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Psoriasis: HELP
Articles by Laura C. Coates
Based on 102 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, L. Coates wrote the following 102 articles about Psoriasis.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5
1 Guideline Treating axial spondyloarthritis and peripheral spondyloarthritis, especially psoriatic arthritis, to target: 2017 update of recommendations by an international task force. 2018

Smolen, Josef S / Schöls, Monika / Braun, Jürgen / Dougados, Maxime / FitzGerald, Oliver / Gladman, Dafna D / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Landewé, Robert / Mease, Philip / Sieper, Joachim / Stamm, Tanja / Wit, Maarten de / Aletaha, Daniel / Baraliakos, Xenofon / Betteridge, Neil / Bosch, Filip van den / Coates, Laura C / Emery, Paul / Gensler, Lianne S / Gossec, Laure / Helliwell, Philip / Jongkees, Merryn / Kvien, Tore K / Inman, Robert D / McInnes, Iain B / Maccarone, Mara / Machado, Pedro M / Molto, Anna / Ogdie, Alexis / Poddubnyy, Denis / Ritchlin, Christopher / Rudwaleit, Martin / Tanew, Adrian / Thio, Bing / Veale, Douglas / Vlam, Kurt de / van der Heijde, Désirée. ·Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine 3, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · 2nd Department of Medicine, Hietzing Hospital, Vienna, Austria. · Health Consult, Vienna, Austria. · Rheumazentrum Ruhrgebiet, Ruhr-University Bochum, Herne, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France. · Department of Rheumatology, St Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · Division of Rheumatology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Rheumatology, University of California, San Diego, CA, USA. · Amsterdam Rheumatology & Immunology Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Division of Rheumatology Research, Swedish-Providence St. Joseph Health System, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. · Department of Gastroenterology, Infectiology and Rheumatology, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Section for Outcomes Research, Center for Medical Statistics, Informatics, and Intelligent Systems, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Medical Humanities, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Neil Betteridge Associates, UK. · Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. · Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Leeds, UK. · Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Department of Rheumatology, UPMC Univ Paris 06, GRC-UPMC 08 (EEMOIS); AP-HP, Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, France. · Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · Seayn Medical, Voorschoten, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · University Health Network and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · University of Glasgow, College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences, Glasgow, UK. · A.DI.PSO. (Associazione per la Difesa degli Psoriasici)-PE.Pso.POF (Pan European Psoriasis Patients' Organization Forum), Rome, Italy. · Centre for Rheumatology & MRC Centre for Neuromuscular Diseases, University College London, London, UK. · Division of Rheumatology, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania, PA, USA. · German Rheumatism Research Centrer, Berlin, Germany. · Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology Division, University of Rochester Medical Center Rochester, New York, NY, USA. · Division of Internal Medicine and Rheumatology, Klinikum Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Dermatology, Erasmus Medical Center, Erasmus University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Klinikum Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany. · Division of Rheumatology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #28684559.

ABSTRACT: Therapeutic targets have been defined for axial and peripheral spondyloarthritis (SpA) in 2012, but the evidence for these recommendations was only of indirect nature. These recommendations were re-evaluated in light of new insights. Based on the results of a systematic literature review and expert opinion, a task force of rheumatologists, dermatologists, patients and a health professional developed an update of the 2012 recommendations. These underwent intensive discussions, on site voting and subsequent anonymous electronic voting on levels of agreement with each item. A set of 5 overarching principles and 11 recommendations were developed and voted on. Some items were present in the previous recommendations, while others were significantly changed or newly formulated. The 2017 task force arrived at a single set of recommendations for axial and peripheral SpA, including psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The most exhaustive discussions related to whether PsA should be assessed using unidimensional composite scores for its different domains or multidimensional scores that comprise multiple domains. This question was not resolved and constitutes an important research agenda. There was broad agreement, now better supported by data than in 2012, that remission/inactive disease and, alternatively, low/minimal disease activity are the principal targets for the treatment of PsA. As instruments to assess the patients on the path to the target, the Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS) for axial SpA and the Disease Activity index for PSoriatic Arthritis (DAPSA) and Minimal Disease Activity (MDA) for PsA were recommended, although not supported by all. Shared decision-making between the clinician and the patient was seen as pivotal to the process. The task force defined the treatment target for SpA as remission or low disease activity and developed a large research agenda to further advance the field.

2 Guideline British Association of Dermatologists guidelines for biologic therapy for psoriasis 2017. 2017

Smith, C H / Jabbar-Lopez, Z K / Yiu, Z Z / Bale, T / Burden, A D / Coates, L C / Cruickshank, M / Hadoke, T / MacMahon, E / Murphy, R / Nelson-Piercy, C / Owen, C M / Parslew, R / Peleva, E / Pottinger, E / Samarasekera, E J / Stoddart, J / Strudwicke, C / Venning, V A / Warren, R B / Exton, L S / Mohd Mustapa, M F. ·St John's Institute of Dermatology, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, SE1 9RT, U.K. · The Dermatology Centre, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, The University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, M13 9NT, U.K. · British Dermatology Nursing Group representative, Aneurin Bevan Health Board, Wales, U.K. · Department of Dermatology, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH3 9HA, U.K. · British Society for Rheumatology, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Leeds, LS7 4SA, U.K. · Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX3 7LD, U.K. · National Guideline Centre, Royal College of Physicians, London, NW1 4LE, U.K. · Patient representatives. · Department of Infectious Diseases, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, SE1 9RT, U.K. · Department of Dermatology, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield, S10 2JF, U.K. · Women's Health Academic Centre, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, SE1 9RT, U.K. · Department of Dermatology, East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust, Burnley, BB10 2PQ, U.K. · Department of Dermatology, Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Trust, Liverpool, L7 8XP, U.K. · Independent chair, Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership, London, EC2Y 9AE, U.K. · Department of Dermatology, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, OX3 7LE, U.K. · British Association of Dermatologists, London, W1T 5HQ, U.K. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #28513835.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Guideline Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis 2015 Treatment Recommendations for Psoriatic Arthritis. 2016

Coates, Laura C / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Mease, Philip J / Soriano, Enrique R / Laura Acosta-Felquer, Maria / Armstrong, April W / Bautista-Molano, Wilson / Boehncke, Wolf-Henning / Campbell, Willemina / Cauli, Alberto / Espinoza, Luis R / FitzGerald, Oliver / Gladman, Dafna D / Gottlieb, Alice / Helliwell, Philip S / Husni, M Elaine / Love, Thorvardur J / Lubrano, Ennio / McHugh, Neil / Nash, Peter / Ogdie, Alexis / Orbai, Ana-Maria / Parkinson, Andrew / O'Sullivan, Denis / Rosen, Cheryl F / Schwartzman, Sergio / Siegel, Evan L / Toloza, Sergio / Tuong, William / Ritchlin, Christopher T. ·Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine and University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · University of California at San Diego. · Swedish Medical Center and University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington. · Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina. · University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles. · Hospital Militar Central and Universidad Militar Nueva Grenada, Bogotá, Colombia. · Geneva University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland. · Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · University of Cagliari, Monserrato Campus, Cagliari, Italy. · Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans. · St. Vincent's University Hospital, The Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, and University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. · University of Toronto and Toronto Western Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine and University of Leeds, Leeds, UK, and Bradford Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Bradford, UK. · Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio. · University of Iceland and Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. · University of Molise, Campobasso, Italy. · Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Bath, UK. · University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Chapel Allerton Hospital, Leeds, UK. · St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · Toronto Western Hospital and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, New York. · Arthritis and Rheumatism Associates, Rockville, Maryland. · Ministry of Health, San Fernando del Valle de Catamarca, Argentina. · University of California, Davis. · University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York. ·Arthritis Rheumatol · Pubmed #26749174.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To update the 2009 Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) treatment recommendations for the spectrum of manifestations affecting patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). METHODS: GRAPPA rheumatologists, dermatologists, and PsA patients drafted overarching principles for the management of PsA, based on consensus achieved at face-to-face meetings and via online surveys. We conducted literature reviews regarding treatment for the key domains of PsA (arthritis, spondylitis, enthesitis, dactylitis, skin disease, and nail disease) and convened a new group to identify pertinent comorbidities and their effect on treatment. Finally, we drafted treatment recommendations for each of the clinical manifestations and assessed the level of agreement for the overarching principles and treatment recommendations among GRAPPA members, using an online questionnaire. RESULTS: Six overarching principles had ≥80% agreement among both health care professionals (n = 135) and patient research partners (n = 10). We developed treatment recommendations and a schema incorporating these principles for arthritis, spondylitis, enthesitis, dactylitis, skin disease, nail disease, and comorbidities in the setting of PsA, using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation process. Agreement of >80% was reached for approval of the individual recommendations and the overall schema. CONCLUSION: We present overarching principles and updated treatment recommendations for the key manifestations of PsA, including related comorbidities, based on a literature review and consensus of GRAPPA members (rheumatologists, dermatologists, other health care providers, and patient research partners). Further updates are anticipated as the therapeutic landscape in PsA evolves.

4 Guideline The 2012 BSR and BHPR guideline for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis with biologics. 2013

Coates, Laura C / Tillett, William / Chandler, David / Helliwell, Philip S / Korendowych, Eleanor / Kyle, Stuart / McInnes, Iain B / Oliver, Susan / Ormerod, Anthony / Smith, Catherine / Symmons, Deborah / Waldron, Nicola / McHugh, Neil J / Anonymous440765. ·Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Upper Borough Walls, Bath BA1 1RL, UK. neil.mchugh@rnhrd.nhs.uk. ·Rheumatology (Oxford) · Pubmed #23887065.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial New GRAPPA and EULAR recommendations for the management of psoriatic arthritis. 2017

Coates, Laura C / Gossec, Laure / Ramiro, Sofia / Mease, Philip / van der Heijde, Désirée / Smolen, Josef S / Ritchlin, Christopher / Kavanaugh, Arthur. ·Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds and Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds UK. · Department of rheumatology, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06; AP-HP, Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, France. · Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Swedish Medical Center Seattle, WA, USA. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine 3, Medical University of Vienna. · 2nd Department of Medicine, Hietzing Hospital, Vienna, Austria. · Allergy, Immunology & Rheumatology Division, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY. · Division of Rheumatology, Allergy Immunology, University of California San Diego, USA. ·Rheumatology (Oxford) · Pubmed #28077693.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial New GRAPPA recommendations for the management of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: process, challenges and implementation. 2016

Coates, L C / Murphy, R / Helliwell, P S. ·Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, U.K. · Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, U.K. · Department of Dermatology, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals and Sheffield Children's Hospital, Sheffield, U.K. · Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Bradford, U.K. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #27317273.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Classification and categorisation of psoriatic arthritis. 2008

Coates, Laura C / Helliwell, Philip S. · ·Clin Rheumatol · Pubmed #18629574.

ABSTRACT: For over 30 years, investigators have used the simple but non-validated classification criteria suggested by Moll and Wright. Several authors have suggested modifications to these but most remain unvalidated or require human leukocyte antigen analysis. Now, a worldwide initiative has developed new criteria which include both clinical and radiological features. These will require further study before they are fully adopted but their improved performance should result in less variation between study cohorts. The recurring question of disease heterogeneity continues to occupy researchers in this field. Despite recent pleas to abandon the original five sub-groups, a case can be made for retaining at least the two sub-groups of peripheral and axial disease and, possibly, splitting the peripheral disease into oligo- and poly-arthritis.

8 Review Clinical management of psoriatic arthritis. 2018

Van den Bosch, Filip / Coates, Laura. ·Department of Rheumatology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium; VIB Center for Inflammation Research, Unit for Molecular Immunology and Inflammation, Department of Internal Medicine, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium. Electronic address: filip.vandenbosch@ugent.be. · Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology, and Musculoskeletal Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. ·Lancet · Pubmed #29893227.

ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis, or the broader term psoriatic disease, refers to an inflammatory disorder that affects multiple organs, including the skin and joints, and that also has related extra-articular manifestations and can have comorbidities. Patients with psoriatic disease have a substantial clinical burden. Early identification leading to timely diagnosis and treatment is crucial to prevent long-term structural damage and disability and the associated socioeconomic consequences. The increase in therapeutic options, such as disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, both biological and targeted synthetic, has revolutionised the treatment of skin and joint disease, and has prompted clinicians to use the full clinical picture of an individual patient to make rational treatment decisions. Current research is also focused on treatment strategies, including treat to target, early remission-induction, and tapering.

9 Review Considerations for the definition of remission criteria in psoriatic arthritis. 2018

Mease, Philip J / Coates, Laura C. ·Swedish Medical Center, University of Washington, Seattle, United States of America. Electronic address: pmease@philipmease.com. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom; Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. ·Semin Arthritis Rheum · Pubmed #29566966.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an autoimmune disease that can cause progressive structural damage of the joints and irreversible disability. The potentially achievable results of biologic therapy for PsA has led to the view that disease remission should be the goal of treatment. However, the heterogeneity of disease manifestations and need for validated outcome measures makes defining remission in PsA challenging. This article evaluates proposed criteria for defining remission in PsA and discusses how these criteria can be applied in clinical practice. METHODS: A primary literature search was conducted in PubMed to identify articles discussing potential PsA treatment goals or targets, including minimal disease activity. English-language publications from the last 10 years were included in this assessment. RESULTS: There are 5 clinical domains in PsA that must be considered when evaluating remission: synovitis, enthesitis, dactylitis, spondylitis, and psoriasis/nail psoriasis. Due to variability in the completeness of remission and time to achieve remission with different therapies between these domains, remission should be measured clinically through a combination of objective measures, or a composite assessment tool. Composite measures are more efficient than unidimensional instruments in measuring remission, but remission rates differ between the available composite indices. CONCLUSION: Although the concept of remission as a treatment goal in PsA is gaining acceptance among rheumatologists, further work is necessary to develop a broadly acceptable definition of remission.

10 Review Current concepts and unmet needs in psoriatic arthritis. 2018

Mahmood, Farrouq / Coates, Laura C / Helliwell, Philip S. ·Clinical Research Fellow in Rheumatology, Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Bradford, UK. · Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic & Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Chapeltown Road, Leeds, LS7 4SA, UK. p.helliwell@leeds.ac.uk. ·Clin Rheumatol · Pubmed #29134513.

ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic inflammatory arthritis that is part of the spondyloarthropathy group of rheumatic diseases and has associated co-morbidities. It can present with various clinical manifestations making diagnosis and treatment challenging, resulting in significant disability and reduced quality of life for patients. Whilst there have been advances in understanding the pathogenic mechanisms of the disease which have resulted in targeted therapies, there is still the need for further studies as some patients fail or are intolerant of current therapies. Better identification of early disease and knowledge of prognostic markers would enable clinicians to initiate appropriate therapy with the expectation that early aggressive treatment will minimise joint damage progression. Improved knowledge of the condition would also enable clinicians to better tailor specific treatment strategies for each of the various clinical domains in psoriatic arthritis.

11 Review The Changing Face of Clinical Trials in Psoriatic Arthritis. 2017

Ogdie, Alexis / Coates, Laura. ·Division of Rheumatology, Departments of Medicine and Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, White Building Room 5023, 3400 Civic Center Blvd, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA. Alexis.ogdie@uphs.upenn.edu. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Chapeltown Road, Leeds, LS7 4SA, UK. ·Curr Rheumatol Rep · Pubmed #28365920.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF THE REVIEW: We will address current treatment and unmet needs in psoriatic arthritis (PsA), examine existing randomized controlled trials (RCTs), and consider options for new trial designs and challenges in their implementation. RECENT FINDINGS: While therapeutic options for PsA have rapidly increased, there continues to be a need for clinical trials to test new therapies and establish optimal treatment strategies in order to improve the care for patients with PsA. In addition, more data is needed on how to select the best therapy for a given patient in clinical practice. Consideration of alternative outcome measures is also needed. Despite the rapid expansion in the number of therapy options available, there is still much to be learned about how to treat the individual patient with PsA.

12 Review Psoriatic arthritis: state of the art review. 2017

Coates, Laura C / Helliwell, Philip S. ·Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK and Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, UK. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK and Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, UK p.helliwell@leeds.ac.uk. ·Clin Med (Lond) · Pubmed #28148584.

ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) accounts for around 20% of referrals to the early arthritis clinic and presents a significant diagnostic and management challenge. Early diagnosis is important to prevent long term functional disability and to ensure optimal management of arthritis and key comorbidities. From the rheumatologist's perspective, the differential diagnosis includes rheumatoid arthritis, gout and other inflammatory arthritides. Once diagnosed, it is essential to assess the disease fully, including arthritis, enthesitis, dactylitis, skin/nail disease and axial involvement. Using this information, appropriate treatment can be planned using therapies that are effective at treating the relevant domains of disease. Despite poor data, traditional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs are commonly used and have been effective in observational studies. Following tumour necrosis factor inhibitors, which have proven excellent efficacy in multiple domains of PsA, new biologics are available or in development and will improve treatment options for people with refractory PsA.

13 Review Psoriatic arthritis: lessons from imaging studies and implications for therapy. 2017

Mathew, Ashish J / Coates, Laura C / Danda, Debashish / Conaghan, Philip G. ·a Clinical Immunology & Rheumatology , Christian Medical College , Vellore , India. · b Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine , University of Leeds & NIHR Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds , UK. ·Expert Rev Clin Immunol · Pubmed #27487860.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Modern imaging may aid in the diagnosis, prognosis and monitoring of therapeutic response in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Detection of osteitis and technical advances like whole body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exemplify the value of this technology. Areas covered: Ultrasound (US) provides a clinic-based tool for evaluating both joint pathologies and extra-articular structures (especially enthesitis) including skin and nail disease. Recent studies have demonstrated subclinical disease in psoriasis without arthritis, as well as in PsA, with implications for diagnosis and treatment classification. Modern imaging can also facilitate decisions on tapering of expensive biologics, though real-world clinical studies are still lacking. Expert commentary: The increase in novel PsA therapies should increase the utilization of modern imaging, providing both increased validation of imaging biomarkers as well as responsive outcome measures.

14 Review Management of psoriatic arthritis in 2016: a comparison of EULAR and GRAPPA recommendations. 2016

Gossec, Laure / Coates, Laura C / de Wit, Maarten / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Ramiro, Sofia / Mease, Philip J / Ritchlin, Christopher T / van der Heijde, Désirée / Smolen, Josef S. ·Sorbonne Universités, Université Pierre and Marie Curie - Paris 6, 4 Place Jussieu 75005, Paris, France; and at the Service de Rhumatologie, L'Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, Pitié Salpêtrière Hôpital, 47-83 Boulevard de l'Hôpital, 75013, Paris, France. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Leeds; and at the Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, 2nd Floor, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Chapeltown Road, Leeds, LS7 4SA, UK. · Department of Medical Humanities, Vrije Universiteit Medical Centre, POBox 7057, 1007 MB Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Division of Rheumatology, Allergy &Immunology, Department of Medicine, University of California San Diego School of Medicine, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0656, USA. · Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Centre, POBox 9600, 2300 RC Leiden, Netherlands. · Rheumatology Clinical Research Division, Swedish Medical Center, 601 Broadway, Suite 600, Seattle, Washington 98102, USA. · Division of Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, BOX 695, Rochester, New York 14642, USA. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine 3, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna, Austria; and at the 2nd Department of Medicine, Hietzing Hospital, Wolkersbergenstraße 1, 1130 Vienna, Austria. ·Nat Rev Rheumatol · Pubmed #27829672.

ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a heterogeneous, potentially severe disease. Many therapeutic agents are now available for PsA, but treatment decisions are not always straightforward. To assist in this decision making, two sets of recommendations for the management of PsA were published in 2016 by international organizations - the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) and the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA). In both sets of recommendations, the heterogeneity of PsA is recognized and the place of various drugs in the therapeutic armamentarium is discussed. Such agents include conventional DMARDs, such as methotrexate, and targeted therapies including biologic agents, such as ustekinumab, secukinumab and TNF inhibitors, or the targeted synthetic drug apremilast. The proposed sequential use of these drugs, as well as some other aspects of PsA management, differ between the two sets of recommendations. This disparity is partly the result of a difference in the evaluation process; the focus of EULAR was primarily rheumatological, whereas that of GRAPPA was balanced between the rheumatological and dermatological aspects of disease. In this Perspectives article, we address the similarities and differences between these two sets of recommendations and the implications for patient management.

15 Review Implementing the findings of the TICOPA trial in clinical practice: challenges in implementation and how information technology can bridge the gap. 2016

Coates, Laura C. ·Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds; and Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, UK. l.c.coates@leeds.ac.uk. ·Clin Exp Rheumatol · Pubmed #27762193.

ABSTRACT: As in rheumatoid arthritis, treating to target in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) has been shown to improve outcomes over standard therapy. As a result of this, the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) updated recommendations for the management of PsA now recommend a treat-to-target approach for all patients with PsA. However, translating the results of this research remains challenging in clinical practice. Prolonged consultation time associated with implementing this into practice can be minimised using a simple to calculate but inclusive target for treatment and assessing this within information technology (IT) systems. IT systems can combine physician and patient-reported outcomes, use algorithms to calculate any target and even be used to suggest follow up times based on previous data. Utilising these tools can help to make optimal treatment of arthritis feasible in routine clinical practice.

16 Review Psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis: Is all inflammation the same? 2016

Coates, Laura C / FitzGerald, Oliver / Helliwell, Philip S / Paul, Carle. ·Faculty of Medicine and Health, Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, 2nd Floor, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Harehills Lane, Leeds LS7 4SA, UK. · Department of Rheumatology, St Vincent's University Hospital and Conway Institute, University College, Dublin, Ireland. · Faculty of Medicine and Health, Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, 2nd Floor, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Harehills Lane, Leeds LS7 4SA, UK. Electronic address: P.Helliwell@leeds.ac.uk. · Larrey Hospital, Paul Sabatier University, Toulouse, France. ·Semin Arthritis Rheum · Pubmed #27388027.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To review the pathophysiology, co-morbidities, and therapeutic options for psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis in order to further understand the similarities and differences in treatment paradigms in the management of each disease. New targets for individualized therapeutic decisions are also identified with the aim of improving therapeutic outcome and reducing toxicity. SEARCH STRATEGY: Using the PubMed database, we searched literature published from 2000 to 2015 using combinations of the key words "psoriasis," "psoriatic arthritis," "rheumatoid arthritis," "pathogenesis," "immunomodulation," and "treatment." INCLUSION AND EXCLUSION CRITERIA: This was a non-systematic review and there were no formal inclusion and exclusion criteria. DATA EXTRACTION: Abstracts identified in the search were screened for relevance and articles considered appropriate evaluated further. References within these selected articles were also screened. Information was extracted from 198 articles for inclusion in this report. DATA SYNTHESIS: There was no formal data synthesis. Articles were reviewed and summarized according to disease area (psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis). HEADLINE RESULTS: The pathophysiology of psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis involves chronic inflammation mediated by pro-inflammatory cytokines. Dysfunction in integrated signaling pathways affecting different constituents of the immune system result in varying clinical features in the three diseases. Co-morbidities, including cardiovascular disease, malignancies, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease are increased. Increased understanding of the immunopathogenesis allowed development of targeted treatments; however, despite a variety of potentially predictive genetic, protein and cellular biomarkers, there is still significant unmet need in these three inflammatory disorders.

17 Review Treating to target in psoriatic arthritis: how to implement in clinical practice. 2016

Coates, Laura C / Helliwell, Philip S. ·Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, UK. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #26672066.

ABSTRACT: Treating to target is becoming the standard of care in many medical specialities, including rheumatology. The Tight Control of Psoriatic Arthritis (TICOPA) trial has recently provided evidence of the benefit of treating to target in psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and the revised European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations on the management of PsA suggest this approach. However, the question of the optimal measure to use and the practicalities of incorporating this into routine clinical practice remain problematic.

18 Review Outcome Measures in Psoriatic Arthritis. 2015

Coates, Laura. ·Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds and Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Chapeltown Road, Leeds LS7 4SA, UK; Division of Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA. Electronic address: l.c.coates@leeds.ac.uk. ·Rheum Dis Clin North Am · Pubmed #26476227.

ABSTRACT: In the last decade, there have been significant advances in outcome measure research in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). In this article, the outcome measures for disease activity in individual key domains of PsA are reviewed, followed by the key patient-reported outcome measures of function, quality of life, fatigue, and a new measure for disease impact, the psoriatic arthritis impact of disease. New research into composite measures of psoriatic disease is summarized, including response measures and proposed cutoff points for disease activity. Finally, the key future issues in outcome measurement in PsA are addressed.

19 Review The involvement of the spine in psoriatic arthritis. 2015

Baraliakos, Xenofon / Coates, Laura C / Braun, Juergen. ·Rheumazentrum Ruhrgebiet Herne, and Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany. baraliakos@me.com. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds and Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, UK. · Rheumazentrum Ruhrgebiet, Herne, and Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany. ·Clin Exp Rheumatol · Pubmed #26471338.

ABSTRACT: Although different classification criteria have been developed for psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and spondyloarthritis (SpA), a clear distinction is still not always possible in daily practice. In addition, clinical examination of patients initially diagnosed as PsA due to peripheral symptoms and skin lesions may also show inflammation in the axial skeleton causing inflammatory back pain, stiffness and changes on imaging including sacroiliitis, spondylitis and syndesmophyte formation, similar to what is known from ankylosing spondylitis (AS), the prototype of SpA. However, and in contrast to patients with AS, the long-term radiographic progression of patients with axial disease in PsA seems to be rather independent from spinal mobility. If axial symptoms predominate, diagnosis and classification can be made as axSpA - with or without psoriasis. Furthermore, also the role of HLA-B27 appears to be different in patients with PsA. Overall, the most data about axial involvement in SpA come from AS and axSpA studies, while data about the axial involvement in PsA is limited. Finally, there are no approved therapies for treatment of axial PsA at present, despite significant clinical morbidity. In recent years, anti-TNF therapies have revolutionised the management of ax-SpA. The new GRAPPA treatment recommendations have given specific management advice for patients with axial involvement based on literature from AS and axial SpA. This review aims to give an overview of the existing evidence, the clinical and imaging presentation, and therapeutic consequences of axial involvement in patients with PsA.

20 Review Therapy strategies in psoriatic arthritis. 2015

Coates, Laura C. ·Leeds Inst. of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, UK and Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds Teaching Hospitals Trust, UK and Div. of Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology, Univ. of Rochester Medical Center, USA. ·Clin Exp Rheumatol · Pubmed #26470949.

ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a heterogeneous condition with a myriad of different clinical presentations. It commonly affects the skin and musculoskeletal system causing psoriasis, peripheral arthritis, axial arthritis, enthesitis and dactylitis. Many patients also have related conditions, such as those within the metabolic syndrome and associated spondyloarthritis (SpA) conditions including inflammatory bowel disease and uveitis. Any therapeutic strategy must be tailored to the individual patient, taking into account her/his complete clinical presentation and comorbidities. New treatment recommendations from the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) provide evidence based recommendations on effective therapies for the management of each different manifestation of PsA, and how treatment may be affected by comorbidities (1). However, the limited evidence comparing different treatment strategies in PsA is recognised as a limitation in these recommendations and further information is detailed below.

21 Review Treat to target in psoriatic arthritis-evidence, target, research agenda. 2015

Coates, Laura C / Helliwell, Philip S. ·Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK, l.c.coates@leeds.ac.uk. ·Curr Rheumatol Rep · Pubmed #25903668.

ABSTRACT: This article summarises the evidence on treating to target (T2T) in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The evidence from the recent European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) literature search in SpA is reviewed. This article found no studies in SpA in 2011 which compared a T2T approach against standard care in a randomised controlled trial (RCT). One of the issues raised in PsA is what target to use. The minimal disease activity (MDA) criteria were developed specifically for PsA and have been validated in observational and interventional cohorts. These have now been utilised in the Tight Control of PsA (TICOPA) study comparing T2T to standard care in early PsA providing the first evidence that T2T in PsA can improve outcomes. To translate this into clinical practice in PsA, patient education and feasibility are key. Future research must address the optimal therapies to be used within a T2T framework which will need to take subtype of PsA into account.

22 Review Treating to target in psoriatic arthritis. 2015

Coates, Laura C. ·NIHR Clinical Lecturer in Rheumatology, Leeds Institute of Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds and Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, UK. ·Curr Opin Rheumatol · Pubmed #25603035.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory arthritis causing significant joint damage and impaired quality of life. A treat to target approach has revolutionized the care of patients with rheumatoid arthritis over the last decade. There is now increasing interest in a similar approach in PsA, as it seems that ongoing joint inflammation predicts subsequent damage and loss of function. RECENT FINDINGS: A 2011 European League Against Rheumatism review highlighted a lack of evidence for treat to target in PsA. However, with the development of the minimal disease activity criteria, a target is available and preliminary results from the first randomized treat-to target study (Tight Control of PsA Study) using these criteria have shown significant benefit in joint and skin disease activity and patient-reported outcomes. SUMMARY: Early evidence has shown the potential benefit of a treat-to-target approach in PsA and further research is needed to optimize treatment pathways for all subtypes of the disease.

23 Review Optimisation of rheumatology indices: dactylitis and enthesitis in psoriatic arthritis. 2014

Ferguson, E G / Coates, L C. ·Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Chapeltown Road, Leeds, LS7 4SA, UK. l.c.coates@leeds.ac.uk. ·Clin Exp Rheumatol · Pubmed #25365099.

ABSTRACT: Outcome measures are a key part of study design and clinical assessment. Enthesitis and dactylitis are typical features of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and the spondyloarthritides but traditionally scoring systems for enthesitis have mainly been validated in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). There are many scoring systems which are not validated used for dactylitis although newer validated scores are now available. Recently there have been advances in composite scores that include enthesitis and dactylitis to assess disease activity. These are currently being validated further and have not yet been tested in routine clinical practice.

24 Review Drug therapies for peripheral joint disease in psoriatic arthritis: a systematic review. 2014

Acosta Felquer, Maria Laura / Coates, Laura C / Soriano, Enrique R / Ranza, Roberto / Espinoza, Luis R / Helliwell, Philip S / FitzGerald, Oliver / McHugh, Neil / Roussou, Euthalia / Mease, Philip J. ·From the Sección Reumatología, Servicio de Clínica Médica, Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina; Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK; Sección Reumatología, Servicio de Clínica Médica, Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires; Academic Unit of Rheumatology, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Uberlândia, MG, Brazil; Section of Rheumatology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA; Academic Unit of Musculoskeletal Disease, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Leeds, UK; Department of Rheumatology, St. Vincent's University Hospital and Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, University College, Dublin, Ireland; Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of Bath, Bath, UK; Barking Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals, NHS Trust; and Queens Mary's University of London, London, UK; and Swedish Medical Center, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington, USA.M.L. Acosta Felquer, MD, Sección Reumatología, Servicio de Clínica Médica, Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires; L.C. Coates, MRCP, PhD, NIHR Clinical Lecturer, Leeds Institute; E.R. Soriano, MD, MSC, Jefe Sección Reumatología, Servicio de Clínica Médica, Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires; R. Ranza, MD, Academic Unit of Rheumatology, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia; L.R. Espinoza, MD, Section of Rheumatology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center; P.S. Helliwell, DM, PhD, Academic Unit of Musculoskeletal Disease, Chapel Allerton Hospital; O. FitzGerald, MD, Department of Rheumatology, St. Vincent's University Hospital and Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, University College; N. McHugh, FRCP, MD, Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of Bath; E. Roussou, MD, Consultant Rheumatologist, Barking Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals, NHS Trust and Clinical Senior Lecturer, Queens Mary's University of London; P.J. Mease, MD, Rhe ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #25362711.

ABSTRACT: In 2009, GRAPPA published their first evidence-based recommendations for the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Since then, new information has been published and drugs developed. We summarize evidence for the efficacy of available treatments for peripheral joint involvement in PsA. We performed a systematic review of current literature on the efficacy of different therapies, management, and therapeutic strategies for peripheral arthritis involvement in PsA, in order to provide information for the development of the new GRAPPA treatment recommendations.

25 Review Systematic review of treatments for psoriatic arthritis: 2014 update for the GRAPPA. 2014

Coates, Laura C / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Ritchlin, Christopher T / Anonymous5640810. ·From the Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK; University of California, San Diego, California; and Allergy, Immunology, and Rheumatology Division, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York, USA.L.C. Coates, MRCP, PhD, NIHR Clinical Lecturer, Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds; A. Kavanaugh, MD, University of California; C.T. Ritchlin, MD, MPH, Allergy, Immunology, and Rheumatology Division, University of Rochester Medical Center. Dr. Kavanaugh and Dr. Ritchlin contributed equally to this report. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #25362710.

ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disorder characterized by the association of arthritis and periarticular inflammation in patients with psoriasis. In addition to a heterogeneous and variable clinical course, PsA is complex and multifaceted and may include prominent involvement in the peripheral and axial diarthrodial joints, the skin and nails, and in periarticular structures such as entheses. Simultaneous inflammation in the skin and musculoskeletal structures in a single patient, a relatively common scenario, often leads to marked decrease in function and quality of life. Thus, it is essential for the clinician to document the extent of disease involvement and craft a therapeutic plan that addresses the different domains of disease. In an effort to update previous treatment recommendations developed by the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA), several evidence-based, systemic reviews of therapies for PsA were completed, analyzed, and circulated for consensus.

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