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Psoriasis: HELP
Articles by Phillip S. Helliwell
Based on 130 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, P. Helliwell wrote the following 130 articles about Psoriasis.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6
1 Guideline Treating axial spondyloarthritis and peripheral spondyloarthritis, especially psoriatic arthritis, to target: 2017 update of recommendations by an international task force. 2018

Smolen, Josef S / Schöls, Monika / Braun, Jürgen / Dougados, Maxime / FitzGerald, Oliver / Gladman, Dafna D / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Landewé, Robert / Mease, Philip / Sieper, Joachim / Stamm, Tanja / Wit, Maarten de / Aletaha, Daniel / Baraliakos, Xenofon / Betteridge, Neil / Bosch, Filip van den / Coates, Laura C / Emery, Paul / Gensler, Lianne S / Gossec, Laure / Helliwell, Philip / Jongkees, Merryn / Kvien, Tore K / Inman, Robert D / McInnes, Iain B / Maccarone, Mara / Machado, Pedro M / Molto, Anna / Ogdie, Alexis / Poddubnyy, Denis / Ritchlin, Christopher / Rudwaleit, Martin / Tanew, Adrian / Thio, Bing / Veale, Douglas / Vlam, Kurt de / van der Heijde, Désirée. ·Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine 3, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · 2nd Department of Medicine, Hietzing Hospital, Vienna, Austria. · Health Consult, Vienna, Austria. · Rheumazentrum Ruhrgebiet, Ruhr-University Bochum, Herne, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France. · Department of Rheumatology, St Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · Division of Rheumatology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Rheumatology, University of California, San Diego, CA, USA. · Amsterdam Rheumatology & Immunology Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Division of Rheumatology Research, Swedish-Providence St. Joseph Health System, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. · Department of Gastroenterology, Infectiology and Rheumatology, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Section for Outcomes Research, Center for Medical Statistics, Informatics, and Intelligent Systems, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Medical Humanities, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Neil Betteridge Associates, UK. · Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. · Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Leeds, UK. · Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Department of Rheumatology, UPMC Univ Paris 06, GRC-UPMC 08 (EEMOIS); AP-HP, Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, France. · Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · Seayn Medical, Voorschoten, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · University Health Network and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · University of Glasgow, College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences, Glasgow, UK. · A.DI.PSO. (Associazione per la Difesa degli Psoriasici)-PE.Pso.POF (Pan European Psoriasis Patients' Organization Forum), Rome, Italy. · Centre for Rheumatology & MRC Centre for Neuromuscular Diseases, University College London, London, UK. · Division of Rheumatology, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania, PA, USA. · German Rheumatism Research Centrer, Berlin, Germany. · Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology Division, University of Rochester Medical Center Rochester, New York, NY, USA. · Division of Internal Medicine and Rheumatology, Klinikum Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Dermatology, Erasmus Medical Center, Erasmus University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Klinikum Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany. · Division of Rheumatology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #28684559.

ABSTRACT: Therapeutic targets have been defined for axial and peripheral spondyloarthritis (SpA) in 2012, but the evidence for these recommendations was only of indirect nature. These recommendations were re-evaluated in light of new insights. Based on the results of a systematic literature review and expert opinion, a task force of rheumatologists, dermatologists, patients and a health professional developed an update of the 2012 recommendations. These underwent intensive discussions, on site voting and subsequent anonymous electronic voting on levels of agreement with each item. A set of 5 overarching principles and 11 recommendations were developed and voted on. Some items were present in the previous recommendations, while others were significantly changed or newly formulated. The 2017 task force arrived at a single set of recommendations for axial and peripheral SpA, including psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The most exhaustive discussions related to whether PsA should be assessed using unidimensional composite scores for its different domains or multidimensional scores that comprise multiple domains. This question was not resolved and constitutes an important research agenda. There was broad agreement, now better supported by data than in 2012, that remission/inactive disease and, alternatively, low/minimal disease activity are the principal targets for the treatment of PsA. As instruments to assess the patients on the path to the target, the Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS) for axial SpA and the Disease Activity index for PSoriatic Arthritis (DAPSA) and Minimal Disease Activity (MDA) for PsA were recommended, although not supported by all. Shared decision-making between the clinician and the patient was seen as pivotal to the process. The task force defined the treatment target for SpA as remission or low disease activity and developed a large research agenda to further advance the field.

2 Guideline Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis 2015 Treatment Recommendations for Psoriatic Arthritis. 2016

Coates, Laura C / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Mease, Philip J / Soriano, Enrique R / Laura Acosta-Felquer, Maria / Armstrong, April W / Bautista-Molano, Wilson / Boehncke, Wolf-Henning / Campbell, Willemina / Cauli, Alberto / Espinoza, Luis R / FitzGerald, Oliver / Gladman, Dafna D / Gottlieb, Alice / Helliwell, Philip S / Husni, M Elaine / Love, Thorvardur J / Lubrano, Ennio / McHugh, Neil / Nash, Peter / Ogdie, Alexis / Orbai, Ana-Maria / Parkinson, Andrew / O'Sullivan, Denis / Rosen, Cheryl F / Schwartzman, Sergio / Siegel, Evan L / Toloza, Sergio / Tuong, William / Ritchlin, Christopher T. ·Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine and University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · University of California at San Diego. · Swedish Medical Center and University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington. · Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina. · University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles. · Hospital Militar Central and Universidad Militar Nueva Grenada, Bogotá, Colombia. · Geneva University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland. · Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · University of Cagliari, Monserrato Campus, Cagliari, Italy. · Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans. · St. Vincent's University Hospital, The Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, and University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. · University of Toronto and Toronto Western Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine and University of Leeds, Leeds, UK, and Bradford Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Bradford, UK. · Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio. · University of Iceland and Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. · University of Molise, Campobasso, Italy. · Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Bath, UK. · University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Chapel Allerton Hospital, Leeds, UK. · St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · Toronto Western Hospital and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, New York. · Arthritis and Rheumatism Associates, Rockville, Maryland. · Ministry of Health, San Fernando del Valle de Catamarca, Argentina. · University of California, Davis. · University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York. ·Arthritis Rheumatol · Pubmed #26749174.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To update the 2009 Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) treatment recommendations for the spectrum of manifestations affecting patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). METHODS: GRAPPA rheumatologists, dermatologists, and PsA patients drafted overarching principles for the management of PsA, based on consensus achieved at face-to-face meetings and via online surveys. We conducted literature reviews regarding treatment for the key domains of PsA (arthritis, spondylitis, enthesitis, dactylitis, skin disease, and nail disease) and convened a new group to identify pertinent comorbidities and their effect on treatment. Finally, we drafted treatment recommendations for each of the clinical manifestations and assessed the level of agreement for the overarching principles and treatment recommendations among GRAPPA members, using an online questionnaire. RESULTS: Six overarching principles had ≥80% agreement among both health care professionals (n = 135) and patient research partners (n = 10). We developed treatment recommendations and a schema incorporating these principles for arthritis, spondylitis, enthesitis, dactylitis, skin disease, nail disease, and comorbidities in the setting of PsA, using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation process. Agreement of >80% was reached for approval of the individual recommendations and the overall schema. CONCLUSION: We present overarching principles and updated treatment recommendations for the key manifestations of PsA, including related comorbidities, based on a literature review and consensus of GRAPPA members (rheumatologists, dermatologists, other health care providers, and patient research partners). Further updates are anticipated as the therapeutic landscape in PsA evolves.

3 Guideline European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the management of psoriatic arthritis with pharmacological therapies: 2015 update. 2016

Gossec, L / Smolen, J S / Ramiro, S / de Wit, M / Cutolo, M / Dougados, M / Emery, P / Landewé, R / Oliver, S / Aletaha, D / Betteridge, N / Braun, J / Burmester, G / Cañete, J D / Damjanov, N / FitzGerald, O / Haglund, E / Helliwell, P / Kvien, T K / Lories, R / Luger, T / Maccarone, M / Marzo-Ortega, H / McGonagle, D / McInnes, I B / Olivieri, I / Pavelka, K / Schett, G / Sieper, J / van den Bosch, F / Veale, D J / Wollenhaupt, J / Zink, A / van der Heijde, D. ·Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Institut Pierre Louis d'Epidémiologie et de Santé Publique, GRC-UPMC 08 (EEMOIS), Paris, France Department of rheumatology, AP-HP, Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, France. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine 3, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria Second Department of Medicine, Hietzing Hospital, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands. · EULAR, representing People with Arthritis/Rheumatism in Europe (PARE), London, UK. · Research Laboratory and Clinical Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genova, Viale Benedetto, Italy. · Medicine Faculty, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France Rheumatology B Department, APHP, Cochin Hospital, Paris, France. · Leeds NIHR Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, LTHT, Leeds, UK Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · Department of Clinical Immunology & Rheumatology, Amsterdam Rheumatology Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands Atrium Medical Center, Heerlen, The Netherlands. · North Devon, UK. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine 3, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Rheumazentrum Ruhrgebiet, Herne and Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Herne, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Charité-University Medicine Berlin, Germany. · Arthritis Unit, Department of Rheumatology, Hospital Clínic and IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Spain. · Belgrade University School of Medicine, Belgrade, Serbia. · Department of Rheumatology, St. Vincent's University Hospital and Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. · Section of Rheumatology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden Sweden and School of Business, Engineering and Science, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden. · Section of Musculoskeletal Disease, Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Laboratory of Tissue Homeostasis and Disease, Skeletal Biology and Engineering Research Center, KU Leuven, Belgium Division of Rheumatology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Münster, Münster, Germany. · A.DI.PSO. (Associazione per la Difesa degli Psoriasici)-PE.Pso.POF (Pan European Psoriasis Patients' Organization Forum), Rome, Italy. · Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Rheumatology Department of Lucania, San Carlo Hospital of Potenza and Madonna delle Grazie Hospital of Matera, Potenza, Italy. · Institute and Clinic of Rheumatology Charles University Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Internal Medicine 3, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité, Berlin, Germany. · Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. · Centre for Arthritis and Rheumatic Disease, Dublin Academic Medical Centre, St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · Schoen Klinik Hamburg, Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, German Rheumatism Research Centre Berlin, Charité-University Medicine Berlin, Germany. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #26644232.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Since the publication of the European League Against Rheumatism recommendations for the pharmacological treatment of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in 2012, new evidence and new therapeutic agents have emerged. The objective was to update these recommendations. METHODS: A systematic literature review was performed regarding pharmacological treatment in PsA. Subsequently, recommendations were formulated based on the evidence and the expert opinion of the 34 Task Force members. Levels of evidence and strengths of recommendations were allocated. RESULTS: The updated recommendations comprise 5 overarching principles and 10 recommendations, covering pharmacological therapies for PsA from non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), to conventional synthetic (csDMARD) and biological (bDMARD) disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, whatever their mode of action, taking articular and extra-articular manifestations of PsA into account, but focusing on musculoskeletal involvement. The overarching principles address the need for shared decision-making and treatment objectives. The recommendations address csDMARDs as an initial therapy after failure of NSAIDs and local therapy for active disease, followed, if necessary, by a bDMARD or a targeted synthetic DMARD (tsDMARD). The first bDMARD would usually be a tumour necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor. bDMARDs targeting interleukin (IL)12/23 (ustekinumab) or IL-17 pathways (secukinumab) may be used in patients for whom TNF inhibitors are inappropriate and a tsDMARD such as a phosphodiesterase 4-inhibitor (apremilast) if bDMARDs are inappropriate. If the first bDMARD strategy fails, any other bDMARD or tsDMARD may be used. CONCLUSIONS: These recommendations provide stakeholders with an updated consensus on the pharmacological treatment of PsA and strategies to reach optimal outcomes in PsA, based on a combination of evidence and expert opinion.

4 Guideline The 2012 BSR and BHPR guideline for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis with biologics. 2013

Coates, Laura C / Tillett, William / Chandler, David / Helliwell, Philip S / Korendowych, Eleanor / Kyle, Stuart / McInnes, Iain B / Oliver, Susan / Ormerod, Anthony / Smith, Catherine / Symmons, Deborah / Waldron, Nicola / McHugh, Neil J / Anonymous440765. ·Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Upper Borough Walls, Bath BA1 1RL, UK. neil.mchugh@rnhrd.nhs.uk. ·Rheumatology (Oxford) · Pubmed #23887065.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Guideline European League Against Rheumatism recommendations for the management of psoriatic arthritis with pharmacological therapies. 2012

Gossec, L / Smolen, J S / Gaujoux-Viala, C / Ash, Z / Marzo-Ortega, H / van der Heijde, D / FitzGerald, O / Aletaha, D / Balint, P / Boumpas, D / Braun, J / Breedveld, F C / Burmester, G / Cañete, J D / de Wit, M / Dagfinrud, H / de Vlam, K / Dougados, M / Helliwell, P / Kavanaugh, A / Kvien, T K / Landewé, R / Luger, T / Maccarone, M / McGonagle, D / McHugh, N / McInnes, I B / Ritchlin, C / Sieper, J / Tak, P P / Valesini, G / Vencovsky, J / Winthrop, K L / Zink, A / Emery, P / Anonymous2420706. ·Paris Descartes University, Paris, France. laure.gossec@cch.aphp.fr ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #21953336.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a clinically heterogeneous disease. Clear consensual treatment guidance focused on the musculoskeletal manifestations of PsA would be advantageous. The authors present European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the treatment of PsA with systemic or local (non-topical) symptomatic and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD). METHODS: The recommendations are based on evidence from systematic literature reviews performed for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), glucocorticoids, synthetic DMARD and biological DMARD. This evidence was discussed, summarised and recommendations were formulated by a task force comprising 35 representatives, and providing levels of evidence, strength of recommendations and levels of agreement. RESULTS: Ten recommendations were developed for treatment from NSAID through synthetic DMARD to biological agents, accounting for articular and extra-articular manifestations of PsA. Five overarching principles and a research agenda were defined. CONCLUSION: These recommendations are intended to provide rheumatologists, patients and other stakeholders with a consensus on the pharmacological treatment of PsA and strategies to reach optimal outcomes, based on combining evidence and expert opinion. The research agenda informs directions within EULAR and other communities interested in PsA.

6 Guideline Treatment recommendations for psoriatic arthritis. 2009

Ritchlin, C T / Kavanaugh, A / Gladman, D D / Mease, P J / Helliwell, P / Boehncke, W-H / de Vlam, K / Fiorentino, D / Fitzgerald, O / Gottlieb, A B / McHugh, N J / Nash, P / Qureshi, A A / Soriano, E R / Taylor, W J / Anonymous6760613. ·Clinical Immunology Research Center, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 695, Rochester, New York 14642, USA. christopher_ritchlin@urmc.rochester.edu ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #18952643.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To develop comprehensive recommendations for the treatment of the various clinical manifestations of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) based on evidence obtained from a systematic review of the literature and from consensus opinion. METHODS: Formal literature reviews of treatment for the most significant discrete clinical manifestations of PsA (skin and nails, peripheral arthritis, axial disease, dactylitis and enthesitis) were performed and published by members of the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA). Treatment recommendations were drafted for each of the clinical manifestations by rheumatologists, dermatologists and PsA patients based on the literature reviews and consensus opinion. The level of agreement for the individual treatment recommendations among GRAPPA members was assessed with an online questionnaire. RESULTS: Treatment recommendations were developed for peripheral arthritis, axial disease, psoriasis, nail disease, dactylitis and enthesitis in the setting of PsA. In rotal, 19 recommendations were drafted, and over 80% agreement was obtained on 16 of them. In addition, a grid that factors disease severity into each of the different disease manifestations was developed to help the clinician with treatment decisions for the individual patient from an evidenced-based perspective. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment recommendations for the cardinal physical manifestations of PsA were developed based on a literature review and consensus between rheumatologists and dermatologists. In addition, a grid was established to assist in therapeutic reasoning and decision making for individual patients. It is anticipated that periodic updates will take place using this framework as new data become available.

7 Editorial New GRAPPA recommendations for the management of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: process, challenges and implementation. 2016

Coates, L C / Murphy, R / Helliwell, P S. ·Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, U.K. · Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, U.K. · Department of Dermatology, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals and Sheffield Children's Hospital, Sheffield, U.K. · Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Bradford, U.K. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #27317273.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Screening for psoriatic arthritis in people with psoriasis. 2015

Helliwell, Philip S. ·Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS7 4SA, UK. p.helliwell@leeds.ac.uk. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #25934876.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Time for a 'joint' approach? 2013

Warren, R B / Helliwell, P S / Chinoy, H. · ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #23495764.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Classification and categorisation of psoriatic arthritis. 2008

Coates, Laura C / Helliwell, Philip S. · ·Clin Rheumatol · Pubmed #18629574.

ABSTRACT: For over 30 years, investigators have used the simple but non-validated classification criteria suggested by Moll and Wright. Several authors have suggested modifications to these but most remain unvalidated or require human leukocyte antigen analysis. Now, a worldwide initiative has developed new criteria which include both clinical and radiological features. These will require further study before they are fully adopted but their improved performance should result in less variation between study cohorts. The recurring question of disease heterogeneity continues to occupy researchers in this field. Despite recent pleas to abandon the original five sub-groups, a case can be made for retaining at least the two sub-groups of peripheral and axial disease and, possibly, splitting the peripheral disease into oligo- and poly-arthritis.

11 Review Focussing on the foot in psoriatic arthritis: pathology and management options. 2018

Patience, Aimie / Helliwell, Philip S / Siddle, Heidi J. ·a Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine , University of Leeds, Chapel Allerton Hospital , Leeds , UK. ·Expert Rev Clin Immunol · Pubmed #29202587.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a heterogeneous chronic inflammatory arthritis characterised by a range of musculoskeletal conditions including enthesitis, dactylitis and synovitis as well as skin and nail manifestations. The foot is a complex mixture of tissues, all of which can be involved in this disease and is frequently the presenting feature. Areas covered: In this under-researched area, articles were reviewed from the authors' publications as well as from other known authors. This review will discuss how PsA affects the foot and ankle with a particular focus on synovitis, tenosynovitis, enthesitis, dactylitis, bone erosion and psoriatic skin and nail disease. The use of imaging is discussed. Conventional radiography is consistently used, however magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound should be used routinely to diagnose, assess and monitor the disease appropriately. The complex nature of PsA in the foot and ankle should be considered when managing the condition and treatment should be individualized to relieve pain, maintain mobility and improve quality of life. Expert commentary: The foot and ankle remains a neglected area in PsA. Problems with the foot and ankle should be prioritised as they can significantly impact on patients' quality of life. Focussing treatment on the foot and ankle can significantly improve outcome.

12 Review Current concepts and unmet needs in psoriatic arthritis. 2018

Mahmood, Farrouq / Coates, Laura C / Helliwell, Philip S. ·Clinical Research Fellow in Rheumatology, Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Bradford, UK. · Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic & Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Chapeltown Road, Leeds, LS7 4SA, UK. p.helliwell@leeds.ac.uk. ·Clin Rheumatol · Pubmed #29134513.

ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic inflammatory arthritis that is part of the spondyloarthropathy group of rheumatic diseases and has associated co-morbidities. It can present with various clinical manifestations making diagnosis and treatment challenging, resulting in significant disability and reduced quality of life for patients. Whilst there have been advances in understanding the pathogenic mechanisms of the disease which have resulted in targeted therapies, there is still the need for further studies as some patients fail or are intolerant of current therapies. Better identification of early disease and knowledge of prognostic markers would enable clinicians to initiate appropriate therapy with the expectation that early aggressive treatment will minimise joint damage progression. Improved knowledge of the condition would also enable clinicians to better tailor specific treatment strategies for each of the various clinical domains in psoriatic arthritis.

13 Review A systematic review of measurement properties of patient reported outcome measures in psoriatic arthritis: A GRAPPA-OMERACT initiative. 2018

Højgaard, Pil / Klokker, Louise / Orbai, Ana-Maria / Holmsted, Kim / Bartels, Else M / Leung, Ying Ying / Goel, Niti / de Wit, Maarten / Gladman, Dafna D / Mease, Philip / Dreyer, Lene / Kristensen, Lars E / FitzGerald, Oliver / Tillett, William / Gossec, Laure / Helliwell, Philip / Strand, Vibeke / Ogdie, Alexis / Terwee, Caroline B / Christensen, Robin. ·The Parker Institute, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg, Nordre Fasanvej 57, DK-2000, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Rheumatology, Rigshospitalet, Gentofte Hospital, Kildegaardsvej 28, 2900 Hellerup, Denmark. · The Parker Institute, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg, Nordre Fasanvej 57, DK-2000, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Baltimore, MD. · Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Singapore General Hospital, 20 College Rd, the Academia, S169856, Singapore. · Division of Rheumatology, Duke University School of Medicine, Advisory Services, QuintilesIMS, Durham, NC. · VU University Amsterdam, Department of Medical Humanities, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Division of Rheumatology and Krembil Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto Western Hospital, 399 Bathurst St, 1E-410B, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5T 2S8. · Division of Rheumatology Clinical Research, Swedish Medical Center, Seattle, WA. · Department of Rheumatology, St Vincent's University Hospital and Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, University College Dublin, Ireland. · Department of Rheumatology, Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of Bath, Bath, UK. · Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, GRC-08, Institut Pierre Louis d'Epidémiologie et de Santé Publique, Paris, France; Pitie-Salpétrière Hospital, AP-HP, Rheumatology Department, 47-83 Bd de l'Hopital, Paris 75013, France. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, 2nd Floor, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Harehills Lane, Leeds LS7 4SA, UK. · Division of Immunology/Rheumatology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA. · Division of Rheumatology, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. · VU University Medical Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · The Parker Institute, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg, Nordre Fasanvej 57, DK-2000, Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: Robin.christensen@regionh.dk. ·Semin Arthritis Rheum · Pubmed #29037523.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: An updated psoriatic arthritis (PsA) core outcome set (COS) for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was endorsed at the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) meeting in 2016. OBJECTIVES: To synthesize the evidence on measurement properties of patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) for PsA and thereby contribute to development of a PsA core outcome measurement set (COMS) as described by the OMERACT Filter 2.0. METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed in EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO on Jan 1, 2017 to identify full-text articles with an aim of assessing the measurement properties of PROMs in PsA. Two independent reviewers rated the quality of studies using the COnsensus based standards for the Selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) checklist, and performed a qualitative evidence synthesis. RESULTS: Fifty-five studies were included in the systematic review. Forty-four instruments and a total of 89 scales were analyzed. PROMs measuring COS domains with at least fair quality evidence for good validity and reliability (and no evidence for poor properties) included the Stockerau Activity Score for PsA (German), Psoriasis Symptom Inventory, visual analogue scale for Patient Global, 36 Item Short Form Health Survey Physical Function subscale, Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index, PsA Impact of Disease questionnaire, PsA Quality of Life questionnaire, VITACORA-19, Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy Fatigue scale and Social Role Participation Questionnaire. CONCLUSIONS: At least one PROM with some evidence for aspects of validity and reliability was available for six of the eight mandatory domains of the PsA COS.

14 Review Psoriatic arthritis: state of the art review. 2017

Coates, Laura C / Helliwell, Philip S. ·Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK and Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, UK. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK and Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, UK p.helliwell@leeds.ac.uk. ·Clin Med (Lond) · Pubmed #28148584.

ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) accounts for around 20% of referrals to the early arthritis clinic and presents a significant diagnostic and management challenge. Early diagnosis is important to prevent long term functional disability and to ensure optimal management of arthritis and key comorbidities. From the rheumatologist's perspective, the differential diagnosis includes rheumatoid arthritis, gout and other inflammatory arthritides. Once diagnosed, it is essential to assess the disease fully, including arthritis, enthesitis, dactylitis, skin/nail disease and axial involvement. Using this information, appropriate treatment can be planned using therapies that are effective at treating the relevant domains of disease. Despite poor data, traditional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs are commonly used and have been effective in observational studies. Following tumour necrosis factor inhibitors, which have proven excellent efficacy in multiple domains of PsA, new biologics are available or in development and will improve treatment options for people with refractory PsA.

15 Review Psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis: Is all inflammation the same? 2016

Coates, Laura C / FitzGerald, Oliver / Helliwell, Philip S / Paul, Carle. ·Faculty of Medicine and Health, Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, 2nd Floor, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Harehills Lane, Leeds LS7 4SA, UK. · Department of Rheumatology, St Vincent's University Hospital and Conway Institute, University College, Dublin, Ireland. · Faculty of Medicine and Health, Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, 2nd Floor, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Harehills Lane, Leeds LS7 4SA, UK. Electronic address: P.Helliwell@leeds.ac.uk. · Larrey Hospital, Paul Sabatier University, Toulouse, France. ·Semin Arthritis Rheum · Pubmed #27388027.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To review the pathophysiology, co-morbidities, and therapeutic options for psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis in order to further understand the similarities and differences in treatment paradigms in the management of each disease. New targets for individualized therapeutic decisions are also identified with the aim of improving therapeutic outcome and reducing toxicity. SEARCH STRATEGY: Using the PubMed database, we searched literature published from 2000 to 2015 using combinations of the key words "psoriasis," "psoriatic arthritis," "rheumatoid arthritis," "pathogenesis," "immunomodulation," and "treatment." INCLUSION AND EXCLUSION CRITERIA: This was a non-systematic review and there were no formal inclusion and exclusion criteria. DATA EXTRACTION: Abstracts identified in the search were screened for relevance and articles considered appropriate evaluated further. References within these selected articles were also screened. Information was extracted from 198 articles for inclusion in this report. DATA SYNTHESIS: There was no formal data synthesis. Articles were reviewed and summarized according to disease area (psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis). HEADLINE RESULTS: The pathophysiology of psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis involves chronic inflammation mediated by pro-inflammatory cytokines. Dysfunction in integrated signaling pathways affecting different constituents of the immune system result in varying clinical features in the three diseases. Co-morbidities, including cardiovascular disease, malignancies, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease are increased. Increased understanding of the immunopathogenesis allowed development of targeted treatments; however, despite a variety of potentially predictive genetic, protein and cellular biomarkers, there is still significant unmet need in these three inflammatory disorders.

16 Review Replication of a distinct psoriatic arthritis risk variant at the IL23R locus. 2016

Budu-Aggrey, Ashley / Bowes, John / Loehr, Sabine / Uebe, Steffen / Zervou, Maria I / Helliwell, Philip / Ryan, Anthony W / Kane, David / Korendowych, Eleanor / Giardina, Emiliano / Packham, Jonathan / McManus, Ross / FitzGerald, Oliver / McHugh, Neil / Behrens, Frank / Burkhardt, Harald / Huffmeier, Ulrike / Ho, Pauline / Martin, Javier / Castañeda, Santos / Goulielmos, George / Reis, Andre / Barton, Anne. ·Arthritis Research UK Centre for Genetics and Genomics, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, The University of Manchester, UK NIHR Manchester Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Central Manchester Foundation Trust and University of Manchester, Manchester Academy of Health Sciences, Manchester, UK. · Arthritis Research UK Centre for Genetics and Genomics, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, The University of Manchester, UK. · Institute of Human Genetics, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany. · Laboratory of Molecular Medicine and Human Genetics, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece. · NIHR-Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · Department of Clinical Medicine, Institute of Molecular Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. · Department of Rheumatology, Adelaide and Meath Hospital and Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. · Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases and Department Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of Bath, Bath, UK. · Department of Biomedicine and Prevention, University of Rome 'Tor Vergata' and Laboratory of Molecular Genetics UILDM, Fondazione Santa Lucia IRCCS, Rome, Italy. · Rheumatology Department, Haywood Hospital, Health Services Research Unit, Institute of Science and Technology in Medicine, Keele University, Stoke on Trent, UK. · Department of Rheumatology, St. Vincent's University Hospital, UCD School of Medicine and Medical Sciences and Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. · Division of Rheumatology and Fraunhofer IME-Project-Group Translational Medicine and Pharmacology, Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany. · Arthritis Research UK Centre for Genetics and Genomics, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, The University of Manchester, UK The Kellgren Centre for Rheumatology, Central Manchester Foundation Trust, NIHR Manchester Biomedical Research Centre, Manchester, UK. · CSIC, Instituto de Parasitologia y Biomedicina Lopez-Neyra, Granada, Spain. · Department of Rheumatology, Hospital La Princesa, IIS-IPrincesa, Madrid, Spain. · Arthritis Research UK Centre for Genetics and Genomics, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, The University of Manchester, UK NIHR Manchester Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Central Manchester Foundation Trust and University of Manchester, Manchester Academy of Health Sciences, Manchester, UK The Kellgren Centre for Rheumatology, Central Manchester Foundation Trust, NIHR Manchester Biomedical Research Centre, Manchester, UK. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #27016051.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Review Treating to target in psoriatic arthritis: how to implement in clinical practice. 2016

Coates, Laura C / Helliwell, Philip S. ·Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, UK. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #26672066.

ABSTRACT: Treating to target is becoming the standard of care in many medical specialities, including rheumatology. The Tight Control of Psoriatic Arthritis (TICOPA) trial has recently provided evidence of the benefit of treating to target in psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and the revised European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations on the management of PsA suggest this approach. However, the question of the optimal measure to use and the practicalities of incorporating this into routine clinical practice remain problematic.

18 Review Natural History, Prognosis, and Socioeconomic Aspects of Psoriatic Arthritis. 2015

Helliwell, Philip S / Ruderman, Eric M. ·Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Chapel Allerton Hospital, University of Leeds, 2nd Floor, Harehills Lane, Leeds LS7 4SA, UK. · Division of Rheumatology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 E Chicago Ave, Chicago, IL 60611, USA. Electronic address: p.helliwell@leeds.ac.uk. ·Rheum Dis Clin North Am · Pubmed #26476220.

ABSTRACT: Although early reports suggested psoriatic arthritis was, with the exception of arthritis mutilans, a relatively mild arthritis, later studies have challenged this view. The burden of skin disease adds to disability and impaired quality of life. Patients in secondary care manifest increased morbidity and mortality, mainly owing to cardiovascular disease. A subset of patients, primarily men with oligoarticular disease, demonstrates low levels of joint involvement without disability. The socioeconomic impact of the disease is significant. We require more information on the impact of early diagnosis and treatment on outcome, according to phenotype, to guide policy.

19 Review Assessment of disease activity in psoriatic arthritis. 2015

Helliwell, Philip S. ·Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, UK. p.helliwell@leeds.ac.uk. ·Clin Exp Rheumatol · Pubmed #26471097.

ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) historically has been assessed according to disease activity measures borrowed from rheumatoid arthritis. However, more disease activity measures specific to PsA have been developed. This development is appropriate, as the disease is not confined to the joints but has multiple manifestations, in addition to skin and joints. Assessments of disease activity are unique to each domain. Including different domains in composite measures increases the level of complexity. This review briefly discusses the available outcome measures, both within domains and as composite measures, and discusses likely future directions.

20 Review Enhanced Patient Involvement and the Need to Revise the Core Set - Report from the Psoriatic Arthritis Working Group at OMERACT 2014. 2015

Tillett, William / Eder, Lihi / Goel, Niti / De Wit, Maarten / Gladman, Dafna D / FitzGerald, Oliver / Campbell, Willemina / Helliwell, Philip S / Gossec, Laure / Orbai, Ana-Maria / Ogdie, Alexis / Strand, Vibeke / McHugh, Neil J / Mease, Philip J. ·From the Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Bath, UK; Toronto Western Hospital; Psoriatic Arthritis Program, University Health Network, Toronto Western Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland; Quintiles; Duke University School of Medicine; Durham, North Carolina, USA; Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds; Chapel Allerton Hospital, Leeds, UK; Sorbonne Universités, Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6 (UPMC Univ Paris 6), Institut Pierre Louis d'Epidémiologie et de Santé Publique; AP-HP, Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Department of Rheumatology, Paris, France; Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Baltimore, Maryland; Division of Immunology/Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Portola Valley, California, USA; University of Bath, Bath, UK; Swedish Medical Center, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (HUP), Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.W. Tillett, MB, ChB, BSc, MRCP, PhD, Research Fellow, Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases; L. Eder, MD, PhD, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Toronto Western Hospital; M. de Wit, PhD, OMERACT Patient Research Partner, The Netherlands; D.D. Gladman, MD, FRCPC, Director, Psoriatic Arthritis Program, University Health Network, Senior Scientist, Toronto Western Research Institute; O. FitzGerald, MD, FRCPI, FRCP( UK), Consultant Rheumatologist and Newman Clinical Research Professor, St. Vincent's University Hospital; N. Goel, MD, OMERACT Patient Research Partner, Quintiles, and Duke University School of Medicine; W. Campbell, BEd, LLB, OMERACT Patient Research Partner; P.S. Helliwell, DM, PhD, FRCP, Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Chapel Allerton Hospital; L. Gossec, MD, PhD, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 6, Institut Pierre Louis d'Epidémiologie et de Sant ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #25934828.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To discuss the need for revision of the "core set" of domains to be included for assessment in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) randomized controlled trials and longitudinal observational studies, review work undertaken since the 2012 meeting of Outcome Measures for Rheumatology 11 (OMERACT 11) to include patient perspectives in this revision, and reassess proposed composite measures in the context of new research data and the OMERACT Filter 2.0 framework. METHODS: The OMERACT 12 (2014) PsA working group presented work completed over the last 2 years to incorporate patient involvement in PsA outcomes research, review the endorsed PsA core set based on the patient perspective as well as new research findings, and further develop PsA responder indices. Breakout groups then discussed 2 topics: (1) the need to revise the PsA core set, and opportunities to add, move, or merge existing domains to improve existing redundancy; and (2) how to incorporate the core set in a composite index. Breakout groups fed back to the working group before participant voting. RESULTS: Meeting participants endorsed the need to revise the PsA core set according to the OMERACT Filter 2.0 framework (100%), and the inclusion of disease impact (94%) and fatigue (72%) in the inner circle. Breakout group feedback suggested the core set revision was an opportunity to consolidate pathophysiologic aspects such as arthritis, enthesitis, dactylitis, spondylitis as "inflammatory musculoskeletal disease," and nail and skin psoriasis as "psoriasis activity." CONCLUSION: Future work will focus on updating the PsA core set and development of responder indices with ongoing, meaningful involvement of patient research partners.

21 Review Treat to target in psoriatic arthritis-evidence, target, research agenda. 2015

Coates, Laura C / Helliwell, Philip S. ·Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK, l.c.coates@leeds.ac.uk. ·Curr Rheumatol Rep · Pubmed #25903668.

ABSTRACT: This article summarises the evidence on treating to target (T2T) in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The evidence from the recent European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) literature search in SpA is reviewed. This article found no studies in SpA in 2011 which compared a T2T approach against standard care in a randomised controlled trial (RCT). One of the issues raised in PsA is what target to use. The minimal disease activity (MDA) criteria were developed specifically for PsA and have been validated in observational and interventional cohorts. These have now been utilised in the Tight Control of PsA (TICOPA) study comparing T2T to standard care in early PsA providing the first evidence that T2T in PsA can improve outcomes. To translate this into clinical practice in PsA, patient education and feasibility are key. Future research must address the optimal therapies to be used within a T2T framework which will need to take subtype of PsA into account.

22 Review Comprehensive treatment of dactylitis in psoriatic arthritis. 2014

Rose, Shawn / Toloza, Sergio / Bautista-Molano, Wilson / Helliwell, Philip S / Anonymous5660810. ·From the US National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA; Rheumatology, Ministry of Health, San Fernando del Valle de Catamarca, Argentina; Department of Rheumatology, Hospital Militar Central, Faculty of Medicine UMNG, Bogotá, Colombia; University of Leeds, Leeds; and Bradford Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Bradford, UK.S. Rose, MD, PhD, Metzger Clinical Scholar, National Institutes of Health; S. Toloza, MD, Rheumatology, Ministry of Health; W. Bautista-Molano, MD, PhD(c), Department of Rheumatology, Hospital Militar Central, Faculty of Medicine UMNG; P.S. Helliwell, DM, PhD, FRCP, Senior Lecturer in Rheumatology, University of Leeds and Bradford Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. Drs. Rose and Toloza contributed equally to this report. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #25362714.

ABSTRACT: Dactylitis, a hallmark clinical feature of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and other spondyloarthropathies, may also be a severity marker for PsA and psoriasis. Traditionally, clinicians have used nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs and local corticosteroid injections to treat dactylitis, although conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs are also used. We performed a systematic literature review to determine the most efficacious current treatment options for dactylitis in PsA. Effect sizes were greatest for the biologic agents ustekinumab, certolizumab, and infliximab, suggesting that therapy with one of these agents should be initiated in patients with dactylitis. However, the limited data highlight the need for randomized, placebo-controlled trials, with dactylitis as a primary outcome, to determine a valid, reliable, and responsive clinical outcome measure for PsA patients with dactylitis.

23 Review Drug therapies for peripheral joint disease in psoriatic arthritis: a systematic review. 2014

Acosta Felquer, Maria Laura / Coates, Laura C / Soriano, Enrique R / Ranza, Roberto / Espinoza, Luis R / Helliwell, Philip S / FitzGerald, Oliver / McHugh, Neil / Roussou, Euthalia / Mease, Philip J. ·From the Sección Reumatología, Servicio de Clínica Médica, Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina; Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK; Sección Reumatología, Servicio de Clínica Médica, Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires; Academic Unit of Rheumatology, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Uberlândia, MG, Brazil; Section of Rheumatology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA; Academic Unit of Musculoskeletal Disease, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Leeds, UK; Department of Rheumatology, St. Vincent's University Hospital and Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, University College, Dublin, Ireland; Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of Bath, Bath, UK; Barking Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals, NHS Trust; and Queens Mary's University of London, London, UK; and Swedish Medical Center, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington, USA.M.L. Acosta Felquer, MD, Sección Reumatología, Servicio de Clínica Médica, Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires; L.C. Coates, MRCP, PhD, NIHR Clinical Lecturer, Leeds Institute; E.R. Soriano, MD, MSC, Jefe Sección Reumatología, Servicio de Clínica Médica, Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires; R. Ranza, MD, Academic Unit of Rheumatology, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia; L.R. Espinoza, MD, Section of Rheumatology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center; P.S. Helliwell, DM, PhD, Academic Unit of Musculoskeletal Disease, Chapel Allerton Hospital; O. FitzGerald, MD, Department of Rheumatology, St. Vincent's University Hospital and Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, University College; N. McHugh, FRCP, MD, Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of Bath; E. Roussou, MD, Consultant Rheumatologist, Barking Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals, NHS Trust and Clinical Senior Lecturer, Queens Mary's University of London; P.J. Mease, MD, Rhe ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #25362711.

ABSTRACT: In 2009, GRAPPA published their first evidence-based recommendations for the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Since then, new information has been published and drugs developed. We summarize evidence for the efficacy of available treatments for peripheral joint involvement in PsA. We performed a systematic review of current literature on the efficacy of different therapies, management, and therapeutic strategies for peripheral arthritis involvement in PsA, in order to provide information for the development of the new GRAPPA treatment recommendations.

24 Review Qualifying unmet needs and improving standards of care in psoriatic arthritis. 2014

Helliwell, Philip / Coates, Laura / Chandran, Vinod / Gladman, Dafna / de Wit, Maarten / FitzGerald, Oliver / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Strand, Vibeke / Mease, Philip J / Boehncke, Wolf-Henning / Langley, Richard G / Lubrano, Ennio / Maccarone, Mara / Schulze-Koops, Hendrik / Miceli-Richard, Corinne / Queiro, Ruben. ·Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. ·Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) · Pubmed #25047391.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

25 Review Patient involvement in outcome measures for psoriatic arthritis. 2014

Tillett, William / Adebajo, Ade / Brooke, Mel / Campbell, Willemina / Coates, Laura C / FitzGerald, Oliver / Gossec, Laure / Helliwell, Philip / Hewlett, Sarah / James, Jana / Minnock, Patricia / Reast, Aisling / O'Sullivan, Dennis / de Wit, Maarten / McHugh, Neil. ·Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Upper Borough Walls, Bath, BA11RL, UK, w.tillett@nhs.net. ·Curr Rheumatol Rep · Pubmed #24623563.

ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a heterogeneous inflammatory arthritis with a varied clinical phenotype. There has been considerable international collaboration over recent years to develop and prioritise appropriate disease domains and outcome measures to capture all aspects of this complex disease. It has been recognised that patient-reported measures and physician assessments are complementary and, when used together, allow an improved reflection of disease burden. Taking this concept one step further, the experience in rheumatoid arthritis has demonstrated benefits of incorporating the patient perspective in the development of outcome measures. We report a systematic review demonstrating (1) that there has been little incorporation of the patient perspective in the development of outcome measures and domains in PsA, (2) the proceedings from the preliminary patient involvement in outcome measures for PsA (PIOMPSA) meetings, and (3) a proposed roadmap for improving patient involvement.

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