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Psoriasis: HELP
Articles from Mexico
Based on 41 articles published since 2008
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These are the 41 published articles about Psoriasis that originated from Mexico during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2
1 Guideline [Mexican treatment goals for plaque psoriasis]. 2017

Estrada-Aguilar, Lorena / Amaya-Guerra, Mario / Gómez-Flores, Minerva / Guevara-Sanginés, Esther / Jurado-Santacruz, Fermín / Lopeztello-Santillán, Adriana / Maldonado-García, César / Rivera-Gómez, Mónica / Rodríguez-Martínez, Norma / Vega-González, Luis. ·Servicio de Dermatología, Hospital Regional Lic. Adolfo López Mateos, ISSSTE, Ciudad de México, México. lorenaestradaaguilar@prodigy.net.mx. ·Rev Med Inst Mex Seguro Soc · Pubmed #28092253.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease with a worldwide prevalence between 6 and 39% in moderate to severe forms. In European countries like Germany and England was identified that only one third of patients with moderate to severe forms will receive systemic management, this fact motivated to integrate into Europe an international consensus on treatment goals with the aim of providing support to the dermatologist by algorithms that serve as a therapeutic guide that allows you to gain control short and long term effects of this disease. The European group met to develop the definitions of severity of psoriasis, treatment goals for moderate to severe disease, and optimization options and / or therapeutic transition than a paper published in 2011 was obtained. In Mexico a working group of experts on biological therapy (GTEB), made up of 10 members and an extended group of 150 dermatologists' voters in the country for the purpose of issuing Mexico's position on the proposals of the European group was formed. In this document the findings of the Working Group of Experts on Biological Therapy in Mexico are listed.

2 Review Dactylitis: A hallmark of psoriatic arthritis. 2018

Kaeley, Gurjit S / Eder, Lihi / Aydin, Sibel Z / Gutierrez, Marwin / Bakewell, Catherine. ·University of Florida College of Medicine, 653-1 West 8th St., LRC 2nd Floor L-14, Jacksonville, FL 32209. Electronic address: Gurjit.Kaeley@jax.ufl.edu. · Women's College Research Institute, Women's College Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · University of Ottawa, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Musculoskeletal and Rheumatic Diseases, Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitación, Mexico City, Mexico. · Intermountain Healthcare, Salt Lake City, UT. ·Semin Arthritis Rheum · Pubmed #29573849.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Dactylitis-long considered a hallmark clinical feature of psoriatic arthritis (PsA)-occurs in 16-49% of patients with PsA. In this review, we discuss the pathology of dactylitis in PsA and clinical and imaging tools used to diagnose and monitor dactylitis. METHODS: PubMed literature searches were conducted using the terms psoriatic arthritis, dactylitis, pathology, imaging, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, clinical, and indices. Articles were deemed relevant if they provided insight into the pathology, diagnosis, and/or monitoring of dactylitis in PsA, or if they discussed clinical or imaging indices used to assess dactylitis. RESULTS: Dactylitis in PsA often occurs asymmetrically, involves the feet more than the hands, and affects multiple digits simultaneously. Although dactylitis can be assessed clinically, imaging (radiography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and bone scintigraphy) has provided key insights by documenting the various anatomic targets affected. Although inflammation can occur in most of the digital compartments, the nail has not been as well studied in dactylitic digits. Outcome measures for dactylitis range from dichotomous documentation to the Leeds dactylometer. Imaging outcome tools utilizing magnetic resonance imaging or ultrasound are under development. CONCLUSION: Dactylitis, which is associated with more erosive forms of PsA, is often the inaugural feature of PsA and may be the only feature for months to years. Early diagnosis and treatment of PsA favors better outcomes, possibly mitigating radiographic progression and destructive changes. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging are useful tools that have not only shed light on the diverse tissues affected in dactylitis but can also be used to document ongoing inflammation. Ultrasound imaging dactylitis scores are being developed that will assist in diagnosing and documenting which compartments optimally respond to various treatment modalities.

3 Review Enthesitis: A hallmark of psoriatic arthritis. 2018

Kaeley, Gurjit S / Eder, Lihi / Aydin, Sibel Z / Gutierrez, Marwin / Bakewell, Catherine. ·Division of Rheumatology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, 653-1 West 8th St., LRC 2nd Floor L-14, Jacksonville, FL, 32209. Electronic address: Gurjit.Kaeley@jax.ufl.edu. · Women's College Research Institute, Women's College Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · University of Ottawa, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Musculoskeletal and Rheumatic Diseases, Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitación, Mexico City, Mexico. · Intermountain Healthcare, Salt Lake City, UT. ·Semin Arthritis Rheum · Pubmed #29429762.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To describe the growing importance of enthesitis in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of clinical and imaging methods currently used to assess enthesitis. METHODS: PubMed literature searches were conducted using the terms psoriatic arthritis, entheses, enthesitis, pathology, imaging, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, clinical, and indices. Articles were deemed relevant if they provided insight into the pathology, monitoring, and/or diagnosis of enthesitis in PsA, or if they discussed clinical or imaging indices used to assess enthesitis. RESULTS: Enthesitis is an early manifestation of PsA that is associated with increased disease activity and reduced quality of life. A variety of clinical indices exist to assess enthesitis in PsA; however, the Leeds Enthesitis Index and Maastricht Ankylosing Spondylitis Enthesitis Score index have been the most frequently used indices in recent clinical trials. Limitations of these indices include an inability to discern structural involvement, risk of missing subclinical enthesitis, and lack of sensitivity in detecting enthesitis, especially in patients with central sensitization and/or pain amplification. Such limitations have led to the emergent importance of imaging techniques in the assessment of enthesitis. Although there have been recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound (US) appears to be the preferred method for detecting enthesitis because it allows for accurate assessment of the soft-tissue components of entheses and also for new bone formation. Hypoechogenicity, increased thickness of tendon insertion, calcifications, enthesophytes, erosions, and Doppler activity have been identified as important US characteristics of enthesitis. CONCLUSION: Enthesitis is thought to be integrally involved in the pathogenesis of PsA and is associated with worse prognostic outcomes in patients with PsA. A validated US index with entheses that are less confounded by mechanical factors and obesity would be the most effective measure of enthesitis in PsA. As imaging techniques continue to advance, our understanding of enthesitis and its involvement in PsA will also improve.

4 Review Immunogenicity of Biologics in Chronic Inflammatory Diseases: A Systematic Review. 2017

Strand, Vibeke / Balsa, Alejandro / Al-Saleh, Jamal / Barile-Fabris, Leonor / Horiuchi, Takahiko / Takeuchi, Tsutomu / Lula, Sadiq / Hawes, Charles / Kola, Blerina / Marshall, Lisa. ·Division of Immunology/Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 306 Ramona Road, Portola Valley, CA, 94028, USA. vibekestrand@me.com. · Rheumatology Unit, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria del Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), Madrid, Spain. · Rheumatology Section, Dubai Hospital, Dubai, United Arab Emirates. · Hospital de Especialidades Centro Médico Nacional Siglo XXI, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, México City, Mexico. · Department of Internal Medicine, Kyushu University Beppu Hospital, Beppu, Japan. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 160-8582, Japan. · Market Access Solutions, Envision Pharma Group, London, UK. · Pfizer Ltd, Surrey, UK. · Medical Affairs, Pfizer, Collegeville, PA, USA. ·BioDrugs · Pubmed #28612180.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: A systematic review was conducted to explore the immunogenicity of biologic agents across inflammatory diseases and its potential impact on efficacy/safety. METHODS: Literature searches were conducted through November 2016 to identify controlled and observational studies of biologics/biosimilars administered for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (nr-axSpA), psoriasis (Ps), Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis. RESULTS: Of >21,000 screened publications, 443 were included. Anti-drug antibody (ADAb) rates varied widely among biologics across diseases (and are not directly comparable because of immunoassay heterogeneity); the highest overall rates were reported with infliximab (0-83%), adalimumab (0-54%), and infliximab biosimilar CT-P13 (21-52%), and the lowest with secukinumab (0-1%), ustekinumab (1-11%), etanercept (0-13%), and golimumab (0-19%). Most ADAbs were neutralizing, except those to abatacept and etanercept. ADAb+ versus ADAb- patients had lower rates of clinical response to adalimumab (RA, PsA, JIA, AS, Ps), golimumab (RA), infliximab (RA, PsA, AS, Ps), rituximab (RA), ustekinumab (Ps), and CT-P13 (RA, AS). Higher rates of infusion-related reactions were reported in infliximab- and CT-P13-treated ADAb+ patients. Background immunosuppressives/anti-proliferatives reduced biologic immunogenicity across diseases. CONCLUSIONS: Based on reviewed reports, biologic/biosimilar immunogenicity differs among agents, with the highest rates observed with infliximab and adalimumab. As ADAb formation in biologic-/biosimilar-treated patients may increase the risk of lost response, the immunogenicity of these agents is an important (albeit not the only) consideration in the treatment decision-making process.

5 Review State of the art of ultrasound in the assessment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. 2017

Gutierrez, Marwin / Kaeley, Gurjit S / Bertolazzi, Chiara / Pineda, Carlos. ·a Division of Musculoskeletal and Rheumatic Disorders , Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitación , México City , Mexico. · b College of Medicine , University of Florida , Jacksonville , USA. ·Expert Rev Clin Immunol · Pubmed #27885882.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Ultrasound (US) is a rapidly evolving technique that is gaining increasing success in the assessment of psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Recently, new research avenues have been opened, and these are focused on the potential of US for the assessment of extra musculoskeletal areas such as skin and nails. This permits work on the concept of 'holistic US assessment of PsA'. Areas covered: Here, we analyze the potential role of US in the global assessment of PsA. Additionally, we provide the current evidence supporting its application in routine clinical practice. Literature was obtained from medical databases including PubMed and Embase. Expert commentary: US can detect not only structural abnormalities but also minimal blood flow changes at the superficial soft tissue level. This makes it a great tool for the global assessment of disease activity in PsA, in which persistently active disease plays a major role in causing anatomical damage and physical functional disability.

6 Review Biosimilars in psoriasis: Clinical practice and regulatory perspectives in Latin America. 2017

de la Cruz, Claudia / de Carvalho, André V E / Dorantes, Gladys L / Londoño Garcia, Angela M / Gonzalez, Cesar / Maskin, Matías / Podoswa, Nancy / Redfern, Jan S / Valenzuela, Fernando / van der Walt, Joelle / Romiti, Ricardo. ·Clínica Dermacross, Santiago, Chile. · Dermatology Ambulatory, Santa Casa de Misericórdia de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, Brazil. · Mexican Association Against Psoriasis, Mexico City, Mexico. · Department of Dermatology of CES University, Medellin, Colombia. · Clínica Universitaria Colombia, Bogotá DC, Colombia. · Department of Dermatology, CEMIC, Buenos Aires, Argentina. · Department of Dermatology, HGR1 IMSS, Mexico City, Mexico. · Redfern Strategic Medical Communications, Springtown, Texas, USA. · Department of Dermatology, University of Chile and Probity Medical Research, Santiago, Chile. · International Psoriasis Council, St Louis, Missouri, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Hospital das Clínicas University of São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, Brazil. ·J Dermatol · Pubmed #27461455.

ABSTRACT: Latin American countries view biosimilar agents as an effective approach to curtail health-care expenditures while maintaining the safety and efficacy profile of their branded innovator comparators. To understand the complexities of the regulatory landscape and key therapeutic issues for use of biosimilars to treat moderate to severe psoriasis in Latin America, the International Psoriasis Council convened dermatology experts from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia and Mexico in October 2015 to review the definition, approval, marketing and future of biosimilars in each country and develop a consensus statement. The regulatory framework for marketing approval of biosimilars in Latin America is currently a mosaic of disparate, country-specific, regulatory review processes, rules and standards, with considerable heterogeneity in clarity and specificity. Regulations in Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Mexico have undergone multiple refinements whereas Colombia is finalizing draft guidelines. Verification of the similarity in quality, safety and efficacy of biosimilars to the innovator biologic remains a key challenge for policy makers and regulatory authorities. Other key regulatory challenges include: naming of agents and traceability, pharmacovigilance, extrapolation of indications, and interchangeability and substitution. An urgent need exists for more Latin American countries to establish national psoriasis registries and to integrate their common components into a multinational psoriasis network, thereby enhancing their interpretative power and impact. A Latin American psoriasis network similar to PSONET in Europe would assist health-care providers, pharmaceutical companies, regulators and patients to fully comprehend specific products being prescribed and dispensed and to identify potential regional trends or differences in safety or outcomes.

7 Review Ultrasound in psoriatic arthritis. Can it facilitate a best routine practice in the diagnosis and management of psoriatic arthritis? 2015

Gutierrez, Marwin / Draghessi, Antonella / Bertolazzi, Chiara / Erre, Gian Luca / Saldarriaga-Rivera, Lina Maria / López-Reyes, Alberto / Fernández-Torres, Javier / Audisio, Marcelo J / Pineda, Carlos / Anonymous2620840. ·Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitación, Ciudad de México, Mexico. dr.gmarwin@gmail.com. · Clinica Reumatologica, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Jesi, Ancona, Italy. dr.gmarwin@gmail.com. · Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitación, Luis Guillermo Ibarra Ibarra, Calzada Mexico-Xochimilco 289, Colonia Arenal de Guadalupe, CP 143898, Mexico City, Mexico. dr.gmarwin@gmail.com. · Clinica Reumatologica, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Jesi, Ancona, Italy. adraghessi@yahoo.com. · Clinica Reumatologica, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Jesi, Ancona, Italy. chiara.bertolazzi@gmail.com. · Rheumatology Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria and University of Sassari, Sassari, Italy. e.gianluca@libero.it. · Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitación, Ciudad de México, Mexico. vasculitisreumato@gmail.com. · Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitación, Ciudad de México, Mexico. allorey@yahoo.com. · Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitación, Ciudad de México, Mexico. javier_astrofan@hotmail.com. · Servicio de Reumatología del Hospital Nacional de Clínicas, Cordoba, Argentina. marceaudisio@gmail.com. · Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitación, Ciudad de México, Mexico. carpineda@yahoo.com. ·Clin Rheumatol · Pubmed #26298533.

ABSTRACT: Important advances from both therapeutic and clinical assessment have recently been reported in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Moreover, the constant challenge to provide a more comprehensive assessment of this heterogeneous disease results in a variety of clinical instruments that help the clinician for a global evaluation of both disease activity and responsiveness. The current European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations on the use of imaging suggest the use of ultrasound (US) in chronic arthritis to increase the diagnostic accuracy and improvement of its management as compared to clinical examination alone. Although US findings are not firmly established in daily clinical practice, it demonstrated several positive aspects such as good sensitivity and specificity, acceptable reliability, and adequate sensitivity to change, especially in the peripheral PsA. Additionally, recent works introduced the role of US in the assessment of skin and nails opening interesting area of research. The aim of this paper is to describe the potential role of US in the assessment of PsA and to discuss the current evidence supporting its application in daily clinical practice.

8 Review Cross Talk between Proliferative, Angiogenic, and Cellular Mechanisms Orchestred by HIF-1α in Psoriasis. 2015

Torales-Cardeña, Azael / Martínez-Torres, Isaí / Rodríguez-Martínez, Sandra / Gómez-Chávez, Fernando / Cancino-Díaz, Juan C / Vázquez-Sánchez, Ernesto A / Cancino-Díaz, Mario E. ·Immunology Department, National School of Biological Sciences, National Polytechnic Institute, Plan de Ayala y Prolongación de Carpio S/N, Colonia Santo Tomás, Miguel Hidalgo, 11340 Mexico City, DF, Mexico. · Microbiology Department, National School of Biological Sciences, National Polytechnic Institute, Plan de Ayala y Prolongación de Carpio S/N, Colonia Santo Tomás, Miguel Hidalgo, 11340 Mexico City, DF, Mexico. ·Mediators Inflamm · Pubmed #26136626.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease where the altered regulation in angiogenesis, inflammation, and proliferation of keratinocytes are the possible causes of the disease, and the transcription factor "hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha" (HIF-1α) is involved in the homeostasis of these three biological phenomena. In this review, the role of HIF-1α in the cross talk between the cytokines and cells of the immunological system involved in the pathogenesis of psoriasis is discussed.

9 Review Prevalence of extra-articular manifestations in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis. 2015

Stolwijk, Carmen / van Tubergen, Astrid / Castillo-Ortiz, José Dionisio / Boonen, Annelies. ·Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, The Netherlands School for Public Health and Primary Care (CAPHRI), University of Maastricht, Maastricht, The Netherlands. · Unidad de Investigacion em Enfermadades Cronico-Degenerativas, Hospital General de Zona 50, Guadalajara, Mexico. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #23999006.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Uveitis, psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are common extra-articular manifestations (EAM) in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS); however, summary data of reported prevalence are lacking. The aim of the present study was to summarise the prevalence of EAMs among patients with AS and to identify underlying factors to explain potential heterogeneity of prevalence. METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed (Medline, Embase and Cochrane Library) to identify relevant articles. Risk of bias was assessed and data were extracted. Pooled prevalences were calculated. Potential sources of any observed clinical or methodological heterogeneity in the estimates were explored by subgroup and metaregression analysis. RESULTS: In the 156 selected articles, 143 reported the prevalence of uveitis (44 372 patients), 56 of psoriasis (27 626 patients) and 69 of IBD (30 410 patients). Substantial heterogeneity was observed in prevalence estimates among all EAMs (I(2)=84-95%). The pooled prevalence of uveitis was 25.8% (95% CI 24.1% to 27.6%), and was positively associated in multivariable metaregression with disease duration (β 0.05, 95% CI 0.03 to 0.08) and random selection of patients (β -0.24, 95% CI -0.43 to -0.04). The pooled prevalence of psoriasis was 9.3% (95% CI 8.1% to 10.6%). The pooled prevalence of IBD was 6.8% (95% CI 6.1% to 7.7%) and was positively associated with the percentage of women in the studies (β 0.02, 95% CI 0.00 to 0.03). Geographical area was associated in multivariable metaregressions with prevalence of all EAMs. CONCLUSIONS: EAMs are common in patients with AS. The large heterogeneity between studies can be partly explained by differences in clinical as well as methodological characteristics.

10 Clinical Trial Tofacitinib or Adalimumab versus Placebo for Psoriatic Arthritis. 2017

Mease, Philip / Hall, Stephen / FitzGerald, Oliver / van der Heijde, Désirée / Merola, Joseph F / Avila-Zapata, Francisco / Cieślak, Dorota / Graham, Daniela / Wang, Cunshan / Menon, Sujatha / Hendrikx, Thijs / Kanik, Keith S. ·From the Swedish Medical Center and University of Washington, Seattle (P.M.) · Cabrini Health and Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia (S.H.) · the Department of Rheumatology, St. Vincent's University Hospital and Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research, University College, Dublin (O.F.) · Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands (D.H.) · Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston (J.F.M.) · Centro Multidisciplinario para el Desarrollo Especializado de la Investigación Clínica en Yucatán Sociedad Civil Privada, Merida, Mexico (F.A.-Z.) · the Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Medical University of Poznan, Poznan, Poland (D.C.) · Pfizer, Groton, CT (D.G., C.W., S.M., K.S.K.) · and Pfizer, Collegeville, PA (T.H.). ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #29045212.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor that is under investigation for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis. We evaluated tofacitinib in patients with active psoriatic arthritis who previously had an inadequate response to conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). METHODS: In this 12-month, double-blind, active-controlled and placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial, we randomly assigned patients in a 2:2:2:1:1 ratio to receive one of the following regimens: tofacitinib at a 5-mg dose taken orally twice daily (107 patients), tofacitinib at a 10-mg dose taken orally twice daily (104), adalimumab at a 40-mg dose administered subcutaneously once every 2 weeks (106), placebo with a blinded switch to the 5-mg tofacitinib dose at 3 months (52), or placebo with a blinded switch to the 10-mg tofacitinib dose at 3 months (53). Placebo groups were pooled for analyses up to month 3. Primary end points were the proportion of patients who had an American College of Rheumatology 20 (ACR20) response (≥20% improvement from baseline in the number of tender and swollen joints and at least three of five other important domains) at month 3 and the change from baseline in the Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI) score (scores range from 0 to 3, with higher scores indicating greater disability) at month 3. RESULTS: ACR20 response rates at month 3 were 50% in the 5-mg tofacitinib group and 61% in the 10-mg tofacitinib group, as compared with 33% in the placebo group (P=0.01 for the comparison of the 5-mg dose with placebo; P<0.001 for the comparison of the 10-mg dose with placebo); the rate was 52% in the adalimumab group. The mean change in the HAQ-DI score was -0.35 in the 5-mg tofacitinib group and -0.40 in the 10-mg tofacitinib group, as compared with -0.18 in the placebo group (P=0.006 for the comparison of the 5-mg dose with placebo; P<0.001 for the comparison of the 10-mg dose with placebo); the score change was -0.38 in the adalimumab group. The rate of adverse events through month 12 was 66% in the 5-mg tofacitinib group, 71% in the 10-mg tofacitinib group, 72% in the adalimumab group, 69% in the placebo group that switched to the 5-mg tofacitinib dose, and 64% in the placebo group that switched to the 10-mg tofacitinib dose. There were four cases of cancer, three serious infections, and four cases of herpes zoster in patients who received tofacitinib during the trial. CONCLUSIONS: The efficacy of tofacitinib was superior to that of placebo at month 3 in patients with psoriatic arthritis who had previously had an inadequate response to conventional synthetic DMARDs. Adverse events were more frequent with tofacitinib than with placebo. (Funded by Pfizer; OPAL Broaden ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01877668 .).

11 Clinical Trial Secukinumab is Efficacious and Safe in Hispanic Patients with Moderate-to-Severe Plaque Psoriasis: Pooled Analysis of Four Phase 3 Trials. 2017

Adsit, Sandra / Zaldivar, Enrique Rivas / Sofen, Howard / Dei-Cas, Ignacio / Maldonado-García, César / Peñaranda, Elkin O / Puig, Luís / Meng, Xiangyi / Fox, Todd / Guana, Adriana. ·TCR Medical Corporation, San Diego, CA, USA. sadsit@therapeuticsinc.com. · Dermos, Guatemala City, Guatemala. · UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Halitus, Buenos Aires, Argentina. · Centro Dermatológico "Dr. Ladislao de la Pascua", Mexico City, Mexico. · Riesgo de Fractura S.A., Bogota, Colombia. · Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ, USA. · Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, Switzerland. ·Adv Ther · Pubmed #28397079.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: There is little evidence available on the efficacy and safety of biologic therapies for the treatment of psoriasis in Hispanic patients. Secukinumab is demonstrated to be highly effective for clearing psoriasis. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of secukinumab in Hispanic and non-Hispanic patients. METHODS: Data were pooled from four phase 3 studies of secukinumab in patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. Patients who self-identified as Hispanic were included in the Hispanic subgroup. RESULTS: Efficacy responses (Psoriasis Area and Severity Index [PASI] 75/90/100 and Investigator's Global Assessment 2011 modified version 0/1) for secukinumab 300 mg were greater than for etanercept at week 12 in the Hispanic and non-Hispanic patient subgroups. At week 12 with secukinumab 300 mg, PASI 90/100 responses were achieved by 70.6%/35.9% of Hispanic patients and 58.0%/28.1% of non-Hispanic patients. At week 12 with secukinumab 150 mg, PASI 90/100 responses were achieved by 59.5%/25.1% of Hispanic patients and 41.2%/13.4% of non-Hispanic patients. In both subgroups, peak efficacy responses with secukinumab were observed at week 16 and were maintained to week 52. CONCLUSIONS: Secukinumab is highly effective for clearing psoriasis in both Hispanic and non-Hispanic patients. FUNDING: Novartis Pharmaceutical Corporation.

12 Clinical Trial Two-year Efficacy and Safety of Etanercept in Pediatric Patients with Extended Oligoarthritis, Enthesitis-related Arthritis, or Psoriatic Arthritis. 2016

Constantin, Tamas / Foeldvari, Ivan / Vojinovic, Jelena / Horneff, Gerd / Burgos-Vargas, Ruben / Nikishina, Irina / Akikusa, Jonathan D / Avcin, Tadej / Chaitow, Jeffrey / Koskova, Elena / Lauwerys, Bernard R / Calvo Penades, Inmaculada / Flato, Berit / Gamir, Maria Luz / Huppertz, Hans-Iko / Jaller Raad, Juan Jose / Jarosova, Katerina / Anton, Jordi / Macku, Marie / Otero Escalante, William J / Rutkowska-Sak, Lidia / Trauzeddel, Ralf / Velez-Sanchez, Patricia J / Wouters, Carine / Wajdula, Joseph / Zang, Chuanbo / Bukowski, Jack / Woodworth, Deborah / Vlahos, Bonnie / Martini, Alberto / Ruperto, Nicolino / Anonymous1410860. ·From the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation (PRINTO), Istituto G. Gaslini, Pediatria II-Reumatologia, PRINTO, Genoa, Italy.T. Constantin, MD, PhD, 2nd Department of Pediatrics, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary; I. Foeldvari, MD, Hamburg Centre for Child and Adolescent Rheumatology, Hamburg, Germany; J. Vojinovic, MD, PhD, Clinic of Pediatrics, Clinical Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University of Nis, Serbia; G. Horneff, MD, Asklepios Clinic, Sankt Augustin, Germany; R. Burgos-Vargas, MD, Hospital General de Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico; I. Nikishina, MD, V.A. Nasonova Research Institute of Rheumatology, Moscow, Russia; J.D. Akikusa, MD, Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; T. Avcin, MD, PhD, University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Pediatric Clinic, Ljubljana, Slovenia; J. Chaitow, MD, The Sydney Children's Hospital Network, Westmead, Sydney, Australia; E. Koskova, MD, PhD, National Institute of Rheumatic Diseases, Piestany, Slovakia; B.R. Lauwerys, MD, PhD, Institut de Recherche Expérimentale et Clinique, Université catholique de Louvain and Department of Rheumatology, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Brussels, Belgium; I. Calvo Penades, MD, PhD, Hospital Universitario y Politécnico La Fe, Pediatric Rheumatology Unit, Valencia, Spain; B. Flato, MD, PhD, Oslo University Hospital, Department of Rheumatology, Oslo, Norway; M.L. Gamir, MD, Hospital Ramon y Cajal Unidad de Reumatologia Pediatrica, Madrid, Spain; H.I. Huppertz, MD, Klinikum Bremen-Mitte, Prof. Hess-Kinderklinik, Bremen, Germany; J.J. Raad, MD, Centro de Reumatologia y Ortopedia, Barranquilla, Atlantico, Colombia; K. Jarosova, MD, Revmatologicky Ustav, Prague, Czech Republic; J. Anton, MD, PhD, Pediatric Rheumatology Unit, Hospital Sant Joan de Déu, Universitat de Barcelona, Espluges (Barcelona), Spain; M. Macku, MD, Fakultni nemocnice Brno, Bohunice, Detska Nemocnice, Ambulance detske revmatologie detske kliniky, Brno, Czech Republic; W.J. O ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #26932344.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The main objective was to determine the 2-year clinical benefit and safety of etanercept (ETN) in children with the juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) categories of extended oligoarthritis (eoJIA), enthesitis-related arthritis (ERA), or psoriatic arthritis (PsA). METHODS: CLIPPER was a 96-week, phase IIIb, open-label, multicenter study. Patients with eoJIA, ERA, or PsA received ETN 0.8 mg/kg once weekly (50 mg max) for up to 96 weeks. The proportions of patients reaching the JIA American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 30/50/70/90/100 and inactive disease responses at Week 96 were calculated. Adverse events (AE) were collected throughout the study (intention-to-treat sample). RESULTS: There were 127 patients (eoJIA n = 60, ERA n = 38, PsA n = 29) who received ≥ 1 dose of ETN. The mean disease duration was 31.6 (eoJIA), 23.0 (ERA), and 21.8 (PsA) months. At Week 96, JIA ACR 30/50/70/90/100/inactive disease responses (95% CI) were achieved by 84.3% (76.7, 90.1), 83.5% (75.8, 89.5), 78.7% (70.6, 85.5), 55.1% (46.0, 63.9), 45.7% (36.8, 54.7), and 27.6% (20.0, 36.2) of patients, respectively. The most common AE (no. events, events per 100 patient-yrs) overall were headache (23, 10.7), pyrexia (12, 5.6), and diarrhea (10, 4.6). The most common infections were upper respiratory tract infection (83, 38.6), pharyngitis (50, 23.2), gastroenteritis (22, 10.2), bronchitis (19, 8.8), and rhinitis (17, 7.9). No cases of malignancy, active tuberculosis, demyelinating disorders, or death were reported. CONCLUSION: Over 96 weeks of therapy, ETN demonstrated sustained efficacy at treating the clinical symptoms of all 3 JIA categories, with no major safety issues.

13 Article What is metacarpophalangeal joint swelling in psoriatic arthritis? Ultrasound findings and reliability assessment. 2018

Macía-Villa, Cristina / Falcao, Sandra / Gutierrez, Marwin / Medina, Julio / Hammer, Hilde Berner / De Miguel, Eugenio. ·Department of Rheumatology, Hospital Universitario Severo Ochoa, Madrid, Spain. ccmacia@gmail.com. · Department of Rheumatology, Chronic Diseases Study Center (CEDOC), NOVA Medical School, UNL, Lisboa, Portugal. · Division of Musculoskeletal and Rheumatic Disorders, Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitación, Mexico City, Mexico. · Department of Rheumatology, Hospital Clinic Universitario, Valladolid, Spain. · Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Rheumatology, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain. ·Clin Exp Rheumatol · Pubmed #29998840.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To evaluate by ultrasound (US) the frequency and reliability of peritenon extensor tendon inflammation (PTI) and intra articular synovitis (IAS) in metacarpophalangeal joints (MCPj) of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients. METHODS: 27 PsA patients with clinical involvement of MCPj were consecutively included. Presence of PTI and IAS were evaluated by grey-scale (GS) and power Doppler (PD). Longitudinal and transverse 3-5 second videos of US examinations were recorded for reliability assessments by five readers. Consensus on positive US results was achieved when at least three readers agreed. RESULTS: Clinical swelling was present in 60 joints whereas US detected IAS and/or PTI in 75 MCPj. GS PTI in at least one MCPj was found in 19 patients and 41 joints, concurring with clinical swelling in 30/41. GS IAS in at least one MCPj was found in 23 patients and 63 joints, concurring with clinical swelling in 37/63. The inter-reader reliability was good for PD PTI and moderate for GS PTI. CONCLUSIONS: Our study identifies that both IAS and PTI cause MCPj swelling, where PTI is almost as frequent as IAS as a cause of swelling. The reliability of PTI is at least as good as for IAS.

14 Article Serum of Patients with Psoriasis Modulates the Production of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 in Cells of Monocytic Lineage. 2018

Amezcua-Guerra, Luis M / Bojalil, Rafael / Espinoza-Hernandez, Jessica / Vega-Memije, María E / Lacy-Niebla, Rosa M / Ortega-Springall, Fernanda / Ortega-Hernández, Jorge / Sánchez-Muñoz, Fausto / Springall, Rashidi. ·a Department of Immunology , Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez , Mexico City , Mexico. · b Cardiovascular Research Laboratory , Unidad de Investigación Traslacional, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México/Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez , Mexico City , Mexico. · c Department of Health Care , Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Xochimilco , Mexico City , Mexico. · d Department of Dermatology , Hospital General Dr. Manuel Gea Gonzalez , Mexico City , Mexico. ·Immunol Invest · Pubmed #29979898.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is triggered by several stimuli that share a systemic production of interferon (IFN)-γ and other inflammatory mediators, which are key to regulate the production of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and its inhibitor (TIMP)-1 by cells of monocytic lineage. This study evaluates the effect of the sera of 55 patients with psoriasis and 41 non-psoriatic individuals on the production of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 in cultured monocytes from a single healthy blood donor and in U937 cells. The effect of IFN-γ stimulation was also evaluated. Serum and supernatant concentrations of IFN-γ, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 were measured by enzyme-linked immunoassays, and the MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratios were calculated. In monocytes, incubation with psoriasis' sera increased the production of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 in comparison with both baseline and monocytes incubated with non-psoriatic sera. Although the MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio was significantly higher compared to the baseline, no differences between groups were observed. In contrast, IFN-γ stimulation in monocytes previously exposed to psoriasis' sera increased MMP-9 levels and decreased TIMP-1 levels, whereas stimulation in monocytes exposed to non-psoriatic sera did not further modify the levels of MMP-9 or TIMP-1. Consequently, the MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio in cells exposed to psoriatic serum was significantly higher than in cells exposed to non-psoriatic sera (24.5 versus 16.7; P < 0.05). Similar results were observed in U937 cells. Therefore, our results suggest that soluble mediators in psoriatic sera may enhance the proteolytic phenotype of monocytes when stimulated with IFN-γ, which supports the existence of a primed state in the inflammatory cells of patients with psoriasis.

15 Article Patient-dermatologist agreement in psoriasis severity, symptoms and satisfaction: results from a real-world multinational survey. 2018

Griffiths, C E M / Augustin, M / Naldi, L / Romiti, R / Guevara-Sangines, E / Howe, T / Pietri, G / Gilloteau, I / Richardson, C / Tian, H / Jo, S J. ·Dermatology Centre, Salford Royal Hospital, NIHR Manchester Biomedical Research Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. · Institute for Health Services Research in Dermatology and Nursing (IVDP), University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (UKE), Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, AULSS 8, Ospedale san Bortolo, Vicenza, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Hospital das Clínicas, University of São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, Brazil. · Hospital Regional 'Lic. Adolfo López Mateos' ISSSTE, México City, Mexico. · GfK, London, UK. · Data Pyxis Ltd., St Albans, UK. · Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, Switzerland. · Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Korea. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #29524271.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Psoriasis is a chronic immune-mediated inflammatory disease, which often requires lifelong treatment. A strong partnership between the patient and healthcare practitioners should help to achieve effective treatment outcomes. OBJECTIVE: To assess concordance of views between patients with psoriasis and their treating dermatologists relative to psoriasis severity, presence of symptoms and satisfaction with disease control achieved. METHODS: We used data from the Growth from Knowledge (GfK) Disease Atlas real-world evidence program, a syndicated, retrospective, cross-sectional survey among dermatologists and their systemic therapy eligible patients with psoriasis, conducted across nine countries. Concordance was measured through patients and their dermatologist's identical answers to the same survey questions. Concordance was evaluated using percentage agreement between dermatologists and their patients, and Cohen's kappa (κ) statistic. The level of concordance was defined as 'none' (κ ≤ 0), 'none to slight' (0.01-0.20), 'fair' (0.21-0.40), 'moderate' (0.41-0.60), 'substantial' (0.61-0.80) and 'almost perfect' (>0.8). The analysis was conducted for the overall population and for each participating country. RESULTS: Overall, 524 dermatologists and 3821 patients with psoriasis were included in the survey. Concordance of patient and dermatologist perceptions of psoriasis severity was fair both at diagnosis, and at the time of the survey (61% agreement, κ = 0.326 and 55% agreement, κ = 0.370, respectively). Higher levels of concordance were reported when patients assessed their psoriasis as moderate-to-severe (using Investigator's Global Assessment/Physician's Global Assessment [IGA/PGA] 5-point scale of 3 or 4). Concordance regarding symptoms ranged from fair to moderate (κ = 0.241-0.575). Satisfaction with psoriasis control was fair (39% agreement, κ = 0.213). Results showed different patterns of concordance across the participating countries although a low concordance was observed on the satisfaction with psoriasis control in all of them. CONCLUSION: Results from this multinational real-world survey indicate different perceptions between patients with psoriasis and their dermatologist with respect to psoriasis severity, symptoms and disease control.

16 Article Expression of MIF and TNFA in psoriatic arthritis: relationship with Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokine profiles and clinical variables. 2018

Bautista-Herrera, L A / De la Cruz-Mosso, U / Morales-Zambrano, R / Villanueva-Quintero, G D / Hernández-Bello, J / Ramírez-Dueñas, M G / Martínez-López, E / Brennan-Bourdon, L M / Baños-Hernández, C J / Muñoz-Valle, J F. ·Instituto de Investigación en Ciencias Biomédicas, Centro Universitario de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad de Guadalajara, Insurgentes 244-1, Lomas de Atemajac, 45178, Zapopan, Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico. · Instituto Dermatológico de Jalisco "Dr, José Barba Rubio", Secretaría de Salud Jalisco, Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico. · Laboratorio de Inmunología, Departamento de Fisiología, Centro Universitario de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad de Guadalajara, Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico. · Laboratorio de Biología Molecular en Medicina, Departamento de Biología Molecular en Medicina, Centro Universitario de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad de Guadalajara, Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico. · Comisión para la Protección contra Riesgos Sanitarios del Estado de Jalisco (COPRISJAL), Secretaria de Salud, Guadalajara, Mexico. · Instituto de Investigación en Ciencias Biomédicas, Centro Universitario de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad de Guadalajara, Insurgentes 244-1, Lomas de Atemajac, 45178, Zapopan, Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico. biologiamolecular@hotmail.com. ·Clin Exp Med · Pubmed #28965181.

ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an autoimmune inflammatory disease associated with psoriasis. The cause of this pathology is still unknown, but research suggests the diseases are caused by a deregulated cytokine production. MIF is a cytokine associated with immunomodulation of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cytokine profiles in inflammatory diseases. Based on this knowledge, the aim of this study was to determine the association of MIF and TNFA expression with Th1, Th2, and Th17 cytokine profiles in serum levels of PsA patients. A cross-sectional study was performed in 50 PsA patients and 30 control subjects (CS). The cytokine profiles were quantified by BioPlex MagPix system and the mRNA expression levels by real-time PCR. TNFA mRNA expression was 138.81-folds higher in PsA patients than CS (p < 0.001). Regarding MIF mRNA expression, no significant differences were observed; however, a positive correlation was identified between MIF mRNA expression and PsA time of evolution (r = - 0.53, p = 0.009). An increase of Th1 (IFNγ: PsA = 37.1 pg/mL vs. CS = 17 pg/mL, p < 0.05; TNFα: PsA = 24.6 pg/mL vs. CS = 9.8 pg/mL, p < 0.0001) and Th17 cytokine profiles (IL-17: PsA = 6.4 pg/mL vs. CS = 2.7 pg/mL, p < 0.05; IL-22: PsA = 8.4 pg/mL vs. CS = 1.8 pg/mL, p < 0.001), were found in PsA patients. Th2 cytokines were not significantly different in both groups. In conclusion, a high expression of TNFA mRNA, as well as an increase of Th1 and Th17 cytokine profiles evaluated by IFNγ, TNFα, IL-17, and IL-22 cytokines, was observed in PsA patients.

17 Article Psoriasis and diabetes mellitus in the dermatological consultation. 2017

Barreda-Zaleta, Lucero / Pérez-Rojas, Diego Olin / Espinoza-Hernández, Claudia Jessica / Ramírez-Terán, Ana Laura / Vega-Memije, María Elisa. ·Escuela Nacional de Medicina y Homeopatía, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México. · Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad de México, México. · Departamento de Dermatopatología, Hospital General Dr. Manuel Gea González, Ciudad de México, México. · Departamento de Dermatología, Hospital General Dr. Manuel Gea González, Ciudad de México, México. ·Gac Med Mex · Pubmed #28991288.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Article [Diagnóstico tardío de psoriasis: motivos y consecuencias]. 2017

Quiroz-Vergara, José Carlos / Morales-Sánchez, Martha Alejandra / Castillo-Rojas, Gonzalo / López-Vidal, Yolanda / Peralta-Pedrero, María Luisa / Jurado-Santa Cruz, Fermín / Ponce de León-Rosales, Samuel. ·División de Investigación, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad de México, México. · Programa de Inmunología Molecular Microbiana, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad de México, México. · Centro Dermatológico Dr. Ladislao de la Pascua, Secretaría de Salud de la Ciudad de México, Ciudad de México, México. · Programa de Inmunología Molecular Microbiana; Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad de México, México. ·Gac Med Mex · Pubmed #28763072.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Psoriasis is an autoimmune skin disease that may be associated with articular manifestations, and the most common clinical presentation is the variety "in plaques". In Mexico, in the Centro Dermatológico Pascua, it is the eighth leading cause of consultation. The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic process of patients in a reference center for diseases of the skin. METHODS: Performing an analytical cross-sectional study that included 100 patients where the diagnostic process was questioned, clinimetric scales were applied and evaluated anthropometric. RESULTS: It was found that 70% of patients had taken over a month to get medical care (median: 3 months; IQR: 11 months), having consulted in 61% to a general physician as a doctor of first contact and 89% being diagnosed by a dermatologist. Eighty-eight percent of the patients were overweight or obese. We found as a factor of delay, a partnership with the variable of having an Institutional Medical Service (p = 0.019; U = 695.5). CONCLUSION: it is necessary to design a system to shorten the diagnostic process, not only in psoriasis, in addition to emphasizing dermatological education.

19 Article [Quality of life in patients with psoriasis]. 2017

García-Sánchez, Liliana / Montiel-Jarquín, Álvaro José / Vázquez-Cruz, Eduardo / May-Salazar, Adriana / Gutiérrez-Gabriel, Itzel / Loría-Castellanoso, Jorge. ·Unidad de Medicina Familiar No. 6 Puebla, IMSS, Puebla, Pue., México. · Academia Nacional de Educación Médica, UMAE No. 275, Hospital de Traumatología y Ortopedia de Puebla, IMSS, Puebla, Pue., México. · Hospital General Regional No. 36, IMSS, Puebla, Pue., México. · División de Proyectos Especiales en Salud, IMSS, Puebla, Pue., México. ·Gac Med Mex · Pubmed #28474705.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease, in which an autoimmune mechanism participates, triggering an accelerated keratopoiesis. Its etiology is unknown; environmental factors, trauma, and infections are involved. The aim of this paper is to present the correlation between the index of severity of psoriasis and quality of life in patients with psoriasis. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study in 72 patients with psoriasis, older than 15 years old, who agreed to participate in the study. We applied the Dermatology Life Quality Index and the Psoriasis Severity Index; descriptive statistics, measures of central tendency, dispersion, and correlation measures were used. RESULTS: Patients (n = 72), were 43% male, 57% female, with a mean age 51.22 (15-77) ± 14.05 years. Education: bachelor's degree 23.6%, housework occupation 26.4%, duration of the disease 12.25 (1-50) ± 10.58 years. Psoriasis plaques occurred in 88.9%, the Psoriasis Severity Index was mild in 70.8%. The result of the impact on quality of life was moderate in effect in 33.3%, the difference between the degree of involvement of the disease and the impact on quality of life was p = 0.104, and correlation between the quality of life and degree of psoriasis was p = 0.463. CONCLUSION: Quality of life is independent of the degree of disease in patients with psoriasis.

20 Article Psoriasis in Children and Adolescents: Epidemiological Study of 280 Patients from Mexico. 2017

Tovar-Garza, Andrea / Meza-Resendiz, Mayela / Guevara-Gutiérrez, Elizabeth / Barrientos-García, Juan Gabriel / Tlacuilo-Parra, Alberto. ·Department of Dermatology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA. · Instituto Dermatológico de Jalisco "Dr. José Barba Rubio", Jalisco Ministery of Health, Zapopan, Jal., Mexico. · UMAE Hospital de Pediatría, Centro Médico Nacional de Occidente, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Guadalajara, Jal, Mexico. ·Rev Invest Clin · Pubmed #28239182.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Psoriasis in children and adolescents has not been well studied in Mexico. OBJECTIVE: To study the epidemiological characteristics of psoriasis in this age group. METHODS: This is a retrospective study in an academic, tertiary care dermatology center from January 1999 to December 2014. We included patients ≤ 18 years of age, with clinical and histopathological diagnosis of psoriasis. We recorded the following information: gender, age, disease duration, clinical variant, nail involvement, treatment, and family history. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used for analysis. RESULTS: Of 2,491 patients with psoriasis, 280 were ≤ 18 years of age, resulting in a prevalence of 11%. There was female predominance and the mean age was 11.5 years. Disease duration was 18 ± 34 months. Plaque psoriasis was the most common form, comprising 191 cases (68%). Nail involvement occurred in only 15 patients (5%). Topical treatment was given to 177 patients (63%). Only 14 cases (5%) had a family history of psoriasis. These variables did not differ when children were compared with adolescents, except in those with a shorter disease duration (13 ± 19 vs. 24 ± 29 months; p = 0.0004). CONCLUSIONS: We found a higher prevalence of psoriasis than previously published studies in this age group and a lower frequency of nail involvement and family history of psoriasis.

21 Article Gender differences among patients with primary ankylosing spondylitis and spondylitis associated with psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease in an iberoamerican spondyloarthritis cohort. 2016

Landi, Margarita / Maldonado-Ficco, Hernán / Perez-Alamino, Rodolfo / Maldonado-Cocco, José A / Citera, Gustavo / Arturi, Pablo / Sampaio-Barros, Percival D / Flores Alvarado, Diana E / Burgos-Vargas, Rubén / Santos, Elena / Palleiro, Daniel / Gutiérrez, Miguel A / Vieira-Sousa, Elsa / Pimentel-Santos, Fernando / Paira, Sergio O / Berman, Alberto / Barrezueta, Claudia Vera / Vazquez-Mellado, Janitzia / Collantes-Estevez, Eduardo / Anonymous2650891. ·aRheumatology Section bFormer Chief of Residents, Rheumatology Section cFormer Fellow in Rheumatology, Instituto de Rehabilitación Psicofísica dConsulting Professor of Rheumatology, University of Buenos Aires School of Medicine eChief, Rheumatology Section fFormer Fellow in Rheumatology, Instituto de Rehabilitación Psicofísica, Buenos Aires, Argentina gDivision of Rheumatology, Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil hHospital Universitario "José Eleuterio González," Monterrey iHospital General de Mexico, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico, Mexico DF, Mexico jPortuguese Institute of Rheumatology, Lisbon, Portugal kInstituto Nacional de Reumatología del Uruguay, Montevideo, Uruguay lDepartment of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile mServiço de Reumatologia e de Doencas Ósseas Metabólicas, Centro Hospitalar Lisboa Norte nFacultade de Ciencias Médicas da Universidade Nova de Lisboa and CHLO, Hospital de Egas Moniz, Lisbon, Portugal oChief Rheumatology Unit, Hospital JM Cullen, Sante Fé pCentro Médico Privado de Reumatología, Tucumán, Argentina qHospital Luis Vernaza, Guayaquil, Profesora de Inmunología Clínica, Universidad Católica de Guayaquil, Guayaquil, Ecuador rRheumatology Service, Hospital General de Mexico y Facultad de Medicina, UNAM, Mexico DF, Mexico sRheumatology Department, "Reina Sofía" University Hospital / IMIBIC, University of Cordoba, Cordoba, Spain. ·Medicine (Baltimore) · Pubmed #28002334.

ABSTRACT: The aim of the study was to compare clinical manifestations, disease activity, functional capacity, spinal mobility, and radiological findings between men and women from a multicenter, multiethnic Ibero-American cohort of patients with Spondyloarthritis (SpA).This observational cross-section study included 1264 consecutive SpA patients who fulfilled the modified New York criteria for ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Demographic, clinical, and radiologic data were evaluated. Categorical data were compared by X or Fisher's exact tests and continuous variables by ANOVA with post-hoc tests.Primary AS was diagnosed in 1072 patients, psoriatic spondylitis in 147, and spondylitis associated to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in 45 patients. Overall, male patients were significantly younger, had longer diagnostic delay, lower disease activity, worse spinal mobility, better quality of life, and more severe radiologic damage. Dactylitis and enthesitis, as well as swollen joint count, were significantly more common among women. In primary AS, there was a marked male predominance (76.2%). Among patients with psoriatic spondylitis, male predominance was lower (57.8%), but was also associated with worse spinal mobility and more severe radiologic damage. In the total population, male patients with primary AS referred higher permanent work disability (13.2% vs 6.9%; P < 0.05), although no difference was observed in psoriatic or IBD spondylitis according to the gender.Among Ibero-American SpA patients, there are some differences in clinical and radiological manifestations, men showing more structural damage, whereas women more active disease. These data suggest that the phenotype of SpA differs between genders. This can influence the subsequent diagnostic approach and therapeutic decisions.

22 Article Body Region Involvement and Quality of Life in Psoriasis: Analysis of a Randomized Controlled Trial of Adalimumab. 2016

Armstrong, April W / Villanueva Quintero, Delfina Guadalupe / Echeverría, Cristina M / Gu, Yihua / Karunaratne, Mahinda / Reyes Servín, Ofelia. ·Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Keith Administration Building, Room 510, 1975 Zonal Avenue, Los Angeles, CA, 90089, USA. april.armstrong@med.usc.edu. · Instituto Dermatológico de Jalisco, Zapopan, Jalisco, Mexico. · Department of Dermatology, Hospital Eva Perón, San Martin, Buenos Aires, Argentina. · AbbVie Inc., North Chicago, IL, USA. ·Am J Clin Dermatol · Pubmed #27815915.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Psoriasis severity and treatment responsiveness vary by body region, which differentially impacts quality of life (QoL). OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to examine adalimumab efficacy by body region and regional response and QoL relationship. METHODS: Patients (n = 1212) with moderate-to-severe psoriasis were randomized 2:1 to 80 mg at week 0, followed by adalimumab 40 mg or placebo every other week for 16 weeks in the double-blind REVEAL study. Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) responses and Dermatology Life Quality Index outcomes were analyzed. RESULTS: Week 16 regional mean PASI improvements were significantly greater with adalimumab (83.1 ± 1.57, 81.3 ± 1.58, 75.7 ± 1.34, and 73.9 ± 1.26% in the trunk, head, upper extremities, and lower extremities, respectively; all p < 0.001 vs. placebo). Likewise, percentages of patients with regional PASI ≥75/≥90/100% reduction from baseline were significantly higher with adalimumab (all p < 0.001); adalimumab responses were greater for the trunk (77.9/65.0/59.1%) and head (74.6/66.1/62.8%; all p ≤ 0.0001 vs. lower) than upper (67.7/45.1/39.6%; p = 0.4, p = 0.04, p = 0.0005, respectively, vs. lower) and lower extremities (65.7/40.0/31.3%). Adalimumab significantly improved Dermatology Life Quality Index scores vs. placebo (8.2- vs 1.7-point decrease from baseline; p < 0.001). LIMITATIONS: The study was a post hoc analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Adalimumab treatment resulted in statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvements in disease severity and QoL. QoL improvements were associated with PASI responses in all body regions. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00237887.

23 Article Correlation of IL-12, IL-22, and IL-23 in patients with psoriasis and metabolic syndrome. Preliminary report. 2016

Brito-Luna, M J / Villanueva-Quintero, D G / Sandoval-Talamantes, A K / Fafutis-Morris, M / Graciano-Machuca, O / Sanchez-Hernandez, P E / Alvarado-Navarro, A. ·Jalisco Dermatology Institute "Dr. José Barba Rubio", Secretary of Health, Jalisco, Mexico, Av. Federalismo Norte 3102, Atemajac del Valle, CP 45190 Zapopan, Jalisco, Mexico. Electronic address: jbrito.lunapiel@gmail.com. · Jalisco Dermatology Institute "Dr. José Barba Rubio", Secretary of Health, Jalisco, Mexico, Av. Federalismo Norte 3102, Atemajac del Valle, CP 45190 Zapopan, Jalisco, Mexico. Electronic address: luviq_16@yahoo.com.mx. · Centre for Research in Immunology and Dermatology, Health Sciences University Centre, University of Guadalajara, Mexico, Av. Federalismo Norte 3102, Atemajac del Valle, CP 45190 Zapopan, Jalisco, Mexico. Electronic address: dra_talamantes@hotmail.com. · Centre for Research in Immunology and Dermatology, Health Sciences University Centre, University of Guadalajara, Mexico, Av. Federalismo Norte 3102, Atemajac del Valle, CP 45190 Zapopan, Jalisco, Mexico. Electronic address: mfafutis@gmail.com. · Centre for Research in Immunology and Dermatology, Health Sciences University Centre, University of Guadalajara, Mexico, Av. Federalismo Norte 3102, Atemajac del Valle, CP 45190 Zapopan, Jalisco, Mexico. Electronic address: omargmachuca@gmail.com. · Immunology Laboratory, Department of Physiology, Health Sciences University Centre, University of Guadalajara, México, Sierra Mojada 950, Col. Independencia, CP 44340 Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico. Electronic address: pedro.e.sanchez@gmail.com. · Centre for Research in Immunology and Dermatology, Health Sciences University Centre, University of Guadalajara, Mexico, Av. Federalismo Norte 3102, Atemajac del Valle, CP 45190 Zapopan, Jalisco, Mexico. Electronic address: bell2000_mx@yahoo.com. ·Cytokine · Pubmed #27344023.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Psoriasis is an autoimmune skin disease characterised by proliferation of keratinocytes, primarily due to cytokines Th1 and Th17. This profile is involved in pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome, a frequently found comorbidity in patients with psoriasis. OBJECTIVE: In this study we determine the correlation of levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-23, IL-12, and IL-22 in patients with psoriasis with and without metabolic syndrome and clinically healthy controls. METHODS: We included 55 patients with plaque psoriasis: 30 with metabolic syndrome (PPMS), 25 without metabolic syndrome (PP), 15 healthy subjects (HS) and 15 with metabolic syndrome (MS). Quantification of serum levels of IL-12, TNF-α, IL-22, and IL-23 was done by ELISA. RESULTS: We observed that serum levels of IL-12 were more elevated in PP group, while the lowest levels of TNF-α were seen in HS group. IL-22 was found to be higher in PP than in PPMS (p<0.05). PP patients with PASI scores rating as severe showed higher levels of IL-12. TNF-α level analysis showed significant differences in HS group compared with the others; levels of this cytokine were lower in patients with PP and moderate PASI scores than in MS group (p<0.05). We found no correlation between cytokine levels and psoriasis or between cytokines and PASI scores. In PP group, a positive correlation was observed between IL-23 and fasting glucose (r=0.432, p<0.05), as well as a negative correlation between IL-23, IL-22, and IL-12 versus waist circumference (r=-0.504, r=-0.556 and r=-0.511, respectively; p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Psoriasis is not just a skin disorder, but rather a condition with systemic implications, with intervention of pro-inflammatory cytokines that contribute to metabolic syndrome and other comorbidities, which in turn increases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease.

24 Article Pregnancy Outcomes in the Tofacitinib Safety Databases for Rheumatoid Arthritis and Psoriasis. 2016

Clowse, Megan E B / Feldman, Steven R / Isaacs, John D / Kimball, Alexandra B / Strand, Vibeke / Warren, Richard B / Xibillé, Daniel / Chen, Yan / Frazier, Donald / Geier, Jamie / Proulx, James / Marren, Amy. ·Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA. · The NIHR Newcastle Biomedical Research Centre, Newcastle University and Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Department of Dermatology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Division of Immunology/Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA, USA. · Dermatology Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, UK. · Hospital General de Cuernavaca, Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico. · Pfizer Inc, 500 Arcola Rd, Collegeville, PA, 19426, USA. · Pfizer Inc, Groton, CT, USA. · Pfizer Inc, New York, NY, USA. · Pfizer Inc, 500 Arcola Rd, Collegeville, PA, 19426, USA. Amy.marren@pfizer.com. ·Drug Saf · Pubmed #27282428.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and is being investigated for the treatment of psoriasis. Both conditions can present in women of child-bearing potential, but pregnancy was an exclusion and discontinuation criterion in tofacitinib randomized controlled trials (RCTs) because of the unknown effects of tofacitinib on mother and child. Tofacitinib is a small molecule that has the potential to cross the placenta. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to report outcomes of pregnancy cases identified through April 2014 from tofacitinib RA/psoriasis RCTs, RA post-approval non-interventional studies, and spontaneous adverse-event reporting. METHODS: Pregnancy outcomes were categorized as follows: healthy newborn, medical termination, fetal death, congenital malformation, spontaneous abortion, or pending/lost to follow-up. RESULTS: Out of 9815 patients, 1821 female patients of child-bearing age were enrolled in the RA/psoriasis RCTs; 47 women became pregnant, including 33 who received tofacitinib monotherapy, 13 who received combination therapy with methotrexate (RA patients only), and one patient whose therapy was still blinded. No fetal deaths were reported. One congenital pulmonary valve stenosis (monotherapy, n = 1), seven spontaneous abortions (monotherapy, n = 4; combination therapy, n = 3), and eight medical terminations (monotherapy, n = 4; combination therapy, n = 3; blinded therapy, n = 1) were identified. Remaining cases reported healthy newborns (n = 25) or were pending/lost to follow-up (n = 6). Forty-four cases of paternal exposure to tofacitinib were reported (monotherapy, n = 43; combination therapy, n = 1), including five spontaneous abortions (monotherapy, n = 4; combination therapy, n = 1), 23 healthy newborns, and 16 pending/lost to follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: The pregnancy outcomes reported in this small number of RA/psoriasis patients appear similar to those observed in the general population and in patients treated with biologic therapies for inflammatory diseases. However, definitive conclusions cannot be drawn, and pregnancy outcomes in patients receiving tofacitinib will continue to be monitored.

25 Article Safety and efficacy of adalimumab treatment in Japanese patients with psoriasis: Results of SALSA study. 2016

Asahina, Akihiko / Torii, Hideshi / Ohtsuki, Mamitaro / Tokimoto, Toshimitsu / Hase, Hidenori / Tsuchiya, Tsuyoshi / Shinmura, Yasuhiko / Reyes Servin, Ofelia / Nakagawa, Hidemi. ·The Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. asahina-tky@umin.ac.jp. · Tokyo Yamate Medical Center, Tokyo, Japan. · Jichi Medical University, Tochigi, Japan. · AbbVie, Tokyo, Japan. · AbbVie Farmacéuticos SA de CV, Mexico City, Mexico. · The Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. ·J Dermatol · Pubmed #27129439.

ABSTRACT: The safety and efficacy of adalimumab were evaluated over 24 weeks in Japanese patients with psoriasis in routine clinical practice. In this multicenter, observational, open-label, postmarketing study, primary efficacy measures included the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) and the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) in all patients with psoriasis. In patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA), the 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28) and the visual analog scale (VAS) pain were also evaluated. Safety was assessed based on the frequency of adverse drug reactions (ADR). Among patients with psoriasis evaluated for efficacy (n = 604), significant improvements from baseline were observed in mean PASI and DLQI scores at weeks 16 and 24 (all P < 0.0001). Furthermore, in psoriasis patients without PsA, the PASI 75/90 response rates were 55.9%/28.4% at week 16 (n = 306) and 65.6%/43.3% at week 24 (n = 270), respectively. In patients with PsA evaluable for effectiveness, significant improvements from baseline were observed in PASI, DAS28 erythrocyte sedimentation rate, DAS28 C-reactive protein and VAS pain at weeks 16 and 24 (all P < 0.0001). ADR and serious ADR were reported by 26.1% and 3.3%, respectively, of 731 safety evaluable patients with psoriasis; no unexpected safety findings were noted. The safety profile and effectiveness of adalimumab for the treatment of psoriasis in a routine clinical setting were as expected in Japanese patients.

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