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Psoriasis: HELP
Articles by Gavin Clunie
Based on 3 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Gavin Clunie wrote the following 3 articles about Psoriasis.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Prevalence and predictors of tumour necrosis factor inhibitor persistence in psoriatic arthritis. 2018

Stober, Carmel / Ye, Weiyu / Guruparan, Thushyanthan / Htut, Eiphyu / Clunie, Gavin / Jadon, Deepak. ·Department of Rheumatology, Addenbrooke's Hospital. · Department of Medicine, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS FT. · School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. ·Rheumatology (Oxford) · Pubmed #29077973.

ABSTRACT: Objectives: To evaluate TNF-α inhibitor (TNFi) persistence when used as first- or second-line biologic therapy for the management of PsA, and to determine baseline clinical and laboratory parameters associated with TNFi persistence. Methods: A retrospective single-centre cohort study was performed on all patients with PsA initiated on TNFi therapy between 2003 and 2015. Demographic, clinical and laboratory characteristics were compared with TNFi persistence, using Kaplan-Meier survival and Cox proportional hazards models. Results: One hundred and eighty-eight patients with PsA were prescribed TNFi therapy as first-line biologic therapy over a period of 635 person-years [46% male, mean (s.d.) age 47.3 (11.4) years; median (interquartile range) disease duration 11 (7-16) years]. At 12 months of follow-up 79% of patients persisted with TNFi therapy, and 73% at 24 months. Of those discontinuing TNFi, 35% stopped due to primary inefficacy, 22% secondary inefficacy and 43% adverse events. Multivariable analysis identified female sex (hazard ratio (HR) 2.57; 95% CI: 1.26, 5.24; P = 0.01) and the presence of metabolic syndrome-related co-morbidities (HR = 2.65, 95% CI: 1.24, 5.69; P = 0.01) as predictors of lower persistence. Of 32 cases treated with a second TNFi, persistence at 12 months was 56%. TNFi persistence was 2-fold less likely in these 32 cases compared with first-line TNFi users (HR = 2.02, 95% CI: 1.20, 3.42; P = 0.01). Conclusion: Patients with PsA who are female and have metabolic syndrome-related co-morbidities have lower TNFi persistence. Although persistence was lower in patients who had switched to a second TNFi, a substantial proportion of these cases responded, advocating switching to a second TNFi as a valid therapeutic strategy.

2 Article Effect of anti-TNF and conventional synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug treatment on work disability and clinical outcome in a multicentre observational cohort study of psoriatic arthritis. 2017

Tillett, William / Shaddick, Gavin / Jobling, Amelia / Askari, Ayman / Cooper, Annie / Creamer, Paul / Clunie, Gavin / Helliwell, Philip S / James, Jana / Kay, Lesley / Korendowych, Eleanor / Lane, Suzanne / Packham, Jonathon / Shaban, Ragai / Thomas, Matthew L / Williamson, Lyn / McHugh, Neil. ·Department of Rheumatology, Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases. · Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology. · Department of Mathematics, University of Bath, Bath. · Department of Rheumatology, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Hospital, Shropshire. · Department of Rheumatology, Queen Alexandra Hospital, Portsmouth. · Department of Rheumatology, North Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol. · Department of Rheumatology, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge. · Department of Rheumatology, NIHR Leeds Biomedical Research Unit, University of Leeds and Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds. · Department of Rheumatology, Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle upon Tyne. · Department of Rheumatology, Ipswich Hospital NHS Trust, Ipswich. · Department of Rheumatology, Haywood Rheumatology Centre, Stoke-on-Trentand. · Department of Rheumatology, Great Western Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Swindon, UK. ·Rheumatology (Oxford) · Pubmed #28013211.

ABSTRACT: Objectives: To determine the effect of medical treatment on work disability in patients with active PsA in a real-world setting. Methods: Four hundred patients with active PsA commencing or switching to anti-TNF or conventional synthetic DMARD (csDMARD) were recruited to a multicentre UK prospective observational cohort study. Work disability was measured using the work productivity and activity-specific health problem instrument and peripheral joint activity was measured with the disease activity in PsA composite measure. Results: Four hundred patients were recruited, of whom 229 (57.25%) were working (of any age). Sixty-two patients of working age (24%) were unemployed. At 6 months there was a 10% improvement in presenteeism ( P = 0.007) and a 15% improvement in work productivity ( P = 0.001) among working patients commenced on csDMARDs ( n = 164) vs a larger and more rapid 30% improvement in presenteeism ( P < 0.001) and 40% improvement in work productivity ( P < 0.001) among those commenced on anti-TNF therapy ( n = 65). Clinical response was poor among patients commenced on a csDMARD ( n = 272), with an 8.4 point improvement in disease activity in PsA ( P < 0.001) vs those commenced on anti-TNF therapy ( n = 121), who had a 36.8 point improvement ( P < 0.001). Conclusion: We report significant and clinically meaningful improvements in both work disability and clinical outcomes after commencement of anti-TNF therapy in a real-world setting. Improvements in all outcomes among those commencing csDMARDs were slower and of a smaller magnitude.

3 Article Factors influencing work disability in psoriatic arthritis: first results from a large UK multicentre study. 2015

Tillett, William / Shaddick, Gavin / Askari, Ayman / Cooper, Annie / Creamer, Paul / Clunie, Gavin / Helliwell, Philip S / Kay, Lesley / Korendowych, Eleanor / Lane, Suzanne / Packham, Jonathan / Shaban, Ragai / Williamson, Lyn / McHugh, Neil. ·Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Department of Mathematics, University of Bath, Bath, Department of Rheumatology, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Hospital, Shropshire, Department of Rheumatology, Royal Hampshire County Hospital, Winchester, Department of Rheumatology, North Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol, Department of Rheumatology, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, NIHR Leeds Biomedical Research Unit, University of Leeds and Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, Department of Rheumatology, Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle upon Tyne, Department of Rheumatology, Ipswich Hospital NHS Trust, Ipswich, Haywood Rheumatology Centre, Stoke-on-Trent, Department of Rheumatology, Queen Alexandra Hospital, Portsmouth, Department of Rheumatology, Great Western Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Swindon and University of Bath, Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Bath, UK. w.tillett@nhs.net. · Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Department of Mathematics, University of Bath, Bath, Department of Rheumatology, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Hospital, Shropshire, Department of Rheumatology, Royal Hampshire County Hospital, Winchester, Department of Rheumatology, North Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol, Department of Rheumatology, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, NIHR Leeds Biomedical Research Unit, University of Leeds and Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, Department of Rheumatology, Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle upon Tyne, Department of Rheumatology, Ipswich Hospital NHS Trust, Ipswich, Haywood Rheumatology Centre, Stoke-on-Trent, Department of Rheumatology, Queen Alexandra Hospital, Portsmouth, Department of Rheumatology, Great Western Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Swindon and University of Bath, Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Bath, UK. · Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Department of Mathematics, University of Bath, Bath, Department of Rheumatology, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Hospital, Shropshire, Department of Rheumatology, Royal Hampshire County Hospital, Winchester, Department of Rheumatology, North Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol, Department of Rheumatology, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, NIHR Leeds Biomedical Research Unit, University of Leeds and Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, Department of Rheumatology, Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle upon Tyne, Department of Rheumatology, Ipswich Hospital NHS Trust, Ipswich, Haywood Rheumatology Centre, Stoke-on-Trent, Department of Rheumatology, Queen Alexandra Hospital, Portsmouth, Department of Rheumatology, Great Western Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Swindon and University of Bath, Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Bath, UK. Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Department of Mathematics, University of Bath, Bath, Department of Rheumatology, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Hospital, Shropshire, Department of Rheumatology, Royal Hampshire County Hospital, Winchester, Department of Rheumatology, North Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol, Department of Rheumatology, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, NIHR Leeds Biomedical Research Unit, University of Leeds and Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, Department of Rheumatology, Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle upon Tyne, Department of Rheumatology, Ipswich Hospital NHS Trust, Ipswich, Haywood Rheumatology Centre, Stoke-on-Trent, Department of Rheumatology, Queen Alexandra Hospital, Portsmouth, Department of Rheumatology, Great Western Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Swindon and University of Bath, Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Bath, UK. ·Rheumatology (Oxford) · Pubmed #25125591.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the extent to which structural damage, clinical disease activity, demographic and social factors are associated with work disability (WD) in PsA. METHODS: Four hundred patients fulfilling CASPAR (Classification Criteria for Psoriatic Arthritis) criteria for PsA were recruited from 23 hospitals across the UK. Demographic, socio-economic, work, clinical and radiographic data were collected. WD was assessed with the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Specific Health Problem (WPAI-SHP) questionnaire reporting WD as a percentage of absenteeism (work time missed), presenteeism (impairment at work/reduced effectiveness) and work productivity loss (overall work impairment/absenteeism plus presenteeism). Logistic and linear regressions were conducted to investigate associations with WD. RESULTS: Two hundred and thirty-six participants of any age were in work. Absenteeism, presenteeism and productivity loss rates were 14% (s.d. 29.0), 39% (s.d. 27.2) and 46% (s.d. 30.4), respectively. Ninety-two (26%) participants of working age were unemployed. Greater age, disease duration of 2-5 years and worse physical function were associated with unemployment. Patients reported that employer awareness and helpfulness exerted a strongly positive influence on remaining in employment. Higher levels of global and joint-specific disease activity and worse physical function were associated with greater levels of presenteeism and productivity loss among those who remained in work. CONCLUSION: Reduced effectiveness at work was associated with measures of disease activity, whereas unemployment, considered the endpoint of WD, was associated with employer factors, age and disease duration. A longitudinal study is under way to determine whether treatment to reduce disease activity ameliorates WD in the real-world setting.