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Psoriasis: HELP
Articles by Wolf Henning Boehncke
Based on 95 articles published since 2010
(Why 95 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, W-H Boehncke wrote the following 95 articles about Psoriasis.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4
1 Guideline S3 Guideline for the treatment of psoriasis vulgaris, update - Short version part 2 - Special patient populations and treatment situations. 2018

Nast, Alexander / Amelunxen, Lasse / Augustin, Matthias / Boehncke, Wolf-Henning / Dressler, Corinna / Gaskins, Matthew / Härle, Peter / Hoffstadt, Bernd / Klaus, Joachim / Koza, Joachim / Mrowietz, Ulrich / Ockenfels, Hans-Michael / Philipp, Sandra / Reich, Kristian / Rosenbach, Thomas / Rzany, Berthold / Schlaeger, Martin / Schmid-Ott, Gerhard / Sebastian, Michael / von Kiedrowski, Ralph / Weberschock, Tobias. ·Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, corporate member of Freie Universität Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, and Berlin Institute of Health, Department of Dermatology, Venereology und Allergy, Division of Evidence-Based Medicine (dEBM). · Fachklinik Bad Bentheim [Bad Bentheim Specialist Hospital]. · Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Institut für Versorgungsforschung in der Dermatologie und bei Pflegeberufen [University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Institute for Health Care Research in Dermatology and Nursing]. · Service de Dermatologie et Vénéréologie, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Genève [Dermatology and Venereology Service, Geneva University Hospitals]. · Katholisches Klinikum Mainz, Zentrum für Rheumatologische Akutdiagnostik, Klinik für Rheumatologie, Klinische Immunologie und Physikalische Therapie [Catholic Medical Center Mainz, Center for Rheumatological Diagnostics, Department of Rheumatology, ClinicaI Immunology and Physical Therapy]. · Selbsthilfegemeinschaft Haut e. V. [Skin self-help association]. · Deutscher Psoriasis Bund e. V. [German Psoriasis Society]. · Psoriasis-Zentrum, Klinik für Dermatologie, Venerologie, Allergologie, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel [Psoriasis Center, Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel campus]. · Haut- und Allergieklinik, Klinikum Hanau [Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Hanau Medical Center]. · Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, corporate member of Freie Universität Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, and Berlin Institute of Health, Department of Dermatology, Venereology und Allergy, Psoriasisstudienzentrum [Psoriasis Study Center, ]. · Dermatologikum Hamburg [Dermatologikum Hamburg]. · Niedergelassener Dermatologe, Osnabrück [Office-based Dermatologist, Osnabrück]. · Privatpraxis Rzany & Hund, Berlin [Office-based Dermatologists Rzany & Hund, Berlin]. · Niedergelassener Dermatologe, Oldenburg [Office-based Dermatologist, Osnabrück]. · Berolina Klinik, Löhne [Berolina Medical Center, Löhne]. · Niedergelassener Dermatologe, Mahlow [Office-based Dermatologist, Mahlow]. · Niedergelassener Dermatologe, Selters [Office-based Dermatologist, Selters]. · Klinik für Dermatologie, Venerologie und Allergologie, Universitätsklinikum Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main und Arbeitsgruppe EbM Frankfurt, Institut für Allgemeinmedizin, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main [Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, Frankfurt University Hospital, Frankfurt/Main and EbM Frankfurt working group, Institute for General Medicine, Goethe University Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main]. ·J Dtsch Dermatol Ges · Pubmed #29873906.

ABSTRACT: The German guideline for the treatment of psoriasis vulgaris was updated using GRADE methodology. The guideline is based on a systematic literature review completed on December 1, 2016, and on a formal consensus and approval process. The second part of this short version of the guideline covers the following special patient populations and treatment situations: tuberculosis screening before and during psoriasis treatment, choice of psoriasis treatment for individuals wishing to have children, as well as during pregnancy and breast-feeding, and patients with joint involvement and vaccinations. In addition, recommendations on the choice of treatment are presented for patients with the following comorbidities: hepatitis and other hepatic impairment, HIV, malignancies, neurological and psychiatric disorders, ischemic heart disease and congestive heart failure, diabetes mellitus, renal impairment and inflammatory bowel disease.

2 Guideline Swiss S1 Guidelines on the Systemic Treatment of Psoriasis Vulgaris. 2016

Kolios, Antonios G A / Yawalkar, Nikhil / Anliker, Mark / Boehncke, Wolf-Henning / Borradori, Luca / Conrad, Curdin / Gilliet, Michel / Häusermann, Peter / Itin, Peter / Laffitte, Emmanuel / Mainetti, Carlo / French, Lars E / Navarini, Alexander A. ·Department of Dermatology, Zurich University Hospital, Zurich, Switzerland. ·Dermatology · Pubmed #27322375.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis vulgaris is a common, chronic inflammatory skin disease with a prevalence of 1.5-2% in Western industrialized countries. A relevant percentage of patients suffer from moderate-to-severe psoriasis and experience a significant reduction in quality of life. The choice of an adequate therapy could help to prevent disease and exacerbation of comorbidity, which could increase quality of life, avoid hospitalization and avoid reduction of working days. The present guidelines are focused on the initiation and management of systemic therapies in cases of moderate-to-severe plaque-type psoriasis in adults to optimize treatment response, adherence and quality of life. This first version of the Swiss S1 guidelines presents therapeutic recommendations which are based on a systematic literature search as well as an informal expert consensus of dermatologists in Switzerland.

3 Guideline Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis 2015 Treatment Recommendations for Psoriatic Arthritis. 2016

Coates, Laura C / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Mease, Philip J / Soriano, Enrique R / Laura Acosta-Felquer, Maria / Armstrong, April W / Bautista-Molano, Wilson / Boehncke, Wolf-Henning / Campbell, Willemina / Cauli, Alberto / Espinoza, Luis R / FitzGerald, Oliver / Gladman, Dafna D / Gottlieb, Alice / Helliwell, Philip S / Husni, M Elaine / Love, Thorvardur J / Lubrano, Ennio / McHugh, Neil / Nash, Peter / Ogdie, Alexis / Orbai, Ana-Maria / Parkinson, Andrew / O'Sullivan, Denis / Rosen, Cheryl F / Schwartzman, Sergio / Siegel, Evan L / Toloza, Sergio / Tuong, William / Ritchlin, Christopher T. ·Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine and University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · University of California at San Diego. · Swedish Medical Center and University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington. · Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina. · University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles. · Hospital Militar Central and Universidad Militar Nueva Grenada, Bogotá, Colombia. · Geneva University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland. · Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · University of Cagliari, Monserrato Campus, Cagliari, Italy. · Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans. · St. Vincent's University Hospital, The Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, and University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. · University of Toronto and Toronto Western Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine and University of Leeds, Leeds, UK, and Bradford Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Bradford, UK. · Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio. · University of Iceland and Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. · University of Molise, Campobasso, Italy. · Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Bath, UK. · University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Chapel Allerton Hospital, Leeds, UK. · St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · Toronto Western Hospital and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, New York. · Arthritis and Rheumatism Associates, Rockville, Maryland. · Ministry of Health, San Fernando del Valle de Catamarca, Argentina. · University of California, Davis. · University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York. ·Arthritis Rheumatol · Pubmed #26749174.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To update the 2009 Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) treatment recommendations for the spectrum of manifestations affecting patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). METHODS: GRAPPA rheumatologists, dermatologists, and PsA patients drafted overarching principles for the management of PsA, based on consensus achieved at face-to-face meetings and via online surveys. We conducted literature reviews regarding treatment for the key domains of PsA (arthritis, spondylitis, enthesitis, dactylitis, skin disease, and nail disease) and convened a new group to identify pertinent comorbidities and their effect on treatment. Finally, we drafted treatment recommendations for each of the clinical manifestations and assessed the level of agreement for the overarching principles and treatment recommendations among GRAPPA members, using an online questionnaire. RESULTS: Six overarching principles had ≥80% agreement among both health care professionals (n = 135) and patient research partners (n = 10). We developed treatment recommendations and a schema incorporating these principles for arthritis, spondylitis, enthesitis, dactylitis, skin disease, nail disease, and comorbidities in the setting of PsA, using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation process. Agreement of >80% was reached for approval of the individual recommendations and the overall schema. CONCLUSION: We present overarching principles and updated treatment recommendations for the key manifestations of PsA, including related comorbidities, based on a literature review and consensus of GRAPPA members (rheumatologists, dermatologists, other health care providers, and patient research partners). Further updates are anticipated as the therapeutic landscape in PsA evolves.

4 Guideline S3 - Guidelines on the treatment of psoriasis vulgaris (English version). Update. 2012

Nast, Alexander / Boehncke, Wolf-Henning / Mrowietz, Ulrich / Ockenfels, Hans-Michael / Philipp, Sandra / Reich, Kristian / Rosenbach, Thomas / Sammain, Adel / Schlaeger, Martin / Sebastian, Michael / Sterry, Wolfram / Streit, Volker / Augustin, Matthias / Erdmann, Ricardo / Klaus, Joachim / Koza, Joachim / Muller, Siegrid / Orzechowski, Hans-Dieter / Rosumeck, Stefanie / Schmid-Ott, Gerhard / Weberschock, Tobias / Rzany, Berthold / Anonymous5540719 / Anonymous5550719. ·Division of Evidence Based Medicine (dEBM), Klinik für Dermatologie, Venerologie und Allergologie, Charité- Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany. ·J Dtsch Dermatol Ges · Pubmed #22386073.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis vulgaris is a common and often chronic inflammatory skin disease. The incidence of psoriasis in Western industrialized countries ranges from 1.5% to 2%. Patients afflicted with severe psoriasis vulgaris may experience a significant reduction in quality of life. Despite the large variety of treatment options available, surveys have shown that patients still do not received optimal treatments. To optimize the treatment of psoriasis in Germany, the Deutsche Dermatologi sche Gesellschaft (DDG) and the Berufsverband Deutscher Dermatologen (BVDD) have initiated a project to develop evidence-based guidelines for the management of psoriasis. They were first published in 2006 and updated in 2011. The Guidelines focus on induction therapy in cases of mild, moderate and severe plaque-type psoriasis in adults including systemic therapy, UV therapy and topical therapies. The therapeutic recommendations were developed based on the results of a systematic literature search and were finalized during a consensus meeting using structured consensus methods (nominal group process).

5 Guideline German S3-guidelines on the treatment of psoriasis vulgaris (short version). 2012

Nast, A / Boehncke, W H / Mrowietz, U / Ockenfels, H M / Philipp, S / Reich, K / Rosenbach, T / Sammain, A / Schlaeger, M / Sebastian, M / Sterry, W / Streit, V / Augustin, M / Erdmann, R / Klaus, J / Koza, J / Müller, S / Orzechowski, H D / Rosumeck, S / Schmid-Ott, G / Weberschock, T / Rzany, B / Anonymous4940718 / Anonymous4950718. ·Division of Evidence Based Medicine, Klinik für Dermatologie, Venerologie und Allergologie, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany. info@psoriasis-leitlinie.de ·Arch Dermatol Res · Pubmed #22350179.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis vulgaris is a common and often chronic inflammatory skin disease. The incidence of psoriasis in Western industrialized countries ranges from 1.5 to 2%. Patients afflicted with severe psoriasis vulgaris may experience a significant reduction in quality of life. Despite the large variety of treatment options available, patient surveys have revealed insufficient satisfaction with the efficacy of available treatments and a high rate of medication non-compliance (Richards et al. in J Am Acad Dermatol 41(4):581-583, 1999). To optimize the treatment of psoriasis in Germany, the Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG) and the Berufsverband Deutscher Dermatologen (BVDD) have initiated a project to develop evidence-based guidelines for the management of psoriasis first published in 2006 and now updated in 2011. The Guidelines focus on induction therapy in cases of mild, moderate, and severe plaque-type psoriasis in adults. This short version of the guidelines presents the resulting series of therapeutic recommendations, which were based on a systematic literature search and discussed and approved by a team of dermatology experts. In addition to the therapeutic recommendations provided in this short version, the full version of the guidelines includes information on contraindications, adverse events, drug interactions, practicality, and costs, as well as detailed information on how best to apply the treatments described (for full version please see Nast et al. in JDDG Suppl 2:S1-S104, 2011 or http://www.psoriasis-leitlinie.de ).

6 Guideline Evidence-based (S3) guideline for the treatment of psoriasis vulgaris - Update: "Therapeutic options" and "Efalizumab". 2010

Nast, Alexander / Augustin, Matthias / Boehncke, Wolf-Henning / Klaus, Joachim / Mrowietz, Ulrich / Ockenfels, Hans-Michael / Philipp, Sandra / Reich, Kristian / Rosenbach, Thomas / Schlaeger, Martin / Sebastian, Michael / Sterry, Wolfram / Streit, Volker / Weisenseel, Peter / Rzany, Berthold. ·Division of Evidence Based Medicine (dEBM), Klinik für Dermatologie, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Charité Mitte, Berlin. alexander.nast@charite.de ·J Dtsch Dermatol Ges · Pubmed #20096063.

ABSTRACT: In February 2009, the European Medicines Agency's (EMEA) Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) had recommended the suspension of efalizumab's (Raptiva) marketing authorization, because its benefits in the treatment of psoriasis were modest, while there was a risk of serious side effects in patients receiving the medicine, including the occurrence of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). The guideline group has changed the guideline accordingly.

7 Editorial New biologics in psoriasis - progress and problems. 2017

Boehncke, W-H. ·Division of Dermatology and Venereology, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland. · Department of Pathology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #29059511.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial "Evergreen" Psoriasis - Neues zu Genetik, Therapie, und überhaupt. 2017

Boehncke, Wolf-Henning. · ·J Dtsch Dermatol Ges · Pubmed #28214311.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial [Warning shot of the WHO]. 2015

Boehncke, Wolf-Henning / Gilliet, Michel. · ·Rev Med Suisse · Pubmed #26021134.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial [To be or not to be: another round in the discussion of the role of psoriasis as a risk factor for associated diseases]. 2013

Boehncke, Wolf-Henning / Schön, Michael P. · ·J Dtsch Dermatol Ges · Pubmed #24267011.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Review Autoreactive T-Lymphocytes in Inflammatory Skin Diseases. 2019

Boehncke, Wolf-Henning / Brembilla, Nicolo Costantino. ·Department of Pathology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. · Divison of Dermatology and Venereology, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland. ·Front Immunol · Pubmed #31191553.

ABSTRACT: The presence of one or several autoantigen(s) and a response by the adaptive immune system are the key criteria to classify a pathology as an autoimmune disease. The list of entities fulfilling this criterion is currently growing in the light of recent advancements in the pathogenetic understanding of a number of important dermatoses. The role of autoreactive T-lymphocytes differs amongst these pathologies. While they are directly involved as effector cells attacking and sometimes killing their respective target in some diseases (e.g., vitiligo), they provide help to B-lymphocytes, which in turn produce the pathogenic autoreactive antibodies in others (pemphigus and pemphigoid). Atopic dermatits is a chimera in this regard, as there is evidence for both functions. Psoriasis is an example for an entity where autoantigens were finally identified, suggesting that at least a subgroup of patients should be classified as suffering from a true autoimmune rather than autoinflammatory condition. Identification of resident memory T-lymphocytes (T

12 Review The IL-17 Family of Cytokines in Psoriasis: IL-17A and Beyond. 2018

Brembilla, Nicolo Costantino / Senra, Luisa / Boehncke, Wolf-Henning. ·Department of Pathology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. · Division of Dermatology and Venereology, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland. ·Front Immunol · Pubmed #30127781.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a frequent chronic inflammatory skin disease, nowadays considered a major global health problem. Several new drugs, targeting the IL-23/IL-17A pathway, have been recently licensed or are in clinical development. These therapies represent a major improvement of the way in which psoriasis is managed, since they show an unprecedented efficacy on skin symptoms of psoriasis. This has been made possible, thanks to an increasingly more accurate pathogenic view of psoriasis. Today, the belief that Th17 cells mediate psoriasis is moving to the concept of psoriasis as an IL-17A-driven disease. New questions arise at the horizon, given that IL-17A is part of a newly described family of cytokines, which has five distinct homologous: IL-17B, IL-17C, IL-17D, IL-17E, also known as IL-25 and IL-17F. IL-17 family cytokines elicit similar effects in target cells, but simultaneously trigger different and sometimes opposite functions in a tissue-specific manner. This is complicated by the fact that IL-17 cytokines show a high capacity of synergisms with other inflammatory stimuli. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge around the cytokines belonging to the IL-17 family in relation to skin inflammation in general and psoriasis in particular, and discuss possible clinical implications. A comprehensive understanding of the different roles played by the IL-17 cytokines is crucial to appreciate current and developing therapies and to allow an effective pathogenesis- and mechanisms-driven drug design.

13 Review Immunogenicity of biologic therapies: causes and consequences. 2018

Boehncke, Wolf-Henning / Brembilla, Nicolo Costantino. ·a Department of Pathology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine , University of Geneva , Geneva , Switzerland. · b Division of Dermatology and Venereology , Geneva University Hospitals , Geneva , Switzerland. ·Expert Rev Clin Immunol · Pubmed #29683362.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Antibodies or fusion proteins termed biologics allow the targeted therapy of diseases. Many of these agents have proven superior efficacy and safety to conventional therapies, and subsequently revolutionized the management of numerous chronic diseases. Repetitive administration of these protein-based therapeutics to immunocompetent patients elicit immune responses in the form of Anti Drug Antibodies (ADAs), which in turn impact their pharmacological properties and may trigger adverse events. Areas covered: Structural characteristics determining the immunogenicity of biologics are reviewed along with strategies to minimize it. Next, the different types of treatment-emerging ADAs, their potential clinical implications, and assays to detect them are addressed. Emphasis is put on the review of data on the immunogenicity of different types of biologics across numerous indications. Finally, practical considerations are discussed on how to manage patients with issues around the immunogenicity of their biologic treatment. Expert commentary: Immunogenicity is a clinically relevant criterion when selecting a biologic. Besides intrinsic properties of the agent (namely its structure), its respective mode of action, dosing regimen, comedication, and the indication treated must be considered. ADA detection assays need to be standardized to improve comparability of available data and to allow clinical decision-making.

14 Review Systemic Inflammation and Cardiovascular Comorbidity in Psoriasis Patients: Causes and Consequences. 2018

Boehncke, Wolf-Henning. ·Department of Pathology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. · Division of Dermatology and Venereology, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland. ·Front Immunol · Pubmed #29675020.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease characterized by the appearance of red scaly plaques that can affect any part of the body. High prevalence, chronicity, disfiguration, disability, and associated comorbidity make it a challenge for clinicians of multiple specialties. Likewise, its complex pathogenesis, comprising inflammation, hyperproliferation, and angioneogenesis, intrigues numerous scientific disciplines, namely, immunology. From a clinical perspective, the severity of psoriasis is highlighted by its increased mortality, with cardiovascular diseases contributing the highest excess risk. From a scientific point of view, psoriasis has to be considered a systemic inflammatory condition, as blood biomarkers of inflammation are elevated and imaging techniques document sites of inflammation beyond the skin. While the association of psoriasis with cardiovascular diseases is now widely accepted, causes and consequences of this association are controversially discussed. This review comments on epidemiologic, genetic, and mechanistic studies that analyzed the relation between psoriasis and cardiovascular comorbidity. The hypothesis of psoriasis potentially being an independent cardiovascular risk factor, driving atherosclerosis

15 Review Unmet Needs in the Field of Psoriasis: Pathogenesis and Treatment. 2018

Boehncke, Wolf-Henning / Brembilla, Nicolo Costantino. ·Divison of Dermatology and Venerology, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland. wolf-henning.boehncke@hcuge.ch. · Department of Pathology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. wolf-henning.boehncke@hcuge.ch. · Department of Pathology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. ·Clin Rev Allergy Immunol · Pubmed #28780731.

ABSTRACT: In times of targeted therapies, innovative therapeutics become tools to further unravel the pathogenesis of the treated disease, thus influencing current pathogenetic concepts. Based on such paradigm shifts, the next generation of novel therapeutic targets might be identified. Psoriasis is a good example for the resulting most fruitful dialog between clinical and fundamental research. As a result of this, the key role of Th17 lymphocytes, some of their effector molecules, as well as mediators contributing to their maturation have been identified, many of these being targeted by some of the most effective drugs currently available to treat psoriasis. During this process, it became obvious that major parts of the puzzle remain yet to be uncovered or understood in much more detail. This review will therefore address the search for additional important effector cells other than Th17 lymphocytes, such as neutrophils, monocytes, and mast cells, mediators other than IL-17A, including some other IL-17 isoforms, and trigger factors such as potential autoantigens. This will lead to discussing the next generation of targeted therapies for psoriasis as well as treatment goals. These goals need to comprise both psoriasis as well as its comorbidities, as a comprehensive approach to manage the whole patient with all his health issues is urgently needed. Finally, given the substantial differences in resources available in different parts of the world, the global burden of psoriasis and options on how to care for patients outside developed countries will be assessed.

16 Review The role of IL-23 and the IL-23/T 2017

Girolomoni, G / Strohal, R / Puig, L / Bachelez, H / Barker, J / Boehncke, W H / Prinz, J C. ·Section of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Dermatology and Venerology, Federal Academic Teaching Hospital of Feldkirch, Feldkirch, Austria. · Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Sorbonne Paris Cité, Université Paris Diderot, Paris, France. · Department of Dermatology, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Paris, France. · UMR INSERM U1163, Institut Imagine, Paris, France. · St John's Institute of Dermatology, King's College London, London, UK. · Division of Dermatology, Geneva University Hospitals, Department of Pathology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. · Department of Dermatology, University of Munich, Munich, Germany. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #28653490.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated disease affecting more than 100 million people worldwide and up to 2.2% of the UK population. The aetiology of psoriasis is thought to originate from an interplay of genetic, environmental, infectious and lifestyle factors. The manner in which genetic and environmental factors interact to contribute to the molecular disease mechanisms has remained elusive. However, the interleukin 23 (IL-23)/T-helper 17 (T

17 Review [Comorbidity in psoriasis]. 2016

Gerdes, S / Mrowietz, U / Boehncke, W-H. ·Psoriasis-Zentrum, Klinik für Dermatologie, Venerologie und Allergologie, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Schittenhelmstr. 7, 24105, Kiel, Deutschland. sgerdes@dermatology.uni-kiel.de. · Psoriasis-Zentrum, Klinik für Dermatologie, Venerologie und Allergologie, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Schittenhelmstr. 7, 24105, Kiel, Deutschland. · Service de Dermatologie et Vénéréologie, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Genève und Département de Pathologie et Immunologie, Université de Genève, Genf, Schweiz. ·Hautarzt · Pubmed #27221798.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a systemic chronic inflammatory disease associated with comorbidity. Many epidemiological studies have shown that psoriasis is associated with psoriatic arthritis as well as cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Furthermore, obesity and psychological diseases such as depression and anxiety disorders are linked with psoriasis and play a central role in its management. The association of psoriasis and its comorbidity can be partly explained by genetic and pathophysiological mechanisms. Approximately 40 psoriasis susceptibility loci have been described with the majority linked to the innate and adaptive immune system. In some associated diseases, such as psoriatic arthritis, an overlap of their genetic susceptibility exists. Pathophysiologically the "psoriatic march" is a model that describes the development of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases due to the presence of underlying systemic inflammation. Dermatologists are the gatekeepers to treatment for patients with psoriasis. The early detection and the management of comorbidity is part of their responsibility. Concepts for the management of psoriasis and tools to screen for psoriatic comorbidity have been developed in order to support dermatologists in daily practice.

18 Review Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis: Flip Sides of the Coin? 2016

Boehncke, Wolf-Henning. ·Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH-1211 Genève 14, Switzerland. wolf-henning.boehncke@hcuge.ch. ·Acta Derm Venereol · Pubmed #26928459.

ABSTRACT: Presence (current or past) of psoriasis of the skin is a major criterion to establish the diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis. However, in individual patients, the course of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis do not seem to correlate. This raises the issue of whether psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis are distinct entities, or parts of the spectrum of a "psoriatic disease". Arguments in favour of both concepts, derived from clinical observations, animal experiments, genetic approaches, and therapeutic studies are reviewed, and the implications for scientists and practicing dermatologists highlighted.

19 Review Promoting patient-centred care in psoriatic arthritis: a multidisciplinary European perspective on improving the patient experience. 2016

Betteridge, N / Boehncke, W-H / Bundy, C / Gossec, L / Gratacós, J / Augustin, M. ·Neil Betteridge Associates, London, UK. · Department of Dermatology, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland. · Department of Pathology and Immunology, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. · Centre for Dermatology Research, Institute for Inflammation and Repair, University of Manchester and Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, Manchester, UK. · Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Paris, France. · Pitie-Salpétrière Hospital AP-HP, Paris, France. · Rheumatology Service, Hospital Universitari Parc Taulí of Sabadell, UAB, Barcelona, Spain. · University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #26377041.

ABSTRACT: Patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) may not be optimally treated. The impact of the disease extends beyond skin and joint symptoms, impairing quality of life. This indicates that the adoption of a patient-focused approach to PsA management is necessary. An expert multidisciplinary working group was convened, with the objective of developing an informed perspective on current best practice and needs for the future management of PsA. Topics of discussion included the barriers to current best practice and calls to action for the improvement of three areas in PsA management: early and accurate diagnosis of PsA, management of disease progression and management of the impact of the condition on the patient. The working group agreed that, to make best use of the available of diagnostic tools, clinical care recommendations and effective treatments, there is a clear need for healthcare professionals from different disciplines to collaborate in the management of PsA. By facilitating appropriate and rapid referral, providing high quality information about PsA and its treatment to patients, and actively involving patients when choosing management plans and setting treatment goals, management of PsA can be improved. The perspective of the working group is presented here, with recommendations for the adoption of a multidisciplinary, patient-focused approach to the management of PsA.

20 Review Etiology and Pathogenesis of Psoriasis. 2015

Boehncke, Wolf-Henning. ·Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Geneva University Hospitals, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, Genève 14 CH - 1211, Switzerland; Department of Pathology and Immunology, University of Geneva, Rue Michel-Servet 7, Geneva CH - 1206, Switzerland. Electronic address: wolf-henning.boehncke@hcuge.ch. ·Rheum Dis Clin North Am · Pubmed #26476225.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a common, chronic inflammatory skin disease most often appearing in the form of well-demarcated, scaly plaques. These lesions highlight the fundamental processes underlying its pathogenesis, namely, inflammation and epidermal hyperproliferation. Both phenomena are considered consequences of an intimate interplay between the innate and the adaptive immune system. This concept is supported by results of genetic studies, pointing toward the signaling pathways of nuclear factor-κB, interferon-γ, and interleukin (IL)-23 as well as antigen presentation as central axes of the psoriatic inflammation. Efficacy of biologics targeting tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-23, or IL-17 provides further evidence in favor of this model.

21 Review Psoriasis. 2015

Boehncke, Wolf-Henning / Schön, Michael P. ·Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland; Department of Pathology and Immunology, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. Electronic address: wolf-henning.boehncke@hcuge.ch. · Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, University Medical Center, Georg August University, Göttingen, Germany. Electronic address: michael.schoen@med.uni-goettingen.de. ·Lancet · Pubmed #26025581.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is an immune-mediated, genetic disease manifesting in the skin or joints or both. A diverse team of clinicians with a range of expertise is often needed to treat the disease. Psoriasis provides many challenges including high prevalence, chronicity, disfiguration, disability, and associated comorbidity. Understanding the role of immune function in psoriasis and the interplay between the innate and adaptive immune system has helped to manage this complex disease, which affects patients far beyond the skin. In this Seminar, we highlight the clinical diversity of psoriasis and associated comorbid diseases. We describe recent developments in psoriasis epidemiology, pathogenesis, and genetics to better understand present trends in psoriasis management. Our key objective is to raise awareness of the complexity of this multifaceted disease, the potential of state-of-the-art therapeutic approaches, and the need for early diagnosis and comprehensive management of patients with psoriasis.

22 Review Safety and efficacy of therapies for skin symptoms of psoriasis in patients with psoriatic arthritis: a systematic review. 2014

Boehncke, Wolf-Henning / Alvarez Martinez, David / Solomon, James A / Gottlieb, Alice B. ·From the Department of Dermatology, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland; Ameriderm Research, Ormond Beach, Florida; University of Central Florida College of Medicine, Orlando, Florida; University of Illinois College of Medicine, Urbana, Illinois; and Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.W-H. Boehncke, MD; D. Alvarez Martinez, BS, Department of Dermatology, Geneva University Hospital; J.A. Solomon, MD, PhD, Ameriderm Research, University of Central Florida College of Medicine, University of Illinois College of Medicine; A.B. Gottlieb, MD, PhD, Tufts Medical Center. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #25362715.

ABSTRACT: Numerous guidelines and recommendations exist for the treatment of psoriasis in various populations. One important population is patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) who have symptoms of both joint and skin disease. In patients with both facets of psoriatic disease, skin and joints must be treated separately, but also simultaneously. As several systemic therapies are approved for either one or both, the concept of treating both facets with the same drug is feasible. This review summarizes evidence from studies in patients with PsA on the efficacy of these drugs on psoriatic skin disease in these patients.

23 Review Qualifying unmet needs and improving standards of care in psoriatic arthritis. 2014

Helliwell, Philip / Coates, Laura / Chandran, Vinod / Gladman, Dafna / de Wit, Maarten / FitzGerald, Oliver / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Strand, Vibeke / Mease, Philip J / Boehncke, Wolf-Henning / Langley, Richard G / Lubrano, Ennio / Maccarone, Mara / Schulze-Koops, Hendrik / Miceli-Richard, Corinne / Queiro, Ruben. ·Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. ·Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) · Pubmed #25047391.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

24 Review [Comorbidities in psoriasic arthritis]. 2014

Zürcher, S / Boehncke, W-H / Boehncke, S. · ·Rev Med Suisse · Pubmed #24772805.

ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis occurs almost exclusively together with psoriasis of the skin. It seems useful therefore for the practitioner to consider the two of them as manifestations of one "psoriatic disease". This pragmatic approach is more contemporary, particularly since it is increasingly clear that the "psoriatic disease" goes beyond damage to the skin and joints. The most important "comorbidities" associated with psoriatic disease are presented here; especially the cardiovascular diseases as well as their risk factors, namely smoking, obesity, and the metabolic syndrome. Moreover, infections, osteoporosis and neoplasia are to be considered.

25 Review More than skin-deep: the many dimensions of the psoriatic disease. 2014

Boehncke, Wolf-Henning / Boehncke, Sandra. ·Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Geneva University Hospitals, Switzerland; Wolf-Henning.Boehncke@hcuge.ch. · Department of Diabetology, Endocrinology, Hypertension, and Nutrition, Geneva University Hospitals, Switzerland. ·Swiss Med Wkly · Pubmed #24764145.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is among the most common skin diseases, exhibiting a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. Joint involvement in the form of psoriatic arthritis is readily recognised, but both frequency and severity of this manifestation have long been underestimated. More recently, additional important diseases have been found to be associated with psoriasis, including the metabolic syndrome (or components thereof), cardiovascular diseases, lymphoma, and anxiety/depression. In the past, psoriasis treatment aimed at suppressing acute rashes. Current concepts regard psoriasis as a chronic systemic inflammatory condition and cardiovascular risk factor. In the light of this concept, long-term disease control through systemic maintenance therapy is increasingly recommended by experts. This approach became feasible with the approval of numerous biologics for the treatment of psoriasis. But to really address all medical needs of psoriasis patients, a truly interdisciplinary, comprehensive management approach is needed. Several national societies have already published algorithms to ensure that this need will be implemented in the daily practice of dermatologists and nondermatologists alike.

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