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Prostatic Neoplasms HELP
Based on 49,118 articles since 2006
|||| 24 

These are the 49118 published articles about Prostatic Neoplasms that originated from Worldwide during 2006-2015.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Effect of the USPSTF Grade D Recommendation against Screening for Prostate Cancer on Incident Prostate Cancer Diagnoses in the United States. 2015

Barocas, Daniel A / Mallin, Katherine / Graves, Amy J / Penson, David F / Palis, Bryan / Winchester, David P / Chang, Sam S. ·Center for Surgical Quality and Outcomes Research, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. Electronic address: dan.barocas@vanderbilt.edu. · National Cancer Data Base, American College of Surgeons, Chicago, Illinois. · Center for Surgical Quality and Outcomes Research, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. · Department of Urologic Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. ·J Urol · Pubmed #26087383.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: In October 2011 the USPSTF (U.S. Preventive Services Task Force) issued a draft guideline discouraging prostate specific antigen based screening for prostate cancer (grade D recommendation). We evaluated the effect of the USPSTF guideline on the number and distribution of new prostate cancer diagnoses in the United States. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We identified incident cancers diagnosed between January 2010 and December 2012 in NCDB (National Cancer Database). We performed an interrupted time series to evaluate the trend of new prostate cancers diagnosed each month before and after the draft guideline with colon cancer as a comparator. RESULTS: Incident monthly prostate cancer diagnoses decreased by -1,363 cases (12.2%, p<0.01) in the month after the USPSTF draft guideline and continued to decrease by 164 cases per month relative to baseline (-1.8%, p<0.01). In contrast monthly colon cancer diagnoses remained stable. Diagnoses of low, intermediate and high risk prostate cancers decreased significantly but new diagnoses of nonlocalized disease did not change. Subgroups of age, comorbidity, race, income and insurance showed comparable decreases in incident prostate cancer following the draft guideline. CONCLUSIONS: There was a 28% decrease in incident diagnoses of prostate cancer in the year after the USPSTF draft recommendation against prostate specific antigen screening. This study helps quantify the potential benefits (reduced harms of over diagnosis and overtreatment of low risk disease and disease found in elderly men) and potential harms (missed opportunities to diagnose important cancers in men who may benefit from treatment) of this guideline.

2 Guideline Treatment of prostate cancer with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). 2015

Novaes, Pers / Mottas, R T / Lundgren, Msfs / Anonymous6750807. · ·Rev Assoc Med Bras · Pubmed #25909199.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Guideline Guideline for referral of patients with suspected prostate cancer by family physicians and other primary care providers. 2015

Young, Sheila-Mae / Bansal, Praveen / Vella, Emily T / Finelli, Antonio / Levitt, Cheryl / Loblaw, Andrew / Anonymous6380805. · ·Can Fam Physician · Pubmed #25756141.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The aim of this guideline is to assist FPs and other primary care providers with recognizing features that should raise their suspicion about the presence of prostate cancer in their patients. COMPOSITION OF THE COMMITTEE: Committee members were selected from among the regional primary care leads from the Cancer Care Ontario Provincial Primary Care and Cancer Network and from among the members of the Cancer Care Ontario Genitourinary Cancer Disease Site Group. METHODS: This guideline was developed through systematic review of the evidence base, synthesis of the evidence, and formal external review involving Canadian stakeholders to validate the relevance of recommendations. REPORT: Evidence-based guidelines were developed to improve the management of patients presenting with clinical features of prostate cancer within the Canadian context. CONCLUSION: These guidelines might lead to more timely and appropriate referrals and might also be of value for informing the development of prostate cancer diagnostic programs and for helping policy makers to ensure appropriate resources are in place.

4 Guideline Castration-resistant prostate cancer: AUA guideline amendment. 2015

Cookson, Michael S / Lowrance, William T / Murad, Mohammad H / Kibel, Adam S / Anonymous1750803. ·American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc., Linthicum, Maryland. · ·J Urol · Pubmed #25444753.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The purpose of this amendment is to incorporate relevant newly-published literature to better provide a rational basis for the management of patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The original systematic review and meta-analysis of the published literature yielded 303 articles published from 1996 through 2013. This review formed a majority of the guideline statements. Clinical Principles and Expert Opinions were used for guideline statements lacking sufficient evidence-based data. In April 2014, the CRPC guideline underwent amendment based on a second comprehensive literature search, which retrieved additional studies published between February 2013 and February 2014. Thirty-seven studies from this search provided data relevant to the specific treatment modalities for CRPC. RESULTS: Guideline statements based on six index patients developed to represent the most common scenarios encountered in clinical practice were amended appropriately. The additional literature provided the basis for an update of current supporting text as well as the incorporation of new guideline statements. Specifically, the addition of Radium-223 was placed in the guidelines related to the treatment of CRPC. CONCLUSIONS: Given the rapidly evolving nature of this field, this guideline should be used in conjunction with recent systematic literature reviews and an understanding of the individual patient's treatment goals. Patients' preferences and personal goals should be considered when choosing management strategies. The newly incorporated evidence-based statements supplement the original guideline published in 2013, which provided guidance for the treatment of men with CRPC. This guideline will be continually updated as new literature emerges in the field.

5 Guideline Adjuvant and salvage radiotherapy after prostatectomy: American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guideline endorsement. 2014

Freedland, Stephen J / Rumble, R Bryan / Finelli, Antonio / Chen, Ronald C / Slovin, Susan / Stein, Mark N / Mendelson, David S / Wackett, Colin / Sandler, Howard M / Anonymous50797. ·Stephen J. Freedland, Duke University, Durham; Ronald C. Chen, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC; R. Bryan Rumble, American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA; Antonio Finelli, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto; Colin Wackett, Patient Advocate, Orillia, Ontario, Canada; Susan Slovin, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY; Mark N. Stein, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ; David S. Mendelson, Pinnacle Oncology Hematology, Scottsdale, AZ; Howard M. Sandler, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA. · ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #25366677.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To endorse the American Urological Association (AUA)/American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) guideline on adjuvant and salvage radiotherapy after prostatectomy. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing clinical practice guidelines developed by other professional organizations. METHODS: The guideline on adjuvant and salvage radiotherapy after prostatectomy was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists. An ASCO endorsement panel then reviewed the content and recommendations. RESULTS: The panel determined that the guideline recommendations on adjuvant and salvage radiotherapy after prostatectomy, published in August 2013, are clear, thorough, and based on the most relevant scientific evidence. ASCO endorsed the guideline on adjuvant and salvage radiotherapy after prostatectomy, adding one qualifying statement that not all candidates for adjuvant or salvage radiotherapy have the same risk of recurrence or disease progression, and thus, risk-benefit ratios are not the same for all men. Those at the highest risk for recurrence after radical prostatectomy include men with seminal vesicle invasion, Gleason score 8 to 10, extensive positive margins, and detectable postoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA). RECOMMENDATIONS: Physicians should discuss adjuvant radiotherapy with patients with adverse pathologic findings at prostatectomy (ie, seminal vesicle invasion, positive surgical margins, extraprostatic extension) and salvage radiotherapy with patients with PSA or local recurrence after prostatectomy. The discussion of radiotherapy should include possible short- and long-term adverse effects and potential benefits. The decision to administer radiotherapy should be made by the patient and multidisciplinary treatment team, keeping in mind that not all men are at equal risk of recurrence or clinically meaningful disease progression. Thus, the risk-benefit ratio will differ for each patient.

6 Guideline Recommendations on screening for prostate cancer with the prostate-specific antigen test. 2014

Anonymous2990795 / Bell, Neil / Connor Gorber, Sarah / Shane, Amanda / Joffres, Michel / Singh, Harminder / Dickinson, James / Shaw, Elizabeth / Dunfield, Lesley / Tonelli, Marcello. · · Department of Family Medicine (Bell), University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alta.; Public Health Agency of Canada (Connor Gorber, Shane, Dunfield), Ottawa, Ont.; Faculty of Health Sciences (Joffres), Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC; Departments of Internal Medicine and Community Health Sciences (Singh), University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Man.; Departments of Family Medicine and Community Health Sciences (Dickinson) and Office of the Associate Dean - Research (Tonelli), University of Calgary, Calgary, Alta.; Department of Family Medicine (Shaw), McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont. ·CMAJ · Pubmed #25349003.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Guideline SEOM clinical guidelines for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer. 2014

Cassinello, J / Climent, M A / González del Alba, A / Mellado, B / Virizuela, J A / Anonymous3910796. ·Medical Oncology Service, Hospital Universitario de Guadalajara, Guadalajara, Spain. · ·Clin Transl Oncol · Pubmed #25319721.

ABSTRACT: Androgen deprivation treatment is the current standard first-line treatment for metastatic prostate cancer. For several years, docetaxel was the only treatment with a proven survival benefit for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Since docetaxel became standard of care for men with symptomatic metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), three treatment virtual spaces, for treatment and drug development in CPRC, have emerged: pre-docetaxel, docetaxel combinations and post-docetaxel. Sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, abiraterone, enzalutamide and radium-223 have been approved in the pre- or post-docetaxel setting in metastatic CRPC during the last few years. Patients are now living longer and experiencing better quality of life. Strategies for patient selection and treatment sequencing are therefore urgently required.

8 Guideline Late-onset hypogonadism or ADAM: diagnosis. 2014

Martits, Am / Costa, Emf / Nardi, Ac / Nardozza Jr, A / Faria, G / Facio Jr, Fn / Bernardo, Wm / Anonymous3170791 / Anonymous3180791. · ·Rev Assoc Med Bras · Pubmed #25211408.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Guideline Prostate cancer early detection, version 1.2014. Featured updates to the NCCN Guidelines. 2014

Carroll, Peter R / Parsons, J Kellogg / Andriole, Gerald / Bahnson, Robert R / Barocas, Daniel A / Catalona, William J / Dahl, Douglas M / Davis, John W / Epstein, Jonathan I / Etzioni, Ruth B / Giri, Veda N / Hemstreet, George P / Kawachi, Mark H / Lange, Paul H / Loughlin, Kevin R / Lowrance, William / Maroni, Paul / Mohler, James / Morgan, Todd M / Nadler, Robert B / Poch, Michael / Scales, Chuck / Shanefelt, Terrence M / Vickers, Andrew J / Wake, Robert / Shead, Dorothy A / Ho, Maria / Anonymous6910790. ·From UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center; UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center; Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine; The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute; Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center; Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University; Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance; Fox Chase Cancer Center; Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center at The Nebraska Medical Center; City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center; University of Washington/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance; Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center; Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah; University of Colorado Cancer Center; Roswell Park Cancer Institute; University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center; Moffitt Cancer Center; Duke Cancer Institute; University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/University of Tennessee Health Science Center; and National Comprehensive Cancer Network. · ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #25190691.

ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Prostate Cancer Early Detection provide recommendations for men choosing to participate in an early detection program for prostate cancer. These NCCN Guidelines Insights highlight notable recent updates. Overall, the 2014 update represents a more streamlined and concise set of recommendations. The panel stratified the age ranges at which initiating testing for prostate cancer should be considered. Indications for biopsy include both a cutpoint and the use of multiple risk variables in combination. In addition to other biomarkers of specificity, the Prostate Health Index has been included to aid biopsy decisions in certain men, given recent FDA approvals.

10 Guideline ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Definitive External-Beam Irradiation in stage T1 and T2 prostate cancer. 2014

Nguyen, Paul L / Aizer, Ayal / Assimos, Dean G / D'Amico, Anthony V / Frank, Steven J / Gottschalk, Alexander R / Gustafson, Gary S / Hsu, I-Chow Joe / McLaughlin, Patrick W / Merrick, Gregory / Rosenthal, Seth A / Showalter, Timothy N / Taira, Al V / Vapiwala, Neha / Yamada, Yoshiya / Davis, Brian J / Anonymous5120790. ·*Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women's Hospital †Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, MA ‡Department of Urology, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, Birmingham, AL §American Urological Association, Linthicum, MD ∥Joint Center for Radiation Therapy, Boston, MA ¶American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA #MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX **Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco ∥∥Radiologic Associates of Sacramento and Sutter Cancer Center, Sacramento ##Western Radiation Oncology, Mountain View Oncology, Mountain View, CA ††William Beaumont Hospital, Troy ‡‡Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Novi, MI §§Schiffler Cancer Center and Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV ¶¶Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA ***Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA †††Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY ‡‡‡Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. · ·Am J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #25180754.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To present the most updated American College of Radiology consensus guidelines formed from an expert panel on the appropriate use of external-beam radiation to manage stage T1 and T2 prostate cancer. METHODS: The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. RESULTS: The panel summarized the most recent and relevant literature on the topic and voted on 3 clinical variants illustrating the appropriate dose, techniques, and use of adjuvant hormone therapy with external-beam radiation for low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk prostate cancer. Numerical rating and commentary reflecting the panel consensus was given for each treatment approach in each variant. CONCLUSIONS: External-beam radiation is a key component of the curative management of T1 and T2 prostate cancer. By combining the most recent medical literature and expert opinion, this guideline can aid clinicians in the appropriate use of external-beam radiation for prostate cancer.

11 Guideline [Recommendations for cancer prevention]. 2014

Marzo-Castillejo, Mercè / Bellas-Beceiro, Begoña / Vela-Vallespín, Carmen / Nuin-Villanueva, Marian / Bartolomé-Moreno, Cruz / Vilarrubí-Estrella, Mercè / Melús-Palazón, Elena / Anonymous220925. ·Unitat de Suport a la Recerca de Costa de Ponent, IDIAP Jordi Gol, Direcció d'Atenció Primària Costa de Ponent, Institut Català de la Salut, Barcelona, España. · Hospital Universitario de Canarias, Santa Cruz de Tenerife, España. · ABS del Riu Nord i Sud, Institut Català de la Salut, Santa Coloma de Gramenet, Barcelona, España. · Servicio de Gestión Clínica y Sistemas de Información, Dirección Atención Primaria, Servicio Navarro de Salud. · Unidad Docente de Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria, Sector Zaragoza I, Servicio Aragonés de Salud, Zaragoza, España. · Centro de Salud Actur Oeste, Zaragoza, España. · ·Aten Primaria · Pubmed #24950629.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Guideline American Cancer Society prostate cancer survivorship care guidelines. 2014

Skolarus, Ted A / Wolf, Andrew M D / Erb, Nicole L / Brooks, Durado D / Rivers, Brian M / Underwood, Willie / Salner, Andrew L / Zelefsky, Michael J / Aragon-Ching, Jeanny B / Slovin, Susan F / Wittmann, Daniela A / Hoyt, Michael A / Sinibaldi, Victoria J / Chodak, Gerald / Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L / Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L. ·Assistant Professor of Urology, Department of Urology, University of Michigan, Research Investigator, HSR&D Center for Clinical Management Research, VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, MI. · ·CA Cancer J Clin · Pubmed #24916760.

ABSTRACT: Prostate cancer survivors approach 2.8 million in number and represent 1 in 5 of all cancer survivors in the United States. While guidelines exist for timely treatment and surveillance for recurrent disease, there is limited availability of guidelines that facilitate the provision of posttreatment clinical follow-up care to address the myriad of long-term and late effects that survivors may face. Based on recommendations set forth by a National Cancer Survivorship Resource Center expert panel, the American Cancer Society developed clinical follow-up care guidelines to facilitate the provision of posttreatment care by primary care clinicians. These guidelines were developed using a combined approach of evidence synthesis and expert consensus. Existing guidelines for health promotion, surveillance, and screening for second primary cancers were referenced when available. To promote comprehensive follow-up care and optimal health and quality of life for the posttreatment survivor, the guidelines address health promotion, surveillance for prostate cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, long-term and late effects assessment and management, psychosocial issues, and care coordination among the oncology team, primary care clinicians, and nononcology specialists. A key challenge to the development of these guidelines was the limited availability of published evidence for management of prostate cancer survivors after treatment. Much of the evidence relies on studies with small sample sizes and retrospective analyses of facility-specific and population databases.

13 Guideline Prostate cancer, version 2.2014. 2014

Mohler, James L / Kantoff, Philip W / Armstrong, Andrew J / Bahnson, Robert R / Cohen, Michael / D'Amico, Anthony Victor / Eastham, James A / Enke, Charles A / Farrington, Thomas A / Higano, Celestia S / Horwitz, Eric Mark / Kane, Christopher J / Kawachi, Mark H / Kuettel, Michael / Kuzel, Timothy M / Lee, Richard J / Malcolm, Arnold W / Miller, David / Plimack, Elizabeth R / Pow-Sang, Julio M / Raben, David / Richey, Sylvia / Roach, Mack / Rohren, Eric / Rosenfeld, Stan / Schaeffer, Edward / Small, Eric J / Sonpavde, Guru / Srinivas, Sandy / Stein, Cy / Strope, Seth A / Tward, Jonathan / Shead, Dorothy A / Ho, Maria / Anonymous6730780. · ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #24812137.

ABSTRACT: Prostate cancer has surpassed lung cancer as the most common cancer in men in the United States. The NCCN Guidelines for Prostate Cancer provide multidisciplinary recommendations on the clinical management of patients with prostate cancer based on clinical evidence and expert consensus. NCCN Panel guidance on treatment decisions for patients with localized disease is represented in this version. Significant updates for early disease include distinction between active surveillance and observation, a new section on principles of imaging, and revisions to radiation recommendations. The full version of these guidelines, including treatment of patients with advanced disease, can be found online at the NCCN website.

14 Guideline EAU guidelines on prostate cancer. Part II: Treatment of advanced, relapsing, and castration-resistant prostate cancer. 2014

Heidenreich, Axel / Bastian, Patrick J / Bellmunt, Joaquim / Bolla, Michel / Joniau, Steven / van der Kwast, Theodor / Mason, Malcolm / Matveev, Vsevolod / Wiegel, Thomas / Zattoni, Filiberto / Mottet, Nicolas / Anonymous750771. ·Department of Urology, RWTH University, Aachen, Germany. Electronic address: aheidenreich@ukaachen.de. · Department of Urology, Klinikum Golzheim, Düsseldorf, Germany. · Department of Medical Oncology, University Hospital Del Mar, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Radiation Therapy, CHU Grenoble, Grenoble, France. · Department of Urology, University Hospital, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Pathology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Oncology and Palliative Medicine, Velindre Hospital, Cardiff, UK. · Department of Urology, Russian Academy of Medical Science, Cancer Research Center, Moscow, Russia. · Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital, Ulm, Germany. · Department of Urology, Santa Maria Della Misericordia Hospital, Udine, Italy. · Department of Urology, University Hospital St Etienne, France. · ·Eur Urol · Pubmed #24321502.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To present a summary of the 2013 version of the European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines on the treatment of advanced, relapsing, and castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: The working panel performed a literature review of the new data (2011-2013). The guidelines were updated, and levels of evidence and/or grades of recommendation were added to the text based on a systematic review of the literature that included a search of online databases and bibliographic reviews. EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS: Luteinising hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists are the standard of care in metastatic prostate cancer (PCa). LHRH antagonists decrease testosterone without any testosterone surge, and they may be associated with an oncologic benefit compared with LHRH analogues. Complete androgen blockade has a small survival benefit of about 5%. Intermittent androgen deprivation results in noninferior oncologic efficacy when compared with continuous androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) in well-selected populations. In locally advanced and metastatic PCa, early ADT does not result in a significant survival advantage when compared with delayed ADT. Relapse after local therapy is defined by prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values >0.2 ng/ml following radical prostatectomy (RP) and >2 ng/ml above the nadir and after radiation therapy (RT). Therapy for PSA relapse after RP includes salvage RT (SRT) at PSA levels <0.5 ng/ml and SRP or cryosurgical ablation of the prostate in radiation failures. Endorectal magnetic resonance imaging and 11C-choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) are of limited importance if the PSA is <1.0 ng/ml; bone scans and CT can be omitted unless PSA is >20 ng/ml. Follow-up after ADT should include analysis of PSA and testosterone levels, and screening for cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome. Treatment of CRPC includes sipuleucel-T, abiraterone acetate plus prednisone (AA/P), or chemotherapy with docetaxel at 75mg/m(2) every 3 wk. Cabazitaxel, AA/P, enzalutamide, and radium-223 are available for second-line treatment of CRPC following docetaxel. Zoledronic acid and denosumab can be used in men with CRPC and osseous metastases to prevent skeletal-related complications. CONCLUSIONS: The knowledge in the field of advanced, metastatic, and castration-resistant PCa is rapidly changing. These EAU guidelines on PCa summarise the most recent findings and put them into clinical practice. A full version is available at the EAU office or at www.uroweb.org. PATIENT SUMMARY: We present a summary of the 2013 version of the European Association of Urology guidelines on treatment of advanced, relapsing, and castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Luteinising hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists are the standard of care in metastatic prostate cancer (PCa). LHRH antagonists decrease testosterone without any testosterone surge, and they might be associated with an oncologic benefit compared with LHRH analogues. Complete androgen blockade has a small survival benefit of about 5%. Intermittent androgen deprivation results in noninferior oncologic efficacy when compared with continuous androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) in well-selected populations. In locally advanced and metastatic PCa, early ADT does not result in a significant survival advantage when compared with delayed ADT. Relapse after local therapy is defined by prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values >0.2 ng/ml following radical prostatectomy (RP) and >2 ng/ml above the nadir and after radiation therapy. Therapy for PSA relapse after RP includes salvage radiation therapy at PSA levels <0.5 ng/ml and salvage RP or cryosurgical ablation of the prostate in radiation failures. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and 11C-choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) are of limited importance if the PSA is <1.0 ng/ml; bone scans, and CT can be omitted unless PSA is >20 ng/ml. Follow-up after ADT should include analysis of PSA and testosterone levels, and screening for cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome. Treatment of castration-resistant CRPC includes sipuleucel-T, abiraterone acetate plus prednisone (AA/P), or chemotherapy with docetaxel 75 mg/m(2) every 3 wk. Cabazitaxel, AA/P, enzalutamide, and radium-223 are available for second-line treatment of CRPC following docetaxel. Zoledronic acid and denosumab can be used in men with CRPC and osseous metastases to prevent skeletal-related complications. The guidelines reported should be adhered to in daily routine to improve the quality of care in PCa patients. As we have shown recently, guideline compliance is only in the area of 30-40%.

15 Guideline EAU guidelines on prostate cancer. part 1: screening, diagnosis, and local treatment with curative intent-update 2013. 2014

Heidenreich, Axel / Bastian, Patrick J / Bellmunt, Joaquim / Bolla, Michel / Joniau, Steven / van der Kwast, Theodor / Mason, Malcolm / Matveev, Vsevolod / Wiegel, Thomas / Zattoni, F / Mottet, Nicolas / Anonymous280769. ·Department of Urology, RWTH University Aachen, Aachen, Germany. Electronic address: aheidenreich@ukaachen.de. · ·Eur Urol · Pubmed #24207135.

ABSTRACT: CONTEXT: The most recent summary of the European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines on prostate cancer (PCa) was published in 2011. OBJECTIVE: To present a summary of the 2013 version of the EAU guidelines on screening, diagnosis, and local treatment with curative intent of clinically organ-confined PCa. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: A literature review of the new data emerging from 2011 to 2013 has been performed by the EAU PCa guideline group. The guidelines have been updated, and levels of evidence and grades of recommendation have been added to the text based on a systematic review of the literature, which included a search of online databases and bibliographic reviews. EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS: A full version of the guidelines is available at the EAU office or online (www.uroweb.org). Current evidence is insufficient to warrant widespread population-based screening by prostate-specific antigen (PSA) for PCa. Systematic prostate biopsies under ultrasound guidance and local anesthesia are the preferred diagnostic method. Active surveillance represents a viable option in men with low-risk PCa and a long life expectancy. A biopsy progression indicates the need for active intervention, whereas the role of PSA doubling time is controversial. In men with locally advanced PCa for whom local therapy is not mandatory, watchful waiting (WW) is a treatment alternative to androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT), with equivalent oncologic efficacy. Active treatment is recommended mostly for patients with localized disease and a long life expectancy, with radical prostatectomy (RP) shown to be superior to WW in prospective randomized trials. Nerve-sparing RP is the approach of choice in organ-confined disease, while neoadjuvant ADT provides no improvement in outcome variables. Radiation therapy should be performed with ≥ 74 Gy in low-risk PCa and 78 Gy in intermediate- or high-risk PCa. For locally advanced disease, adjuvant ADT for 3 yr results in superior rates for disease-specific and overall survival and is the treatment of choice. Follow-up after local therapy is largely based on PSA and a disease-specific history, with imaging indicated only when symptoms occur. CONCLUSIONS: Knowledge in the field of PCa is rapidly changing. These EAU guidelines on PCa summarize the most recent findings and put them into clinical practice. PATIENT SUMMARY: A summary is presented of the 2013 EAU guidelines on screening, diagnosis, and local treatment with curative intent of clinically organ-confined prostate cancer (PCa). Screening continues to be done on an individual basis, in consultation with a physician. Diagnosis is by prostate biopsy. Active surveillance is an option in low-risk PCa and watchful waiting is an alternative to androgen-deprivation therapy in locally advanced PCa not requiring immediate local treatment. Radical prostatectomy is the only surgical option. Radiation therapy can be external or delivered by way of prostate implants. Treatment follow-up is based on the PSA level.

16 Guideline [CCAFU Recommendations 2013: Prostate cancer]. 2013

Salomon, L / Bastide, C / Beuzeboc, P / Cormier, L / Fromont, G / Hennequin, C / Mongiat-Artus, P / Peyromaure, M / Ploussard, G / Renard-Penna, R / Rozet, F / Azria, D / Coloby, P / Molinié, V / Ravery, V / Rebillard, X / Richaud, P / Villers, A / Soulié, M / Anonymous6520767. · · Membre de la SFRO. · Membres experts du CCAFU. ·Prog Urol · Pubmed #24485295.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The sub Comittee prostate of the CCAFU established guidelines for diagnostic, treatment, evaluation and standart of care of prostate cancer. METHODS: Guidelines 2010 were updated based on systematic literature search performed by the sub-Comittee in Medline and PubMed databases to evaluate references, levels of evidence and grade of recommandation. RESULTS: Pathological examination of the tissue specimens was defined specifically for Gleason score according to ISP 2005 recommandations. Prostate and pelvis RMN became the reference in terms of radiological exam. Individual and early diagnosis of prostate cancer was defined and role of PSA was precised. Active surveillance became one of the standart of care of low-risk tumors, radical prostatectomy remained one of the options for all risk group tumors, length of hormonotherapy in association with radiotherapy was precised according to the risk group. Side effects of hormonotherapy treament needed specific supervision ; hormonotherapy had no indication in case of non metastatic tumors and intermittent hormonotherapy in metastatic tumors. New hormonal drugs in pre and post chemotherapy and bone target drugs opened new therapeutics pathways. CONCLUSION: From 2010 to 2013, standarts of care of prostate cancer were modified because of results of prospective studies and new therapeutics. They allowed precise treatments for each specific clinical situation. In the future, multidisciplinary treatments for high risk tumors, time of adjuvant treatment and sequencies of new hormonal treatment had to be defined.

17 Guideline Prostate cancer, version 1.2014. 2013

Mohler, James L / Kantoff, Philip W / Armstrong, Andrew J / Bahnson, Robert R / Cohen, Michael / D'Amico, Anthony Victor / Eastham, James A / Enke, Charles A / Farrington, Thomas A / Higano, Celestia S / Horwitz, Eric Mark / Kawachi, Mark H / Kuettel, Michael / Lee, Richard J / Macvicar, Gary R / Malcolm, Arnold W / Miller, David / Plimack, Elizabeth R / Pow-Sang, Julio M / Richey, Sylvia / Roach, Mack / Rohren, Eric / Rosenfeld, Stan / Small, Eric J / Srinivas, Sandy / Stein, Cy / Strope, Seth A / Tward, Jonathan / Walsh, Patrick C / Shead, Dorothy A / Ho, Maria / Anonymous1860766. ·From 1Roswell Park Cancer Institute; 2Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center; 3Duke Cancer Institute; 4The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute; 5Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah; 6Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center; 7Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center at The Nebraska Medical Center; 8Prostate Health Education Network; 9University of Washington/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance; 10Fox Chase Cancer Center; 11City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center; 12Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center; 13Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University; 14Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center; 15University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center; 16Moffitt Cancer Center; 17St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/The University of Tennessee Health Science Center; 18UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center; 19The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; 20Patient Advocate; 21Stanford Cancer Institute; 22Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine; 23The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins; and 24National Comprehensive Cancer Network. · ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #24335682.

ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Prostate Cancer provide multidisciplinary recommendations on the clinical management of patients with prostate cancer. This report highlights notable recent updates. Radium-223 dichloride is a first-in-class radiopharmaceutical that recently received approval for the treatment of patients with symptomatic bone metastases and no known visceral disease. It received a category 1 recommendation as both a first-line and second-line option. The NCCN Prostate Cancer Panel also revised recommendations on the choice of intermittent or continuous androgen deprivation therapy based on recent phase III clinical data comparing the 2 strategies in the nonmetastatic and metastatic settings.

18 Guideline Management of prostate cancer in Asia: resource-stratified guidelines from the Asian Oncology Summit 2013. 2013

Williams, Scott / Chiong, Edmund / Lojanapiwat, Bannakij / Umbas, Rainy / Akaza, Hideyuki / Anonymous4260762. ·Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Electronic address: scott.williams@petermac.org. · ·Lancet Oncol · Pubmed #24176571.

ABSTRACT: Many local and systemic options for prostate cancer have emerged in recent years, but existing management guidelines do not account for diversity in health resources between different countries. We present recommendations for the management of prostate cancer, stratified according to the extent of resource availability-based on a four-tier system of basic, limited, enhanced, and maximum resources-to enable applicability to Asian countries with differing levels of health-care resources. This statement of recommendations was formulated by a multidisciplinary panel from Asia-Pacific countries, at a consensus session on prostate cancer that was held as part of the 2013 Asian Oncology Summit in Bangkok, Thailand.

19 Guideline Percutaneous suprapubic tube bladder drainage after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy: a step-by-step guide. 2013

Ghani, Khurshid R / Trinh, Quoc-Dien / Sammon, Jesse D / Jeong, Wooju / Simone, Andrea / Dabaja, Ali / Dusik, Stacey / Peabody, James O / Menon, Mani. ·Vattikuti Urology Institute, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI, USA. · ·BJU Int · Pubmed #23924427.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To describe our technique of maintaining bladder drainage after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) using a percutaneous suprapubic tube (PST) in place of a urethral catheter. METHODS: A watertight anastomosis permits placement of the PST. Contraindications include morbid obesity, concomitant inguinal hernia mesh repair, anticoagulation therapy, limited hand dexterity in the patient, bladder neck reconstruction and extensive adhesiolysis at RARP. The necessary equipment includes a 14-F PST balloon catheter set, a three-way connector, a connecting tube, a suture passer, 1/0 polypropylene sutures on a CT1 needle, a sterile plastic button, adhesive and steri-strips. RESULTS: The important steps for PST placement are: Step 1: robot-assisted placement of a bladder wall anchor suture; Step 2: transferring the bladder wall suture to anterior abdominal skin; Step 3: guided placement of the PST under robotic vision; Step 4: securing the PST within the bladder and abdominal wall; Step 5. postoperative care: clamping the PST on postoperative day 5, recording each void and post-void residual urine volumes in a patient diary, removal of the PST on postoperative day 7 after 48 h of voiding with residual urine <100 mL per void. CONCLUSION: We provide a concise step-by-step guide for placement of a PST during RARP as well as important management aspects for the successful adoption of this technique.

20 Guideline American Urological Association (AUA) guideline on prostate cancer detection: process and rationale. 2013

Carter, H Ballentine. ·The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Urology, The James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA. ·BJU Int · Pubmed #23924423.

ABSTRACT: To review the process and rationale for the American Urological Association (AUA) guideline on prostate cancer detection. The AUA guideline on detection of prostate cancer involved a systematic literature review of >300 studies that evaluated outcomes important to patients (prostate cancer, incidence/mortality, health-related quality of life, diagnostic accuracy and harms of testing). A multidisciplinary panel interpreted the evidence and formulated statements to assist the urologist and the asymptomatic average-risk man in decision-making about prostate cancer detection. Other than prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-based prostate cancer screening, there was no evidence to address the outcomes of interest to patients. The strongest evidence that benefits may outweigh harms was in men aged 55-69 years undergoing PSA-based screening. This led the panel to recommend shared decision-making for these men at average risk, but recommend against routine screening for other age groups at average risk. Further, to reduce the harms associated with screening (false positive tests, over diagnosis, over treatment), the panel recommended against annual screening for those who choose to be screened. A panel under the auspices of the AUA recommended shared decision-making for the average risk asymptomatic man aged 55-69 years considering PSA-based screening for prostate cancer detection.

21 Guideline Guidelines on processing and reporting of prostate biopsies: the 2013 update of the pathology committee of the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC). 2013

Van der Kwast, T / Bubendorf, L / Mazerolles, C / Raspollini, M R / Van Leenders, G J / Pihl, C-G / Kujala, P / Anonymous4220757. ·Department of Pathology, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Canada. theo.vdkwast@uhn.on.ca · ·Virchows Arch · Pubmed #23918245.

ABSTRACT: The histopathological examination of a prostate biopsy is the basis of prostate cancer diagnostics. Prostate cancer grade and extent of cancer in the diagnostic biopsy are important determinants of patient management. Quality of the prostate biopsy and its processing may influence the outcome of the histopathological evaluation. Further, an unambiguous and concise pathology reporting is essential for an appropriate clinical decision process. Since our initial report in 2003, there have been several practice changes, including the increased uptake of follow-up biopsies of patients who are under active surveillance, increasingly taken under guidance of MRI, or who underwent a prostate-sparing therapy. Therefore, we investigated the literature on the current pathology practices and recommendations with regard to prostate biopsy processing and reporting, both at initial diagnosis and in the context of follow-up biopsies in order to update our guidelines on the optimal processing and reporting of prostate biopsies.

22 Guideline Early detection of prostate cancer: European Association of Urology recommendation. 2013

Heidenreich, Axel / Abrahamsson, Per-Anders / Artibani, Walter / Catto, James / Montorsi, Francesco / Van Poppel, Hein / Wirth, Manfred / Mottet, Nicolas / Anonymous2560755. ·Department of Urology, RWTH University Aachen, Aachen, Germany. aheidenreich@ukaachen.de · ·Eur Urol · Pubmed #23856038.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The recommendations and the updated EAU guidelines consider early detection of PCa with the purpose of reducing PCa-related mortality and the development of advanced or metastatic disease. OBJECTIVE: This paper presents the recommendations of the European Association of Urology (EAU) for early detection of prostate cancer (PCa) in men without evidence of PCa-related symptoms. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: The working panel conducted a systematic literature review and meta-analysis of prospective and retrospective clinical studies on baseline prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and early detection of PCa and on PCa screening published between 1990 and 2013 using Cochrane Reviews, Embase, and Medline search strategies. EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS: The level of evidence and grade of recommendation were analysed according to the principles of evidence-based medicine. The current strategy of the EAU recommends that (1) early detection of PCa reduces PCa-related mortality; (2) early detection of PCa reduces the risk of being diagnosed and developing advanced and metastatic PCa; (3) a baseline serum PSA level should be obtained at 40-45 yr of age; (4) intervals for early detection of PCa should be adapted to the baseline PSA serum concentration; (5) early detection should be offered to men with a life expectancy ≥ 10 yr; and (6) in the future, multivariable clinical risk-prediction tools need to be integrated into the decision-making process. CONCLUSIONS: A baseline serum PSA should be offered to all men 40-45 yr of age to initiate a risk-adapted follow-up approach with the purpose of reducing PCa mortality and the incidence of advanced and metastatic PCa. In the future, the development and application of multivariable risk-prediction tools will be necessary to prevent over diagnosis and over treatment.

23 Guideline Adjuvant and salvage radiation therapy after prostatectomy: American Society for Radiation Oncology/American Urological Association guidelines. 2013

Valicenti, Richard K / Thompson, Ian / Albertsen, Peter / Davis, Brian J / Goldenberg, S Larry / Wolf, J Stuart / Sartor, Oliver / Klein, Eric / Hahn, Carol / Michalski, Jeff / Roach, Mack / Faraday, Martha M / Anonymous3090753. ·Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Davis, California, USA. Richard.valicenti@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu · ·Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys · Pubmed #23845839.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The purpose of this guideline was to provide a clinical framework for the use of radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy as adjuvant or salvage therapy. METHODS AND MATERIALS: A systematic literature review using PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane database was conducted to identify peer-reviewed publications relevant to the use of radiation therapy after prostatectomy. The review yielded 294 articles; these publications were used to create the evidence-based guideline statements. Additional guidance is provided as Clinical Principles when insufficient evidence existed. RESULTS: Guideline statements are provided for patient counseling, use of radiation therapy in the adjuvant and salvage contexts, defining biochemical recurrence, and conducting a restaging evaluation. CONCLUSIONS: Physicians should offer adjuvant radiation therapy to patients with adverse pathologic findings at prostatectomy (ie, seminal vesicle invastion, positive surgical margins, extraprostatic extension) and salvage radiation therapy to patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) or local recurrence after prostatectomy in whom there is no evidence of distant metastatic disease. The offer of radiation therapy should be made in the context of a thoughtful discussion of possible short- and long-term side effects of radiation therapy as well as the potential benefits of preventing recurrence. The decision to administer radiation therapy should be made by the patient and the multidisciplinary treatment team with full consideration of the patient's history, values, preferences, quality of life, and functional status. The American Society for Radiation Oncology and American Urological Association websites show this guideline in its entirety, including the full literature review.

24 Guideline Prostate cancer: ESMO Clinical Practice Guidelines for diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. 2013

Horwich, A / Parker, C / de Reijke, T / Kataja, V / Anonymous6200759. ·Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton, UK. · ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #23813930.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

25 Guideline [International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on handling and staging of radical prostatectomy specimens]. 2013

Compérat, Eva / Camparo, Philippe / Srigley, John / Delahunt, Brett / Egevad, Lars / Anonymous6290751. ·Service d'anatomie et cytologie pathologique, hôpital La Pitié-Salpêtrière, UPMC Paris VI, 47-83, boulevard de l'Hôpital, 75013 Paris, France. eva.comperat@psl.aphp.fr · ·Ann Pathol · Pubmed #23790653.

ABSTRACT: The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) consensus conference on handling and staging of radical prostatectomy specimens issued recommendations for standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. The conference addressed specimen handling, T2 substaging, prostate cancer volume, extraprostatic extension, lymphovascular invasion, seminal vesicle invasion, lymph node metastases and surgical margins. This review summarizes the conclusions and recommendations resulting from the consensus process.

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