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Psoriasis: HELP
Articles by William W. Huang
Based on 6 articles published since 2010
(Why 6 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, William Huang wrote the following 6 articles about Psoriasis.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Molluscum contagiosum in immunocompromised patients: AIDS presenting as molluscum contagiosum in a patient with psoriasis on biologic therapy. 2018

Kaufman, William S / Ahn, Christine S / Huang, William W. ·Department of Dermatology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA. ·Cutis · Pubmed #29554156.

ABSTRACT: Molluscum contagiosum (MC) is a common, self-limited cutaneous infection in immunocompetent individuals. However, in immunocompromised individuals the infection often has an atypical presentation and can be difficult to eradicate, making both the diagnosis and treatment challenging. Due to advancements in the management of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and cancer, there is a growing population of immunosuppressed individuals, signaling the need for dermatologists to recognize and manage related skin diseases. We present a case of an atypical MC eruption in a patient on biologic therapy for psoriasis and an unrecognized underlying HIV infection, followed by a current review of the presentation and treatment of MC in various immunosuppressed states. With a growing population of immunosuppressed patients, it is important to recognize MC as a potential indicator of underlying immunosuppression. Testing for HIV should be offered to any patient starting immunosuppressive therapy such as biologic agents.

2 Review Adherence in dermatology. 2017

Ahn, Christine S / Culp, Leonora / Huang, William W / Davis, Scott A / Feldman, Steven R. ·a Department of Dermatology , Center for Dermatology Research, Wake Forest School of Medicine , Winston-Salem , NC , USA. · b Pathology & Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine , Winston-Salem , NC , USA. ·J Dermatolog Treat · Pubmed #27180785.

ABSTRACT: Non-adherence to treatment and medical recommendations is one of the leading causes of treatment failure, poor clinical outcomes, and increased healthcare utilization. Although non-adherence is observed across all medical specialties, adherence to treatment in dermatology deserves special attention given the multiple different routes of treatment. Adherence can be measured using subjective methods (patient reporting and questionnaires) or objective methods (pill counts, electronic chips, and pharmacy records). Adherence to dermatologic treatments varies based on the specific condition but is poor for systemic therapies and even worse with topical agents. Among the factors that influence adherence, duration of treatment, complexity of regimen, and access play a large role. Interventions to improve adherence can range from simplifying treatment regimens to scheduling more frequent office visits. Due to the profound effect on cost, healthcare outcomes, and mortality, understanding and improving adherence is equally as important as making the correct diagnosis and prescribing the correct treatment.

3 Review To test or not to test? An updated evidence-based assessment of the value of screening and monitoring tests when using systemic biologic agents to treat psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. 2015

Ahn, Christine S / Dothard, Emily H / Garner, Michael L / Feldman, Steven R / Huang, William W. ·Department of Dermatology, Center for Dermatology Research, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. · University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. · Department of Dermatology, Center for Dermatology Research, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina; Department of Pathology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina; Department of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. · Department of Dermatology, Center for Dermatology Research, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Electronic address: whuang@wakehealth.edu. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #26184440.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Safety profiles of systemic biologic agents for the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) encompass a wide spectrum of adverse events. To date, no uniform evidence-based guidelines exist regarding screening and monitoring patients who are undergoing biologic therapy. OBJECTIVE: We sought to identify studies evaluating screening and monitoring tests in the treatment of psoriasis and PsA with systemic biologic agents, and to propose evidence-based practical guidelines. METHODS: The MEDLINE database was searched to identify data on risks associated with adalimumab, etanercept, infliximab, and ustekinumab. Articles were reviewed and graded according to methods developed by the US Preventative Services Task Force. RESULTS: Evidence was strongest (grade B) for tuberculosis screening. Interferon-gamma release assay was preferable to tuberculin skin testing. Among known hepatitis B virus carriers, the evidence grade was C for monitoring liver function tests and viral load. LIMITATIONS: This study was limited by the lack of high-quality controlled trials evaluating screening and monitoring tests in patients treated with biologic agents. CONCLUSIONS: Baseline tuberculosis testing remains the only screening test with strong evidence to support its practice. Other screening and monitoring tests commonly performed in patients who are taking biologic agents are supported only in certain clinical settings or lack evidence to support or recommend against their practice.

4 Review The quality of life impact of acne and rosacea compared to other major medical conditions. 2014

Cresce, Nicole D / Davis, Scott A / Huang, William W / Feldman, Steven R. · ·J Drugs Dermatol · Pubmed #24918559.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Acne and rosacea cause significant negative impact on quality of life. There is limited information comparing the health-related quality of life (HRQL) impact associated with acne and rosacea to other patient populations. PURPOSE: We review available literature to assess the HRQL impact of acne and rosacea and compare them with major medical conditions. METHODS: A PubMed search identified studies that utilized the Short Form 36 (SF-36), the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), and the willingness-to-pay (WTP) metric to assess the HRQL impact of acne and rosacea. These data were compared to HRQL values for other diseases. RESULTS: The HRQL impact of acne is similar to asthma, epilepsy, diabetes, back pain, arthritis, and coronary heart disease using SF-36 data. DLQI scores for acne ranged from 2 to 17.7 and for rosacea ranged from 4.3 to 17.3; the DLQI scores for psoriasis ranged from 1.7 to 18.2. WTP data identified ranged widely for both acne and rosacea. LIMITATIONS: There was limited broadly generalizable data for acne and rosacea. CONCLUSIONS: Acne and rosacea impact HRQL to a similar degree as other major medical conditions by indirect comparison to psoriasis, a skin condition causing significant disability, and by direct comparison for acne. In the setting of limited health care resources, allocation should be grounded in the evidence that acne and rosacea are not trivial in their effects.

5 Article Dermatology Residents are Prescribing Tanning Bed Treatment. 2016

Anderson, Kathryn L / Huang, Karen E / Huang, William W / Feldman, Steven R. ·Center for Dermatology Research, Department of Dermatology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Anderson.kathryn.lee@gmail.com. ·Dermatol Online J · Pubmed #27617718.

ABSTRACT: Although 90% of dermatologists discourage the use of tanning beds, about half of psoriasis patients report using tanning beds and most of these note improvement. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if dermatology residents are advocating the tanning bed use to their patients.

6 Article Psoriasis and cardiovascular screening rates in the United States. 2013

Alamdari, Habibollah S / Gustafson, Cheryl J / Davis, Scott A / Huang, William / Feldman, Steven R. ·Department of Dermatology, Center for Dermatology Research, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA. ·J Drugs Dermatol · Pubmed #23377342.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Guidelines to screen for cardiovascular (CV) risk factors in psoriasis patients have been established. However, the frequency with which dermatologists and nondermatologists screen psoriasis patients for CV risk factors is not well characterized. PURPOSE: To determine how frequently psoriasis patients are screened for CV risk factors in the ambulatory care setting and to identify factors affecting screening rates. METHODS: Data from the 2005 to 2009 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) were analyzed to determine screening rates for blood pressure, glucose, cholesterol, and body mass index (BMI). The probability of a patient having at least 1 of the 4 risk factors screened was determined and was termed the "composite" score. Screening rates were assessed by physician specialty, patient demographics, and clinical practice characteristics. RESULTS: There were an estimated 11.4 million psoriasis patient visits from 2005 to 2009. Blood pressure, glucose, cholesterol, and BMI were evaluated at 32.2%, 5.9%, 9%, and 26% of psoriasis visits, respectively, with a composite score of 41.2%. Patients without psoriasis were screened for these CV risk factors at 59.0%, 6%, 8%, and 38.1% of outpatient visits, respectively, with a composite score of 66.3%. The results of a multivariate analysis accounting for patient age differences indicated psoriasis had a statistically significant effect on rates of blood pressure and BMI screening. In general, screening rates were higher if the patient was male, African American, or non-Hispanic, and screening rates were relatively equal across age groups. Higher screening rates were also associated with primary care specialties, faculty practice or community health clinics with contracted physicians, clinics that utilized electronic medical records, practices with a higher percentage of revenue from a Medicare/Medicaid payer, or offices with discounted fees and capitation payment structures. LIMITATIONS: Data from NAMCS are cross-sectional, permitting assessment of screening rates based on visits but not on patients. CONCLUSIONS: Screening for high blood pressure, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, and obesity are not performed at most outpatient visits for psoriasis. Care should be taken to ensure that patients do receive appropriate screening for the comorbidities associated with psoriasis.