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Psoriasis: HELP
Articles from Austria
Based on 155 articles published since 2009
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These are the 155 published articles about Psoriasis that originated from Austria during 2009-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7
1 Guideline Treating axial spondyloarthritis and peripheral spondyloarthritis, especially psoriatic arthritis, to target: 2017 update of recommendations by an international task force. 2018

Smolen, Josef S / Schöls, Monika / Braun, Jürgen / Dougados, Maxime / FitzGerald, Oliver / Gladman, Dafna D / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Landewé, Robert / Mease, Philip / Sieper, Joachim / Stamm, Tanja / Wit, Maarten de / Aletaha, Daniel / Baraliakos, Xenofon / Betteridge, Neil / Bosch, Filip van den / Coates, Laura C / Emery, Paul / Gensler, Lianne S / Gossec, Laure / Helliwell, Philip / Jongkees, Merryn / Kvien, Tore K / Inman, Robert D / McInnes, Iain B / Maccarone, Mara / Machado, Pedro M / Molto, Anna / Ogdie, Alexis / Poddubnyy, Denis / Ritchlin, Christopher / Rudwaleit, Martin / Tanew, Adrian / Thio, Bing / Veale, Douglas / Vlam, Kurt de / van der Heijde, Désirée. ·Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine 3, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · 2nd Department of Medicine, Hietzing Hospital, Vienna, Austria. · Health Consult, Vienna, Austria. · Rheumazentrum Ruhrgebiet, Ruhr-University Bochum, Herne, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France. · Department of Rheumatology, St Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · Division of Rheumatology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Rheumatology, University of California, San Diego, CA, USA. · Amsterdam Rheumatology & Immunology Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Division of Rheumatology Research, Swedish-Providence St. Joseph Health System, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. · Department of Gastroenterology, Infectiology and Rheumatology, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Section for Outcomes Research, Center for Medical Statistics, Informatics, and Intelligent Systems, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Medical Humanities, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Neil Betteridge Associates, UK. · Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. · Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Leeds, UK. · Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Department of Rheumatology, UPMC Univ Paris 06, GRC-UPMC 08 (EEMOIS); AP-HP, Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, France. · Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · Seayn Medical, Voorschoten, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · University Health Network and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · University of Glasgow, College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences, Glasgow, UK. · A.DI.PSO. (Associazione per la Difesa degli Psoriasici)-PE.Pso.POF (Pan European Psoriasis Patients' Organization Forum), Rome, Italy. · Centre for Rheumatology & MRC Centre for Neuromuscular Diseases, University College London, London, UK. · Division of Rheumatology, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania, PA, USA. · German Rheumatism Research Centrer, Berlin, Germany. · Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology Division, University of Rochester Medical Center Rochester, New York, NY, USA. · Division of Internal Medicine and Rheumatology, Klinikum Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Dermatology, Erasmus Medical Center, Erasmus University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Klinikum Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany. · Division of Rheumatology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #28684559.

ABSTRACT: Therapeutic targets have been defined for axial and peripheral spondyloarthritis (SpA) in 2012, but the evidence for these recommendations was only of indirect nature. These recommendations were re-evaluated in light of new insights. Based on the results of a systematic literature review and expert opinion, a task force of rheumatologists, dermatologists, patients and a health professional developed an update of the 2012 recommendations. These underwent intensive discussions, on site voting and subsequent anonymous electronic voting on levels of agreement with each item. A set of 5 overarching principles and 11 recommendations were developed and voted on. Some items were present in the previous recommendations, while others were significantly changed or newly formulated. The 2017 task force arrived at a single set of recommendations for axial and peripheral SpA, including psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The most exhaustive discussions related to whether PsA should be assessed using unidimensional composite scores for its different domains or multidimensional scores that comprise multiple domains. This question was not resolved and constitutes an important research agenda. There was broad agreement, now better supported by data than in 2012, that remission/inactive disease and, alternatively, low/minimal disease activity are the principal targets for the treatment of PsA. As instruments to assess the patients on the path to the target, the Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS) for axial SpA and the Disease Activity index for PSoriatic Arthritis (DAPSA) and Minimal Disease Activity (MDA) for PsA were recommended, although not supported by all. Shared decision-making between the clinician and the patient was seen as pivotal to the process. The task force defined the treatment target for SpA as remission or low disease activity and developed a large research agenda to further advance the field.

2 Guideline EULAR recommendations for cardiovascular disease risk management in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other forms of inflammatory joint disorders: 2015/2016 update. 2017

Agca, R / Heslinga, S C / Rollefstad, S / Heslinga, M / McInnes, I B / Peters, M J L / Kvien, T K / Dougados, M / Radner, H / Atzeni, F / Primdahl, J / Södergren, A / Wallberg Jonsson, S / van Rompay, J / Zabalan, C / Pedersen, T R / Jacobsson, L / de Vlam, K / Gonzalez-Gay, M A / Semb, A G / Kitas, G D / Smulders, Y M / Szekanecz, Z / Sattar, N / Symmons, D P M / Nurmohamed, M T. ·Departments of Rheumatology, Amsterdam Rheumatology and Immunology Center, Reade & VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Preventive Cardio-Rheuma Clinic, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Internal and Vascular Medicine, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Rheumatology, Paris Descartes University, Hôpital Cochin. Assistance Publique, Hôpitaux de Paris INSERM (U1153): Clinical epidemiology and biostatistics, PRES Sorbonne Paris-Cité, Paris, France. · Department of Internal Medicine III, Division of Rheumatology, Medical University Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · IRCCS Galeazzi Orthopedic Institute, Milan, Italy. · Institute for Regional Health Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. · Sygehus Sønderjylland (Hospital of Southern Jutland), Aabenraa, Denmark. · King Christian 10's Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Graasten, Denmark. · Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine/Rheumatology, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden. · PARE (patient research partners), Sint-Joris-Weert, Belgium. · Romanian League Against Rheumatism (Vice-President) and Board Member (General Secretary) of AGORA, the Platform of S-E organisations for patients with RMDs, Bucharest, Romania. · Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, Center for Preventive Medicine and Medical Faculty, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Rheumatology & Inflammation Research, Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg and Section of Rheumatology, Lund, Sweden. · Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. · Department of Rheumatology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · University of Cantabria, IDIVAL, Santander, Spain. · Head of Research and Development, Academic Affairs Dudley Group NHS Foundation Trust, Arthritis Research UK Centre for Epidemiology, University of Manchester, Russells Hall Hospital, Clinical Research Unit, Dudley, UK. · Faculty of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, University of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hungary. · Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Science, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Department of Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Epidemiology, Arthritis Research UK Centre for Epidemiology, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. · Department of Rheumatology Reade, Amsterdam Rheumatology and Immunology Center, Reade & VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #27697765.

ABSTRACT: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other inflammatory joint disorders (IJD) have increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk compared with the general population. In 2009, the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) taskforce recommended screening, identification of CVD risk factors and CVD risk management largely based on expert opinion. In view of substantial new evidence, an update was conducted with the aim of producing CVD risk management recommendations for patients with IJD that now incorporates an increasing evidence base. A multidisciplinary steering committee (representing 13 European countries) comprised 26 members including patient representatives, rheumatologists, cardiologists, internists, epidemiologists, a health professional and fellows. Systematic literature searches were performed and evidence was categorised according to standard guidelines. The evidence was discussed and summarised by the experts in the course of a consensus finding and voting process. Three overarching principles were defined. First, there is a higher risk for CVD in patients with RA, and this may also apply to ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis. Second, the rheumatologist is responsible for CVD risk management in patients with IJD. Third, the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids should be in accordance with treatment-specific recommendations from EULAR and Assessment of Spondyloarthritis International Society. Ten recommendations were defined, of which one is new and six were changed compared with the 2009 recommendations. Each designated an appropriate evidence support level. The present update extends on the evidence that CVD risk in the whole spectrum of IJD is increased. This underscores the need for CVD risk management in these patients. These recommendations are defined to provide assistance in CVD risk management in IJD, based on expert opinion and scientific evidence.

3 Guideline European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the management of psoriatic arthritis with pharmacological therapies: 2015 update. 2016

Gossec, L / Smolen, J S / Ramiro, S / de Wit, M / Cutolo, M / Dougados, M / Emery, P / Landewé, R / Oliver, S / Aletaha, D / Betteridge, N / Braun, J / Burmester, G / Cañete, J D / Damjanov, N / FitzGerald, O / Haglund, E / Helliwell, P / Kvien, T K / Lories, R / Luger, T / Maccarone, M / Marzo-Ortega, H / McGonagle, D / McInnes, I B / Olivieri, I / Pavelka, K / Schett, G / Sieper, J / van den Bosch, F / Veale, D J / Wollenhaupt, J / Zink, A / van der Heijde, D. ·Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Institut Pierre Louis d'Epidémiologie et de Santé Publique, GRC-UPMC 08 (EEMOIS), Paris, France Department of rheumatology, AP-HP, Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, France. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine 3, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria Second Department of Medicine, Hietzing Hospital, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands. · EULAR, representing People with Arthritis/Rheumatism in Europe (PARE), London, UK. · Research Laboratory and Clinical Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genova, Viale Benedetto, Italy. · Medicine Faculty, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France Rheumatology B Department, APHP, Cochin Hospital, Paris, France. · Leeds NIHR Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, LTHT, Leeds, UK Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · Department of Clinical Immunology & Rheumatology, Amsterdam Rheumatology Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands Atrium Medical Center, Heerlen, The Netherlands. · North Devon, UK. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine 3, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Rheumazentrum Ruhrgebiet, Herne and Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Herne, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Charité-University Medicine Berlin, Germany. · Arthritis Unit, Department of Rheumatology, Hospital Clínic and IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Spain. · Belgrade University School of Medicine, Belgrade, Serbia. · Department of Rheumatology, St. Vincent's University Hospital and Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. · Section of Rheumatology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden Sweden and School of Business, Engineering and Science, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden. · Section of Musculoskeletal Disease, Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Laboratory of Tissue Homeostasis and Disease, Skeletal Biology and Engineering Research Center, KU Leuven, Belgium Division of Rheumatology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Münster, Münster, Germany. · A.DI.PSO. (Associazione per la Difesa degli Psoriasici)-PE.Pso.POF (Pan European Psoriasis Patients' Organization Forum), Rome, Italy. · Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Rheumatology Department of Lucania, San Carlo Hospital of Potenza and Madonna delle Grazie Hospital of Matera, Potenza, Italy. · Institute and Clinic of Rheumatology Charles University Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Internal Medicine 3, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité, Berlin, Germany. · Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. · Centre for Arthritis and Rheumatic Disease, Dublin Academic Medical Centre, St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · Schoen Klinik Hamburg, Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, German Rheumatism Research Centre Berlin, Charité-University Medicine Berlin, Germany. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #26644232.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Since the publication of the European League Against Rheumatism recommendations for the pharmacological treatment of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in 2012, new evidence and new therapeutic agents have emerged. The objective was to update these recommendations. METHODS: A systematic literature review was performed regarding pharmacological treatment in PsA. Subsequently, recommendations were formulated based on the evidence and the expert opinion of the 34 Task Force members. Levels of evidence and strengths of recommendations were allocated. RESULTS: The updated recommendations comprise 5 overarching principles and 10 recommendations, covering pharmacological therapies for PsA from non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), to conventional synthetic (csDMARD) and biological (bDMARD) disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, whatever their mode of action, taking articular and extra-articular manifestations of PsA into account, but focusing on musculoskeletal involvement. The overarching principles address the need for shared decision-making and treatment objectives. The recommendations address csDMARDs as an initial therapy after failure of NSAIDs and local therapy for active disease, followed, if necessary, by a bDMARD or a targeted synthetic DMARD (tsDMARD). The first bDMARD would usually be a tumour necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor. bDMARDs targeting interleukin (IL)12/23 (ustekinumab) or IL-17 pathways (secukinumab) may be used in patients for whom TNF inhibitors are inappropriate and a tsDMARD such as a phosphodiesterase 4-inhibitor (apremilast) if bDMARDs are inappropriate. If the first bDMARD strategy fails, any other bDMARD or tsDMARD may be used. CONCLUSIONS: These recommendations provide stakeholders with an updated consensus on the pharmacological treatment of PsA and strategies to reach optimal outcomes in PsA, based on a combination of evidence and expert opinion.

4 Editorial Phototherapy for psoriasis - outdated or underused? 2018

Tanew, A / Lim, H W. ·Phototherapy Unit, Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI, U.S.A. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #30387510.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial Allocation of biologics: health economics and clinical decision making in plaque psoriasis. 2018

Bray, N / Wolf, P. ·Centre for Health Economics and Medicines Evaluation, Ardudwy Hall, Bangor University, Gwynedd, LL57 2PZ, U.K. · Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Graz, Auenbruggerplatz 8, 8036, Graz, Austria. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #29785820.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial New GRAPPA and EULAR recommendations for the management of psoriatic arthritis. 2017

Coates, Laura C / Gossec, Laure / Ramiro, Sofia / Mease, Philip / van der Heijde, Désirée / Smolen, Josef S / Ritchlin, Christopher / Kavanaugh, Arthur. ·Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds and Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds UK. · Department of rheumatology, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06; AP-HP, Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, France. · Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Swedish Medical Center Seattle, WA, USA. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine 3, Medical University of Vienna. · 2nd Department of Medicine, Hietzing Hospital, Vienna, Austria. · Allergy, Immunology & Rheumatology Division, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY. · Division of Rheumatology, Allergy Immunology, University of California San Diego, USA. ·Rheumatology (Oxford) · Pubmed #28077693.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Review Disease activity assessment in patients with psoriatic arthritis. 2018

Kerschbaumer, Andreas / Smolen, Josef S / Aletaha, Daniel. ·Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine 3, Medical University of Vienna, Austria. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine 3, Medical University of Vienna, Austria. Electronic address: daniel.aletaha@meduniwien.ac.at. ·Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol · Pubmed #31171311.

ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory disease in patients with a personal or family history of psoriasis. While synovitis is the major hallmark, enthesitis, dactylitis, axial inflammation, and skin and nail involvement are variable in prevalence and severity. The assessment of disease activity is important to determine the treatment target ("Treat-to-Target") as well as early response to therapy, because a prolonged ineffective medication may not only be associated with an adverse disease outcome but constitutes a waste of individual and/or societal expenses. Various measures of disease activity have been established for all manifestations individually ('uni-dimensional approach') or by combining such measures into a single umbrella score ('multi-dimensional approach'). Because pathogeneses and therapeutic responsiveness differ among individual domains, a uni-dimensional approach is preferred. The major uni-dimensional index is the Disease Activity index for PSoriatic Arthritis, which provides a continuous scale and allows calculating disease activity at any point in time, determining response to therapy and defining disease activity states, such as remission, as a treatment target. The assessment of the various domains by individual and combined indices is discussed.

8 Review Tildrakizumab for the treatment of psoriasis. 2018

Bangert, Christine / Kopp, Tamara. ·Department of Dermatology, University of Vienna Medical School, 1090 Vienna, Austria. · Juvenis Medical Center, 1010 Vienna, Austria. ·Immunotherapy · Pubmed #30081696.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic skin disorder driven by IL-23 and the downstream T-helper cell 17 (Th17) pathway. Tildrakizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody selectively targeting the p19 subunit of IL-23, a key cytokine for Th17 cells. Here, we provide an overview of IL-23 in the context of psoriasis pathogenesis and review the results of the Phase I, II and III clinical trials for tildrakizumab in patients with moderate-to-severe chronic plaque psoriasis in order to assess its efficacy, safety and clinical usefulness. In all clinical trials, tildrakizumab demonstrated significant clinical improvement and a favorable safety profile. In Phase III trials, 75% of tildrakizumab-treated patients reached a Psoriasis Area and Severity Index 75 at week 28 demonstrating superior efficacy as compared with etanercept treatment. The tildrakizumab-induced reduction in skin inflammation proves the important pathogenic role of IL-23 in psoriasis and further supports the utility of drugs targeting the IL-23/Th17 pathway. Targeting IL-23p19 with tildrakizumab augments the therapeutic repertoire for patients with moderate-to-severe chronic plaque psoriasis.

9 Review One year in review 2018: ultrasonography in rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis. 2018

Zabotti, Alen / Mandl, Peter / Zampogna, Giuseppe / Dejaco, Christian / Iagnocco, Annamaria. ·Department of Medical and Biological Sciences, Rheumatology Clinic, University of Udine, Italy. · Department of Rheumatology, Medical University of Vienna, Austria. · Department of Rheumatology, Hospital of Bruneck, Italy. · Department of Rheumatology, Hospital of Bruneck, Italy; and Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Medical University Graz, Austria. · Academic Rheumatology Center, Università degli Studi di Torino, Italy. annamaria.iagnocco1@gmail.com. ·Clin Exp Rheumatol · Pubmed #30058527.

ABSTRACT: Ultrasound is playing an increasingly important role in the differential diagnosis and monitoring of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). This technique is more sensitive and specific than clinical examination to detect active synovitis, and the identification of specific synovitis patterns enable differentiation of PsA from RA and other entities. Ultrasound verified inflammation changes along with clinical improvement during therapy, and ultrasound was shown to predict future clinical and structural outcomes thus complementing the clinical risk assessment of patients. In the present review, we summarised the scientific evidence published in 2017 focussing on the use of ultrasonography for clinically relevant and pragmatic aspects of diagnosis and management of RA and PsA.

10 Review The role of IL-23 and the IL-23/T 2017

Girolomoni, G / Strohal, R / Puig, L / Bachelez, H / Barker, J / Boehncke, W H / Prinz, J C. ·Section of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Dermatology and Venerology, Federal Academic Teaching Hospital of Feldkirch, Feldkirch, Austria. · Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Sorbonne Paris Cité, Université Paris Diderot, Paris, France. · Department of Dermatology, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Paris, France. · UMR INSERM U1163, Institut Imagine, Paris, France. · St John's Institute of Dermatology, King's College London, London, UK. · Division of Dermatology, Geneva University Hospitals, Department of Pathology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. · Department of Dermatology, University of Munich, Munich, Germany. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #28653490.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated disease affecting more than 100 million people worldwide and up to 2.2% of the UK population. The aetiology of psoriasis is thought to originate from an interplay of genetic, environmental, infectious and lifestyle factors. The manner in which genetic and environmental factors interact to contribute to the molecular disease mechanisms has remained elusive. However, the interleukin 23 (IL-23)/T-helper 17 (T

11 Review [Fifteen years of the histopathological synovitis score : Review and further developments of a diagnostic score]. 2017

Krenn, V / Perino, G / Rüther, W / Krenn, V T / Huber, M / Hügle, T / Najm, A / Müller, S / Boettner, F / Pessler, F / Waldstein, W / Kriegsmann, J / Häupl, T / Wienert, S / Krukemeyer, M G / Sesselmann, S / Tikhilov, R / Morawietz, L. ·MVZ-Zentrum für Histologie, Zytologie und Molekulare Diagnostik, Max-Planck-Str. 5, 54296, Trier, Deutschland. krenn@patho-trier.de. · Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, USA. · Klinik und Poliklinik für Orthopädie, Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Deutschland. · MVZ-Zentrum für Histologie, Zytologie und Molekulare Diagnostik, Max-Planck-Str. 5, 54296, Trier, Deutschland. · Pathologisch-bakteriologisches Institut, Otto Wagner Spital, Wien, Österreich. · Hôpital Orthopédique, Lausanne, Schweiz. · Rhumatologie, Centre hospital-universitaire de Nantes, Nantes, Frankreich. · TWINCORE, Zentrum für Experimentelle und Klinische Infektionsforschung GmbH, Hannover, Deutschland. · AKH-Wien, Universitätsklinik für Orthopädie, Medizinische Universität Wien, Wien, Österreich. · Med. Klinik, Rheumatologie und Klinische Immunologie, Charité, Berlin, Deutschland. · VMscope-Berlin, Berlin, Deutschland. · Paracelsus-Kliniken Deutschland, Osnabrück, Deutschland. · Orthopädische Universitätsklinik Erlangen, Erlangen, Deutschland. · Vreden Russian Scientific Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics, Saint Petersburg, Russland. · Klinikum Ernst von Bergmann gemeinnützige GmbH, Potsdam, Deutschland. ·Z Rheumatol · Pubmed #28470440.

ABSTRACT: The histopathological synovitis score evaluates in a graded approach, as is largely usual for diagnostic histopathological scores, the immunological and inflammatory changes caused by synovitis. A synovitis score of between 1 and ≤ 4 is classified as low-grade (osteoarthritis-related synovitis, post-traumatic synovitis, meniscopathy-related synovitis and synovitis in hemochromatosis). Synovitis scores of between ≥ 5 and 9 are classified as high-grade synovitis (rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, Lyme's arthritis, post-infection/reactive arthritis and peripheral arthritis in Bechterew disease); sensitivity is 61.7% and sensitivity 96.1%. According to receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis (AUC: 0.8-0.9), diagnostic value is good. National and international acceptance of the synovitis score has grown since the first publication in 2002 and a related follow-up publication in 2006. PubMed data analysis (as of 11.01.2017) yielded the following citation values according to "cited by PubMed Central articles" for two publications relating to the synovitis score: there were 29 cited-by-PubMed articles for DOI: 10.1078/0344-0338-5710261 , and 44 cited-in-PubMed articles for the second publication, DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2559.2006.02508 . This makes a total of 73 PubMed citations over a period of 15 years, thereby evidencing the score's international acceptance. Immunohistochemical determination of a number of CD antigens relevant to inflammation has been proposed to further specify the synovitis score for the purposes of risk stratification of high-grade synovitis (e.g., risk of progression and sensitivity to biological agents).

12 Review Management of psoriatic arthritis in 2016: a comparison of EULAR and GRAPPA recommendations. 2016

Gossec, Laure / Coates, Laura C / de Wit, Maarten / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Ramiro, Sofia / Mease, Philip J / Ritchlin, Christopher T / van der Heijde, Désirée / Smolen, Josef S. ·Sorbonne Universités, Université Pierre and Marie Curie - Paris 6, 4 Place Jussieu 75005, Paris, France; and at the Service de Rhumatologie, L'Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, Pitié Salpêtrière Hôpital, 47-83 Boulevard de l'Hôpital, 75013, Paris, France. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Leeds; and at the Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, 2nd Floor, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Chapeltown Road, Leeds, LS7 4SA, UK. · Department of Medical Humanities, Vrije Universiteit Medical Centre, POBox 7057, 1007 MB Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Division of Rheumatology, Allergy &Immunology, Department of Medicine, University of California San Diego School of Medicine, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0656, USA. · Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Centre, POBox 9600, 2300 RC Leiden, Netherlands. · Rheumatology Clinical Research Division, Swedish Medical Center, 601 Broadway, Suite 600, Seattle, Washington 98102, USA. · Division of Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, BOX 695, Rochester, New York 14642, USA. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine 3, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna, Austria; and at the 2nd Department of Medicine, Hietzing Hospital, Wolkersbergenstraße 1, 1130 Vienna, Austria. ·Nat Rev Rheumatol · Pubmed #27829672.

ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a heterogeneous, potentially severe disease. Many therapeutic agents are now available for PsA, but treatment decisions are not always straightforward. To assist in this decision making, two sets of recommendations for the management of PsA were published in 2016 by international organizations - the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) and the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA). In both sets of recommendations, the heterogeneity of PsA is recognized and the place of various drugs in the therapeutic armamentarium is discussed. Such agents include conventional DMARDs, such as methotrexate, and targeted therapies including biologic agents, such as ustekinumab, secukinumab and TNF inhibitors, or the targeted synthetic drug apremilast. The proposed sequential use of these drugs, as well as some other aspects of PsA management, differ between the two sets of recommendations. This disparity is partly the result of a difference in the evaluation process; the focus of EULAR was primarily rheumatological, whereas that of GRAPPA was balanced between the rheumatological and dermatological aspects of disease. In this Perspectives article, we address the similarities and differences between these two sets of recommendations and the implications for patient management.

13 Review An overview of psoriatic arthritis - epidemiology, clinical features, pathophysiology and novel treatment targets. 2016

Kerschbaumer, Andreas / Fenzl, Karl H / Erlacher, Ludwig / Aletaha, Daniel. ·Department of Internal Medicine III, Division of Rheumatology, Medical University of Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090, Vienna, Austria. andreas.kerschbaumer@meduniwien.ac.at. · Karl Landsteiner Institute for Autoimmune Diseases and Rheumatology, Kundratstraße 3, 1100, Vienna, Austria. andreas.kerschbaumer@meduniwien.ac.at. · Karl Landsteiner Institute for Autoimmune Diseases and Rheumatology, Kundratstraße 3, 1100, Vienna, Austria. · 2nd Medical Department with Rheumatology, Osteology and Geriatrics, Kundratstraße 3, 1100, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Internal Medicine III, Division of Rheumatology, Medical University of Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090, Vienna, Austria. ·Wien Klin Wochenschr · Pubmed #27822746.

ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic inflammatory joint disease occurring in a subgroup of patients suffering from psoriasis. This article gives an overview of the complexity of psoriatic arthritis, looking at several aspects of this heterogeneous disease, such as epidemiology, important clinical features and comorbidities as well as current concepts of the pathophysiology and subsequent insights in novel treatment targets.

14 Review Comparative Risk of Harm Associated With the Use of Targeted Immunomodulators: A Systematic Review. 2016

Desai, Rishi J / Thaler, Kylie J / Mahlknecht, Peter / Gartlehner, Gerald / McDonagh, Marian S / Mesgarpour, Bita / Mazinanian, Alireza / Glechner, Anna / Gopalakrishnan, Chandrasekar / Hansen, Richard A. ·Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Danube University, Krems, Austria. · Danube University, Krems, Austria, and RTI International, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. · Pacific Northwest Evidence-Based Practice Center, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon. · Digestive Diseases Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. · Harrison School of Pharmacy, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama. ·Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) · Pubmed #26663412.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To systematically compare the risk of adverse events (AEs) for 13 targeted immunomodulators (TIMs) indicated for ankylosing spondylitis (AS), inflammatory bowel diseases, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, plaque psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis (PsA), or rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: We searched electronic databases through July 2015 to retrieve randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies comparing AEs between 2 or more TIMs head-to-head. We reported on the following outcomes: number of AEs, discontinuation due to AEs, serious AEs, mortality, serious infections, tuberculosis, herpes zoster, and malignancies. We qualitatively synthesized the literature and conducted random-effects meta-analyses if 3 or more studies provided data for an outcome. RESULTS: Ten head-to-head RCTs and 51 observational studies were included in this systematic review. A majority of the studies (70%) were conducted in RA patients. Risk of treatment discontinuation due to AEs was higher with infliximab than with adalimumab or etanercept in RA, PsA, and AS. A higher risk for serious infections was noted with infliximab than with abatacept, adalimumab, or etanercept in RA. Risk for treatment discontinuation due to AEs, serious infections, and tuberculosis was lower with etanercept than with adalimumab in RA. Limited evidence suggested no comparative differences in risk for mortality, malignancies, and herpes zoster for adalimumab, etanercept, and infliximab in RA. CONCLUSION: Important differences were noted in the safety profile of TIMs in RA, generally favoring abatacept, adalimumab, and etanercept over infliximab. Head-to-head comparative evidence for other TIMs and non-RA populations was insufficient to draw conclusions for most of the safety outcomes.

15 Review Pharmacological treatment of psoriatic arthritis: a systematic literature review for the 2015 update of the EULAR recommendations for the management of psoriatic arthritis. 2016

Ramiro, Sofia / Smolen, Josef S / Landewé, Robert / van der Heijde, Désirée / Dougados, Maxime / Emery, Paul / de Wit, Maarten / Cutolo, Maurizio / Oliver, Susan / Gossec, Laure. ·Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Hietzing Hospital, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Clinical Immunology & Rheumatology, Amsterdam Rheumatology Center, Amsterdam and Atrium Medical Center, Heerlen, The Netherlands. · Medicine Faculty, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France Rheumatology B Department, APHP, Cochin Hospital, Paris, France. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK NIHR Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds Teaching Hospitals Trust, Leeds, UK. · EULAR past Vice President representing People with Arthritis/Rheumatism in Europe (PARE). · Research Laboratory and Clinical Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genova, Italy. · Independent Nurse Consultant, North Devon, UK. · Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Institut Pierre Louis d'Epidémiologie et de Santé Publique, GRC-UPMC 08 (EEMOIS), Paris, France Department of rheumatology, AP-HP, Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, France. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #26660203.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To update the evidence on the efficacy and safety of pharmacological agents in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). METHODS: Systematic literature review of randomised controlled trials comparing pharmacological interventions in PsA: non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, glucocorticoid, synthetic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (sDMARDs) either conventional or targeted, biologicals (bDMARDs), placebo or any combination. Main outcomes were American College of Rheumatology (ACR)20-50, Psoriasis Area Severity Index 75, radiographic progression, and withdrawals due to adverse events (AEs). Multiple studies of the same intervention were meta-analysed using random effects. RESULTS: In total, 25 papers and 12 abstracts were included. The efficacy of tumour necrosis factor inhibitors (including the recently added golimumab and certolizumab pegol) was confirmed and 16 articles/abstracts focused on 3 drugs with new modes of action: ustekinumab (UST), secukinumab (SEC) and apremilast (APR). All were placebo-compared trials and met their primary end point, ACR20. In 2 studies with UST ACR20 was met by 50% and 44% of patients with UST 90 mg, 42% and 44% with UST 45 mg vs 23% and 20% with placebo, respectively. In two studies with SEC ACR20 ranged 54% (SEC 300 mg), 50-51% (SEC 150 mg), 29-51% (SEC 75 mg) and 15-17% (placebo). In four studies with APR, ACR20 ranged 32-43% (APR 30 mg), 29-38% (APR 20 mg) and 17-20% (placebo). For all three drugs, no more withdrawals due to AEs than placebo were seen and, in general, safety appeared satisfactory. A strategy trial, TIght COntrol of Psoriatic Arthritis (TICOPA), showed better ACR responses with treatment adaptations upon tight control compared with standard care. CONCLUSIONS: UST, SEC and APR are new drugs with efficacy demonstrated for the treatment of PsA. No major safety signals arise, but long-term studies are needed. This review informed about the European League Against Rheumatism recommendations for management of PsA.

16 Review High-Resolution US of Rheumatologic Diseases. 2015

Taljanovic, Mihra S / Melville, David M / Gimber, Lana H / Scalcione, Luke R / Miller, Margaret D / Kwoh, C Kent / Klauser, Andrea S. ·From the Department of Medical Imaging (M.S.T., D.M.M., L.H.G., L.R.S.), Department of Medicine (M.D.M.), and Division of Rheumatology (C.K.K.), University of Arizona, Banner-University Medical Center, 1501 N Campbell Ave, PO Box 245067, Tucson, AZ 85724 · and Department of Radiology, Medical University Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria (A.S.K.). ·Radiographics · Pubmed #26562235.

ABSTRACT: For the past 15 years, high-resolution ultrasonography (US) is being routinely and increasingly used for initial evaluation and treatment follow-up of rheumatologic diseases. This imaging technique is performed by using high-frequency linear transducers and has proved to be a powerful diagnostic tool in evaluation of articular erosions, simple and complex joint and bursal effusions, tendon sheath effusions, and synovitis, with results comparable to those of magnetic resonance imaging, excluding detection of bone marrow edema. Crystal deposition diseases including gouty arthropathy and calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease (CPPD) have characteristic appearances at US, enabling differentiation between these two diseases and from inflammatory arthropathies. Enthesopathy, which frequently accompanies psoriatic and reactive arthritis, also has a characteristic appearance at high-resolution US, distinguishing these two entities from other inflammatory and metabolic arthropathies. The presence of Doppler signal in examined joints, bursae, and tendon sheaths indicates active synovitis. Microbubble echo contrast agents augment detection of tissue vascularity and may act in the future as a drug delivery vehicle. Frequently, joint, tendon sheath, and bursal fluid aspirations and therapeutic injections are performed under US guidance. The authors describe the high-resolution US technique including gray-scale, color or power Doppler, and contrast agent-enhanced US that is used in evaluation of rheumatologic diseases of the wrist and hand and the ankle and foot in their routine clinical practice. This article demonstrates imaging findings of normal joints, rheumatoid arthritis, gouty arthritis, CPPD, psoriatic and reactive arthritis, and osteoarthritis.

17 Review Epidermal barrier in hereditary ichthyoses, atopic dermatitis, and psoriasis. 2015

Schmuth, Matthias / Blunder, Stefan / Dubrac, Sandrine / Gruber, Robert / Moosbrugger-Martinz, Verena. ·Department of Dermatology and Venereology, University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria. ·J Dtsch Dermatol Ges · Pubmed #26513068.

ABSTRACT: Several skin disorders are associated with impaired skin barrier function. Primary dysfunction is caused by monogenic defects in key components of the epidermis (for example ichthyoses). Secondary barrier impairment occurs in inflammatory dermatoses marked by disturbed epidermal homeostasis (eczema, psoriasis, etc.). In these disorders, inflammation impedes the synthesis or maintenance of skin barrier components. Recent evidence suggests a combination of primary and secondary barrier dysfunction in atopic dermatitis and, to a lesser extent, also in psoriasis. In the future, subtypes of atopic dermatitis may likely be defined, in which one or the other is prevalent.

18 Review Disease activity and response assessment in psoriatic arthritis using the Disease Activity index for PSoriatic Arthritis (DAPSA). A brief review. 2015

Smolen, Josef S / Schoels, Monika / Aletaha, Daniel. ·Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine 3, Medical University of Vienna, Austria. josef.smolen@wienkav.at. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine 3, Medical University of Vienna, Austria. ·Clin Exp Rheumatol · Pubmed #26471734.

ABSTRACT: In this review we provide reasons to use joint specific composite measures of disease activity for psoriatic arthritis (PsA) rather than composite scores that combine several manifestations of psoriatic disease, including skin involvement. Based on a principal component analysis, which, indeed, excluded skin involvement as a major factor in PsA, the Disease Activity index for PSoriatic Arthritis (DAPSA) was validated using clinical trial and observational data. Further, disease activity states and response criteria were recently defined. The DAPSA is simply calculated by summing swollen + tender joint counts + patient pain + patient global assessments + CRP, using 66/68 joint counts. DAPSA has meanwhile been validated in other studies and has shown to have a very high level of validity, also when compared with joint sonography. Thus, DAPSA is useful in clinical practice, clinical trials and observational studies.

19 Review Treatment of psoriatic arthritis: management recommendations. 2015

Gossec, Laure / Smolen, Josef S. ·Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Institut Pierre Louis d'Epidémiologie et de Santé Publique, GRC-UPMC 08 (EEMOIS); AP-HP, Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Department of Rheumatology, Paris, France. laure.gossec@aphp.fr. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine 3, Medical University of Vienna, and 2nd Department of Medicine, Hietzing Hospital, Vienna, Austria. ·Clin Exp Rheumatol · Pubmed #26471459.

ABSTRACT: Given the varied therapeutic options available for the management of psoriatic arthritis (PsA), recommendations for the management of PsA have been developed by several expert groups. These recommendations deal mainly with pharmacological treatments. At the international level, 2 recommendations sets are available: these have been developed by the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) and by the European League against Rheumatism (EULAR). These recommendations were published in 2009 and in 2012, respectively; and updates of these recommendations are currently ongoing. The first sets of recommendations dealt with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, glucocorticoids, conventional synthetic disease modifying drugs and tumour necrosis factor inhibitors; the 2015 sets of recommendations also deal with new drugs with other mechanisms of action, namely ustekinumab, secukinumab and apremilast. In the present paper, we will review these management recommendations.

20 Review A patient-centred approach to biological treatment decision making for psoriasis: an expert consensus. 2015

Strohal, R / Prinz, J C / Girolomoni, G / Nast, A. ·Department of Dermatology and Venerology, Federal Academic Teaching Hospital of Feldkirch, Feldkirch, Austria. · Department of Dermatology, University of Munich, Munich, Germany. · Section of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Division of Evidence Based Medicine (dEBM), Department of Dermatology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #26370908.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Each individual psoriasis patient has different expectations and goals for biological treatment, which may differ from those of the clinician. As such, a patient-centred approach to treatment goals remains an unmet need in psoriasis. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to review available data on patients' and physicians' decision criteria and expectations of biological treatment for moderate-to-severe psoriasis with the aim of developing a core set of questions for clinicians to ask patients routinely to understand what is important to them and thus better align physicians' and patients' expectations of treatment with biologics and its outcomes. METHODS: A literature search was conducted to identify key themes and data gaps. Aspects of treatment relevant when choosing a biological agent for an individual patient were identified and compared to an existing validated instrument. A series of questions aimed at helping the physician to identify the particular aspects of treatment that are recognised as important to individual psoriasis patients was developed. RESULTS: Key findings of the literature search were grouped under themes of adherence, decision-making, quality of life, patient/physician goals, communication, patient-reported outcomes, satisfaction and patient benefit index. Several aspects of treatment were identified as being relevant when choosing a biological agent for an individual patient. The questionnaire is devised in two parts. The first part asks questions about patients' experience of psoriasis and satisfaction with previous treatments. The second part aims to identify the treatment attributes patients consider to be important and may as such affect their preference for a particular biological treatment. The questionnaire results will allow the physician to understand the key factors that can be influenced by biological drug choice that are of importance to the patient. This information can be used be the physician in clinical decision making. CONCLUSION: The questionnaire has been developed to provide a new tool to better understand and align patients' and physicians' preferences and goals for biological treatment of psoriasis.

21 Review PSOCUBE, a multidimensional assessment of psoriasis patients as a both clinically/practically sustainable and evidence-based algorithm. 2015

Linder, D / Altomare, G / Amato, S / Amerio, P / Balato, N / Campanati, A / Conti, A / Gisondi, P / Prignano, F / Saraceno, R / Piaserico, S. ·Department of Dermatology, University Hospital of Padua, Italy. · Research Unit of Behavioural Medicine, Health Psychology and Empirical Psychosomatics, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria. · Dermatology Unit, Istituto Ortopedico Galeazzi IRCCS, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. · Department of Dermatology and STD, ARNAS-Palermo, Palermo, Italy. · Department of Oncology and Neurosciences, Dermatologic Clinic, University G. D'Annunzio, Chieti, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, University Federico II, Naples, Italy. · Dermatological Clinic, Department of Clinical and Molecular Sciences, Polytechnic Marche University, Ancona, Italy. · Dermatology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Policlinico, Modena, Italy. · Department of Medicine, Section of Dermatology and Venereology, University of Verona, Italy. · Division of Clinical, Preventive and Oncology Dermatology, Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, Florence University, Florence, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, University Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #25370415.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: There is increasing awareness of the clinical relevance of psoriasis comorbidities and of the importance of timely and effective screening for such comorbidities in the management of psoriatic patients. Previous works have focused on assessing evidence for prevalence of comorbidities and on the best available evidence for sensitivity in diagnosing suspected comorbidities. No algorithms are available, which have been tested on large numbers of physicians concerning the acceptance of such algorithms both by practicing clinical dermatologists and by their consulting specialists from other fields. OBJECTIVE: To propose a multidimensional assessment algorithm for psoriasis comorbidities which may prove at the same time enough sensitive and practically sustainable in daily clinical practice. METHODS: After an exhaustive literature search, we performed a Delphi procedure involving 50 dedicated dermatological centres to obtain a standardized assessment algorithm, which would meet requirements of sustainability and acceptability both from the point of view of Evidence-Based Medicine as well as from the point of view of practical and clinical feasibility: to meet both requirements, results from the Delphi procedure were elaborated and modified by a restricted panel of experts. RESULTS: The procedure has yielded PSOCUBE, a three-dimensional table comprising 14 clinical examination and history taking items, 32 screening laboratory and instrumental exams and 11 clinimetric scores. CONCLUSION: PSOCUBE, a simple algorithm, may be employed by practising dermatologists to perform standardized assessment procedures on psoriatic patients raising the chances of early recognition of patients at risk for comorbidities, thus fostering more effective prevention; PSOCUBE may therefore contribute to reduce the overall impact of this chronic, widespread disease.

22 Review Biological agents in psoriatic arthritis. 2015

Kocijan, Roland / Muschitz, Christian / Rech, Jürgen. ·Medical Department II, St. Vincent Hospital,Academic Teaching Hospital of Medical University of Vienna, The VINFORCE Study Group, Stumpergasse 13, 1060, Vienna, Austria, roland.kocijan@bhs.at. ·Wien Med Wochenschr · Pubmed #25205184.

ABSTRACT: Anti-tumor necrosis factors (TNFs) are effective drugs for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) regarding reduction of pain and inflammation, enthesitis, dactylitis, as well as psoriatic skin and nail disease. Moreover, radiographic progression in PsA is decelerated. The efficacy of anti-TNFs seems to be independent of synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, suggesting only a minor role of combination therapy in PsA. Anti-TNFs are generally well tolerated in patients with PsA. Adverse events are similar to those reported in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Ustekinumab, a recently approved IL-12/IL-23-antibody is another promising biological agent in the treatment of PsA.

23 Review Psoriatic arthritis indices. 2014

Schoels, M. ·2nd Department of Internal Medicine, Hietzing Hospital, Vienna, Austria. monika.schoels@live.com. ·Clin Exp Rheumatol · Pubmed #25365098.

ABSTRACT: The approach to measuring psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is still very variable. However, consistently assessed disease activity enables the determination, documentation and communication of treatment success or failure and facilitates the comparison of outcomes between trial populations and real-life patients. Consequently, homogeneously applied measures are desirable to optimise patient care. In the following, we present a brief overview of single disease activity measures and compound scores for PsA.

24 Review Antipsoriatic treatment extends beyond the skin: recovering of high-density lipoprotein function. 2014

Marsche, Gunther / Holzer, Michael / Wolf, Peter. ·Institute of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria. ·Exp Dermatol · Pubmed #24980461.

ABSTRACT: Epidemiological and clinical studies have shown a consistent association of psoriasis with systemic metabolic disorders including an increased prevalence of diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular disease. Psoriasis is accompanied by systemic inflammation and low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. Recent studies provided clear evidence that psoriasis affects HDL composition and function. HDL isolated from patients with psoriasis showed a significantly impaired capability to mobilize cholesterol from macrophages, a crucial step in reverse cholesterol transport and markedly lower paraoxonase activity, a protein that co-transports with HDL in serum with well-known anti-atherogenic properties. Of particular interest, successful antipsoriatic therapy significantly improved HDL composition and function independently of serum HDL cholesterol levels. These novel findings suggest that the conventional approaches of evaluating cardiovascular risk in psoriasis may be in need of refinement. As these data argue for a loss of beneficial activities of HDL in patients with psoriasis, altered HDL functionality should be considered when evaluating the lipid status of patients.

25 Review Psoriasis beyond the skin: a review of the literature on cardiometabolic and psychological co-morbidities of psoriasis. 2014

Puig, Lluis / Kirby, Brian / Mallbris, Lotus / Strohal, Robert. ·Department of Dermatology, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Sant Antoni Maria Claret 167, 08025 Barcelona, Spain. · St Vincent's University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin, Ireland. · Lotus Mallbris, Pfizer Global Medical Dermatology Lead, Philadelphia, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Federal Academic Teaching Hospital, Feldkirch, Austria. ·Eur J Dermatol · Pubmed #24752135.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is increasingly associated with a range of co-morbid diseases and risk factors. Patients with co-morbidities are more likely to need hospitalisation for non-dermatological conditions, and incur greater total costs than those without co-morbidities. A literature review was conducted on two of the most common co-morbidities of psoriasis (cardiovascular (CV) and psychological co-morbidities), to establish their incidence and impact and to raise awareness of unanswered questions and highlight knowledge gaps. A large number of small controlled or cross-sectional studies report increased prevalence of cardiometabolic and psychological co-morbidities in psoriasis patients. A number of large cohort studies documented the incidence of various cardiometabolic co-morbidities. Severe psoriasis is associated with increased mortality, and the most common cause of death is CV disease. Studies on the management of co-morbidities and their impact on psoriasis treatment are scarce. Many questions on the co-morbidities of psoriasis remain to be answered.

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