling. 2019

Anonymous731524. · ·Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #30575679.

ABSTRACT: The goal of prepregnancy care is to reduce the risk of adverse health effects for the woman, fetus, and neonate by working with the woman to optimize health, address modifiable risk factors, and provide education about healthy pregnancy. All those planning to initiate a pregnancy should be counseled, including heterosexual, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, asexual, and gender nonconforming individuals. Counseling can begin with the following question: "Would you like to become pregnant in the next year?" Prepregnancy counseling is appropriate whether the reproductive-aged patient is currently using contraception or planning pregnancy. Because health status and risk factors can change over time, prepregnancy counseling should occur several times during a woman's reproductive lifespan, increasing her opportunity for education and potentially maximizing her reproductive and pregnancy outcomes. Many chronic medical conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, psychiatric illness, and thyroid disease have implications for pregnancy outcomes and should be optimally managed before pregnancy. Counseling patients about optimal intervals between pregnancies may be helpful to reduce future complications. Assessment of the need for sexually transmitted infection screening should be performed at the time of prepregnancy counseling. Women who present for prepregnancy counseling should be offered screening for the same genetic conditions as recommended for pregnant women. All patients should be routinely asked about their use of alcohol, nicotine products, and drugs, including prescription opioids and other medications used for nonmedical reasons. Screening for intimate partner violence should occur during prepregnancy counseling. Female prepregnancy folic acid supplementation should be encouraged to reduce the risk of neural tube defects.

10 Guideline ACOG Committee Opinion No. 761: Cesarean Delivery on Maternal Request. 2019

Anonymous721524. · ·Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #30575678.

ABSTRACT: The incidence of cesarean delivery on maternal request and its contribution to the overall increase in the cesarean delivery rate are not well known, but it is estimated that 2.5% of all births in the United States are cesarean delivery on maternal request. Cesarean delivery on maternal request is not a well-recognized clinical entity. The available information that compared the risks and benefits of cesarean delivery on maternal request and planned vaginal delivery does not provide the basis for a recommendation for either mode of delivery. When a woman desires a cesarean delivery on maternal request, her health care provider should consider her specific risk factors, such as age, body mass index, accuracy of estimated gestational age, reproductive plans, personal values, and cultural context. In the absence of maternal or fetal indications for cesarean delivery, a plan for vaginal delivery is safe and appropriate and should be recommended. After exploring the reasons behind the patient's request and discussing the risks and benefits, if a patient decides to pursue cesarean delivery on maternal request, the following is recommended: in the absence of other indications for early delivery, cesarean delivery on maternal request should not be performed before a gestational age of 39 weeks; and, given the high repeat cesarean delivery rate, patients should be informed that the risks of placenta previa, placenta accreta spectrum, and gravid hysterectomy increase with each subsequent cesarean delivery. This Committee Opinion has been revised to incorporate additional data regarding outcomes and information on counseling, and to link to existing American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' resources.

11 Guideline Obstetric Care Consensus No. 8: Interpregnancy Care. 2019

Anonymous711524. · ·Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #30575677.

ABSTRACT: Interpregnancy care aims to maximize a woman's level of wellness not just in between pregnancies and during subsequent pregnancies, but also along her life course. Because the interpregnancy period is a continuum for overall health and wellness, all women of reproductive age who have been pregnant regardless of the outcome of their pregnancies (ie, miscarriage, abortion, preterm, full-term delivery), should receive interpregnancy care as a continuum from postpartum care. The initial components of interpregnancy care should include the components of postpartum care, such as reproductive life planning, screening for depression, vaccination, managing diabetes or hypertension if needed, education about future health, assisting the patient to develop a postpartum care team, and making plans for long-term medical care. In women with chronic medical conditions, interpregnancy care provides an opportunity to optimize health before a subsequent pregnancy. For women who will not have any future pregnancies, the period after pregnancy also affords an opportunity for secondary prevention and improvement of future health.

12 Guideline ACOG Practice Bulletin No. 203: Chronic Hypertension in Pregnancy. 2019

Anonymous701524. · ·Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #30575676.

ABSTRACT: Chronic hypertension is present in 0.9-1.5% of pregnant women () and may result in significant maternal, fetal, and neonatal morbidity and mortality. The rate of maternal chronic hypertension increased by 67% from 2000 to 2009, with the largest increase (87%) among African American women. This increase is largely secondary to the obesity epidemic and increasing maternal age (). The trend is expected to continue.The purpose of this document is to clarify the criteria used to define and diagnose chronic hypertension before or during pregnancy, to review the effects of chronic hypertension on pregnancy and vice versa, and to appraise the available evidence for management options. The purpose of these revised best practice recommendations is to provide a rational approach to chronic hypertension in pregnancy based on new research data and relevant pathophysiologic and pharmacologic considerations.

13 Guideline ACOG Practice Bulletin No. 202: Gestational Hypertension and Preeclampsia. 2019

Anonymous691524. · ·Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #30575675.

ABSTRACT: Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy constitute one of the leading causes of maternal and perinatal mortality worldwide. It has been estimated that preeclampsia complicates 2-8% of pregnancies globally (). In Latin America and the Caribbean, hypertensive disorders are responsible for almost 26% of maternal deaths, whereas in Africa and Asia they contribute to 9% of deaths. Although maternal mortality is much lower in high-income countries than in developing countries, 16% of maternal deaths can be attributed to hypertensive disorders (). In the United States, the rate of preeclampsia increased by 25% between 1987 and 2004 (). Moreover, in comparison with women giving birth in 1980, those giving birth in 2003 were at 6.7-fold increased risk of severe preeclampsia (). This complication is costly: one study reported that in 2012 in the United States, the estimated cost of preeclampsia within the first 12 months of delivery was $2.18 billion ($1.03 billion for women and $1.15 billion for infants), which was disproportionately borne by premature births (). This Practice Bulletin will provide guidelines for the diagnosis and management of gestational hypertension and preeclampsia.

14 Guideline Clinical Updates in Women's Health Care Summary: Surgical Considerations: Primary and Preventive Care Review. 2019

Shafer, Aaron / Gehrig, Paola. · ·Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #30575674.

ABSTRACT: Obstetrician-gynecologists often incorporate surgical procedures in the care of women. Each phase of a woman's life cycle presents different challenges regarding preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative management. Appropriate workup and preparation of patients for surgery are key to a successful surgical outcome. As women age, their risk of medical comorbidities, such as coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, or obesity, increases, as does the need for surgical procedures. Correctly identifying medical conditions and related surgical risks will help obstetrician-gynecologists provide safe, appropriate, and evidence-based care to women. Increasingly, obstetrician-gynecologists work in the setting of multidisciplinary teams, and many have access to preoperative assessment clinics and hospitalists to assist in the management of preoperative and perioperative patients. It is the responsibility of the referring physician to understand the services these clinics and hospitalists provide. An appropriate and cost-effective evidence-based preliminary workup, such as laboratory and imaging tests, also is important. The purpose of this monograph is to help guide obstetrician-gynecologists through the appropriate preoperative assessment of women who require surgery and identify intraoperative and postoperative management strategies that will help decrease avoidable morbidity and mortality of these patients.

15 Guideline ACOG Committee Opinion No. 763 Summary: Ethical Considerations for the Care of Patients With Obesity. 2019

Anonymous681524. · ·Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #30575673.

ABSTRACT: Obesity is a medical condition that may be associated with bias among health care professionals, and this bias may result in disrespectful or inadequate care of patients with obesity. Obstetrician-gynecologists regularly care for patients with obesity and play an integral role in advocating for best practices in health care and optimizing health outcomes for patients with obesity. Obstetrician-gynecologists should be prepared to care for their patients with obesity in a nonjudgmental manner, being cognizant of the medical and societal implications of obesity. This Committee Opinion has been updated from its previous version to focus on obesity bias within the medical community and to provide practical guidance using people-first language instead of labels (ie, "patients with obesity" versus "obese patients") to help obstetrician-gynecologists deliver effective, compassionate medical care that meets the needs of patients with obesity.

16 Guideline ACOG Committee Opinion No. 762 Summary: Prepregnancy Counseling. 2019

Anonymous671524. · ·Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #30575672.

ABSTRACT: The goal of prepregnancy care is to reduce the risk of adverse health effects for the woman, fetus, and neonate by working with the woman to optimize health, address modifiable risk factors, and provide education about healthy pregnancy. All those planning to initiate a pregnancy should be counseled, including heterosexual, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, asexual, and gender nonconforming individuals. Counseling can begin with the following question: "Would you like to become pregnant in the next year?" Prepregnancy counseling is appropriate whether the reproductive-aged patient is currently using contraception or planning pregnancy. Because health status and risk factors can change over time, prepregnancy counseling should occur several times during a woman's reproductive lifespan, increasing her opportunity for education and potentially maximizing her reproductive and pregnancy outcomes. Many chronic medical conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, psychiatric illness, and thyroid disease have implications for pregnancy outcomes and should be optimally managed before pregnancy. Counseling patients about optimal intervals between pregnancies may be helpful to reduce future complications. Assessment of the need for sexually transmitted infection screening should be performed at the time of prepregnancy counseling. Women who present for prepregnancy counseling should be offered screening for the same genetic conditions as recommended for pregnant women. All patients should be routinely asked about their use of alcohol, nicotine products, and drugs, including prescription opioids and other medications used for nonmedical reasons. Screening for intimate partner violence should occur during prepregnancy counseling. Female prepregnancy folic acid supplementation should be encouraged to reduce the risk of neural tube defects.

17 Guideline ACOG Committee Opinion No. 761 Summary: Cesarean Delivery on Maternal Request. 2019

Anonymous661524. · ·Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #30575671.

ABSTRACT: The incidence of cesarean delivery on maternal request and its contribution to the overall increase in the cesarean delivery rate are not well known, but it is estimated that 2.5% of all births in the United States are cesarean delivery on maternal request. Cesarean delivery on maternal request is not a well-recognized clinical entity. The available information that compared the risks and benefits of cesarean delivery on maternal request and planned vaginal delivery does not provide the basis for a recommendation for either mode of delivery. When a woman desires a cesarean delivery on maternal request, her health care provider should consider her specific risk factors, such as age, body mass index, accuracy of estimated gestational age, reproductive plans, personal values, and cultural context. In the absence of maternal or fetal indications for cesarean delivery, a plan for vaginal delivery is safe and appropriate and should be recommended. After exploring the reasons behind the patient's request and discussing the risks and benefits, if a patient decides to pursue cesarean delivery on maternal request, the following is recommended: in the absence of other indications for early delivery, cesarean delivery on maternal request should not be performed before a gestational age of 39 weeks; and, given the high repeat cesarean delivery rate, patients should be informed that the risks of placenta previa, placenta accreta spectrum, and gravid hysterectomy increase with each subsequent cesarean delivery. This Committee Opinion has been revised to incorporate additional data regarding outcomes and information on counseling, and to link to existing American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' resources.

18 Guideline Obstetric Care Consensus No. 8 Summary: Interpregnancy Care. 2019

Anonymous651524. · ·Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #30575670.

ABSTRACT: Interpregnancy care aims to maximize a woman's level of wellness not just in between pregnancies and during subsequent pregnancies, but also along her life course. Because the interpregnancy period is a continuum for overall health and wellness, all women of reproductive age who have been pregnant regardless of the outcome of their pregnancies (ie, miscarriage, abortion, preterm, full-term delivery), should receive interpregnancy care as a continuum from postpartum care. The initial components of interpregnancy care should include the components of postpartum care, such as reproductive life planning, screening for depression, vaccination, managing diabetes or hypertension if needed, education about future health, assisting the patient to develop a postpartum care team, and making plans for long-term medical care. In women with chronic medical conditions, interpregnancy care provides an opportunity to optimize health before a subsequent pregnancy. For women who will not have any future pregnancies, the period after pregnancy also affords an opportunity for secondary prevention and improvement of future health.

19 Guideline ACOG Practice Bulletin No. 203 Summary: Chronic Hypertension in Pregnancy. 2019

Anonymous641524. · ·Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #30575669.

ABSTRACT: Chronic hypertension is present in 0.9-1.5% of pregnant women (1) and may result in significant maternal, fetal, and neonatal morbidity and mortality. The rate of maternal chronic hypertension increased by 67% from 2000 to 2009, with the largest increase (87%) among African American women. This increase is largely secondary to the obesity epidemic and increasing maternal age (1, 2). The trend is expected to continue.The purpose of this document is to clarify the criteria used to define and diagnose chronic hypertension before or during pregnancy, to review the effects of chronic hypertension on pregnancy and vice versa, and to appraise the available evidence for management options. The purpose of these revised best practice recommendations is to provide a rational approach to chronic hypertension in pregnancy based on new research data and relevant pathophysiologic and pharmacologic considerations.

20 Guideline ACOG Practice Bulletin No. 202 Summary: Gestational Hypertension and Preeclampsia. 2019

Anonymous631524. · ·Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #30575668.

ABSTRACT: Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy constitute one of the leading causes of maternal and perinatal mortality worldwide. It has been estimated that preeclampsia complicates 2-8% of pregnancies globally (). In Latin America and the Caribbean, hypertensive disorders are responsible for almost 26% of maternal deaths, whereas in Africa and Asia they contribute to 9% of deaths. Although maternal mortality is much lower in high-income countries than in developing countries, 16% of maternal deaths can be attributed to hypertensive disorders (). In the United States, the rate of preeclampsia increased by 25% between 1987 and 2004 (). Moreover, in comparison with women giving birth in 1980, those giving birth in 2003 were at 6.7-fold increased risk of severe preeclampsia (). This complication is costly: one study reported that in 2012 in the United States, the estimated cost of preeclampsia within the first 12 months of delivery was $2.18 billion ($1.03 billion for women and $1.15 billion for infants), which was disproportionately borne by premature births (). This Practice Bulletin will provide guidelines for the diagnosis and management of gestational hypertension and preeclampsia.

21 Guideline Draft Opioid-Prescribing Guidelines for Uncomplicated Normal Spontaneous Vaginal Birth. 2019

Mills, J Rebecca / Huizinga, Mary Margaret / Robinson, Scott B / Lamprecht, Lara / Handler, Arden / Petros, Michael / Davis, Teresa / Chan, Kee. ·University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois; Novartis Oncology, East Hanover, New Jersey; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, DC; and Premier, Inc, Charlotte, North Carolina. ·Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #30531583.

ABSTRACT: Women who experience an uncomplicated vaginal delivery have acute intrapartum pain and variable pain in the immediate postpartum period. Although the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has urged clinicians to improve opioid-prescribing behavior, there are no published clinical practice guidelines for prescribing opioids during labor and delivery and at discharge for patients with uncomplicated normal spontaneous vaginal delivery. To address the knowledge gap regarding guidelines for pain management in this population, we used the national Premiere Health Care Database for deliveries of uncomplicated vaginal births from January 1, 2014, to December 31, 2016, to determine the prevalence of opioid administration. Among the 49,133 women who met inclusion criteria, 78.2% were administered opioids during hospitalization and 29.8% were administered opioids on the day of discharge. Descriptive statistics were generated to document the characteristics of the patients receiving opioids as well as the characteristics of hospitals administering opioids during inpatient labor and delivery and on discharge. Patient-level variables included age group, marital status, race, ethnicity, payer type, and length of stay. Hospital-level variables included bed size, geographic region, teaching status, and urbanicity status. These data were then presented in an electronic Delphi survey to 14 participants. The survey participants were obstetrician-gynecologists identified by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists as being thought leaders in the obstetrics field and who had also demonstrated an active interest in the opioid epidemic and its effect on women's health. After the panelists viewed the opioid administration data, they were presented with an adapted version of the CDC's guidelines for opioid prescribing for chronic pain management. The eight adapted guidelines were constructed to be more relevant and appropriate for the inpatient normal spontaneous vaginal delivery population. After three rounds of the surveying process, seven of the eight adapted guidelines were endorsed by the survey participants. These seven draft consensus guidelines could now be used as a starting point to develop more broadly endorsed and studied guidelines for appropriately managing pain control for women with uncomplicated spontaneous vaginal birth.

22 Guideline Care of Women with Obesity in Pregnancy: Green-top Guideline No. 72. 2019

Denison, F C / Aedla, N R / Keag, O / Hor, K / Reynolds, R M / Milne, A / Diamond, A / Anonymous1491094. · ·BJOG · Pubmed #30465332.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

23 Guideline None 2019

Bouillet, Laurence / Defendi, Frederica / Hardy, Gaelle / Cesbron, Jean Yves / Boccon-Gibod, Isabelle / Deroux, Alban / Mansard, Catherine / Launay, David / Gompel, Anne / Floccard, Bernard / Jaussaud, Roland / Beaudouin, Etienne / Armengol, Guillaume / Olliver, Yann / Gayet, Stephane / Du Than, Aureli / Sailler, Laurent / Guez, Stephane / Sarrat, Anne / Sorin, Lucile / de Moreuil, Claire / Pelletier, Fabien / Javaud, Nicolas / Marmion, Nicolas / Fain, Olivier / Fauré, Julien / Dumestre-Pérard, Chantal. ·Université Grenoble Alpes (UGA), service de médecine interne, CHUGA, unité Inserm 1036, Grenoble, France; Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France. Electronic address: lbouillet@chu-grenoble.fr. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; Service d'immunologie, CHUGA, 38043 Grenoble, France. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; Laboratoire de biochimie génétique et moléculaire, CHUGA, 38043 Grenoble, France. · Université Grenoble Alpes (UGA), service de médecine interne, CHUGA, unité Inserm 1036, Grenoble, France; Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; CHU de Lille, université de Lille, département de médecine interne et immunologie clinique, European Reference Network on Rare Connective Tissue and Musculoskeletal Diseases Network (ReCONNET), 59000 Lille, France. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; Université Paris Descartes, hôpitaux universitaires Cochin, hôtel-dieu Broca, Inserm U 1007, 75014 Paris, France. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; Hôpital Edouard-Herriot, hospices civils de Lyon, département d'anesthésie-réanimation, 69000 Lyon, France. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; CHRU de Nancy et université de Lorraine, département de médecine interne immunologie clinique, 54035 Nancy, France. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; CH Emile Durkheim, service d'allergologie, 88021 Epinal, France. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; CHU de Rouen, service de médecine interne, 76000 Rouen, France. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; CHU de Caen, service d'allergologie, pôle médecine de spécialité, 14033 Caen, France. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; Hôpital de la Timone, service de médecine interne, Marseille, France. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; CHU de Montpellier, université Montpellier, service de dermatologie, 13005 Montpellier, France. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; CHU de Toulouse, service de médecine interne, Toulouse université, 34090 Toulouse, France. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; CHU de Bordeaux-GH Pellegrin, service de médecine interne et post-urgences, 31059 Bordeaux, France. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; CHU de Bordeaux, laboratoire d'immunologie et immunogénétique, 33000 Bordeaux, France. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; Centre hospitalier de Niort, service de médecine interne, 79000 Niort, France. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; CHU de Brest, service de médecine interne, GETBO - EA3878, 29200 Brest, France. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; Université de Franche-Comté, CHU de Besançon, unité de dermatologie-allergologie, Inserm 1098, 25030 Besançon, France. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; AP-HP, Urgences, université Paris 7, hôpital Louis-Mourier, 92700 Colombes, France. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; CHU de Saint Pierre, médecine polyvalente Saint Louis, 97448 Saint Pierre, Réunion. · Centre de référence national des angioedèmes (CREAK), 38043 Grenoble, France; AP-HP, Sorbonne Université, hôpital Saint-Antoine, hôpitaux universitaires de l'Est Parisien, service de médecine interne, 75012 Paris, France. ·Presse Med · Pubmed #30416009.

ABSTRACT: Bradykinin mediated angioedema (BK-AE) can be associated either with C1Inhibitor deficiency (hereditary and acquired forms), either with normal C1Inh (hereditary form and drug induced AE as angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors…). In case of high clinical suspicion of BK-AE, C1Inh exploration must be done at first: C1Inh function and antigenemy as well as C4 concentration. C1Inh deficiency is significant if the tests are below 50 % of the normal values and controlled a second time. In case of C1Inh deficiency, you have to identify hereditary from acquired forms. C1q and anti-C1Inh antibody tests are useful for acquired BK-AE. SERPING1 gene screening must be done if a hereditary angioedema is suspected, even if there is no family context (de novo mutation 15 %). If a hereditary BK-AE with normal C1Inh is suspected, F12 and PLG gene screening is suitable.

24 Guideline ISUOG Practice Guidelines: role of ultrasound in screening for and follow-up of pre-eclampsia. 2019

Sotiriadis, A / Hernandez-Andrade, E / da Silva Costa, F / Ghi, T / Glanc, P / Khalil, A / Martins, W P / Odibo, A O / Papageorghiou, A T / Salomon, L J / Thilaganathan, B / Anonymous2411280. ·Second Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hutzel Women Hospital, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA. · Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil; and Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. · Obstetrics and Gynecology Unit, University of Parma, Parma, Italy. · Department of Radiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Fetal Medicine Unit, St George's University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK; and Vascular Biology Research Centre, Molecular and Clinical Sciences Research Institute, St George's University of London, London, UK. · SEMEAR Fertilidade, Reproductive Medicine and Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA. · Fetal Medicine Unit, St George's University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK; and Nuffield Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Oxford, Women's Center, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK. · Department of Obstetrics and Fetal Medicine, Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France. ·Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #30320479.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

25 Guideline Placenta Praevia and Placenta Accreta: Diagnosis and Management: Green-top Guideline No. 27a. 2019

Jauniaux, Erm / Alfirevic, Z / Bhide, A G / Belfort, M A / Burton, G J / Collins, S L / Dornan, S / Jurkovic, D / Kayem, G / Kingdom, J / Silver, R / Sentilhes, L / Anonymous2181086. · ·BJOG · Pubmed #30260097.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

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