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Psoriasis: HELP
Articles by Mohammed Tikly
Based on 4 articles published since 2010
(Why 4 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Mohammed Tikly wrote the following 4 articles about Psoriasis.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Double trouble: psoriasis and cardiometabolic disorders. 2018

Mahyoodeen, Nasrin Goolam / Crowther, Nigel J / Tikly, Mohammed. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. Email: mahyoodeen@yahoo.com. · Department of Chemical Pathology, National Health Laboratory Services and University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. · Department of Internal Medicine, Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. ·Cardiovasc J Afr · Pubmed #29293257.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis (PsO) is a chronic immune-mediated inflammatory skin disorder associated with numerous co-morbidities. This descriptive review focuses on the cardiometabolic co-morbidities of PsO with reference to the epidemiology and pathogenetic mechanisms linking PsO and cardiometabolic disease (CMD). Registry-based studies have shown PsO to be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Factors linking PsO and CMD include: chronic inflammation, obesity, classic cardiovascular risk factors, and the effects of systemic therapy used to treat PsO. Chronic inflammation is associated with PsO itself, and with obesity. Adipose tissue is responsible for the secretion of various adipokines, which together with pro-inflammatory cytokines arising from the psoriatic plaque, contribute to the pro-inflammatory and pro-atherogenic environment. Systemic therapy aimed at decreasing inflammation has been shown to improve CMD in PsO. Screening for and treating CMD and initiating lifestyle modifications will remain the most important interventions until further data emerge regarding the effect of systemic therapy on CMD progression.

2 Review Spondyloarthritis in sub-Saharan Africa. 2014

Tikly, Mohammed / Njobvu, Panganani / McGill, Paul. ·Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital and Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, P.O. Box Bertsham 2013, Johannesburg, South Africa, mohammed.tikly@wits.ac.za. ·Curr Rheumatol Rep · Pubmed #24744085.

ABSTRACT: Spondyloarthritis (SpA) is generally uncommon in sub-Saharan Africa, in part because of the rarity of HLA-B27 in this region. However, the relationship between HLA-B27 and SpA, particularly ankylosing spondylitis (AS), is complex. Despite the HLA-B 27:05 risk allele occurring in some West African populations, associated AS is not seen. In fact, most patients with AS are HLA-B27-negative, although there is emerging evidence that another class I HLA molecule, HLA-B 14:03, is associated with AS in black Africans. The Assessment of SpondyloArthritis International Society criteria for detecting early axial disease are of limited value in sub-Saharan Africa, because of both the rarity of HLA-B27 and very limited access to magnetic resonance imaging. Reactive arthritis (ReA), psoriatic arthritis, and undifferentiated SpA are seen mainly in the context of HIV infection, although the exact effect of the virus in the pathogenesis of arthritis is unclear. In Zambia, ReA is associated with the HLA-B*57:03 allele, which is paradoxically also associated with slow progression of HIV infection. HIV-associated ReA has a more protracted and aggressive course than standard ReA. Enthesitis-related arthritis is more common in children infected with HIV by vertical mother-to child transmission. Use of TNF inhibitors for axial disease is problematic, mainly because of cost, but also because of potential safety problems, especially reactivation of tuberculosis.

3 Article Relationship of Visceral Fat and Adipokines with Cardiometabolic Diseases in Psoriasis. 2019

Goolam Mahyoodeen, Nasrin / Crowther, Nigel J / Pillay, Lushen / Snyman, Tracy / Toman, Marketa / Daya, Sheetal / Tikly, Mohammed. ·Internal Medicine, Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital, 2013 Johannesburg, South Africa. mahyoodeen@yahoo.com. ·Acta Derm Venereol · Pubmed #31580467.

ABSTRACT: As part of a larger cross-sectional, case-control study on cardiometabolic diseases in psoriasis this study investigated the association of visceral fat and serum adipokines with psoriasis and cardiometabolic diseases. A total of 103 patients with psoriasis and 98 controls, matched for body mass index, ethnicity and sex, were recruited over 15 months. Abdominal visceral fat was measured by computerized tomo-graphy. Logistic regression analysis revealed that visceral fat was associated with psoriasis (odds ratio (95% confidence interval): 1.56 (1.15, 2.11)), hyper-triglyceridaemia (1.67 (1.22, 2.28)), low high-density lipoprotein (1.63 (1.19, 2.22)) and type 2 diabetes (1.77 (1.24, 2.54)), (p < 0.005 for all). These respective associations were linked to serum interleukin-6, adiponectin, tumour necrosis factor and insulin resistance. Psoriasis was associated with type 2 diabetes (7.94 (2.64, 23.9)), independent of visceral fat. These data suggest that visceral fat and its mediators play a key role in psoriasis-associated cardiometabolic diseases. Psoriasis itself is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes.

4 Article High burden of the metabolic syndrome and its component disorders in South Africans with psoriasis. 2019

Goolam Mahyoodeen, Nasrin / Crowther, Nigel J / Snyman, Tracy / Pillay, Lushen / Tikly, Mohammed. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. · Department of Chemical Pathology, National Health Laboratory Service, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. · Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. ·Int J Dermatol · Pubmed #30565666.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Psoriasis is associated with cardiometabolic diseases (CMDs) in Caucasians, but no data is available from sub-Saharan populations on either CMD prevalence or psoriasis risk factors. Our aim was to investigate the prevalence of CMDs in a predominantly non-Caucasian cohort of South Africans with psoriasis and to determine the principal risk factors associated with psoriasis. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional case-control study of adult psoriasis patients (n = 103) and controls (n = 98), comparing sociodemographic, anthropometric, clinical, and biochemical characteristics. The groups were matched for gender, ethnicity, and body mass index (BMI). RESULTS: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) (52.4% vs. 33.7%; P = 0.007), type 2 diabetes (T2D) (25.2% vs. 4.1%; P < 0.0001), and hypertension (70.9% vs. 46.6%; P = 0.001) were all higher in the psoriasis group. High-sensitivity CRP was higher in psoriasis patients than controls (4.70 (2.00, 10.9) vs. 2.00 (1.10, 4.80) ng/ml; P < 0.0005). Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that severe psoriasis was independently associated with MetS (odds ratio [95% CIs]: 4.42 [1.72, 11.4]; P = 0.002), T2D (11.3 [3.07, 41.3]; P = 0.0002), and hypertension (2.48 [0.97, 6.32]; P = 0.05), whilst for psoriasis the principal risk factors were smoking (3.87 [1.97, 7.63]; P < 0.0001) and hsCRP (1.05 [1.00, 1.10]; P = 0.029), with completion of high school (0.23 [0.11, 0.48]; P < 0.0001) being protective. CONCLUSIONS: In this population, psoriasis is characterized by a high burden of CMDs, particularly in those subjects with severe psoriasis. Inflammation plays a role in the etiology of psoriasis, whilst smoking and poor education further increase disease risk.