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Psoriasis: HELP
Articles by Oliver M. FitzGerald
Based on 116 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, O. FitzGerald wrote the following 116 articles about Psoriasis.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5
1 Guideline Treating axial spondyloarthritis and peripheral spondyloarthritis, especially psoriatic arthritis, to target: 2017 update of recommendations by an international task force. 2018

Smolen, Josef S / Schöls, Monika / Braun, Jürgen / Dougados, Maxime / FitzGerald, Oliver / Gladman, Dafna D / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Landewé, Robert / Mease, Philip / Sieper, Joachim / Stamm, Tanja / Wit, Maarten de / Aletaha, Daniel / Baraliakos, Xenofon / Betteridge, Neil / Bosch, Filip van den / Coates, Laura C / Emery, Paul / Gensler, Lianne S / Gossec, Laure / Helliwell, Philip / Jongkees, Merryn / Kvien, Tore K / Inman, Robert D / McInnes, Iain B / Maccarone, Mara / Machado, Pedro M / Molto, Anna / Ogdie, Alexis / Poddubnyy, Denis / Ritchlin, Christopher / Rudwaleit, Martin / Tanew, Adrian / Thio, Bing / Veale, Douglas / Vlam, Kurt de / van der Heijde, Désirée. ·Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine 3, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · 2nd Department of Medicine, Hietzing Hospital, Vienna, Austria. · Health Consult, Vienna, Austria. · Rheumazentrum Ruhrgebiet, Ruhr-University Bochum, Herne, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France. · Department of Rheumatology, St Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · Division of Rheumatology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Rheumatology, University of California, San Diego, CA, USA. · Amsterdam Rheumatology & Immunology Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Division of Rheumatology Research, Swedish-Providence St. Joseph Health System, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. · Department of Gastroenterology, Infectiology and Rheumatology, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Section for Outcomes Research, Center for Medical Statistics, Informatics, and Intelligent Systems, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Medical Humanities, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Neil Betteridge Associates, UK. · Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. · Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Leeds, UK. · Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Department of Rheumatology, UPMC Univ Paris 06, GRC-UPMC 08 (EEMOIS); AP-HP, Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, France. · Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · Seayn Medical, Voorschoten, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · University Health Network and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · University of Glasgow, College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences, Glasgow, UK. · A.DI.PSO. (Associazione per la Difesa degli Psoriasici)-PE.Pso.POF (Pan European Psoriasis Patients' Organization Forum), Rome, Italy. · Centre for Rheumatology & MRC Centre for Neuromuscular Diseases, University College London, London, UK. · Division of Rheumatology, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania, PA, USA. · German Rheumatism Research Centrer, Berlin, Germany. · Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology Division, University of Rochester Medical Center Rochester, New York, NY, USA. · Division of Internal Medicine and Rheumatology, Klinikum Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Dermatology, Erasmus Medical Center, Erasmus University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Klinikum Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany. · Division of Rheumatology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #28684559.

ABSTRACT: Therapeutic targets have been defined for axial and peripheral spondyloarthritis (SpA) in 2012, but the evidence for these recommendations was only of indirect nature. These recommendations were re-evaluated in light of new insights. Based on the results of a systematic literature review and expert opinion, a task force of rheumatologists, dermatologists, patients and a health professional developed an update of the 2012 recommendations. These underwent intensive discussions, on site voting and subsequent anonymous electronic voting on levels of agreement with each item. A set of 5 overarching principles and 11 recommendations were developed and voted on. Some items were present in the previous recommendations, while others were significantly changed or newly formulated. The 2017 task force arrived at a single set of recommendations for axial and peripheral SpA, including psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The most exhaustive discussions related to whether PsA should be assessed using unidimensional composite scores for its different domains or multidimensional scores that comprise multiple domains. This question was not resolved and constitutes an important research agenda. There was broad agreement, now better supported by data than in 2012, that remission/inactive disease and, alternatively, low/minimal disease activity are the principal targets for the treatment of PsA. As instruments to assess the patients on the path to the target, the Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS) for axial SpA and the Disease Activity index for PSoriatic Arthritis (DAPSA) and Minimal Disease Activity (MDA) for PsA were recommended, although not supported by all. Shared decision-making between the clinician and the patient was seen as pivotal to the process. The task force defined the treatment target for SpA as remission or low disease activity and developed a large research agenda to further advance the field.

2 Guideline Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis 2015 Treatment Recommendations for Psoriatic Arthritis. 2016

Coates, Laura C / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Mease, Philip J / Soriano, Enrique R / Laura Acosta-Felquer, Maria / Armstrong, April W / Bautista-Molano, Wilson / Boehncke, Wolf-Henning / Campbell, Willemina / Cauli, Alberto / Espinoza, Luis R / FitzGerald, Oliver / Gladman, Dafna D / Gottlieb, Alice / Helliwell, Philip S / Husni, M Elaine / Love, Thorvardur J / Lubrano, Ennio / McHugh, Neil / Nash, Peter / Ogdie, Alexis / Orbai, Ana-Maria / Parkinson, Andrew / O'Sullivan, Denis / Rosen, Cheryl F / Schwartzman, Sergio / Siegel, Evan L / Toloza, Sergio / Tuong, William / Ritchlin, Christopher T. ·Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine and University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · University of California at San Diego. · Swedish Medical Center and University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington. · Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina. · University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles. · Hospital Militar Central and Universidad Militar Nueva Grenada, Bogotá, Colombia. · Geneva University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland. · Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · University of Cagliari, Monserrato Campus, Cagliari, Italy. · Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans. · St. Vincent's University Hospital, The Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, and University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. · University of Toronto and Toronto Western Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine and University of Leeds, Leeds, UK, and Bradford Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Bradford, UK. · Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio. · University of Iceland and Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. · University of Molise, Campobasso, Italy. · Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Bath, UK. · University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Chapel Allerton Hospital, Leeds, UK. · St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · Toronto Western Hospital and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, New York. · Arthritis and Rheumatism Associates, Rockville, Maryland. · Ministry of Health, San Fernando del Valle de Catamarca, Argentina. · University of California, Davis. · University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York. ·Arthritis Rheumatol · Pubmed #26749174.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To update the 2009 Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) treatment recommendations for the spectrum of manifestations affecting patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). METHODS: GRAPPA rheumatologists, dermatologists, and PsA patients drafted overarching principles for the management of PsA, based on consensus achieved at face-to-face meetings and via online surveys. We conducted literature reviews regarding treatment for the key domains of PsA (arthritis, spondylitis, enthesitis, dactylitis, skin disease, and nail disease) and convened a new group to identify pertinent comorbidities and their effect on treatment. Finally, we drafted treatment recommendations for each of the clinical manifestations and assessed the level of agreement for the overarching principles and treatment recommendations among GRAPPA members, using an online questionnaire. RESULTS: Six overarching principles had ≥80% agreement among both health care professionals (n = 135) and patient research partners (n = 10). We developed treatment recommendations and a schema incorporating these principles for arthritis, spondylitis, enthesitis, dactylitis, skin disease, nail disease, and comorbidities in the setting of PsA, using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation process. Agreement of >80% was reached for approval of the individual recommendations and the overall schema. CONCLUSION: We present overarching principles and updated treatment recommendations for the key manifestations of PsA, including related comorbidities, based on a literature review and consensus of GRAPPA members (rheumatologists, dermatologists, other health care providers, and patient research partners). Further updates are anticipated as the therapeutic landscape in PsA evolves.

3 Guideline European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the management of psoriatic arthritis with pharmacological therapies: 2015 update. 2016

Gossec, L / Smolen, J S / Ramiro, S / de Wit, M / Cutolo, M / Dougados, M / Emery, P / Landewé, R / Oliver, S / Aletaha, D / Betteridge, N / Braun, J / Burmester, G / Cañete, J D / Damjanov, N / FitzGerald, O / Haglund, E / Helliwell, P / Kvien, T K / Lories, R / Luger, T / Maccarone, M / Marzo-Ortega, H / McGonagle, D / McInnes, I B / Olivieri, I / Pavelka, K / Schett, G / Sieper, J / van den Bosch, F / Veale, D J / Wollenhaupt, J / Zink, A / van der Heijde, D. ·Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Institut Pierre Louis d'Epidémiologie et de Santé Publique, GRC-UPMC 08 (EEMOIS), Paris, France Department of rheumatology, AP-HP, Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, France. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine 3, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria Second Department of Medicine, Hietzing Hospital, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands. · EULAR, representing People with Arthritis/Rheumatism in Europe (PARE), London, UK. · Research Laboratory and Clinical Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genova, Viale Benedetto, Italy. · Medicine Faculty, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France Rheumatology B Department, APHP, Cochin Hospital, Paris, France. · Leeds NIHR Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, LTHT, Leeds, UK Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · Department of Clinical Immunology & Rheumatology, Amsterdam Rheumatology Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands Atrium Medical Center, Heerlen, The Netherlands. · North Devon, UK. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine 3, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Rheumazentrum Ruhrgebiet, Herne and Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Herne, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Charité-University Medicine Berlin, Germany. · Arthritis Unit, Department of Rheumatology, Hospital Clínic and IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Spain. · Belgrade University School of Medicine, Belgrade, Serbia. · Department of Rheumatology, St. Vincent's University Hospital and Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. · Section of Rheumatology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden Sweden and School of Business, Engineering and Science, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden. · Section of Musculoskeletal Disease, Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Laboratory of Tissue Homeostasis and Disease, Skeletal Biology and Engineering Research Center, KU Leuven, Belgium Division of Rheumatology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Münster, Münster, Germany. · A.DI.PSO. (Associazione per la Difesa degli Psoriasici)-PE.Pso.POF (Pan European Psoriasis Patients' Organization Forum), Rome, Italy. · Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Rheumatology Department of Lucania, San Carlo Hospital of Potenza and Madonna delle Grazie Hospital of Matera, Potenza, Italy. · Institute and Clinic of Rheumatology Charles University Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Internal Medicine 3, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité, Berlin, Germany. · Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. · Centre for Arthritis and Rheumatic Disease, Dublin Academic Medical Centre, St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · Schoen Klinik Hamburg, Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, German Rheumatism Research Centre Berlin, Charité-University Medicine Berlin, Germany. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #26644232.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Since the publication of the European League Against Rheumatism recommendations for the pharmacological treatment of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in 2012, new evidence and new therapeutic agents have emerged. The objective was to update these recommendations. METHODS: A systematic literature review was performed regarding pharmacological treatment in PsA. Subsequently, recommendations were formulated based on the evidence and the expert opinion of the 34 Task Force members. Levels of evidence and strengths of recommendations were allocated. RESULTS: The updated recommendations comprise 5 overarching principles and 10 recommendations, covering pharmacological therapies for PsA from non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), to conventional synthetic (csDMARD) and biological (bDMARD) disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, whatever their mode of action, taking articular and extra-articular manifestations of PsA into account, but focusing on musculoskeletal involvement. The overarching principles address the need for shared decision-making and treatment objectives. The recommendations address csDMARDs as an initial therapy after failure of NSAIDs and local therapy for active disease, followed, if necessary, by a bDMARD or a targeted synthetic DMARD (tsDMARD). The first bDMARD would usually be a tumour necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor. bDMARDs targeting interleukin (IL)12/23 (ustekinumab) or IL-17 pathways (secukinumab) may be used in patients for whom TNF inhibitors are inappropriate and a tsDMARD such as a phosphodiesterase 4-inhibitor (apremilast) if bDMARDs are inappropriate. If the first bDMARD strategy fails, any other bDMARD or tsDMARD may be used. CONCLUSIONS: These recommendations provide stakeholders with an updated consensus on the pharmacological treatment of PsA and strategies to reach optimal outcomes in PsA, based on a combination of evidence and expert opinion.

4 Guideline European League Against Rheumatism recommendations for the management of psoriatic arthritis with pharmacological therapies. 2012

Gossec, L / Smolen, J S / Gaujoux-Viala, C / Ash, Z / Marzo-Ortega, H / van der Heijde, D / FitzGerald, O / Aletaha, D / Balint, P / Boumpas, D / Braun, J / Breedveld, F C / Burmester, G / Cañete, J D / de Wit, M / Dagfinrud, H / de Vlam, K / Dougados, M / Helliwell, P / Kavanaugh, A / Kvien, T K / Landewé, R / Luger, T / Maccarone, M / McGonagle, D / McHugh, N / McInnes, I B / Ritchlin, C / Sieper, J / Tak, P P / Valesini, G / Vencovsky, J / Winthrop, K L / Zink, A / Emery, P / Anonymous2420706. ·Paris Descartes University, Paris, France. laure.gossec@cch.aphp.fr ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #21953336.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a clinically heterogeneous disease. Clear consensual treatment guidance focused on the musculoskeletal manifestations of PsA would be advantageous. The authors present European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the treatment of PsA with systemic or local (non-topical) symptomatic and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD). METHODS: The recommendations are based on evidence from systematic literature reviews performed for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), glucocorticoids, synthetic DMARD and biological DMARD. This evidence was discussed, summarised and recommendations were formulated by a task force comprising 35 representatives, and providing levels of evidence, strength of recommendations and levels of agreement. RESULTS: Ten recommendations were developed for treatment from NSAID through synthetic DMARD to biological agents, accounting for articular and extra-articular manifestations of PsA. Five overarching principles and a research agenda were defined. CONCLUSION: These recommendations are intended to provide rheumatologists, patients and other stakeholders with a consensus on the pharmacological treatment of PsA and strategies to reach optimal outcomes, based on combining evidence and expert opinion. The research agenda informs directions within EULAR and other communities interested in PsA.

5 Guideline Treatment recommendations for psoriatic arthritis. 2009

Ritchlin, C T / Kavanaugh, A / Gladman, D D / Mease, P J / Helliwell, P / Boehncke, W-H / de Vlam, K / Fiorentino, D / Fitzgerald, O / Gottlieb, A B / McHugh, N J / Nash, P / Qureshi, A A / Soriano, E R / Taylor, W J / Anonymous6760613. ·Clinical Immunology Research Center, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 695, Rochester, New York 14642, USA. christopher_ritchlin@urmc.rochester.edu ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #18952643.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To develop comprehensive recommendations for the treatment of the various clinical manifestations of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) based on evidence obtained from a systematic review of the literature and from consensus opinion. METHODS: Formal literature reviews of treatment for the most significant discrete clinical manifestations of PsA (skin and nails, peripheral arthritis, axial disease, dactylitis and enthesitis) were performed and published by members of the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA). Treatment recommendations were drafted for each of the clinical manifestations by rheumatologists, dermatologists and PsA patients based on the literature reviews and consensus opinion. The level of agreement for the individual treatment recommendations among GRAPPA members was assessed with an online questionnaire. RESULTS: Treatment recommendations were developed for peripheral arthritis, axial disease, psoriasis, nail disease, dactylitis and enthesitis in the setting of PsA. In rotal, 19 recommendations were drafted, and over 80% agreement was obtained on 16 of them. In addition, a grid that factors disease severity into each of the different disease manifestations was developed to help the clinician with treatment decisions for the individual patient from an evidenced-based perspective. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment recommendations for the cardinal physical manifestations of PsA were developed based on a literature review and consensus between rheumatologists and dermatologists. In addition, a grid was established to assist in therapeutic reasoning and decision making for individual patients. It is anticipated that periodic updates will take place using this framework as new data become available.

6 Editorial Editorial: emerging evidence for critical involvement of the interleukin-17 pathway in both psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. 2014

Fitzgerald, Oliver / Winchester, Robert. ·St. Vincent's University Hospital, The Conway Institute, and University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. ·Arthritis Rheumatol · Pubmed #24470140.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Review A systematic review of measurement properties of patient reported outcome measures in psoriatic arthritis: A GRAPPA-OMERACT initiative. 2018

Højgaard, Pil / Klokker, Louise / Orbai, Ana-Maria / Holmsted, Kim / Bartels, Else M / Leung, Ying Ying / Goel, Niti / de Wit, Maarten / Gladman, Dafna D / Mease, Philip / Dreyer, Lene / Kristensen, Lars E / FitzGerald, Oliver / Tillett, William / Gossec, Laure / Helliwell, Philip / Strand, Vibeke / Ogdie, Alexis / Terwee, Caroline B / Christensen, Robin. ·The Parker Institute, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg, Nordre Fasanvej 57, DK-2000, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Rheumatology, Rigshospitalet, Gentofte Hospital, Kildegaardsvej 28, 2900 Hellerup, Denmark. · The Parker Institute, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg, Nordre Fasanvej 57, DK-2000, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Baltimore, MD. · Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Singapore General Hospital, 20 College Rd, the Academia, S169856, Singapore. · Division of Rheumatology, Duke University School of Medicine, Advisory Services, QuintilesIMS, Durham, NC. · VU University Amsterdam, Department of Medical Humanities, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Division of Rheumatology and Krembil Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto Western Hospital, 399 Bathurst St, 1E-410B, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5T 2S8. · Division of Rheumatology Clinical Research, Swedish Medical Center, Seattle, WA. · Department of Rheumatology, St Vincent's University Hospital and Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, University College Dublin, Ireland. · Department of Rheumatology, Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of Bath, Bath, UK. · Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, GRC-08, Institut Pierre Louis d'Epidémiologie et de Santé Publique, Paris, France; Pitie-Salpétrière Hospital, AP-HP, Rheumatology Department, 47-83 Bd de l'Hopital, Paris 75013, France. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, 2nd Floor, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Harehills Lane, Leeds LS7 4SA, UK. · Division of Immunology/Rheumatology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA. · Division of Rheumatology, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. · VU University Medical Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · The Parker Institute, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg, Nordre Fasanvej 57, DK-2000, Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: Robin.christensen@regionh.dk. ·Semin Arthritis Rheum · Pubmed #29037523.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: An updated psoriatic arthritis (PsA) core outcome set (COS) for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was endorsed at the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) meeting in 2016. OBJECTIVES: To synthesize the evidence on measurement properties of patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) for PsA and thereby contribute to development of a PsA core outcome measurement set (COMS) as described by the OMERACT Filter 2.0. METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed in EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO on Jan 1, 2017 to identify full-text articles with an aim of assessing the measurement properties of PROMs in PsA. Two independent reviewers rated the quality of studies using the COnsensus based standards for the Selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) checklist, and performed a qualitative evidence synthesis. RESULTS: Fifty-five studies were included in the systematic review. Forty-four instruments and a total of 89 scales were analyzed. PROMs measuring COS domains with at least fair quality evidence for good validity and reliability (and no evidence for poor properties) included the Stockerau Activity Score for PsA (German), Psoriasis Symptom Inventory, visual analogue scale for Patient Global, 36 Item Short Form Health Survey Physical Function subscale, Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index, PsA Impact of Disease questionnaire, PsA Quality of Life questionnaire, VITACORA-19, Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy Fatigue scale and Social Role Participation Questionnaire. CONCLUSIONS: At least one PROM with some evidence for aspects of validity and reliability was available for six of the eight mandatory domains of the PsA COS.

8 Review Clinical Features of Psoriatic Arthritis: a Comprehensive Review of Unmet Clinical Needs. 2018

McArdle, Angela / Pennington, Stephen / FitzGerald, Oliver. ·Conway Institute of Biomedical Research, University College Dublin, Dublin, 4, Ireland. · Conway Institute of Biomedical Research, University College Dublin, Dublin, 4, Ireland. oliver.fitzgerald@ucd.ie. · Department of Rheumatology, St. Vincent's University Hospital and Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, University College Dublin, Elm Park, Dublin, 4, Ireland. oliver.fitzgerald@ucd.ie. ·Clin Rev Allergy Immunol · Pubmed #28748366.

ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a form of inflammatory arthritis (IA) affecting approximately 0.25% of the population. It is a heterogeneous disorder associated with joint damage, disability, disfiguring skin disease and in severe cases, premature mortality. Inherently irreversible and frequently progressive, the process of joint damage begins at, or before, the clinical onset of disease. Early recognition and intervention is thus crucial to patient outcome. At disease onset, however, PsA often resembles other forms of arthritis-especially rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Despite the similarities between PsA and RA, their distinctive pathologies require different treatments. For example, drugs that are effective in RA may not be effective in PsA and can even cause adverse effects. Since there is no currently validated test for PsA, the diagnosis is often missed or delayed and this has functional consequences for the patient. In the context of PsA and RA, making an accurate diagnosis is not the only challenge faced by rheumatologists. Choosing an effective and safe medication to manage the disease is another significant challenge and currently approximately 40% achieve meaningful responses such as minimal disease activity status. For the patient, several months may be lost as a result of trial and error testing-meanwhile, irreversible joint damage may occur. Clearly, more effective clinical tests are urgently needed to improve personalised patient care in PsA. Specifically, there is need to develop minimally invasive tests predictive of diagnosis, response to treatment and radiographic progression. In this review, we examined the biomarker development process, highlighted the importance of qualifying unmet clinical needs and emphasised the challenges that impede biomarker studies. We have compiled a comprehensive list of potentially clinically relevant biomarkers in PsA and provided a summary of proteomic technologies that might usefully support additional biomarker research in PsA.

9 Review Psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis: Is all inflammation the same? 2016

Coates, Laura C / FitzGerald, Oliver / Helliwell, Philip S / Paul, Carle. ·Faculty of Medicine and Health, Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, 2nd Floor, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Harehills Lane, Leeds LS7 4SA, UK. · Department of Rheumatology, St Vincent's University Hospital and Conway Institute, University College, Dublin, Ireland. · Faculty of Medicine and Health, Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, 2nd Floor, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Harehills Lane, Leeds LS7 4SA, UK. Electronic address: P.Helliwell@leeds.ac.uk. · Larrey Hospital, Paul Sabatier University, Toulouse, France. ·Semin Arthritis Rheum · Pubmed #27388027.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To review the pathophysiology, co-morbidities, and therapeutic options for psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis in order to further understand the similarities and differences in treatment paradigms in the management of each disease. New targets for individualized therapeutic decisions are also identified with the aim of improving therapeutic outcome and reducing toxicity. SEARCH STRATEGY: Using the PubMed database, we searched literature published from 2000 to 2015 using combinations of the key words "psoriasis," "psoriatic arthritis," "rheumatoid arthritis," "pathogenesis," "immunomodulation," and "treatment." INCLUSION AND EXCLUSION CRITERIA: This was a non-systematic review and there were no formal inclusion and exclusion criteria. DATA EXTRACTION: Abstracts identified in the search were screened for relevance and articles considered appropriate evaluated further. References within these selected articles were also screened. Information was extracted from 198 articles for inclusion in this report. DATA SYNTHESIS: There was no formal data synthesis. Articles were reviewed and summarized according to disease area (psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis). HEADLINE RESULTS: The pathophysiology of psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis involves chronic inflammation mediated by pro-inflammatory cytokines. Dysfunction in integrated signaling pathways affecting different constituents of the immune system result in varying clinical features in the three diseases. Co-morbidities, including cardiovascular disease, malignancies, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease are increased. Increased understanding of the immunopathogenesis allowed development of targeted treatments; however, despite a variety of potentially predictive genetic, protein and cellular biomarkers, there is still significant unmet need in these three inflammatory disorders.

10 Review Replication of a distinct psoriatic arthritis risk variant at the IL23R locus. 2016

Budu-Aggrey, Ashley / Bowes, John / Loehr, Sabine / Uebe, Steffen / Zervou, Maria I / Helliwell, Philip / Ryan, Anthony W / Kane, David / Korendowych, Eleanor / Giardina, Emiliano / Packham, Jonathan / McManus, Ross / FitzGerald, Oliver / McHugh, Neil / Behrens, Frank / Burkhardt, Harald / Huffmeier, Ulrike / Ho, Pauline / Martin, Javier / Castañeda, Santos / Goulielmos, George / Reis, Andre / Barton, Anne. ·Arthritis Research UK Centre for Genetics and Genomics, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, The University of Manchester, UK NIHR Manchester Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Central Manchester Foundation Trust and University of Manchester, Manchester Academy of Health Sciences, Manchester, UK. · Arthritis Research UK Centre for Genetics and Genomics, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, The University of Manchester, UK. · Institute of Human Genetics, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany. · Laboratory of Molecular Medicine and Human Genetics, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece. · NIHR-Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · Department of Clinical Medicine, Institute of Molecular Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. · Department of Rheumatology, Adelaide and Meath Hospital and Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. · Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases and Department Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of Bath, Bath, UK. · Department of Biomedicine and Prevention, University of Rome 'Tor Vergata' and Laboratory of Molecular Genetics UILDM, Fondazione Santa Lucia IRCCS, Rome, Italy. · Rheumatology Department, Haywood Hospital, Health Services Research Unit, Institute of Science and Technology in Medicine, Keele University, Stoke on Trent, UK. · Department of Rheumatology, St. Vincent's University Hospital, UCD School of Medicine and Medical Sciences and Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. · Division of Rheumatology and Fraunhofer IME-Project-Group Translational Medicine and Pharmacology, Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany. · Arthritis Research UK Centre for Genetics and Genomics, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, The University of Manchester, UK The Kellgren Centre for Rheumatology, Central Manchester Foundation Trust, NIHR Manchester Biomedical Research Centre, Manchester, UK. · CSIC, Instituto de Parasitologia y Biomedicina Lopez-Neyra, Granada, Spain. · Department of Rheumatology, Hospital La Princesa, IIS-IPrincesa, Madrid, Spain. · Arthritis Research UK Centre for Genetics and Genomics, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, The University of Manchester, UK NIHR Manchester Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Central Manchester Foundation Trust and University of Manchester, Manchester Academy of Health Sciences, Manchester, UK The Kellgren Centre for Rheumatology, Central Manchester Foundation Trust, NIHR Manchester Biomedical Research Centre, Manchester, UK. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #27016051.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Review Psoriatic arthritis: complexities, comorbidities and implications for the clinic. 2016

Haroon, Muhammad / FitzGerald, Oliver. ·a Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University Hospital Kerry and Clinical Senior Lecturer , University College Cork , Cork , Ireland. · b Department of Rheumatology , St Vincent's University Hospital , Dublin , Ireland. · c Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research , University College Dublin , Dublin , Ireland. ·Expert Rev Clin Immunol · Pubmed #26735626.

ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic immune-mediated inflammatory disease that affects peripheral joints, entheses and axial sites in addition to both skin and nails. There is considerable evidence to support the assertion that PsA is actually a multisystem disease. Contrary to earlier beliefs, PsA is not only common but also a potentially deforming and disabling disease. In addition to the characteristic extra-articular features, such as uveitis and inflammatory bowel disease, patients with PsA may also suffer from co-existing diseases, referred to as comorbidities. The presence of both extra-articular manifestations and comorbidities may have consequences for the treatment, prognosis and outcome of the disease, which frequently go unrecognized or undertreated. The following review article describes the complexities and comorbidities of PsA as well as their implications for the clinic.

12 Review Peripheral joint involvement in psoriatic arthritis patients. 2015

Acosta Felquer, Maria Laura / FitzGerald, Oliver. ·Rheumatology Section, Medical Services, Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Instituto Universitario Escuela de Medicina Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina. · Department of Rheumatology, St Vincent's University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin, Ireland. oliver.fitzgerald@ucd.ie. ·Clin Exp Rheumatol · Pubmed #26471860.

ABSTRACT: Peripheral joint involvement is a common, potentially debilitating feature of psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Joint involvement is commonly symmetrical and polyarticular similar to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) but it can also be oligoarticular, asymmetrical or occasionally monoarticular. Involvement of the distal interphalangeal joints is a feature which distinguishes PsA from RA. Articular involvement in PsA can be severe with a mutilating arthropathy found in about 5%. These patients are characterised clinically by digital shortening and on radiographs by erosion on both sides of the joint and/or osteolysis. Treatments targeting joint disease frequently reduces symptoms and signs resulting in prevention of damage progression.

13 Review Early biomarkers of joint damage in rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis. 2015

Mc Ardle, Angela / Flatley, Brian / Pennington, Stephen R / FitzGerald, Oliver. ·Conway Institute of Biomedical Research, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland. angela.mc-ardle@ucdconnect.ie. · Conway Institute of Biomedical Research, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland. brian.flatley@ucd.ie. · Conway Institute of Biomedical Research, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland. Stephen.Pennington@ucd.ie. · Conway Institute of Biomedical Research, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland. Oliver.Fitzgerald@ucd.ie. · Department of Rheumatology, St Vincent's University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4, Ireland. Oliver.Fitzgerald@ucd.ie. ·Arthritis Res Ther · Pubmed #26028339.

ABSTRACT: Joint destruction, as evidenced by radiographic findings, is a significant problem for patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis. Inherently irreversible and frequently progressive, the process of joint damage begins at and even before the clinical onset of disease. However, rheumatoid and psoriatic arthropathies are heterogeneous in nature and not all patients progress to joint damage. It is therefore important to identify patients susceptible to joint destruction in order to initiate more aggressive treatment as soon as possible and thereby potentially prevent irreversible joint damage. At the same time, the high cost and potential side effects associated with aggressive treatment mean it is also important not to over treat patients and especially those who, even if left untreated, would not progress to joint destruction. It is therefore clear that a protein biomarker signature that could predict joint damage at an early stage would support more informed clinical decisions on the most appropriate treatment regimens for individual patients. Although many candidate biomarkers for rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis have been reported in the literature, relatively few have reached clinical use and as a consequence the number of prognostic biomarkers used in rheumatology has remained relatively static for several years. It has become evident that a significant challenge in the transition of biomarker candidates to clinical diagnostic assays lies in the development of suitably robust biomarker assays, especially multiplexed assays, and their clinical validation in appropriate patient sample cohorts. Recent developments in mass spectrometry-based targeted quantitative protein measurements have transformed our ability to rapidly develop multiplexed protein biomarker assays. These advances are likely to have a significant impact on the validation of biomarkers in the future. In this review, we have comprehensively compiled a list of candidate biomarkers in rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis, evaluated the evidence for their potential as biomarkers of bone (joint) damage, and outlined how mass spectrometry-based targeted and multiplexed measurement of candidate biomarker proteins is likely to accelerate their clinical validation and the development of clinical diagnostic tests.

14 Review Concepts of pathogenesis in psoriatic arthritis: genotype determines clinical phenotype. 2015

FitzGerald, Oliver / Haroon, Muhammad / Giles, Jon T / Winchester, Robert. ·Department of Rheumatology, St Vincent's University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin, 4, Ireland. oliver.fitzgerald@ucd.ie. · Department of Rheumatology, St Vincent's University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin, 4, Ireland. mharoon301@hotmail.com. · Rheumatology Division, Department of Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, 630 West 168th Street, New York City, NY, 10032, USA. jtg2122@columbia.edu. · Rheumatology Division, Department of Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, 630 West 168th Street, New York City, NY, 10032, USA. rjw8@columbia.edu. ·Arthritis Res Ther · Pubmed #25948071.

ABSTRACT: This review focuses on the genetic features of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and their relationship to phenotypic heterogeneity in the disease, and addresses three questions: what do the recent studies on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) tell us about the genetic relationship between cutaneous psoriasis (PsO) and PsA - that is, is PsO a unitary phenotype; is PsA a genetically heterogeneous or homogeneous entity; and do the genetic factors implicated in determining susceptibility to PsA predict clinical phenotype? We first discuss the results from comparing the HLA typing of two PsO cohorts: one cohort providing the dermatologic perspective, consisting of patients with PsO without evidence of arthritic disease; and the second cohort providing the rheumatologic perspective, consisting of patients with PsA. We show that these two cohorts differ considerably in their predominant HLA alleles, indicating the heterogeneity of the overall PsO phenotype. Moreover, the genotype of patients in the PsA cohort was shown to be heterogeneous with significant elevations in the frequency of haplotypes containing HLA-B*08, HLA-C*06:02, HLA-B*27, HLA-B*38 and HLA-B*39. Because different genetic susceptibility genes imply different disease mechanisms, and possibly different clinical courses and therapeutic responses, we then review the evidence for a phenotypic difference among patients with PsA who have inherited different HLA alleles. We provide evidence that different alleles and, more importantly, different haplotypes implicated in determining PsA susceptibility are associated with different phenotypic characteristics that appear to be subphenotypes. The implication of these findings for the overall pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in PsA is discussed with specific reference to their bearing on the discussion of whether PsA is conceptualised as an autoimmune process or one that is based on entheseal responses.

15 Review Enhanced Patient Involvement and the Need to Revise the Core Set - Report from the Psoriatic Arthritis Working Group at OMERACT 2014. 2015

Tillett, William / Eder, Lihi / Goel, Niti / De Wit, Maarten / Gladman, Dafna D / FitzGerald, Oliver / Campbell, Willemina / Helliwell, Philip S / Gossec, Laure / Orbai, Ana-Maria / Ogdie, Alexis / Strand, Vibeke / McHugh, Neil J / Mease, Philip J. ·From the Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Bath, UK; Toronto Western Hospital; Psoriatic Arthritis Program, University Health Network, Toronto Western Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland; Quintiles; Duke University School of Medicine; Durham, North Carolina, USA; Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds; Chapel Allerton Hospital, Leeds, UK; Sorbonne Universités, Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6 (UPMC Univ Paris 6), Institut Pierre Louis d'Epidémiologie et de Santé Publique; AP-HP, Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Department of Rheumatology, Paris, France; Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Baltimore, Maryland; Division of Immunology/Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Portola Valley, California, USA; University of Bath, Bath, UK; Swedish Medical Center, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (HUP), Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.W. Tillett, MB, ChB, BSc, MRCP, PhD, Research Fellow, Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases; L. Eder, MD, PhD, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Toronto Western Hospital; M. de Wit, PhD, OMERACT Patient Research Partner, The Netherlands; D.D. Gladman, MD, FRCPC, Director, Psoriatic Arthritis Program, University Health Network, Senior Scientist, Toronto Western Research Institute; O. FitzGerald, MD, FRCPI, FRCP( UK), Consultant Rheumatologist and Newman Clinical Research Professor, St. Vincent's University Hospital; N. Goel, MD, OMERACT Patient Research Partner, Quintiles, and Duke University School of Medicine; W. Campbell, BEd, LLB, OMERACT Patient Research Partner; P.S. Helliwell, DM, PhD, FRCP, Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Chapel Allerton Hospital; L. Gossec, MD, PhD, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 6, Institut Pierre Louis d'Epidémiologie et de Sant ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #25934828.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To discuss the need for revision of the "core set" of domains to be included for assessment in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) randomized controlled trials and longitudinal observational studies, review work undertaken since the 2012 meeting of Outcome Measures for Rheumatology 11 (OMERACT 11) to include patient perspectives in this revision, and reassess proposed composite measures in the context of new research data and the OMERACT Filter 2.0 framework. METHODS: The OMERACT 12 (2014) PsA working group presented work completed over the last 2 years to incorporate patient involvement in PsA outcomes research, review the endorsed PsA core set based on the patient perspective as well as new research findings, and further develop PsA responder indices. Breakout groups then discussed 2 topics: (1) the need to revise the PsA core set, and opportunities to add, move, or merge existing domains to improve existing redundancy; and (2) how to incorporate the core set in a composite index. Breakout groups fed back to the working group before participant voting. RESULTS: Meeting participants endorsed the need to revise the PsA core set according to the OMERACT Filter 2.0 framework (100%), and the inclusion of disease impact (94%) and fatigue (72%) in the inner circle. Breakout group feedback suggested the core set revision was an opportunity to consolidate pathophysiologic aspects such as arthritis, enthesitis, dactylitis, spondylitis as "inflammatory musculoskeletal disease," and nail and skin psoriasis as "psoriasis activity." CONCLUSION: Future work will focus on updating the PsA core set and development of responder indices with ongoing, meaningful involvement of patient research partners.

16 Review Psoriatic arthritis under a proteomic spotlight: application of novel technologies to advance diagnosis and management. 2015

Butt, Aisha Q / McArdle, Angela / Gibson, David S / FitzGerald, Oliver / Pennington, Stephen R. ·School of Medicine and Medical Science, UCD Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland. ·Curr Rheumatol Rep · Pubmed #25895652.

ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis is a form of inflammatory arthritis that is frequently associated with psoriasis. Individuals with this disease present with heterogeneous clinical manifestations, making it challenging to diagnose and select optimal treatment strategies. Perhaps, not unsurprisingly, there are currently no molecular diagnostic or prognostic tests to confirm if a patient has the disease or predict how they may respond to therapy. Instead, a range of classification criteria have been developed, and the experience of the treating clinician is heavily relied upon. It is therefore widely accepted that there is a significant and as yet unmet need for effective molecular markers in psoriatic arthritis. Protein mediators drive disease pathogenesis and, therefore, represent logical potential biomarkers. Indeed, significant advances have recently been made by the introduction of multiplexed protein biomarker tests for monitoring disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis. At the same time, recent advances in proteomics have enhanced the capabilities for the detection and discovery of protein biomarkers. These advances offer renewed opportunities for the development of multi-protein biomarker signatures to support clinical decision-making in the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of psoriatic arthritis. This review summarises the pathogenesis of psoriatic arthritis, highlighting specific areas of unmet clinical need. Furthermore, it seeks to illustrate how the latest developments in proteomic technologies could be used to enhance our understanding of the molecular pathology of psoriatic arthritis and improve clinical outcomes and quality of life for patients.

17 Review Drug therapies for peripheral joint disease in psoriatic arthritis: a systematic review. 2014

Acosta Felquer, Maria Laura / Coates, Laura C / Soriano, Enrique R / Ranza, Roberto / Espinoza, Luis R / Helliwell, Philip S / FitzGerald, Oliver / McHugh, Neil / Roussou, Euthalia / Mease, Philip J. ·From the Sección Reumatología, Servicio de Clínica Médica, Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina; Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK; Sección Reumatología, Servicio de Clínica Médica, Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires; Academic Unit of Rheumatology, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Uberlândia, MG, Brazil; Section of Rheumatology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA; Academic Unit of Musculoskeletal Disease, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Leeds, UK; Department of Rheumatology, St. Vincent's University Hospital and Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, University College, Dublin, Ireland; Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of Bath, Bath, UK; Barking Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals, NHS Trust; and Queens Mary's University of London, London, UK; and Swedish Medical Center, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington, USA.M.L. Acosta Felquer, MD, Sección Reumatología, Servicio de Clínica Médica, Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires; L.C. Coates, MRCP, PhD, NIHR Clinical Lecturer, Leeds Institute; E.R. Soriano, MD, MSC, Jefe Sección Reumatología, Servicio de Clínica Médica, Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires; R. Ranza, MD, Academic Unit of Rheumatology, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia; L.R. Espinoza, MD, Section of Rheumatology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center; P.S. Helliwell, DM, PhD, Academic Unit of Musculoskeletal Disease, Chapel Allerton Hospital; O. FitzGerald, MD, Department of Rheumatology, St. Vincent's University Hospital and Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, University College; N. McHugh, FRCP, MD, Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of Bath; E. Roussou, MD, Consultant Rheumatologist, Barking Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals, NHS Trust and Clinical Senior Lecturer, Queens Mary's University of London; P.J. Mease, MD, Rhe ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #25362711.

ABSTRACT: In 2009, GRAPPA published their first evidence-based recommendations for the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Since then, new information has been published and drugs developed. We summarize evidence for the efficacy of available treatments for peripheral joint involvement in PsA. We performed a systematic review of current literature on the efficacy of different therapies, management, and therapeutic strategies for peripheral arthritis involvement in PsA, in order to provide information for the development of the new GRAPPA treatment recommendations.

18 Review Qualifying unmet needs and improving standards of care in psoriatic arthritis. 2014

Helliwell, Philip / Coates, Laura / Chandran, Vinod / Gladman, Dafna / de Wit, Maarten / FitzGerald, Oliver / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Strand, Vibeke / Mease, Philip J / Boehncke, Wolf-Henning / Langley, Richard G / Lubrano, Ennio / Maccarone, Mara / Schulze-Koops, Hendrik / Miceli-Richard, Corinne / Queiro, Ruben. ·Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. ·Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) · Pubmed #25047391.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Review Patient involvement in outcome measures for psoriatic arthritis. 2014

Tillett, William / Adebajo, Ade / Brooke, Mel / Campbell, Willemina / Coates, Laura C / FitzGerald, Oliver / Gossec, Laure / Helliwell, Philip / Hewlett, Sarah / James, Jana / Minnock, Patricia / Reast, Aisling / O'Sullivan, Dennis / de Wit, Maarten / McHugh, Neil. ·Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Upper Borough Walls, Bath, BA11RL, UK, w.tillett@nhs.net. ·Curr Rheumatol Rep · Pubmed #24623563.

ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a heterogeneous inflammatory arthritis with a varied clinical phenotype. There has been considerable international collaboration over recent years to develop and prioritise appropriate disease domains and outcome measures to capture all aspects of this complex disease. It has been recognised that patient-reported measures and physician assessments are complementary and, when used together, allow an improved reflection of disease burden. Taking this concept one step further, the experience in rheumatoid arthritis has demonstrated benefits of incorporating the patient perspective in the development of outcome measures. We report a systematic review demonstrating (1) that there has been little incorporation of the patient perspective in the development of outcome measures and domains in PsA, (2) the proceedings from the preliminary patient involvement in outcome measures for PsA (PIOMPSA) meetings, and (3) a proposed roadmap for improving patient involvement.

20 Review Development of a disease activity and responder index for psoriatic arthritis--report of the Psoriatic Arthritis Module at OMERACT 11. 2014

Coates, Laura C / FitzGerald, Oliver / Mease, Philip J / Gladman, Dafna D / Strand, Vibeke / Goel, Niti / Campbell, Ina / Krueger, Gerald / McHugh, Neil J / Helliwell, Philip S. ·From the Division of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Disease, University of Leeds, UK; Department of Rheumatology, St. Vincent's University Hospital and Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; Seattle Rheumatology Associates, Swedish Medical Center, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington, USA; Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Centre for Prognosis Studies in the Rheumatic Diseases, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Division of Immunology/Rheumatology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California; Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, and General Medicine Therapeutic Delivery Unit, Quintiles, Morrisville, North Carolina; Department of Dermatology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA; Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases and University of Bath, Bath, UK. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #24488420.

ABSTRACT: This module reflected work within the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) to develop and validate composite disease activity measures in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). At the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) 8 Meeting, a core set of domains to be assessed in randomized controlled trials (RCT) and longitudinal observational studies of PsA was agreed upon. At OMERACT 10, 5 proposed composite responder definitions for PsA were reviewed and discussed, including new data from the GRACE (GRAppa Composite Exercise) study. At OMERACT 11, ongoing retrospective analyses of RCT data using the 3 proposed measures (Composite Psoriatic Disease Activity Index, Psoriatic Arthritis Disease Activity Score, and Arithmetic Mean of the Desirability Function) were discussed in detail. There was agreement that developing composite outcome measures for use in RCT and longitudinal observational studies in PsA was important. Concerns were expressed regarding development of a single measure that encompassed diverse domains, such as joint counts, quality of life (QOL), and disability measures. It was emphasized that the use of any composite measure should include the ability to differentiate between activity in individual domains, such as enthesitis or psoriasis, such that the effect of each could be assessed independently. It was also agreed that patients would be systematically involved in further development and refinement of composite measures. Future plans include qualitative work with patients to explore their experience of disease activity and statistical modeling to explore how each of the proposed measures will perform in different disease subgroups.

21 Review Treating axial and peripheral spondyloarthritis, including psoriatic arthritis, to target: results of a systematic literature search to support an international treat-to-target recommendation in spondyloarthritis. 2014

Schoels, M M / Braun, J / Dougados, M / Emery, P / Fitzgerald, O / Kavanaugh, A / Kvien, T K / Landewé, R / Luger, T / Mease, P / Olivieri, I / Reveille, J / Ritchlin, C / Rudwaleit, M / Sieper, J / Smolen, J S / Wit, M de / van der Heijde, D. ·2nd Department of Internal Medicine, Center for Rheumatic Diseases, Hietzing Hospital, , Vienna, Austria. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #23740234.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Current recommendations for the management of axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) and psoriatic arthritis are to monitor disease activity and adjust therapy accordingly. However, treatment targets and timeframes of change have not been defined. An international expert panel has been convened to develop 'treat-to-target' recommendations, based on published evidence and expert opinion. OBJECTIVE: To review evidence on targeted treatment for axial and peripheral SpA, as well as for psoriatic skin disease. METHODS: We performed a systematic literature search covering Medline, Embase and Cochrane, conference abstracts and studies in http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. RESULTS: Randomised comparisons of targeted versus routine treatment are lacking. Some studies implemented treatment targets before escalating therapy: in ankylosing spondylitis, most trials used a decrease in Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index; in psoriatic arthritis, protocols primarily considered a reduction in swollen and tender joints; in psoriasis, the Modified Psoriasis Severity Score and the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index were used. Complementary evidence correlating these factors with function and radiographic damage at follow-up is sparse and equivocal. CONCLUSIONS: There is a need for randomised trials that investigate the value of treat-to-target recommendations in SpA and psoriasis. Several trials have used thresholds of disease activity measures to guide treatment decisions. However, evidence on the effect of these data on long-term outcome is scarce. The search data informed the expert committee regarding the formulation of recommendations and a research agenda.

22 Review Can traditional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs be withdrawn or tapered in psoriatic arthritis? 2013

Lubrano, Ennio / Soriano, Enrique / FitzGerald, Oliver. ·Academic Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Molise, Campobasso, Italy. enniolubrano@hotmail.com. ·Clin Exp Rheumatol · Pubmed #24129139.

ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a complex, multisystem disease with musculoskeletal and skin manifestations frequently associated with features of the metabolic syndrome. For many years, treatment strategies were largely borrowed from the rheumatoid arthritis literature, with clinical trials of traditional DMARDs in PsA often inadequate and using limited outcome measures. Nonetheless, DMARDs - in particular, methotrexate - remain the treatment of first choice for most rheumatologists treating this disease, especially for those with prominent polyarticular involvement. While there is no agreed definition of remission in PsA, a number of longitudinal studies suggests that remission can be achieved in approximately 25% of patients treated with traditional DMARDs, with drug-free remission possible in <10%. There are many unanswered questions, and this review concludes by highlighting a research agenda which aims to address some of the most critical questions for physicians and patients alike faced with deciding if treatment should be withdrawn or continued when disease remission is achieved.

23 Review New insight into the functions of the interleukin-17 receptor adaptor protein Act1 in psoriatic arthritis. 2012

Doyle, Matthew S / Collins, Emily S / FitzGerald, Oliver M / Pennington, Stephen R. · ·Arthritis Res Ther · Pubmed #23116200.

ABSTRACT: Recent genome-wide association studies have implicated the tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 3-interacting protein 2 (TRAF3IP2) gene and its product, nuclear factor-kappa-B activator 1 (Act1), in the development of psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The high level of sequence homology of the TRAF3IP2 (Act1) gene across the animal kingdom and the presence of the Act1 protein in multiple cell types strongly suggest that the protein is of importance in normal cellular function. Act1 is an adaptor protein for the interleukin-17 (IL-17) receptor, and recent observations have highlighted the significance of IL-17 signaling and localized inflammation in autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes data from recent genome-wide association studies as well as immunological and molecular investigations of Act1. Together, these studies provide new insight into the role of IL-17 signaling in PsA. It is well established that IL-17 activation of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) signaling pathways normally leads to nuclear factor-kappa-B-mediated inflammation. However, the dominant PsA-associated TRAF3IP2 (Act1) gene single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs33980500) results in decreased binding of Act1 to TRAF6. This key mutation in Act1 could lead to a greater association of the IL-17 receptor with TRAF2/TRAF5 and this in turn suggests an alternative function for IL-17 in PsA. The recent observations described and discussed in this review raise the clinically significant possibility of redefining the immunological role of IL-17 in PsA and provide a basis for defining future studies to elucidate the molecular and cellular functions of Act1.

24 Review Pathogenetic overview of psoriatic disease. 2012

Haroon, Muhammad / Fitzgerald, Oliver. ·St Vincent's University Hospital and Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. ·J Rheumatol Suppl · Pubmed #22751581.

ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory musculoskeletal disease with both autoimmune and autoinflammatory features. Evidence supports the distinct nature of PsA regarding its clinical, genetic, immunohistochemical, and imaging features. Such features can help to distinguish PsA from other common rheumatic diseases. Apart from peripheral joint involvement, the musculoskeletal lesions in PsA include enthesitis and involvement of the distal interphalangeal joint (frequently associated with nail involvement, dactylitis, and axial involvement). The traditional model of pathogenesis in PsA has identified it as an autoimmune disease; however, an alternative model classifies it as having autoinflammatory features. Similarly, there are important new genetic observations focusing on the HLA region, and genome-wide association that confirms the genetic heterogeneity of patients with psoriasis and patients with PsA. Newer imaging techniques have also provided a much more detailed characterization of tissue abnormalities, in particular highlighting the extent of new bone formation, which is quite distinct from rheumatoid arthritis.

25 Review A systematic literature review of drug therapies for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis: current evidence and meta-analysis informing the EULAR recommendations for the management of psoriatic arthritis. 2012

Ash, Zoe / Gaujoux-Viala, Cécile / Gossec, Laure / Hensor, Elizabeth M A / FitzGerald, Oliver / Winthrop, Kevin / van der Heijde, Désirée / Emery, Paul / Smolen, Josef S / Marzo-Ortega, Helena. ·Section of Musculoskeletal Disease, Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #21803753.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To review the available evidence for the efficacy and safety of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), synthetic and biological drug therapies for the different clinical manifestations of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in order to provide data for the development of treatment recommendations by the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) taskforce. METHODS: A systematic literature review (SLR) of available treatments for PsA was performed using the largest electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE and COCHRANE) by two working groups formed within the EULAR taskforce. This comprised a comprehensive sample of rheumatologists, dermatologists, epidemiologists and patients. The available evidence was reviewed for NSAIDs, synthetic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), local and systemic corticosteroids and biologic drugs. All articles and abstracts published between 1962 and January 2010 were reviewed and considered and a meta-analysis of data on biological therapies was performed. RESULTS: While little data are available on NSAIDs, glucocorticoids and synthetic DMARDs, the available evidence suggests an acceptable efficacy and safety profile of both NSAIDs and synthetic DMARDs (methotrexate, cyclosporine A, sulfasalazine and leflunomide) in PsA. More evidence is available (level 1B) supporting the efficacy of anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF) agents (adalimumab, etanercept, golimumab and infliximab) in treating the signs and symptoms of PsA as well as reducing radiographic progression. Registry data show no new safety concerns, although the numbers studied to date are relatively small. CONCLUSIONS: This SLR reveals some evidence to support the use of NSAIDs and synthetic DMARDs and good evidence for the efficacy of anti-TNF therapy in PsA.

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