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Psoriasis: HELP
Articles from Israel
Based on 147 articles published since 2008
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These are the 147 published articles about Psoriasis that originated from Israel during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6
1 Review IL-17 inhibition: is it the long-awaited savior for alopecia areata? 2018

Ramot, Yuval / Marzani, Barbara / Pinto, Daniela / Sorbellini, Elisabetta / Rinaldi, Fabio. ·Department of Dermatology, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, PO Box 12000, 9112001, Jerusalem, Israel. yramot@gmail.com. · Giuliani S.p.a., Milan, Italy. · International Hair Research Foundation (IHRF), Milan, Italy. ·Arch Dermatol Res · Pubmed #29497840.

ABSTRACT: Interleukin-17 (IL-17) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a large number of inflammatory and autoimmune conditions, including skin disorders such as psoriasis. Recently, much data have accumulated on the possible role of IL-17 in the pathogenesis of alopecia areata (AA). In this review, the available information on the connection between AA and IL-17 is described. While IL-17 levels are consistently reported to be elevated in the serum and lesional skin of AA patients, there is no clear connection between IL-17 levels and disease severity or duration. Some evidence has suggested an association between IL-17 and an early-onset disease, although this awaits further confirmation. While there is enough information to support clinical trials with IL-17-targeted treatments, it is possible that they will be effective only in a subset of AA patients. Further studies are warranted to better delineate the exact role of IL-17 in AA pathogenesis.

2 Review The contribution of feedback loops between miRNAs, cytokines and growth factors to the pathogenesis of psoriasis. 2018

Masalha, Moamen / Sidi, Yechezkel / Avni, Dror. ·Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Center for Cancer Research and Department of Medicine C, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel. · Faculty of Medicine, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. ·Exp Dermatol · Pubmed #29479749.

ABSTRACT: The present review describes in detail the existent data regarding feedback loops between miRNAs and cytokines or growth factors in the psoriatic inflammation. We have chosen to describe the roles of miR-31, miR-21, miR-146a, miR-155, miR-197 and miR-99a in this process. This choice derives from the fact that among around 250 miRNAs being altered in the psoriatic lesion, the comprehensive functional role was described only in those detailed above. In addition, considering the molecular targets and the pathways, which may possibly be regulated by those miRNAs, it seems that they may be chosen as preferred targets for the therapy of psoriasis.

3 Review Lessons Learned from Imaging on Enthesitis in Psoriatic Arthritis. 2017

Watad, Abdulla / Eshed, Iris / McGonagle, Dennis. ·Department of Medicine B, Zabludowicz Center for Autoimmune Diseases, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel. · Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. · Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds and NIHR Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Chapel Allerton. ·Isr Med Assoc J · Pubmed #29185286.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Enthesitis is a term that refers to inflammation at tendon, ligament, or joint capsule insertions. The entheses are increasinlgly considered to be the primary site of joint inflammation in the spondyloarthropathies including psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Great advances have occurred in the understanding of enthesopathy, which has resulted in a better understanding of the etiopathogenesis of PsA. Enthesitis is difficult to assess on both clinical examination and on imaging because of the overlap in features between mechanical, degenerative, and inflammatory pathologies. Ultrasonography frequently detects entheseal abnormalities in patients with psoriasis, despite the absence of clinical symptoms of arthropathy and the longitudinal value of such lesions for PsA prediction remains unknown. The role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the assessment and monitoring of enthesitis is not fully agreed on but it is clearly superior for the assessment of spinal polyenthesitis and for diffuse peri-enthseal osteitis that can occur anywhere in the skeleton. Nuclear medicine, including conventional positron-emission tomography (PET) and high-resolution PET scan (hrPET), is more of a research tool for enthesitis and can, for example, help distinguish between PsA and osteoarthritis. Entheseal abnormalities are common in osteoarthritis, which creates diagnostic difficulty from PsA. Entheseal changes, especially on imaging, may also occur in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and likely reflect the extension of the inflammatory process from the adjacent synovium. The nail is anatomically anchored to the skeleton via a mini-enthesis network. An association between ultrasonography determined distal interphalageal joint (DIP) extensor tendon enthesopathy and clinical nail disease was found, which highlights the pivotal role of the enthesis in this PsA risk factor. This review summarizes the relevant insights and implication of imaging for enthesitis, primarily in PsA but also in other arthropathies.

4 Review [THE EFFECT OF BIOLOGIC THERAPY ON THE LIPID PROFILE OF RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS (RA), PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS (PSA) AND ANKYLOSING SPONDYLITIS (AS) PATIENTS]. 2017

Hassan, Shadi / Feld, Joy / Cohen, Shai / Zisman, Devy. ·Internal Ward, Carmel Medical Center, Haifa. · Rheumatology Unit, Carmel and Lin Medical Centers, Haifa. ·Harefuah · Pubmed #28786273.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality is elevated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PSA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients. The inflammation not only accelerates atherosclerosis, but also influences CV risk factors such as lipid profile, blood pressure and insulin resistance. RA and PSA patients are initially treated with DMARDS (disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs). However, if remission is not achieved in RA, a variety of biologics (anti- TNF rituximab, tocilizumab, abatacept) are added to the treatment regimen. In PSA, only anti-TNF drugs are approved. AS is treated solely by NSAIDS and anti-TNF drugs. DMARDS were found to reduce the CV morbidity in RA patients, in addition to their anti-inflammatory affect. However, it has not been proven that anti-inflammatory therapy reduces the cardiovascular risk in PSA and AS patients. Anti-TNF drugs have been shown to reduce CV morbidity and mortality in RA and AS patients, however their effect on these patient's lipid profile in not yet clear. Despite the scarce evidence available, it seems that rituximab may have a positive influence on the patient's lipid profile. Even though tocilizumab adversely affects the lipid profile, this drug's overall CV effect is still being examined in clinical trials. There is not enough evidence to determine the effect of abatacept on the lipid profile. These issues are currently in the focus of many clinical trials and no doubt these issues will be clarified in the future.

5 Review Biosimilars for psoriasis: worldwide overview of regulatory guidelines, uptake and implications for dermatology clinical practice. 2017

Cohen, A D / Wu, J J / Puig, L / Chimenti, S / Vender, R / Rajagopalan, M / Romiti, R / de la Cruz, C / Skov, L / Zachariae, C / Young, H S / Foley, P / van der Walt, J M / Naldi, L / Prens, E P / Blauvelt, A. ·Siaal Research Center for Family Medicine and Primary Care, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel. · Department of Quality Measurements and Research, Chief Physician's Office, Clalit Health Services, Tel Aviv, Israel. · Department of Dermatology, Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, U.S.A. · Department of Dermatology, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy. · Dermatrials Research Inc. & Venderm Innovations in Psoriasis, Hamilton, ON, Canada. · Department of Dermatology, Apollo Hospitals, Chennai, India. · Department of Dermatology, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. · Clínica Dermacross, Santiago, Chile. · Department of Dermatology and Allergy, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · The University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, U.K. · Department of Dermatology, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, U.K. · Skin & Cancer Foundation Inc., Carlton, Vic., Australia. · Department of Dermatology, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Vic., Australia. · St Vincent's Hospital, Melbourne, Vic., Australia. · International Psoriasis Council, St Louis, MO, U.S.A. · Department of Dermatology, Azienda Ospedaliera Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy. · Deptartment of Dermatology, Erasmus MC, P.O. Box 5201, 3008, AE Rotterdam, the Netherlands. · Oregon Medical Research Center, Portland, OR, U.S.A. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #28646580.

ABSTRACT: The introduction of biological drugs for the treatment of patients with psoriasis has revolutionized treatment paradigms and enabled numerous patients to achieve disease control with an acceptable safety profile. However, the high cost of biologics limits access to these medications for the majority of patients worldwide. In recent years, the introduction of biosimilars for inflammatory diseases has become a fast evolving field. The future use of biosimilars offers the potential for decreased cost and increased access to biologics for patients with psoriasis. For approval of biosimilars, different regulatory agencies use highly variable methods for definition, production, approval, marketing and postmarketing surveillance. Due to potential interchangeability between biologics and biosimilars, traceability and pharmacovigilance are required to collect accurate data about adverse events in patients with psoriasis; spontaneous reporting, registries and use of 'big data' should facilitate this process on a global basis. The current article describes biosimilar regulatory guidelines and examples of biosimilar uptake in clinical practice in several countries around the world. As it is apparent that biological therapy treatment decisions may become more physician independent, the International Psoriasis Council recommends that dermatologists should take an active role in the development of biosimilar prescribing policies with their respective healthcare settings and government agencies.

6 Review Risk for hepatitis B and C virus reactivation in patients with psoriasis on biologic therapies: A retrospective cohort study and systematic review of the literature. 2017

Snast, Igor / Atzmony, Lihi / Braun, Marius / Hodak, Emmilia / Pavlovsky, Lev. ·Department of Dermatology, Rabin Medical Center Beilinson Hospital, Petach Tikva, Isreal. · Liver Institute, Rabin Medical Center Beilinson Hospital, Petach Tikva, Isreal; Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Isreal. · Department of Dermatology, Rabin Medical Center Beilinson Hospital, Petach Tikva, Isreal; Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Isreal. · Department of Dermatology, Rabin Medical Center Beilinson Hospital, Petach Tikva, Isreal. Electronic address: levp@clalit.org.il. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #28495497.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Patients with psoriasis on biologic therapies and a history of viral hepatitis carry a risk for reactivation. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated safety of biologic therapies in psoriasis patients seropositive for hepatitis B or C viruses (HBV, HCV). METHODS: A retrospective cohort study design was used. Clinical and laboratory data for 30 patients undergoing biologic therapy who were seropositive for HBV or HCV were evaluated. Next, a systematic review was performed. Primary outcomes were hepatitis and viral reactivation during therapy. Treatment duration and antiviral prophylaxis were also recorded. RESULTS: Serology indicated HCV infection in 4 patients, past HBV infection in 17 patients, isolated core antibody in 8 patients, and chronic HBV infection in 1 patient. During follow-up (mean 4.85 ± 3.1 years), no patients experienced hepatitis or viral reactivation. The systematic review of the literature included 49 studies comprising 312 patients followed for a mean of 30.9 months. Viral reactivation occurred in 2/175 patients who were seropositive for core antibody and 3/97 with HCV infection (yearly rates, 0.32% and 2.42%, respectively) compared with 8/40 patients with chronic HBV infection (yearly rate, 13.92%). Three of these 8 patients with reactivated HBV infection received antiviral prophylaxis. LIMITATIONS: We pooled heterogeneous studies evaluating different biologic therapies. CONCLUSION: Biologic therapies pose minimal risk for viral reactivation in low-risk patients without hepatitis seropositive for HCV or HBV core antibody but are a considerable risk in patients with chronic HBV infection, highlighting the necessity of antiviral prophylaxis.

7 Review Janus kinase inhibitors in dermatology: A systematic review. 2017

Shreberk-Hassidim, Rony / Ramot, Yuval / Zlotogorski, Abraham. ·Department of Dermatology, Hadassah - Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel. · Department of Dermatology, Hadassah - Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel. Electronic address: zloto@cc.huji.ac.il. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #28169015.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors are emerging as a promising new treatment modality for many inflammatory conditions. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to systematically review the available data on the use of JAK inhibitors in cutaneous diseases. METHODS: This is a systematic review of PubMed and ClinicalTrials.gov. RESULTS: One hundred thirty-four articles matched our search terms, of which 78 were original articles and 12 reports on adverse events. Eighteen clinical trials were found. JAK inhibitors have been extensively studied for psoriasis, showing beneficial results that were comparable to the effects achieved by etanercept. Favorable results were also observed for alopecia areata. Promising preliminary results were reported for vitiligo, dermatitis, graft versus host disease, cutaneous T cell lymphoma, and lupus erythematosus. The most common adverse events reported were infections, mostly nasopharyngitis and upper respiratory tract infections. LIMITATIONS: It was not possible to perform a meta-analysis of the results. CONCLUSIONS: This systematic review shows that while JAK inhibitors hold promise for many skin disorders, there are still gaps regarding the correct dosing and safety profile of these medications for dermatologic indications. Additional trials are necessary to address these gaps.

8 Review Biosimilars for psoriasis: clinical studies to determine similarity. 2017

Blauvelt, A / Puig, L / Chimenti, S / Vender, R / Rajagopalan, M / Romiti, R / Skov, L / Zachariae, C / Young, H / Prens, E / Cohen, A / van der Walt, J / Wu, J J. ·Oregon Medical Research Center, Portland, OR, U.S.A. · Department of Dermatology, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · University of Rome Tor Vergate, Rome, Italy. · Dermatrials Research Inc., Hamilton, ON, Canada. · Venderm Innovations in Psoriasis, Hamilton, ON, Canada. · Apollo Hospitals, Chennai, India. · Department of Dermatology, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. · Herllev and Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Department of Dermatology, University of Manchester, Salford Royal Hospital, Manchester, U.K. · Department of Dermatology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Siaal Research Center for Family Medicine and Primary Care, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel. · Department of Quality Measurements and Research, Chief Physician's Office, Clalit Health Services, Tel Aviv, Israel. · International Psoriasis Council, St Louis, MO, U.S.A. · Department of Dermatology, Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, U.S.A. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #27639072.

ABSTRACT: Biosimilars are drugs that are similar, but not identical, to originator biologics. Preclinical analytical studies are required to show similarity on a molecular and structural level, but efficacy and safety studies in humans are essential to determining biosimilarity. In this review, written by members of the International Psoriasis Council, we discuss how biosimilars are evaluated in a clinical setting, with emphasis on extrapolation of indication, interchangeability and optimal clinical trial design.

9 Review Inflammatory Lipid Mediators in Common Skin Diseases. 2016

Kutlubay, Zekayi / Tüzün, YalçIn / Wolf, Ronni / Engin, Burhan. ·Istanbul University, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Department of Dermatology, Istanbul, Turkey; zekayikutlubay@hotmail.com. · Istanbul University, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Department of Dermatology, Istanbul, Turkey. · Dermatology Unit, Kaplan Medical Center, Rechovot, Israel. ·Skinmed · Pubmed #27072724.

ABSTRACT: Lipid mediators play a main role in the complex course of cutaneous inflammatory reactions. They regulate a wide spectrum of cellular processes such as cell proliferation and apoptosis. In the early phase of inflammation, excessive amounts of lipid mediators are released and play a major role in the pathogenesis of skin diseases. Recent data suggest that lipid mediators are able to interfere with the pathogenesis of certain dermatologic diseases, seriously affecting patient quality of life. Acne, psoriasis, and atopic dermatitis are specific examples of skin diseases that may respond to treatment with medication affecting these metabolic pathways. The authors briefly present the current knowledge about the role of lipid mediators in common skin pathologies.

10 Review Biosimilars for psoriasis: preclinical analytical assessment to determine similarity. 2016

Blauvelt, A / Cohen, A D / Puig, L / Vender, R / van der Walt, J / Wu, J J. ·Oregon Medical Research Center, Portland, OR, U.S.A. · Siaal Research Center for Family Medicine and Primary Care, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel. · Department of Quality Measurements and Research, Chief Physician's Office, Clalit Health Services, Tel Aviv, Israel. · Department of Dermatology, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Dermatrials Research Inc., 132 Young Street, Hamilton, ON, Canada, L8N 1V6. · International Psoriasis Council, St Louis, MO, U.S.A. · Department of Dermatology, Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center, 1515 North Vermont Avenue, 5th Floor, Los Angeles, CA, 90027, U.S.A. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #26522054.

ABSTRACT: Biosimilars, sometimes called 'generic biologics', are no longer a vision for the future but a present-day reality. Drug manufacturers and regulatory authorities are charged with ensuring that these products are safe and effective. Because biologically produced medications are large, complex proteins, many factors affect the quality of the end product, including glycosylation and presence of impurities, and thus many factors need to be compared between an emerging biosimilar and its originator biologic. Indeed, preclinical analytical assessments to determine similarity to an originator biologic are critical and are considered to be the foundation for regulatory approval of biosimilars. Here, the science behind the preclinical development of biosimilars is discussed by members of the International Psoriasis Council, and suggestions are put forth to try to ensure that future biosimilars are produced in a high quality and standardized manner.

11 Review Non-thrombocytopenic purpura in familial Mediterranean fever-comorbidity with Henoch-Schönlein purpura or an additional rare manifestation of familial Mediterranean fever? 2016

Ben-Chetrit, Eldad / Yazici, Hasan. ·Rheumatology Unit, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel and eldad@hadassah.org.il. · Department of Rheumatology, Academic Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey. ·Rheumatology (Oxford) · Pubmed #26464521.

ABSTRACT: Henoch-Schönlein purpura is a relatively common vasculitis mainly affecting children. It is characterized by purpuric skin rash, abdominal cramping, and haematuria. Skin biopsies taken from Henoch-Schönlein purpura lesions disclose perivascular IgA deposits. FMF is an autoinflammatory disease characterized by recurrent attacks of fever lasting 2-3 days which resolve spontaneously. Typical manifestations of the disease are peritonitis, pleuritis, pericarditis, arthritis and erysipelas-like erythema usually affecting the lower limbs. Over the years many reviews emphasized the clinical impression that Henoch-Schönlein purpura is more common among FMF patients than in healthy control population. In this review we summarize these reports and show that sometimes Henoch-Schönlein purpura associated with FMF differs from typical isolated Henoch-Schönlein purpura, and this is also the case with polyarteritis nodosa and SpA associated with FMF. It is suggested that these clinical manifestations (polyarteritis nodosa, Henoch-Schönlein purpura and SpA) should be considered to be associated with FMF as part of what we call FMF rather than as co-existing additional separate clinical entities.

12 Review The OMERACT MRI in Arthritis Working Group - Update on Status and Future Research Priorities. 2015

Østergaard, Mikkel / Bird, Paul / Gandjbakhch, Frédérique / Eshed, Iris / Haugen, Ida K / Haavardsholm, Espen A / Lillegraven, Siri / Foltz, Violaine / Glinatsi, Daniel / Peterfy, Charles / Ejbjerg, Bo / Bøyesen, Pernille / Mease, Philip J / Hermann, Kay-Geert / Emery, Paul / Genant, Harry K / Conaghan, Philip G. ·From the Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research, Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Glostrup Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia; Department of Rheumatology, Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, APHP, Université Paris 6-UPMC, Paris, France; Sheba Medical Center, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel; Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway; Spire Sciences, Boca Raton, Florida, USA; Department of Rheumatology, Slagelse Hospital, Slagelse, Denmark; Division of Rheumatology Research, Swedish Medical Center, University of Washington School of Medicine; and Seattle Rheumatology Associates, Seattle, Washington, USA; Department of Radiology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin, Germany; Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds; National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds, UK; University of California, San Francisco, and Synarc Inc., San Francisco, California, USA. M. Østergaard, MD, PhD, DMSc, Professor of Rheumatology, Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research, Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Glostrup Hospital and Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Copenhagen; P. Bird, BMed (Hons), FRACP, PhD, Grad Dip MRI, Senior Lecturer, University of NSW; F. Gandjbakhch, MD, Practicing Rheumatologist, Department of Rheumatology, Pitié-Salpêtrière, APHP, Université Paris 6-UPMC; I. Eshed, MD, Professor of Radiology, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Aviv University; I.K. Haugen, MD, PhD, Postdoctoral Researcher, Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital; E.A. Haavardsholm, MD, PhD, Postdoctoral Researcher, Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital; S. Lillegraven, MD, PhD, Postdoctoral Researcher, Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, University of Oslo; V. Foltz, MD, Practicing Rheumatologist, ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #25684771.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To provide an update on the status and future research priorities of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in arthritis working group. METHODS: A summary is provided of the activities of the group within rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and osteoarthritis (OA), and its research priorities. RESULTS: The OMERACT RA MRI score (RAMRIS) evaluating bone erosion, bone edema (osteitis), and synovitis is now the standard method of quantifying articular pathology in RA trials. Cartilage loss is another important part of joint damage, and at the OMERACT 12 conference, we provided longitudinal data demonstrating reliability and sensitivity to change of the RAMRIS JSN component score, supporting its use in future clinical trials. The MRI group has previously developed a PsA MRI score (PsAMRIS). At OMERACT 12, PsAMRIS was evaluated in a randomized placebo-controlled trial of patients with PsA, demonstrating the responsiveness and discriminatory ability of applying the PsAMRIS to hands and feet. A hand OA MRI score (HOAMRIS) was introduced at OMERACT 11, and has subsequently been further validated. At OMERACT 12, good cross-sectional interreader reliability, but variable reliability of change scores, were reported. Potential future research areas were identified at the MRI session at OMERACT 12 including assessment of tenosynovitis in RA and enthesitis in PsA and focusing on alternative MRI techniques. CONCLUSION: MRI has been further developed and validated as an outcome measure in RA, PsA, and OA. The group will continue its efforts to optimize the value of MRI as a robust biomarker in rheumatology clinical trials.

13 Review Comprehensive treatment of psoriatic arthritis: managing comorbidities and extraarticular manifestations. 2014

Ogdie, Alexis / Schwartzman, Sergio / Eder, Lihi / Maharaj, Ajesh B / Zisman, Devy / Raychaudhuri, Siba P / Reddy, Soumya M / Husni, Elaine. ·From the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, New York, USA; Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, University of KwaZulu Natal, Durban, South Africa, and Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Carmel Medical Center, Faculty of Medicine, Technion, Haifa, Israel; Rheumatology, VA Sacramento Medical Center; Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Clinical Immunology, School of Medicine, UC Davis, Davis, California; Division of Rheumatology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York; and the Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.A. Ogdie, MD, MSCE, University of Pennsylvania; S. Schwartzman, MD, Hospital for Special Surgery; L. Eder, MD, PhD, Toronto Western Hospital; A.B. Maharaj, MB, BS, HDipIntMed(SA), FCP(SA), Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, University of KwaZulu Natal and Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam; D. Zisman, MD, Carmel Medical Center, Faculty of Medicine, Technion; S.P. Raychaudhuri, MD, Rheumatology, VA Sacramento Medical Center; Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Clinical Immunology, School of Medicine, UC Davis; S.M. Reddy, MD, Division of Rheumatology, New York University School of Medicine; E. Husni, MD, MPH, Cleveland Clinic. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #25362717.

ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory arthritis associated with psoriasis that can lead to decreased health-related quality of life and permanent joint damage leading to functional decline. In addition to joint and skin manifestations, both psoriasis and PsA are associated with numerous comorbidities and extraarticular/cutaneous manifestations, which may influence the physician's choice of therapy. The objectives of this review are (1) to identify comorbidities in patients with PsA based on the available evidence; (2) to examine the effects of these comorbidities or extraarticular/cutaneous manifestation on the management of patients with PsA as well as the selection of therapy; and (3) to highlight research needs around comorbidities and treatment paradigms. This review is part of a treatment recommendations update initiated by the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA).

14 Review Systematic review of treatment effectiveness and outcome measures for enthesitis in psoriatic arthritis. 2014

Orbai, Ana-Maria / Weitz, Joshua / Siegel, Evan L / Siebert, Stefan / Savage, Laura J / Aydin, Sibel Z / Luime, Jolanda J / Elkayam, Ori / Neerinckx, Barbara / Urbancek, Slavo / de Vlam, Kurt / Ritchlin, Christopher T / Anonymous5650810. ·From Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center, Baltimore, Maryland; Dermatology Associates of Rochester, Rochester, New York; Arthritis and Rheumatism Associates, Rockville, Maryland, USA; Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Glasgow, Glasgow; Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK; Department of Rheumatology, Koc University, Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul, Turkey; Department of Rheumatology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Rheumatology, Tel Aviv Medical Center and the Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel; University Hospital Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; Department of Dermatology, F.D. Roosevelt Hospital, Banska Bystrica, Slovakia; and Allergy, Immunology, and Rheumatology Division, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York, USA.A.M. Orbai, MD, MHS, Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center; J. Weitz, MD, Dermatology Associates of Rochester; E.L. Siegel, MD, Arthritis and Rheumatism Associates; S. Siebert, MD, Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Glasgow; L.J. Savage, MD, Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds; S.Z. Aydin, Department of Rheumatology, Koc University Faculty of Medicine; J.J. Luime, PhD, Department of Rheumatology, Erasmus Medical Center; O. Elkayam, MD, Department of Rheumatology, Tel Aviv Medical Center and Sackler Faculty of Medicine; B. Neerinckx, MD, University Hospital Leuven; S. Urbancek, MD, PhD, Department of Dermatology, F.D. Roosevelt Hospital; K. de Vlam, MD, PhD, University Hospital Leuven; C.T. Ritchlin, MD, MPH, Allergy, Immunology, and Rheumatology Division, University of Rochester Medical Center. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #25362713.

ABSTRACT: Enthesitis is a characteristic feature of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and is important in disease pathogenesis and classification. Use of clinical outcome measures for enthesitis is heterogeneous, and only 1 measure has been specifically developed and validated in PsA. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging assessments of enthesitis may have advantages over clinical examination but are insufficiently studied. As part of an update of treatment recommendations by the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA), we performed a systematic literature review and identified randomized controlled trials with enthesitis outcomes in PsA. For each treatment agent we calculated treatment effect sizes (where applicable) and graded the level of evidence.

15 Review The effect of the novel tellurium compound AS101 on autoimmune diseases. 2014

Halpert, Gilad / Sredni, Benjamin. ·C.A.I.R. Institute, The Safdié AIDS and Immunology Research Center, The Mina & Everard Goodman Faculty of Life Sciences, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900, Israel. · C.A.I.R. Institute, The Safdié AIDS and Immunology Research Center, The Mina & Everard Goodman Faculty of Life Sciences, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900, Israel. Electronic address: srednib@gmail.com. ·Autoimmun Rev · Pubmed #25153485.

ABSTRACT: Tellurium is a rare element, which has been regarded as a non-essential trace element despite its relative abundance in the human body. The chemistry of tellurium supports a plethora of activities, but its biochemistry is not clearly established to date. The small tellurium(IV) compound, ammonium trichloro (dioxoethylene-o,o')tellurate (AS101) developed and initially investigated by us, is currently being evaluated in Phase II clinical trials in psoriasis patients. AS101 is the first tellurium compound to be tested for clinical efficacy. This compound is a potent immunomodulator both in vitro and in vivo with a variety of potential therapeutic applications. The present review will focus on the immunomodulatory properties of AS101, and specifically, its effects in mitigating autoimmune diseases. AS101 has several activities that act on the immune system, including: 1) its ability to reduce IL-17 levels and to inhibit the function of Th17 cells; 2) its specific unique redox-modulating activities enabling the inhibition of specific leukocyte integrins such as α4β1 and α4β7, that are pivotal for diapedesis of macrophages and CD4(+) T inflammatory/auto-reactive cells into the autoimmune tissues; and 3) its ability to enhance the activity of regulatory T cells (Treg). These activities coupled with its excellent safety profile suggest that AS101 may be a promising candidate for the management of autoimmune diseases.

16 Review Helicobacter pylori and skin autoimmune diseases. 2014

Magen, Eli / Delgado, Jorge-Shmuel. ·Eli Magen, Allergy and Clinical Immunology Unit, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of The Negev, Ashkelon 77456, Israel. ·World J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #24587626.

ABSTRACT: Autoimmune skin diseases are characterized by dysregulation of the immune system resulting in a loss of tolerance to skin self-antigen(s). The prolonged interaction between the bacterium and host immune mechanisms makes Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) a plausible infectious agent for triggering autoimmunity. Epidemiological and experimental data now point to a strong relation of H. pylori infection on the development of many extragastric diseases, including several allergic and autoimmune diseases. H. pylori antigens activate cross-reactive T cells and induce autoantibodies production. Microbial heat shock proteins (HSP) play an important role of in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases because of the high level of sequence homology with human HSP. Eradication of H. pylori infection has been shown to be effective in some patients with chronic autoimmune urticaria, psoriasis, alopecia areata and Schoenlein-Henoch purpura. There is conflicting and controversial data regarding the association of H. pylori infection with Behçet's disease, scleroderma and autoimmune bullous diseases. No data are available evaluating the association of H. pylori infection with other skin autoimmune diseases, such as vitiligo, cutaneous lupus erythematosus and dermatomyositis. The epidemiological and experimental evidence for a possible role of H. pylori infection in skin autoimmune diseases are the subject of this review.

17 Review Periorbital (eyelid) dermatides. 2014

Wolf, Ronni / Orion, Edith / Tüzün, Yalçın. ·Dermatology Unit, Kaplan Medical Center, Rehovot, Israel; School of Medicine, Hebrew University and Hadassah Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel. Electronic address: wolf_r@netvision.net.il. ·Clin Dermatol · Pubmed #24314387.

ABSTRACT: Physicians in various specialties-and dermatologists in particular-frequently encounter various forms of inflammation of the eyelids and of the anterior surface of the eye. Distinguishing the cause of itchy, painful, red, edematous eyelids is often difficult. Because the uppermost layer of the eyelids is part of the skin that wraps the entire body, almost every skin disease in the textbook can affect the periorbital area as well. In this contribution, we focused on the most common such disorders that require special consideration, as a result of their special appearance, their challenging diagnosis, or the nature of their treatment. We reviewed the key features of several common dermatides that affect the eyelids, such as atopic dermatitis, seborrheic dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, airborne contact dermatitis, rosacea, psoriasis, and others. We focused on the special clinical features, causes, and treatments specific to the delicate skin of the eyelids. Because structures of the eye itself (i.e., the conjunctiva, the cornea, the lens, and the retina) may be involved in some of the discussed periorbital skin diseases, we found it useful to add a brief summary of the eyelid complications of those diseases. We then briefly reviewed some acute sight-threatening and even life-threatening infections of the eyelids, although dermatologists are not likely to be the primary care physicians responsible for treating them.

18 Review Non-invasive evaluation of skin cytokines secretion: an innovative complementary method for monitoring skin disorders. 2013

Portugal-Cohen, Meital / Kohen, Ron. ·Institute for Drug Research, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel. ·Methods · Pubmed #23063704.

ABSTRACT: In this review, a novel non-invasive approach based on skin surface wash sampling is described. Since the epidermis possesses a high metabolic activity, the secretion of various biomarkers can be exploited to develop non-invasive procedures for skin measurement to monitor disorders and to define a therapeutic strategy. Thus, we developed a method for the quantification of skin surface compounds. In this procedure, a well is placed on skin surface and is attached using an adhesive pad. Extraction buffer is introduced into the well for 30 min incubation period and the secretion of different biomarkers on skin surface can be measured: cytokines, antioxidants, peptides, RNA, DNA volatile organic compounds etc. Here, the focus is on cytokine measurement. After collecting skin samples cytokines can be quantified using ELISA assay. Since so far cytokine levels in skin have been evaluated mostly by invasive and prolonged procedures (punch biopsy, blister fluid and scrapping), employing this method has important implications, because it allows assessing cytokine amount with minimal invasion and high accuracy. We have already applied skin surface wash sampling for cytokine quantification in different clinical conditions: psoriasis, atopic dermatitis and chronic renal failure. A distinct pattern of cytokine secretion has been demonstrated for each disorder. Differences were also observed between lesional and non-lesional areas. The obtained results shed a new light on cutaneous cytokine expression in different clinical conditions. Moreover, the interplay between cytokines and other soluble compounds can give an added value in understanding the mechanism of skin pathologies.

19 Review [Psoriasis and cardiovascular risk factors]. 2012

Tal, Roy / Pavlovsky, Lev / David, Michael. ·Dermatology Department, Rabin Medical Center, Petah Tikva, Israel. ·Harefuah · Pubmed #23316664.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease which may dramatically affect patients' lives. This chronic disease is characterized by a protracted course of alternating remissions and relapses. In recent years, the attention of researchers has focused on the association between psoriasis and cardiovascular disease risk factors. This review summarizes the literature on this topic with an emphasis on research conducted in Israel.

20 Review Clinical efficacy and adverse effects of golimumab in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. 2012

Chovel-Sella, Aluma / Karplus, Rebekah / Sella, Tal / Amital, Howard. ·Department of Medicine B, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, affiliated with Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, Israel. ·Isr Med Assoc J · Pubmed #22891404.

ABSTRACT: Golimumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody targeting tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha), an important cytokine in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other arthritides. Golimumab was approved for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis with methotrexate (MTX) and with or without MTX for psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis. Administration is by monthly subcutaneous injection. In this review we present some of the major clinical trials evaluating the efficacy of golimumab with or without concomitant MTX in RA patients, including patients resistant to previous biologic treatments. In addition, we collected data on safety and adverse effects encountered in clinical trials. Current data show golimumab to be an effective and safe choice for the treatment of various inflammatory arthritides.

21 Review Scientific evidence of the therapeutic effects of dead sea treatments: a systematic review. 2012

Katz, Uriel / Shoenfeld, Yehuda / Zakin, Varda / Sherer, Yaniv / Sukenik, Shaul. ·Maccabi Healthcare Services, Tel Aviv, Israel. ukatz@netvision.net.il ·Semin Arthritis Rheum · Pubmed #22503590.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The Dead Sea, the deepest and most saline lake on earth, has been known from biblical times for its healing properties. The aim of this systematic review was to present critically the level of evidence for the claims of therapeutic effects of Dead Sea treatments in several rheumatologic diseases and psoriasis as well as to review these treatments' safety. METHODS: All articles cited in MEDLINE under the query, "Dead Sea," were reviewed. RESULTS: We found bona fide evidence that Dead Sea treatments are especially effective in psoriasis due to both the special characteristics of solar ultraviolet radiation in the Dead Sea and the Dead Sea water balneotherapy. Dead Sea mud and Dead Sea balneotherapy have been found to be beneficial in rheumatologic diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and knee osteoarthritis. In the safety analysis, we found no evidence for an increase in skin neoplasia, although skin actinic damage seems to be increased in patients treated in the Dead Sea. Dead Sea treatments do not lead to worsening of blood pressure. Substantial ingestion of Dead Sea water (generally in unusual near-drowning cases) is toxic and can result in cardiac rhythm disturbances because of electrolyte concentration abnormalities. Laboratory analysis of Dead Sea mud did not reveal mineral concentrations that could represent a health concern for their intended use. CONCLUSIONS: Dead Sea treatments are beneficial in several rheumatologic diseases and psoriasis and have a good safety profile.

22 Review Modified phospholipids as anti-inflammatory compounds. 2010

Feige, Erez / Mendel, Itzhak / George, Jacob / Yacov, Niva / Harats, Dror. ·VBL Therapeutics, Or Yehuda, Israel. ·Curr Opin Lipidol · Pubmed #20827191.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Oxidized phospholipids (OxPLs) are abundantly found at sites of inflammation and are considered to play an active role in the modulation of the immune response. Whereas most studies attributed a proinflammatory role to OxPLs, recent studies demonstrate that some products of phospholipid oxidation may in fact exhibit anti-inflammatory properties. This study summarizes the proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory properties of OxPLs and sheds light on the therapeutic potential of OxPL derivatives or analogs for treatment of chronic inflammatory disorders. RECENT FINDINGS: OxPLs may inhibit activation of several Toll-like receptors and can epigenetically reduce the capacity of dendritic cells to function as mature, fully functional immunostimulatory cells. These data demonstrate that OxPLs can induce anti-inflammatory effects. Moreover, VB-201, an orally available synthetic phospholipid analog of the Lecinoxoid family, was found to attenuate inflammation in various preclinical animal models and is currently employed in a phase II clinical trial in psoriasis. SUMMARY: Chemical or biological modifications of phospholipids yield various products, some of which may exhibit anti-inflammatory properties. Identification of such species and generation of more stable/potent anti-inflammatory OxPL variants may represent a novel approach for the treatment of immune-mediated diseases such as psoriasis, atherosclerosis, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis.

23 Review Phototherapy for psoriasis: what to choose and how to use: facts and controversies. 2010

Matz, Hagit. ·Department of Dermatology, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv University, 6 Weitzman Street, 62092 Tel-Aviv, Israel. e_h_matz@netvision.net.il ·Clin Dermatol · Pubmed #20082955.

ABSTRACT: In dermatologic practice, phototherapy is restricted mainly to the use of ultraviolet radiation. When used in combination with a photosensitizing chemical, it becomes photochemotherapy. Discussion of these therapeutic modalities includes mode of use, indications, and unwanted effects.

24 Review Psoriatic arthropathy: where now? 2009

Slobodin, Gleb / Rosner, Itzhak / Rozenbaum, Michael / Boulman, Nina / Kessel, Aharon / Toubi, Elias. ·Department of lnternal Medicine A, Bnai Zion Medical Center, Haifa, Israel. gslobodin@yahoo.com ·Isr Med Assoc J · Pubmed #19911496.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

25 Review Use of peritoneal dialysis and mesothelium in non primary renal conditions. 2009

Gotloib, Lazaro / Fudin, Roberto. ·Laboratory of Experimental Nephrology, Ha'Emek Medical Center, Afula, Israel. gotloib@012.net.il ·Adv Perit Dial · Pubmed #19886308.

ABSTRACT: The management of a handful of non renal clinical conditions includes peritoneal dialysis (PD) as a therapeutic tool. Peritoneal lavage after abdominal surgery is still performed in infectious peritonitis and cases of necrotizing hemorrhagic pancreatitis. Use of PD in active psoriasis resulted in approximately 40 papers reporting mostly isolated cases and showing both therapeutic success and failure. That ambiguous picture persisted during controlled studies, and interest in treating psoriasis with PD faded over the last 20 years. As an emergency tool, PD has been also used in the treatment of metabolic crisis resulting from inborn errors of metabolism such as deficiency of any of the five enzymes of the urea cycle and other inherited disorders of organic and aminoacid metabolism such as maple syrup urine disease, citrullinemia, and propionic acidemia. Recent studies have shown that continuous hemofiltration therapies have more effective clearances than PD does. Similar observations were reported for the use of PD in drug poisoning. Peritoneal dialysis is still a valuable tool as a complementary measure in the treatment of hypothermia. Recently, prospective work in patients affected by end-stage congestive heart failure has shown that maintenance PD significantly lowers morbidity and mortality and substantially improves functional capabilities and quality of life in these otherwise terminally ill patients.

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